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Three Women
by Lisa Taddeo

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

July 09, 2019

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Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</b><br /> <br /><b>“Extraordinary…A nonfiction literary masterpiece…I can’t remember the last time a book affected me as profoundly as <i>Three Women</i>.” —Elizabeth Gilbert</b><br /> <br /><b>“The hottest book of the summer…Groundbreaking…Breathtaking…Staggeringly intimate.” —<i>Entertainment Weekly</i></b><br /> <br /><b>“The most in-depth look at the female sex drive that’s been published in decades.” —<i>New York</i></b><br /> <br /><b>“<i>Three Women</i> will be whispered about around pools from coast to coast.” —<i>Town & Country</i></b><br /> <br /><b>Desire as we’ve never seen it before: a riveting true story about the sex lives of three real American women, based on nearly a decade of reporting.</b><br /><br />It thrills us and torments us. It controls our thoughts, destroys our lives, and it’s all we live for. Yet we almost never speak of it. And as a buried force in our lives, desire remains largely unexplored—until now. Over the past eight years, journalist Lisa Taddeo has driven across the country six times to embed herself with ordinary women from different regions and backgrounds. The result,<i> Three Women</i>, is the deepest nonfiction portrait of desire ever written and one of the most anticipated books of the year.<br /> <br />We begin in suburban Indiana with Lina, a homemaker and mother of two whose marriage, after a decade, has lost its passion. She passes her days cooking and cleaning for a man who refuses to kiss her on the mouth, protesting that “the sensation offends” him. To Lina’s horror, even her marriage counselor says her husband’s position is valid. Starved for affection, Lina battles daily panic attacks. When she reconnects with an old flame through social media, she embarks on an affair that quickly becomes all-consuming.<br /> <br />In North Dakota we meet Maggie, a seventeen-year-old high school student who finds a confidant in her handsome, married English teacher. By Maggie’s account, supportive nightly texts and phone calls evolve into a clandestine physical relationship, with plans to skip school on her eighteenth birthday and make love all day; instead, he breaks up with her on the morning he turns thirty. A few years later, Maggie has no degree, no career, and no dreams to live for. When she learns that this man has been named North Dakota’s Teacher of the Year, she steps forward with her story—and is met with disbelief by former schoolmates and the jury that hears her case. The trial will turn their quiet community upside down.<br /> <br />Finally, in an exclusive enclave of the Northeast, we meet Sloane—a gorgeous, successful, and refined restaurant owner—who is happily married to a man who likes to watch her have sex with other men and women. He picks out partners for her alone or for a threesome, and she ensures that everyone’s needs are satisfied. For years, Sloane has been asking herself where her husband’s desire ends and hers begins. One day, they invite a new man into their bed—but he brings a secret with him that will finally force Sloane to confront the uneven power dynamics that fuel their lifestyle.<br /> <br />Based on years of immersive reporting, and told with astonishing frankness and immediacy, <i>Three Women</i> is a groundbreaking portrait of erotic longing in today’s America, exposing the fragility, complexity, and inequality of female desire with unprecedented depth and emotional power. It is both a feat of journalism and a triumph of storytelling, brimming with nuance and empathy, that introduces us to three unforgettable women—and one remarkable writer—whose experiences remind us that we are not alone.
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

469

Publication Date

February 10, 2015

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Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg </strong></p><p>From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”</p><p>One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?</p><p>Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, <em>Sapiens</em> integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.</p><p>Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?</p><p>Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.</p>
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
by J. D. Vance

Language

English

Pages

291

Publication Date

May 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>#1 NEW YORK TIMES </em>BESTSELLER, NAMED BY THE <em>TIMES </em>AS ONE OF "6 BOOKS TO HELP UNDERSTAND TRUMP'S WIN" AND SOON TO BE A MAJOR-MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD </strong></p><p><strong>"You will not read a more important book about America this year.</strong><strong>"—<em>The Economist </em></strong></p><p><strong>"A riveting book."—<em>The Wall Street Journal</em></strong></p><p><strong>"Essential reading."—David Brooks,</strong><strong> </strong><em><strong>New York Times</strong></em></p><p><em>Hillbilly Elegy</em> is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.</p><p>The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of <em>Hillbilly Elegy</em> plays out, we learn that J.D.'s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history.</p><p>A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, <em>Hillbilly Elegy</em> is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.</p>
Those Who Wander: America's Lost Street Kids
by Vivian Ho

Language

English

Pages

208

Publication Date

September 01, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Award-winning journalist Vivian Ho exposes a shattering true-crime story, shedding light on America’s new lost generation.</b></p><p>In 2015, the senseless Bay Area murders of twenty-three-year-old Audrey Carey and sixty-seven-year-old Steve Carter were personal tragedies for the victims’ families. But they also shed light on a more complex issue. The killers were three drifters scrounging for a living among a burgeoning counterculture population. Soon this community of runaways and transients became vulnerable scapegoats of a modern witch hunt. The supposedly progressive residents of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, only two generations removed from the Summer of Love, now feared all of society’s outcasts as threats.</p><p>In <i>Those Who Wander</i>, Vivian Ho delves deep into a rising subculture that’s changing the very fabric of her city and all of urban America. Moving beyond the disheartening statistics, she gives voices to these young people—victims of abuse, failed foster care, mental illness, and drug addiction. She also doesn’t ignore the threat they pose to themselves and to others as a dangerous dark side emerges. With alarming urgency, she asks what can be done to save the next generation of America’s vagabond youth.</p>
A People's History of the United States
by Howard Zinn

Language

English

Pages

764

Publication Date

November 17, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"A wonderful, splendid book--a book that should be ready by every American, student or otherwise, who wants to understand his country, its true history, and its hope for the future." --Howard Fast</strong></p><p>With a new introduction by Anthony Arnove, this edition of the classic national bestseller chronicles American history from the bottom up, throwing out the official narrative taught in schools—with its emphasis on great men in high places—to focus on the street, the home and the workplace.</p><p>Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, <em>A People's History</em> <em>of the United States</em> is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of—and in the words of—America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of our country's greatest battles—the fights for a fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality—were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance.</p><p>Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through President Clinton's first term, <em>A People's History of the United States </em>features insightful analysis of the most important events in our history. </p>
Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion
by Jia Tolentino

Language

English

Pages

303

Publication Date

August 06, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“From <i>The New Yorker</i>’s beloved cultural critic comes a bold, unflinching collection of essays about self-deception, examining everything from scammer culture to reality television.” <i>—Esquire</i><br /><i> </i><br />“A whip-smart, challenging book.” —Zadie Smith • “Jia Tolentino could be the Joan Didion of our time.” <i>—Vulture</i></b><br /><br /> Jia Tolentino is a peerless voice of her generation, tackling the conflicts, contradictions, and sea changes that define us and our time. Now, in this dazzling collection of nine entirely original essays, written with a rare combination of give and sharpness, wit and fearlessness, she delves into the forces that warp our vision, demonstrating an unparalleled stylistic potency and critical dexterity.<br /><br /> <i>Trick Mirror</i> is an enlightening, unforgettable trip through the river of self-delusion that surges just beneath the surface of our lives. This is a book about the incentives that shape us, and about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly through a culture that revolves around the self. In each essay, Tolentino writes about a cultural prism: the rise of the nightmare social internet; the advent of scamming as the definitive millennial ethos; the literary heroine’s journey from brave to blank to bitter; the punitive dream of optimization, which insists that everything, including our bodies, should become more efficient and beautiful until we die. Gleaming with Tolentino’s sense of humor and capacity to elucidate the impossibly complex in an instant, and marked by her desire to treat the reader with profound honesty, <i>Trick Mirror</i> is an instant classic of the worst decade yet.<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for <i>Trick Mirror</i></b><br /><br />“Jia Tolentino is the best young essayist at work in the United States, one I’ve consistently admired and learned from, and I was exhilarated to get a whole lot of her at once in <i>Trick Mirror</i>. In these nine essays, she rethinks troubling ingredients of modern life, from the internet to mind-altering drugs to wedding culture. All through the book, single sentences flash like lightning to show something familiar in a startling way, but she also builds extended arguments with her usual, unusual blend of lyricism and skepticism. In the end, we have a picture of America that was as missing as it was needed.” <b>—Rebecca Solnit, author of <i>Men Explain Things to Me</i><br /></b>
Between the World and Me
by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Language

English

Pages

155

Publication Date

July 14, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (<i>The New York Observer</i>)</b><br /><br />#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | <b>NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • <b><i>Entertainment Weekly • </i></b>Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly</i></b><br /></b></b><br />In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?<br /><br /> <i>Between the World and Me </i>is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, <i>Between the World and Me </i>clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Between the World and Me</i></b><br /><br />“Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”<b>—Michiko Kakutani, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s <i>Invisible Man</i> . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”<b>—<i>The Boston Globe</i></b><br /><br /> “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”<b>—<i>Vogue</i></b><br /><br /> “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”<b>—<i>The New Yorker</i></b><br /><br /> “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”<b>—<i>Entertainment Weekly</i></b>
Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest N...
by Adam Higginbotham

Language

English

Pages

561

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><br /> <br /><b>Journalist Adam Higginbotham’s definitive, years-in-the-making account of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster—and a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters.</b><br /><br />Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute.<br /> <br />Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.<br /> <br /><i>Midnight in Chernobyl </i>is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will—lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About ...
by Robin J. DiAngelo

Language

English

Pages

187

Publication Date

June 26, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The <i>New York Times</i> best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality.</b> <br /><br />In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.
Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language
by Gretchen McCulloch

Language

English

Pages

335

Publication Date

July 23, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>AN INSTANT <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER!!</b><br /></b> <br /><b>A <i>Wired</i> Must-Read Book of Summer</b> <b> </b><br /><br /><b>“Gretchen McCulloch is the internet’s favorite linguist, and this book is essential reading. Reading her work is like suddenly being able to see the matrix.” —Jonny Sun, author of <i>everyone's a aliebn when ur a aliebn too</i></b> <b> </b><br /><br /><b><i>Because </i>Internet is for anyone who's ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message or wondered where memes come from. It's the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that's a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are. </b> <br /><br />Language is humanity's most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. Internet conversations are structured by the shape of our apps and platforms, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What's more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can watch language evolve in real time. <br /><br />Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how your first social internet experience influences whether you prefer "LOL" or "lol," why ~sparkly tildes~ succeeded where centuries of proposals for irony punctuation had failed, what emoji have in common with physical gestures, and how the artfully disarrayed language of animal memes like lolcats and doggo made them more likely to spread.

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