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Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
by Alfred Lansing

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 29, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>Bound for Antarctica, where polar explorer Ernest Shackleton planned to cross on foot the last uncharted continent, the <I>Endurance</I> set sail from England in August 1914. In January 1915, after battling its way for six weeks through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day's sail short of its destination, the <I>Endurance</I> became locked in an island of ice. For ten months the ice-moored <I>Endurance</I> drifted northwest before it was finally crushed. But for Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men, the ordeal had barely begun. It would end only after a miraculous journey through more than 850 miles of the South Atlantic's heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization.<BR><br />In <I>Endurance</I>, the definitive account of Shackleton's fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing voyage that has defined heroism for the last century.<BR><BR></div>
In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the...
by Hampton Sides

Language

English

Pages

489

Publication Date

August 05, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i></b> <b>bestselling author Hampton Sides returns with a white-knuckle tale of polar exploration and survival in the Gilded Age<br /></b><br />In the late nineteenth century, people were obsessed by one of the last unmapped areas of the globe: the North Pole. No one knew what existed beyond the fortress of ice rimming the northern oceans, although theories abounded. The foremost cartographer in the world, a German named August Petermann, believed that warm currents sustained a verdant island at the top of the world. National glory would fall to whoever could plant his flag upon its shores. <br /><br />James Gordon Bennett, the eccentric and stupendously wealthy owner of <i>The New York Herald</i>, had recently captured the world's attention by dispatching Stanley to Africa to find Dr. Livingstone. Now he was keen to re-create that sensation on an even more epic scale. So he funded an official U.S. naval expedition to reach the Pole, choosing as its captain a young officer named George Washington De Long, who had gained fame for a rescue operation off the coast of Greenland. De Long led a team of 32 men deep into uncharted Arctic waters, carrying the aspirations of a young country burning to become a world power. On July 8, 1879, the USS <i>Jeannette</i> set sail from San Francisco to cheering crowds in the grip of "Arctic Fever." <br /><br />The ship sailed into uncharted seas, but soon was trapped in pack ice. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the hull was breached. Amid the rush of water and the shrieks of breaking wooden boards, the crew abandoned the ship. Less than an hour later, the <i>Jeannette </i>sank to the bottom,and the men found themselves marooned a thousand miles north of Siberia with only the barest supplies. Thus began their long march across the endless ice—a frozen hell in the most lonesome corner of the world. Facing everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and frosty labyrinths, the expedition battled madness and starvation as they desperately strove for survival. <br /><br />With twists and turns worthy of a thriller, <i>In The Kingdom of Ice</i> is a spellbinding tale of heroism and determination in the most unforgiving territory on Earth.<br /><br /><b>Ebook edition includes over a dozen extra images<br /></b>
The Worst Journey in the World (Penguin Classics)
by , Apsley Cherry-Garrard

Language

English

Pages

640

Publication Date

February 28, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A firsthand account of Scott's disastrous Antarctic expedition</b><br /><br /><i>The Worst Journey in the World</i> recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard—the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey—draws on his firsthand experiences as well as the diaries of his compatriots to create a stirring and detailed account of Scott’s legendary expedition. Cherry himself would be among the search party that discovered the corpses of Scott and his men, who had long since perished from starvation and brutal cold. It is through Cherry’s insightful narrative and keen descriptions that Scott and the other members of the expedition are fully memorialized.<br /><br />For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Ice Ghosts: The Epic Hunt for the Lost Franklin Expedition
by Paul Watson

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

March 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The spellbinding true story of the greatest cold case in Arctic history—and how the rare mix of marine science and Inuit knowledge finally led to the recent discovery of the shipwrecks.</p><br /><p>Spanning nearly 200 years, <em>Ice Ghosts</em> is a fast-paced detective story about Western science, indigenous beliefs, and the irrepressible spirit of exploration and discovery. It weaves together an epic account of the legendary Franklin Expedition of 1845—whose two ships, the HMS <em>Erebus</em> and the HMS <em>Terror</em>, and their crew of 129 were lost to the Arctic ice—with the modern tale of the scientists, researchers, divers, and local Inuit behind the recent discoveries of the two ships, which made news around the world.</p><br /><p>The journalist Paul Watson was on the icebreaker that led the expedition that discovered the HMS <em>Erebus</em> in 2014, and he broke the news of the discovery of the HMS <em>Terror</em> in 2016. In a masterful work of history and contemporary reporting, he tells the full story of the Franklin Expedition: Sir John Franklin and his crew setting off from England in search of the fabled Northwest Passage; the hazards they encountered and the reasons they were forced to abandon ship after getting stuck in the ice hundreds of miles from the nearest outpost of Western civilization; and the dozens of search expeditions over more than 160 years, which collectively have been called “the most extensive, expensive, perverse, and ill-starred . . . manhunt in history.”</p><br /><p>All that searching turned up a legendary trail of sailors’ relics, a fabled note, a lifeboat with skeletons lying next to loaded rifles, and rumors of cannibalism . . . but no sign of the ships until, finally, the discoveries in our own time. As Watson reveals, the epic hunt for the lost Franklin Expedition found success only when searchers combined the latest marine science with faith in Inuit lore that had been passed down orally for generations.</p><br /><p><em>Ice Ghosts</em> is narrative nonfiction of the highest order, full of drama and rich in characters: Lady Jane Franklin, who almost single-handedly kept the search alive for decades; an Inuit historian who worked for decades gathering elders’ accounts; an American software billionaire who launched his own hunt; and underwater archaeologists honing their skills to help find the ships. Watson also shows how the hunt for the Franklin Expedition was connected to such technological advances as SCUBA gear and sonar technology, and how it ignited debates over how to preserve the relics discovered with the ships.</p><br /><p>A modern adventure story that arcs back through history, <em>Ice Ghosts</em> tells the complete and incredible story of the Franklin Expedition—the greatest of Arctic mysteries—for the ages.</p>
Shackleton's Way: Leadership Lessons from the Great Antarctic Exp...
by , Stephanie Capparell

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

January 08, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Lead your business to survival and success by following the example of legendary explorer Ernest Shackleton</b><br /><br />Sir Ernest Shackleton has been called "the greatest leader that ever came on God's earth, bar none" for saving the lives of the twenty-seven men stranded with him in the Antarctic for almost two years. Because of his courageous actions, he remains to this day a model for great leadership and masterful crisis management. Now, through anecdotes, the diaries of the men in his crew, and Shackleton's own writing, Shackleton's leadership style and time-honored principles are translated for the modern business world. Written by two veteran business observers and illustrated with ship photographer Frank Hurley's masterpieces and other rarely seen photos, this practical book helps today's leaders follow Shackleton's triumphant example.<br /><br />"An important addition to any leader's library." -<i>Seattle Times</i>
Sea of Glory: America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring E...
by Nathaniel Philbrick

Language

English

Pages

481

Publication Date

October 26, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"A treasure of a book."—<b>David McCullough<br /><br />The harrowing story of a pathbreaking naval expedition that set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean, dwarfing Lewis and Clark with its discoveries.<br /></b><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book</b><br /><br />America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling <i>In the Heart of the Sea</i> Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory.<br /><br />Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize
Leading at The Edge: Leadership Lessons from the Extraordinary Sa...
by DENNIS N.T. PERKINS

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

March 28, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
For the 100th anniversary of the Race to the South Pole, a fresh look at what Shackleton's legendary Antarctic adventure can teach us about true leadership. <br /><br />Stranded in the frozen Antarctic sea for nearly two years, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his team of 27 polar explorers endured extreme temperatures, hazardous ice, dwindling food, and complete isolation. Despite these seemingly insurmountable obstacles, the group remained cohesive, congenial, and mercifully alive—a fact that speaks not just to luck but to an unparalleled feat of leadership. <br /><br />Drawing on this amazing story, Leading at The Edge demonstrates the importance of a strong leader in times of adversity, uncertainty, and change. The book reveals 10 timeless leadership lessons that show readers how to: • Instill optimism while staying grounded in reality<br />• Have the courage to step up to risks worth taking<br />• Consistently reinforce the team message<br />• Set a personal example<br />• Find something to celebrate and something to laugh about<br />• Never give up. <br /><br />Part adventure tale, part leadership guide, the second edition features additional lessons, new case studies of the strategies in action, tools to uncover and resolve conflicts, and expanded resources. An updated epilogue compares the leadership styles of the famous polar explorers Shackleton, Amundsen, and Scott. Today’s leaders have much to learn from this gripping account of survival against all odds. Leading at The Edge will help them bring order to chaos—and achieve success in the face of adversity.
Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of E...
by David Roberts

Language

English

Pages

393

Publication Date

January 28, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>“An important missing story from the heroic age of Antarctic exploration.”—Laurence Gonzales, author of <em>Deep Survival</em></p><br />On January 17, 1913, alone and near starvation, Douglas Mawson, leader of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, was hauling a sledge to get back to base camp. The dogs were gone. Now Mawson himself plunged through a snow bridge, dangling over an abyss by the sledge harness. A line of poetry gave him the will to haul himself back to the surface.<br /><br /><br /><br />Mawson was sometimes reduced to crawling, and one night he discovered that the soles of his feet had completely detached from the flesh beneath. On February 8, when he staggered back to base, his features unrecognizably skeletal, the first teammate to reach him blurted out, “Which one are you?”<br /><br /><br /><br />This thrilling and almost unbelievable account establishes Mawson in his rightful place as one of the greatest polar explorers and expedition leaders. It is illustrated by a trove of Frank Hurley’s famous Antarctic photographs, many never before published in the United States.
The Last Viking: The Life of Roald Amundsen (A Merloyd Lawrence B...
by Stephen R. Bown

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

September 25, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><I>The Last Viking</I> unravels the life of the man who stands head and shoulders above all those who raced to map the last corners of the world. In 1900, the four great geographical mysteries—the Northwest Passage, the Northeast Passage, the South Pole, and the North Pole—remained blank spots on the globe. Within twenty years Roald Amundsen would claim all four prizes. Renowned for his determination and technical skills, both feared and beloved by his men, Amundsen is a legend of the heroic age of exploration, which shortly thereafter would be tamed by technology, commerce, and publicity. Féted in his lifetime as an international celebrity, pursued by women and creditors, he died in the Arctic on a rescue mission for an inept rival explorer.<BR><BR>Stephen R. Bown has unearthed archival material to give Amundsen's life the grim immediacy of Apsley Cherry-Garrard's <I>The Worst Journey in the World</I>, the exciting detail of <I>The Endurance</I>, and the suspense of a Jon Krakauer tale. <I>The Last Viking</I> is both a thrilling literary biography and a cracking good story.<BR></div>
In the Land of White Death: An Epic Story of Survival in the Sibe...
by , Linda Dubosson

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

February 01, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In 1912, six months after Robert Falcon Scott and four of his men came to grief in Antarctica, a thirty-two-year-old Russian navigator named Valerian Albanov embarked on an expedition that would prove even more disastrous. In search of new Arctic hunting grounds, Albanov's ship, the Saint Anna, was frozen fast in the pack ice of the treacherous Kara Sea-a misfortune grievously compounded by an incompetent commander, the absence of crucial nautical charts, insufficient fuel, and inadequate provisions that left the crew weak and debilitated by scurvy.<br /><br />For nearly a year and a half, the twenty-five men and one woman aboard the Saint Anna endured terrible hardships and danger as the icebound ship drifted helplessly north. Convinced that the Saint Anna would never free herself from the ice, Albanov and thirteen crewmen left the ship in January 1914, hauling makeshift sledges and kayaks behind them across the frozen sea, hoping to reach the distant coast of Franz Josef Land. With only a shockingly inaccurate map to guide him, Albanov led his men on a 235-mile journey of continuous peril, enduring blizzards, disintegrating ice floes, attacks by polar bears and walrus, starvation, sickness, snowblindness, and mutiny. That any of the team survived is a wonder. That Albanov kept a diary of his ninety-day ordeal-a story that Jon Krakauer calls an "astounding, utterly compelling book," and David Roberts calls "as lean and taut as a good thriller"-is nearly miraculous.<br /><br />First published in Russia in 1917, Albanov's narrative is here translated into English for the first time. Haunting, suspenseful, and told with gripping detail, <b>In the Land of White Death</b> can now rightfully take its place among the classic writings of Nansen, Scott, Cherry-Garrard, and Shackleton.

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