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Eating Viet Nam: Dispatches from a Blue Plastic Table
by Graham Holliday

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Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

March 17, 2015

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Customer Reviews
<p>A journalist and blogger takes us on a colorful and spicy gastronomic tour through Viet Nam in this entertaining, offbeat travel memoir, with a foreword by Anthony Bourdain.</p><p> Growing up in a small town in northern England, Graham Holliday wasn’t keen on travel. But in his early twenties, a picture of Hanoi sparked a curiosity that propelled him halfway across the globe. Graham didn’t want to be a tourist in an alien land, though; he was determined to live it. An ordinary guy who liked trying interesting food, he moved to the capital city and embarked on a quest to find real Vietnamese food. In <em>Eating Viet Nam</em>, he chronicles his odyssey in this strange, enticing land infused with sublime smells and tastes.</p><p>Traveling through the back alleys and across the boulevards of Hanoi—where home cooks set up grills and stripped-down stands serving sumptuous fare on blue plastic furniture—he risked dysentery, giardia, and diarrhea to discover a culinary treasure-load that was truly foreign and unique. Holliday shares every bite of the extraordinary fresh dishes, pungent and bursting with flavor, which he came to love in Hanoi, Saigon, and the countryside. Here, too, are the remarkable people who became a part of his new life, including his wife, Sophie.</p><p>A feast for the senses, funny, charming, and always delicious, <em>Eating Viet Nam</em> will inspire armchair travelers, curious palates, and everyone itching for a taste of adventure. </p>
Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love
by Simran Sethi

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Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

November 10, 2015

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Customer Reviews
<p>Award-winning journalist Simran Sethi explores the history and cultural importance of our most beloved tastes, paying homage to the ingredients that give us daily pleasure, while providing a thoughtful wake-up call to the homogenization that is threatening the diversity of our food supply.</p><p>Food is one of the greatest pleasures of human life. Our response to sweet, salty, bitter, or sour is deeply personal, combining our individual biological characteristics, personal preferences, and emotional connections. <em>Bread, Wine, Chocolate</em> illuminates not only what it means to recognize the importance of the foods we love, but also what it means to lose them. Award-winning journalist Simran Sethi reveals how the foods we enjoy are endangered by genetic erosion—a slow and steady loss of diversity in what we grow and eat. In America today, food often looks and tastes the same, whether at a San Francisco farmers market or at a Midwestern potluck. Shockingly, 95% of the world’s calories now come from only thirty species. Though supermarkets seem to be stocked with endless options, the differences between products are superficial, primarily in flavor and brand.</p><p>Sethi draws on interviews with scientists, farmers, chefs, vintners, beer brewers, coffee roasters and others with firsthand knowledge of our food to reveal the multiple and interconnected reasons for this loss, and its consequences for our health, traditions, and culture. She travels to Ethiopian coffee forests, British yeast culture labs, and Ecuadoran cocoa plantations collecting fascinating stories that will inspire readers to eat more consciously and purposefully, better understand familiar and new foods, and learn what it takes to save the tastes that connect us with the world around us.</p>
Cooking Through the Decades: Authentic Recipes From the 1920s, 19...
by Alice Kertesz

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Language

English

Pages

115

Publication Date

March 09, 2011

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Customer Reviews
Rural America in the 1920s was a time when neighbors got together to help one another with tasks on the farm and, in between the work, they shared stories and enjoyed the home-made meals and snacks provided by the hostess. She might bring out a plate of cookies or an elegant cake, and she would take pride in the complements and expect requests for her recipes. Alice Tomashek Kertesz lived in rural Wisconsin and haslots of memories – and recipes – from that era. She remembers her mother helping their neighbors with feather plucking when it was time for their neighbors to sell the ducks they raised. Alice always hoped her mother would bring home some new recipes they could try making on their wood-burning stove/oven. Cookbooks were not common in those days, and recipes were passed around and copied and recopied onto treasured recipe cards.<br /><br />The 1930s were mostly about “making due” as incomes plunged during the Great Depression. Electric kitchen appliances had begun to appear during the 20s, and more of them came on the market in the 30s, along with cookbooks that, for the first time, gave precise measurements. Also new and popular were portable radios that let women listen to soap operas while they cooked.<br /><br />The 1940s saw kitchens take on a sleeker polished look with appliances built into the design of the kitchen. The War years meant women going to work in factories and having to cook without sugar and other ingredients that were unavailable or rationed. New appliances were not available either, as factories turned out tanks and airplanes instead of refrigerators.<br /><br />Alice Tomashek Kertesz has kept her recipes from those decades, collected during the years she was growing up in rural Wisconsin and teaching in one-room schoolhouses as a young woman. She lived with a number of immigrant families during her teaching years in the late 1930s and early 1940s; she obtained recipes from all of them. Alice came to Flint Michigan for a summer job in a spark plug factory in 1943 and met and married John Kertesz. Her daughters and granddaughters have preserved the recipes and are responsible for this cookbook. <br /><br />Here are 154 authentic recipes from the decades of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. Cooking Through the Decades includes Alice’s colorful commentary on how she acquired many of the recipes, and her daughter Theresa’s comments on the changes to kitchens and cookbooks over these decades. Here are recipes with a past – elegant cakes like Feather Spice Cake, Strawberry Meringue Cake, and Enchanted Cream Sponge Cake, unusual recipes like Caraway Seed Cookies and Radio Pudding, along with low- or no-sugar recipes from the World War II years like Maple Syrup Pie and Honey Party Loaf Cake. This is a cookbook and a history lesson, all in one. Enjoy!<br />
The Taste of Conquest: The Rise and Fall of the Three Great Citie...
by Michael Krondl

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Language

English

Pages

318

Publication Date

October 22, 2008

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Customer Reviews
The smell of sweet cinnamon on your morning oatmeal, the gentle heat of gingerbread, the sharp piquant bite from your everyday peppermill. The tales these spices could tell: of lavish Renaissance banquets perfumed with cloves, and flimsy sailing ships sent around the world to secure a scented prize; of cinnamon-dusted custard tarts and nutmeg-induced genocide; of pungent elixirs and the quest for the pepper groves of paradise. <br /><br />The Taste of Conquest offers up a riveting, globe-trotting tale of unquenchable desire, fanatical religion, raw greed, fickle fashion, and mouthwatering cuisine–in short, the very stuff of which our world is made. In this engaging, enlightening, and anecdote-filled history, Michael Krondl, a noted chef turned writer and food historian, tells the story of three legendary cities–Venice, Lisbon, and Amsterdam–and how their single-minded pursuit of spice helped to make (and remake) the Western diet and set in motion the first great wave of globalization.<br /><br />In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the world’s peoples were irrevocably brought together as a result of the spice trade. Before the great voyages of discovery, Venice controlled the business in Eastern seasonings and thereby became medieval Europe’s most cosmopolitan urban center. Driven to dominate this trade, Portugal’s mariners pioneered sea routes to the New World and around the Cape of Good Hope to India to unseat Venice as Europe’s chief pepper dealer. Then, in the 1600s, the savvy businessmen of Amsterdam “invented” the modern corporation–the Dutch East India Company–and took over as spice merchants to the world.<br /><br />Sharing meals and stories with Indian pepper planters, Portuguese sailors, and Venetian foodies, Krondl takes every opportunity to explore the world of long ago and sample its many flavors. The spice trade and its cultural exchanges didn’t merely lend kick to the traditional Venetian cookies called peverini, or add flavor to Portuguese sausages of every description, or even make the Indonesian rice table more popular than Chinese takeout in trendy Amsterdam. No, the taste for spice of a few wealthy Europeans led to great crusades, astonishing feats of bravery, and even wholesale slaughter.<br /><br />As stimulating as it is pleasurable, and filled with surprising insights, The Taste of Conquest offers a fascinating perspective on how, in search of a tastier dish, the world has been transformed.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
Medieval Cuisine (Food Fare Culinary Collection Book 1)
by Shenanchie O'Toole

Price : $2 or less

Language

English

Pages

44

Publication Date

May 10, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"Medieval Cuisine" from Food Fare features information about food and culture in the Middle Ages, including the history of medieval dishes, kitchen utensils and other cooking tools, etiquette, dining, holy days, common recipes, food terms, words and phrases, a medieval day in the life, and links for further study. *UPDATED in May 2013 with 15 new recipes and extra content.*
The Frugal Housewife: Dedicated to Those Who Are Not Ashamed of E...
by Lydia Maria Child

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Language

English

Pages

96

Publication Date

July 16, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>Published in 1829 in Boston, <i>The Frugal Housewife</i> was written by one of the foremost female writers and social reformers of her time, Lydia Maria Child. The charming collection of recipes and tips for homemakers of the early 19th century emphasized frugality in the kitchen and self-reliance in the household—making this work wildly popular in its day. It had over 35 printings, and much of the content is relevant in modern times. <i>Frugal Housewife</i> was the first American cookbook to replace Amelia Simmons’s <i>American Cookery</i>, still in use since publication in 1796, and it was also the first to emphasize the themes of thrift and economy in the kitchen.</div><DIV> </div><DIV>Considered a “must-read” for every new bride in the 19th century, <i>The Frugal Housewife</i> offered simple recipes such as Apple Pie, Corned Beef, Gingerbread, Indian Cakes, and Pie Crust, but also included advice on parenting, cleaning, and medical problems, plus numerous practical, Yankee-straightforward tips for saving money. Not just a collection for antiquarians, <i>The Frugal Housewife</i> is a fascinating work by a prolific author that will delight modern-day readers with its quaint but still usable recipes and tips.</div><DIV> </div>This edition of <i>The Frugal Housewife </i>was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the society is a research library documenting the lives of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection comprises approximately 1,100 volumes.     
The Foie Gras Wars: How a 5,000-Year-Old Delicacy Inspired the Wo...
by Mark Caro

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Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

February 20, 2009

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Customer Reviews
In announcing that he had stopped serving the fattened livers of force-fed ducks and geese at his world-renowned restaurant, influential chef Charlie Trotter heaved a grenade into a simmering food fight, and the Foie Gras Wars erupted. He said his morally minded menu revision was meant merely to raise consciousness, but what was he thinking when he also suggested -- to <i>Chicago Tribune</i> reporter Mark Caro -- that a rival four-star chef 's liver be eaten as "a little treat"? The reaction to Caro's subsequent front-page story was explosive, as Trotter's sizable hometown moved to ban the ancient delicacy known as foie gras while an international array of activists, farmers, chefs and politicians clashed forcefully and sometimes violently over whether fattening birds for the sake of scrumptious livers amounts to ethical agriculture or torture. <BR> <BR> "Take a dish with a funny French name, add ducks, top it all off with celebrity chefs eating each other's livers, and that's entertainment," Caro writes. Yet as absurd as battling over bloated waterfowl organs might seem, the controversy struck a serious chord even among those who had never tasted the stuff. Reporting from the front lines of this passionate dining debate, Caro explores the questions we too often avoid: What is an acceptable amount of suffering for an animal that winds up on our plate? Is a duck that lives comfortably for twelve weeks before enduring a few weeks of periodic force-feedings worse off than a supermarket broiler chicken that never sees the light of day over its six to seven weeks on earth? Why is the animal-rights movement picking on such a rarefied dish when so many more chickens, pigs and cows are being processed on factory farms? Then again, how could the treatment of other animals possibly justify the practice of feeding a duck through a metal tube down its throat? <BR> <BR> In his relentless yet good-humored pursuit of clarity, Caro takes us to the streets where activists use bullhorns, spray paint, Superglue and/or lawsuits as their weapons; the government chambers where politicians weigh the ducks' interests against their own; the restaurants and outlaw dining clubs where haute cuisine preparations coexist with Foie-lipops; and the U.S. and French farms whose operators maintain that they are honoring tradition, not abusing animals. Can foie gras survive after 5,000 years? Are we on the verge of a more enlightened era of eating? Can both answers be yes? Our appetites hang in the balance.
American Cookery (American Antiquarian Cookbook Collection)
by Amelia Simmons

Price : $2 or less

Language

English

Pages

113

Publication Date

October 16, 2012

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Customer Reviews
<B>Published in Hartford in 1796, this volume in the American Antiquarian Cookbook Collection is a facsimile edition of one of the most important documents in American culinary history. This is the first cookbook written by an American author specifically published for American kitchens.</B><DIV><BR>Named by the Library of Congress as one of the 88 "Books That Shaped America," <i>American Cookery</i> was the first cookbook by an American author published in the United States. Until its publication, cookbooks printed and used by American colonists were British. As indicated in Amelia Simmons’s subtitle, the recipes in her book were “adapted to this country,” reflecting the fact that American cooks had learned to make do with what was available in North America. This cookbook reveals the rich variety of food colonial Americans used, their tastes, cooking and eating habits, and even their rich, down-to-earth language.</div><DIV><DIV> </div><DIV>Bringing together English cooking methods with truly American products, <i>American Cookery</i> contains the first known printed recipes substituting American maize for English oats; and the recipe for Johnny Cake is apparently the first printed version using cornmeal. The book also contains the first known recipe for turkey. Possibly the most far-reaching innovation was Simmons’s use of pearlash—a staple in colonial households as a leavening agent in dough, which eventually led to the development of modern baking powders.  <BR><BR>“Thus, twenty years after the political upheaval of the American Revolution of 1776, a second revolution—a culinary revolution—occurred with the publication of a cookbook by an American for Americans.” (Jan Longone, curator of American Culinary History, University of Michigan)<BR><BR>This facsimile edition of Amelia Simmons's <i>American Cookery </i>was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the Society is a research library documenting the life of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The Society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection includes approximately 1,100 volumes.</div><DIV></div><DIV></div><DIV></div></div><DIV></div>
A Greedy Man in a Hungry World: How (almost) everything you thoug...
by Jay Rayner

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Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

May 23, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The UK’s most influential food and drink journalist shoots a few sacred cows of food culture.</p><p>Buying ‘locally’ does no good. Farmers’ markets are merely a lifestyle choice. And ‘organic’ is little more than a marketing label, way past its sell by date. This may be a little hard to swallow for the ethically-aware food shopper but it doesn’t make it any less true. And now the UK’s most outspoken and entertaining food writer is ready to explain why.</p><p>Jay Rayner combines personal experience and hard-nosed reportage to explain why the doctrine of organic has been eclipsed by the need for sustainable intensification; and why the future lies in large-scale food production rather than the cottage industries that foodies often cheer for. From the cornfields of Illinois to the killing lines of Yorkshire abattoirs, Rayner takes us on a journey that will change the way we shop, cook and eat forever. And give us a few belly laughs along the way.</p>
The Meanings of Craft Beer (Kindle Single)
by Evan Rail

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Language

English

Pages

50

Publication Date

March 14, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>Silver Medal Winner, Best Commentary or Criticism, North American Guild of Beer Writers</i></b><br /> <br />Craft beer is everywhere. But what is it? Award-winning journalist Evan Rail returns with this sharp take on craft beer — what it is, how it came about and what it means, from the 12th-century etymology of the Old English word "craft" to the reason contemporary craft brewers are beginning to reject the term. Two decades after the phrase “craft brewery” entered mainstream use, is there any remaining significance to the concept of a craft beer? With the annual craft beer business topping $20 billion, and with craft breweries regularly selling out for hundreds of millions, is it still fair to claim that craft brewers are artists — or has craft beer turned into something that it is not?

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