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Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
by Bryan Stevenson

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

342

Publication Date

October 21, 2014

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Customer Reviews
<b><b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • <b>NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE STARRING MICHAEL B. JORDAN AND JAMIE FOXX • A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice—from one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time.<br /><br /> “[Bryan Stevenson’s] dedication to fighting for justice and equality has inspired me and many others and made a lasting impact on our country.”<b>—John Legend</b><br /><br /><b>NAMED ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL BOOKS OF THE DECADE BY CNN</b> • Named One of the Best Books of the Year by <i>The New York Times • The Washington Post • The Boston Globe • The Seattle Times • Esquire • Time</i></b><br /></b></b><br /> Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.<br /><br /> <i>Just Mercy </i>is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.<br /><br /><b>Winner of the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction • Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Nonfiction • Winner of a Books for a Better Life Award • Finalist for the <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Book Prize • Finalist for the <i>Kirkus Reviews </i>Prize • An American Library Association Notable Book</b><br /><br />“Every bit as moving as <i>To Kill a Mockingbird, </i>and in some ways more so . . . a searing indictment of American criminal justice and a stirring testament to the salvation that fighting for the vulnerable sometimes yields.”<b>—David Cole, <i>The New York Review of Books</i></b><br /><br /> “Searing, moving . . . Bryan Stevenson may, indeed, be America’s Mandela.”<b>—Nicholas Kristof, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “You don’t have to read too long to start cheering for this man. . . . The message of this book . . . is that evil can be overcome, a difference can be made. <i>Just Mercy</i> will make you upset and it will make you hopeful.”<b>—Ted Conover, <i>The New York Times Book Review </i></b><br /><br /> “Inspiring . . . a work of style, substance and clarity . . . Stevenson is not only a great lawyer, he’s also a gifted writer and storyteller.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “As deeply moving, poignant and powerful a book as has been, and maybe ever can be, written about the death penalty.”<b><i>—The Financial Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Brilliant.”<b><i>—The Philadelphia Inquirer</i></b>
The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America
by Timothy Snyder

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

354

Publication Date

April 03, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • From the author of <i>On Tyranny</i> comes a stunning new chronicle of the rise of authoritarianism from Russia to Europe and America.</b><br /><br /><b>“A brilliant analysis of our time.”—Karl Ove Knausgaard, <i>The New Yorker</i></b><br /><br />With the end of the Cold War, the victory of liberal democracy seemed final. Observers declared the end of history, confident in a peaceful, globalized future. This faith was misplaced. Authoritarianism returned to Russia, as Putin found fascist ideas that could be used to justify rule by the wealthy. In the 2010s, it has spread from east to west, aided by Russian warfare in Ukraine and cyberwar in Europe and the United States.  <br /><br />Russia found allies among nationalists, oligarchs, and radicals everywhere, and its drive to dissolve Western institutions, states, and values found resonance within the West itself.  The rise of populism, the British vote against the EU, and the election of Donald Trump were all Russian goals, but their achievement reveals the vulnerability of Western societies.<br /><br />In this forceful and unsparing work of contemporary history, based on vast research as well as personal reporting, Snyder goes beyond the headlines to expose the true nature of the threat to democracy and law. To understand the challenge is to see, and perhaps renew, the fundamental political virtues offered by tradition and demanded by the future. By revealing the stark choices before us--between equality or oligarchy, individuality or totality, truth and falsehood--Snyder restores our understanding of the basis of our way of life, offering a way forward in a time of terrible uncertainty.
Mindhunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit
by , Mark Olshaker

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

445

Publication Date

November 26, 1998

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Now a Netflix original series</b><br /> <br />Discover the classic, behind-the-scenes chronicle of John E. Douglas’ twenty-five-year career in the FBI Investigative Support Unit, where he used psychological profiling to delve into the minds of the country’s most notorious serial killers and criminals.<br /><br />In chilling detail, the legendary Mindhunter takes us behind the scenes of some of his most gruesome, fascinating, and challenging cases—and into the darkest recesses of our worst nightmares.<br /> <br /> During his twenty-five year career with the Investigative Support Unit, Special Agent John Douglas became a legendary figure in law enforcement, pursuing some of the most notorious and sadistic serial killers of our time: the man who hunted prostitutes for sport in the woods of Alaska, the Atlanta child murderer, and Seattle's Green River killer, the case that nearly cost Douglas his life.<br /> <br /> As the model for Jack Crawford in <i>The Silence of the Lambs</i>, Douglas has confronted, interviewed, and studied scores of serial killers and assassins, including Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, and Ed Gein, who dressed himself in his victims' peeled skin. Using his uncanny ability to become both predator and prey, Douglas examines each crime scene, reliving both the killer's and the victim's actions in his mind, creating their profiles, describing their habits, and predicting their next moves.
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
by Michelle Alexander

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

January 07, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Named one of the most important nonfiction books of the 21st century by <em>Entertainment Weekly‚</em> <em>Slate‚</em> <em>Chronicle of Higher Eduction‚</em> <em>Literary Hub</em>, <em>Book Riot‚</em> and <em>Zora</em></strong></p> <p><strong>A tenth-anniversary edition of the iconic bestseller—“one of the most influential books of the past 20 years,” according to the <em>Chronicle of Higher Education</em>—with a new preface by the author</strong></p> <p><strong>“It is in no small part thanks to Alexander’s account that civil rights organizations such as Black Lives Matter have focused so much of their energy on the criminal justice system.” </strong><br /><strong>—Adam Shatz, <em>London Review of Books</em></strong></p> <p>Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s <em>The New Jim Crow</em>. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the <em>New York Times</em> bestseller list.</p> <p>Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the <em>Birmingham News</em> proclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.”</p> <p>Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.</p> <p> </p>
The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segre...
by Richard Rothstein

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

369

Publication Date

May 02, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller • Notable Book of the Year • Editors' Choice Selection<br /><br />One of Bill Gates’ “Amazing Books” of the Year<br /><br />One of <em>Publishers Weekly</em>’s 10 Best Books of the Year<br /><br />Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction<br /><br />An NPR Best Book of the Year<br /><br />Winner of the Hillman Prize for Nonfiction<br /><br />Gold Winner • California Book Award (Nonfiction)<br /><br />Finalist • <em>Los Angeles Times</em> Book Prize (History)<br /><br />Finalist • Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize</strong></p><br /><p><strong>This “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide (<em>New York Times Book Review</em>).</strong></p><br /><p><strong> </strong></p><br />Widely heralded as a “masterful” (<em>Washington Post</em>) and “essential” (<em>Slate</em>) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s <em>The Color of Law</em> offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history (<em>Chicago Daily Observer</em>), <em>The Color of Law</em> forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.
No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Ca...
by Rachel Louise Snyder

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

309

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>TOP 10 BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Nonfiction<br /><br />NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF 2019 BY: </b><i><b>Esquire</b></i><b>, Amazon, <i>Kirkus</i>, <i>Library Journal</i>, </b><i><b>Publishers Weekly, BookPage, </b></i><i><b>BookRiot, </b></i><i><b>Economist, New York Times </b></i><b>Staff Critics</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>“A seminal and breathtaking account of why home is the most dangerous place to be a woman . . . A tour de force.” -Eve Ensler</b><br /> <b><br /> "Terrifying, courageous reportage from our internal war zone." -Andrew Solomon</b><br /> <b><br /> "Extraordinary." -<i>New York Times ,“Editors' Choice”</i></b><br /> <b><br /> “Gut-wrenching, required reading.” -<i>Esquire</i></b><br /> <b><br /> "Compulsively readable . . . It will save lives." -<i>Washington Post </i></b><br /><b><i><br /></i></b><b><i>“</i>Essential, devastating reading.<i>” -</i>Cheryl Strayed<i>, New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /> <b><i><br /> </i>An award-winning journalist's intimate investigation of the true scope of domestic violence, revealing how the roots of America's most pressing social crises are buried in abuse that happens behind closed doors. </b><br /> <b><br /> </b>We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem.<br /> <br /> In <i>No Visible Bruises</i>, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don't know we're seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths-that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.
Restoring the Lost Constitution: The Presumption of Liberty - Upd...
by Randy E. Barnett

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

432

Publication Date

November 24, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The U.S. Constitution found in school textbooks and under glass in Washington is not the one enforced today by the Supreme Court. In <i>Restoring the Lost Constitution</i>, Randy Barnett argues that since the nation's founding, but especially since the 1930s, the courts have been cutting holes in the original Constitution and its amendments to eliminate the parts that protect liberty from the power of government. From the Commerce Clause, to the Necessary and Proper Clause, to the Ninth and Tenth Amendments, to the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, the Supreme Court has rendered each of these provisions toothless. In the process, the written Constitution has been lost.</p><br /><p> Barnett establishes the original meaning of these lost clauses and offers a practical way to restore them to their central role in constraining government: adopting a "presumption of liberty" to give the benefit of the doubt to citizens when laws restrict their rightful exercises of liberty. He also provides a new, realistic and philosophically rigorous theory of constitutional legitimacy that justifies both interpreting the Constitution according to its original meaning and, where that meaning is vague or open-ended, construing it so as to better protect the rights retained by the people.</p><br /><p> As clearly argued as it is insightful and provocative, <i>Restoring the Lost Constitution</i> forcefully disputes the conventional wisdom, posing a powerful challenge to which others must now respond.</p><br /><p> This updated edition features an afterword with further reflections on individual popular sovereignty, originalist interpretation, judicial engagement, and the gravitational force that original meaning has exerted on the Supreme Court in several recent cases.</p>
Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty
by , James A. Robinson

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

556

Publication Date

March 20, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Brilliant and engagingly written, <i>Why Nations Fail </i>answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine? <br /><i><br /></i></b>Is it culture, the weather, geography? Perhaps ignorance of what the right policies are? <br /><br />Simply, no. None of these factors is either definitive or destiny. Otherwise, how to explain why Botswana has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world, while other African nations, such as Zimbabwe, the Congo, and Sierra Leone, are mired in poverty and violence? <br /><br />Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson conclusively show that it is man-made political and economic institutions that underlie economic success (or lack of it). Korea, to take just one of their fascinating examples, is a remarkably homogeneous nation, yet the people of North Korea are among the poorest on earth while their brothers and sisters in South Korea are among the richest. The south forged a society that created incentives, rewarded innovation, and allowed everyone to participate in economic opportunities. <br /><br />The economic success thus spurred was sustained because the government became accountable and responsive to citizens and the great mass of people. Sadly, the people of the north have endured decades of famine, political repression, and very different economic institutions—with no end in sight. The differences between the Koreas is due to the politics that created these completely different institutional trajectories. <br /><br />Based on fifteen years of original research Acemoglu and Robinson marshall extraordinary historical evidence from the Roman Empire, the Mayan city-states, medieval Venice, the Soviet Union, Latin America, England, Europe, the United States, and Africa to build a new theory of political economy with great relevance for the big questions of today, including: <br /><br />- China has built an authoritarian growth machine. Will it continue to grow at such high speed and overwhelm the West? <br /><br />- Are America’s best days behind it? Are we moving from a virtuous circle in which efforts by elites to aggrandize power are resisted to a vicious one that enriches and empowers a small minority? <br /><br />- What is the most effective way to help move billions of people from the rut of poverty to prosperity? More philanthropy from the wealthy nations of the West? Or learning the hard-won lessons of Acemoglu and Robinson’s breakthrough ideas on the interplay between inclusive political and economic institutions? <br /><br /><b><i>Why Nations Fail </i>will change the way you look at—and understand—the world. </b>
Give Me Liberty: A History of America's Exceptional Idea
by Richard Brookhiser

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

264

Publication Date

November 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An award-winning historian recounts the history of American liberty through the stories of thirteen essential documents</b><br />Nationalism is inevitable: It supplies feelings of belonging, identity, and recognition. It binds us to our neighbors and tells us who we are. But increasingly -- from the United States to India, from Russia to Burma -- nationalism is being invoked for unworthy ends: to disdain minorities or to support despots. As a result, nationalism has become to many a dirty word.<br />In <i>Give Me Liberty</i>, award-winning historian and biographer Richard Brookhiser offers up a truer and more inspiring story of American nationalism as it has evolved over four hundred years. He examines America's history through thirteen documents that made the United States a new country in a new world: a free country. We are what we are because of them; we stay true to what we are by staying true to them.<br />Americans have always sought liberty, asked for it, fought for it; every victory has been the fulfillment of old hopes and promises. This is our nationalism, and we should be proud of it.<br />
American Prison: A Reporter's Undercover Journey into the Busines...
by Shane Bauer

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

366

Publication Date

September 18, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>The PBS NewsHour/<b><i>New York Times</i> Book Club February 2020 selection</b><br /></b><i><br /><br /><br />New York Times Book Review</i> 10 Best Books of 2018<br />One of President Barack Obama’s favorite books of 2018</b><br />Winner of the 2019 J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize <br />Winner of the Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism<br />Winner of the 2019 RFK Book and Journalism Award<br />A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book <br /><br />A ground-breaking and brave inside reckoning with the nexus of prison and profit in America: in one Louisiana prison and over the course of our country's history.</b><br /><br />In 2014, Shane Bauer was hired for $9 an hour to work as an entry-level prison guard at a private prison in Winnfield, Louisiana. An award-winning investigative journalist, he used his real name; there was no meaningful background check. Four months later, his employment came to an abrupt end. But he had seen enough, and in short order he wrote an exposé about his experiences that won a National Magazine Award and became the most-read feature in the history of the magazine <i>Mother Jones.</i> Still, there was much more that he needed to say. In <i>American Prison</i>, Bauer weaves a much deeper reckoning with his experiences together with a thoroughly researched history of for-profit prisons in America from their origins in the decades before the Civil War. For, as he soon realized, we can't understand the cruelty of our current system and its place in the larger story of mass incarceration without understanding where it came from. Private prisons became entrenched in the South as part of a systemic effort to keep the African-American labor force in place in the aftermath of slavery, and the echoes of these shameful origins are with us still.<br /><br />The private prison system is deliberately unaccountable to public scrutiny. Private prisons are not incentivized to tend to the health of their inmates, or to feed them well, or to attract and retain a highly-trained prison staff. Though Bauer befriends some of his colleagues and sympathizes with their plight, the chronic dysfunction of their lives only adds to the prison's sense of chaos. To his horror, Bauer finds himself becoming crueler and more aggressive the longer he works in the prison, and he is far from alone. <br /><br />A blistering indictment of the private prison system, and the powerful forces that drive it, <i>American Prison </i>is a necessary human document about the true face of justice in America.

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