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Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

469

Publication Date

February 10, 2015

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Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg </strong></p><p>From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”</p><p>One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?</p><p>Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, <em>Sapiens</em> integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.</p><p>Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?</p><p>Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.</p>
21 Lessons for the 21st Century
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

356

Publication Date

September 04, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER </b>• <b>In<i> Sapiens, </i>he explored our past. In <i>Homo Deus, </i>he looked to our future<i>. </i>Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today’s most pressing issues.</b><br /><br /><b>“Fascinating . . . a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the twenty-first century.”—Bill Gates, <i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /><br /> How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children? <br /><br />Yuval Noah Harari’s <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i> is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.<br /><br /> In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?<br /><br /> Harari’s unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i> is essential reading.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i></b><br /><br />“If there were such a thing as a required instruction manual for politicians and thought leaders, Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari’s <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i> would deserve serious consideration. In this collection of provocative essays, Harari . . . tackles a daunting array of issues, endeavoring to answer a persistent question: ‘What is happening in the world today, and what is the deep meaning of these events?’”<b>—<i>BookPage </i>(top pick)<br /><br /></b>“A sobering and tough-minded perspective on bewildering new vistas.”<b>—<i>Booklist</i> (starred review)</b>
The Library Book
by Susan Orlean

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR </b> * <b>A</b> <b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</b><BR> <BR><b>“A constant pleasure to read…Everybody who loves books should check out <i>The Library Book</i>.” —<i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR> <b>“CAPTIVATING…DELIGHTFUL.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i> * “EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING.” —<i>The New York Times</i> * “MESMERIZING…RIVETING.” —<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><BR> <BR> <b>A dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries—from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by <i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>.</b><BR><BR>On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?<BR> <BR> Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>reporter and <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Library Book</i>, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.<BR> <BR> Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.<BR> <BR> Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, <i>The Library Book </i>is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.
The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Id...
by , Jonathan Haidt

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

September 04, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Something is going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and afraid to speak honestly. How did this happen?</b><br />  <br /> First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: what doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths are incompatible with basic psychological principles, as well as ancient wisdom from many cultures. They interfere with healthy development. Anyone who embraces these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—is less likely to become an autonomous adult able to navigate the bumpy road of life. <br />  <br /> Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to produce these untruths. They situate the conflicts on campus in the context of America’s rapidly rising political polarization, including a rise in hate crimes and off-campus provocation. They explore changes in childhood including the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade. <br />  <br /> This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.
Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World--and Why Thi...
by , Ola Rosling

Language

English

Pages

341

Publication Date

April 03, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>INSTANT <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</p><p><b>“One of the most important books I’ve ever read—an indispensable guide to thinking clearly about the world.” – Bill Gates</b><br /><b></b><br /><b>“Hans Rosling tells the story of ‘the secret silent miracle of human progress’ as only he can. But <i>Factfulness</i> does much more than that. It also explains why progress is so often secret and silent and teaches readers how to see it clearly.” <i>—</i>Melinda Gates</b><br /><b></b><br /><b></b><b>"<i>Factfulness</i> by Hans Rosling, an outstanding international public health expert, is a hopeful book about the potential for human progress when we work off facts rather than our inherent biases." - Former U.S. President Barack Obama</b><b><i></i></b><br /><b><i></i></b><br /><b><i>Factfulnes</i>s: The stress-reducing habit of only carrying opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. </b></p><p>When asked simple questions about global trends—<i>what percentage of the world’s population live in poverty; why the world’s population is increasing; how many girls finish school</i>—we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers.</p><p>In <i>Factfulness</i>, Professor of International Health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers <b>a radical new explanation of why this happens</b>. They reveal <b>the ten instincts that distort our perspective</b>—from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of <i>us</i> and <i>them</i>) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse). </p><p>Our problem is that we don’t know what we don’t know, and even our guesses are informed by unconscious and predictable biases.</p><p><b>It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think.</b> That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most. </p><p>Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, <b><i>Factfulness </i>is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future. </b></p><p>---</p><p>“This book is my last battle in my life-long mission to fight devastating ignorance…Previously I armed myself with huge data sets, eye-opening software, an energetic learning style and a Swedish bayonet for sword-swallowing. It wasn’t enough. But I hope this book will be.” Hans Rosling, February 2017.</p>
Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

456

Publication Date

February 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Official U.S. edition with full color illustrations throughout.</strong></p><p><strong><em>NEW YORK TIMES</em> BESTSELLER </strong></p><p>Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed <em>New York Times</em> bestseller and international phenomenon <em>Sapiens</em>, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.</p><strong></strong><p>Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.</p><p>What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake?<em> Homo Deus</em> explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus.</p><p>With the same insight and clarity that made <em>Sapiens</em> an international hit and a <em>New York Times</em> bestseller, Harari maps out our future. </p>
A People's History of the United States
by Howard Zinn

Language

English

Pages

764

Publication Date

November 17, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"A wonderful, splendid book--a book that should be ready by every American, student or otherwise, who wants to understand his country, its true history, and its hope for the future." --Howard Fast</strong></p><p>With a new introduction by Anthony Arnove, this edition of the classic national bestseller chronicles American history from the bottom up, throwing out the official narrative taught in schools—with its emphasis on great men in high places—to focus on the street, the home and the workplace.</p><p>Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, <em>A People's History</em> <em>of the United States</em> is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of—and in the words of—America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of our country's greatest battles—the fights for a fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality—were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance.</p><p>Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through President Clinton's first term, <em>A People's History of the United States </em>features insightful analysis of the most important events in our history. </p>
Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places
by Colin Dickey

Language

English

Pages

330

Publication Date

October 04, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b><b><b>One of NPR's Great Reads of 2016<br /><br />“A lively assemblage and smart analysis of dozens of haunting stories… absorbing…[and] intellectually intriguing.”—<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b></b><br /><br />An intellectual feast for fans of offbeat history, <i>Ghostland </i>takes readers on a road trip through some of the country's most infamously haunted places<b>—</b>and deep into the dark side of our history.</b><br /></b></b><br />Colin Dickey is on the trail of America's ghosts. Crammed into old houses and hotels, abandoned prisons and empty hospitals, the spirits that linger continue to capture our collective imagination, but why? His own fascination piqued by a house hunt in Los Angeles that revealed derelict foreclosures and "zombie homes," Dickey embarks on a journey across the continental United States to decode and unpack the American history repressed in our most famous haunted places. Some have established reputations as "the most haunted mansion in America," or "the most haunted prison"; others, like the haunted Indian burial grounds in West Virginia, evoke memories from the past our collective nation tries to forget.     <br />       With boundless curiosity, Dickey conjures the dead by focusing on questions of the living<b>—</b>how do we, the living, deal with stories about ghosts, and how do we inhabit and move through spaces that have been deemed, for whatever reason, haunted? Paying attention not only to the true facts behind a ghost story, but also to the ways in which changes to those facts are made<b>—</b>and why those changes are made<b>—</b>Dickey paints a version of American history left out of the textbooks, one of things left undone, crimes left unsolved. <br />       Spellbinding, scary, and wickedly insightful, <i>Ghostland</i> discovers the past we're most afraid to speak of aloud in the bright light of day is the same past that tends to linger in the ghost stories we whisper in the dark.
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
by J. D. Vance

Language

English

Pages

291

Publication Date

May 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>#1 NEW YORK TIMES </em>BESTSELLER, NAMED BY THE <em>TIMES </em>AS ONE OF "6 BOOKS TO HELP UNDERSTAND TRUMP'S WIN" AND SOON TO BE A MAJOR-MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD </strong></p><p><strong>"You will not read a more important book about America this year.</strong><strong>"—<em>The Economist </em></strong></p><p><strong>"A riveting book."—<em>The Wall Street Journal</em></strong></p><p><strong>"Essential reading."—David Brooks,</strong><strong> </strong><em><strong>New York Times</strong></em></p><p><em>Hillbilly Elegy</em> is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.</p><p>The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of <em>Hillbilly Elegy</em> plays out, we learn that J.D.'s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history.</p><p>A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, <em>Hillbilly Elegy</em> is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.</p>
The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail-but Some D...
by Nate Silver

Language

English

Pages

556

Publication Date

September 27, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>One of</b> <b><i>Wall Street Journal</i>'s</b> <b>Best Ten Works of Nonfiction in 2012</b><br /> <b> </b><br /> <b><i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><br /><br /> “Not so different in spirit from the way public intellectuals like John Kenneth Galbraith once shaped discussions of economic policy and public figures like Walter Cronkite helped sway opinion on the Vietnam War…could turn out to be <b>one of the more momentous books of the decade</b>.”<br /> —<i>New York Times Book Review</i><br /> <i> </i><br /> "Nate Silver's <i>The Signal and the Noise</i> is<b> The Soul of a New Machine for the 21st century</b>." <br /> —Rachel Maddow, author of <i>Drift</i><br /><br /> "<b>A serious treatise about the craft of prediction—</b>without academic mathematics<b>—cheerily aimed at lay readers</b>. Silver's coverage is polymathic, ranging from poker and earthquakes to climate change and terrorism."<br /> <i>—New York Review of Books</i><br /><br /> Nate Silver built an innovative system for predicting baseball performance, predicted the 2008 election within a hair’s breadth, and became a national sensation as a blogger—all by the time he was thirty. He solidified his standing as the nation's foremost political forecaster with his near perfect prediction of the 2012 election. Silver is the founder and editor in chief of the website FiveThirtyEight. <br />  <br />Drawing on his own groundbreaking work, Silver examines the world of prediction, investigating how we can distinguish a true signal from a universe of noisy data. Most predictions fail, often at great cost to society, because most of us have a poor understanding of probability and uncertainty. Both experts and laypeople mistake more confident predictions for more accurate ones. But overconfidence is often the reason for failure. If our appreciation of uncertainty improves, our predictions can get better too. This is the “prediction paradox”: The more humility we have about our ability to make predictions, the more successful we can be in planning for the future.<br /><br />In keeping with his own aim to seek truth from data, Silver visits the most successful forecasters in a range of areas, from hurricanes to baseball, from the poker table to the stock market, from Capitol Hill to the NBA. He explains and evaluates how these forecasters think and what bonds they share. What lies behind their success? Are they good—or just lucky? What patterns have they unraveled? And are their forecasts really right? He explores unanticipated commonalities and exposes unexpected juxtapositions. And sometimes, it is not so much how good a prediction is in an absolute sense that matters but how good it is relative to the competition. In other cases, prediction is still a very rudimentary—and dangerous—science.<br /><br />Silver observes that the most accurate forecasters tend to have a superior command of probability, and they tend to be both humble and hardworking. They distinguish the predictable from the unpredictable, and they notice a thousand little details that lead them closer to the truth. Because of their appreciation of probability, they can distinguish the signal from the noise.<br /><br />With everything from the health of the global economy to our ability to fight terrorism dependent on the quality of our predictions, Nate Silver’s insights are an essential read.

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