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The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier
by Ian Urbina

Language

English

Pages

513

Publication Date

August 20, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"<b>A riveting, terrifying, thrilling story of a netherworld that few people know about, and fewer will ever see . . . The soul of this book is as wild as the ocean itself." --Susan Casey, best-selling author of </b><b><i>The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean</i></b><br /><br /><br /><b>A riveting, adrenaline-fueled tour of a vast, lawless and rampantly criminal world that few have ever seen: the high seas.</b></b><br /><br />There are few remaining frontiers on our planet. But perhaps the wildest, and least understood, are the world's oceans: too big to police, and under no clear international authority, these immense regions of treacherous water play host to rampant criminality and exploitation.<br /><br />Traffickers and smugglers, pirates and mercenaries, wreck thieves and repo men, vigilante conservationists and elusive poachers, seabound abortion providers, clandestine oil-dumpers, shackled slaves and cast-adrift stowaways -- drawing on five years of perilous and intrepid reporting, often hundreds of miles from shore, Ian Urbina introduces us to the inhabitants of this hidden world. Through their stories of astonishing courage and brutality, survival and tragedy, he uncovers a globe-spanning network of crime and exploitation that emanates from the fishing, oil and shipping industries, and on which the world's economies rely. <br /><br />Both a gripping adventure story and a stunning exposé, this unique work of reportage brings fully into view for the first time the disturbing reality of a floating world that connects us all, a place where anyone can do anything because no one is watching.
The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Hei...
by Kirk Wallace Johnson

Language

English

Pages

318

Publication Date

April 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>As heard on NPR's <i>This American Life</i><br /><br />“Absorbing . . . Though it's non-fiction, <i>The Feather Thief</i> contains many of the elements of a classic thriller.” —Maureen Corrigan, NPR’s <i>Fresh Air</i><br /><br />“One of the most peculiar and memorable true-crime books ever.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i><br /><br /><b>A rollicking true-crime adventure and a captivating journey into an underground world of fanatical fly-tiers and plume peddlers, for readers of <i>The Stranger in the Woods</i>, <i>The Lost City of Z</i>, and <i>The Orchid Thief</i>.</b><br /><br /></b>On a cool June evening in 2009, after performing a concert at London's Royal Academy of Music, twenty-year-old American flautist Edwin Rist boarded a train for a suburban outpost of the British Museum of Natural History. Home to one of the largest ornithological collections in the world, the Tring museum was full of rare bird specimens whose gorgeous feathers were worth staggering amounts of money to the men who shared Edwin's obsession: the Victorian art of salmon fly-tying. Once inside the museum, the champion fly-tier grabbed hundreds of bird skins—some collected 150 years earlier by a contemporary of Darwin's, Alfred Russel Wallace, who'd risked everything to gather them—and escaped into the darkness.<b><br /><br /></b>Two years later, Kirk Wallace Johnson was waist high in a river in northern New Mexico when his fly-fishing guide told him about the heist. He was soon consumed by the strange case of the feather thief. What would possess a person to steal dead birds? Had Edwin paid the price for his crime? What became of the missing skins? In his search for answers, Johnson was catapulted into a years-long, worldwide investigation. The gripping story of a bizarre and shocking crime, and one man's relentless pursuit of justice, <i>The Feather Thief</i> is also a fascinating exploration of obsession, and man's destructive instinct to harvest the beauty of nature.
The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey
by Rinker Buck

Language

English

Pages

465

Publication Date

June 30, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • #1 Indie Next Pick • Winner of the PEN New England Award</b><br /> <br /><b>“Enchanting…A book filled with so much love…Long before Oregon, Rinker Buck has convinced us that the best way to see America is from the seat of a covered wagon.” —<i>The Wall Street Journal</i></b><br /> <br /><b>“Amazing…A real nonfiction thriller.” —Ian Frazier, <i>The New York Review of Books</i></b><br /> <br /><b>“Absorbing…Winning…The many layers in <i>The Oregon Trail</i> are linked by Mr. Buck’s voice, which is alert and unpretentious in a manner that put me in mind of Bill Bryson’s comic tone in <i>A Walk in the Woods</i>.” —Dwight Garner, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br />A major bestseller that has been hailed as a “quintessential American story” (<i>Christian Science Monitor</i>), Rinker Buck’s <i>The Oregon Trail </i>is an epic account of traveling the 2,000-mile length of the Oregon Trail the old-fashioned way—in a covered wagon with a team of mules—that has captivated readers, critics, and booksellers from coast to coast. Simultaneously a majestic journey across the West, a significant work of history, and a moving personal saga, Buck’s chronicle is a “laugh-out-loud masterpiece” (<i>Willamette Week</i>) that “so ensnares the emotions it becomes a tear-jerker at its close” (<i>Star Tribune, </i>Minneapolis) and “will leave you daydreaming and hungry to see this land” (<i>The Boston Globe</i>).
Into Thin Air
by Jon Krakauer

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

November 12, 1998

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>National Bestseller </b><br /><br />A bank of clouds was assembling on the not-so-distant horizon, but journalist-mountaineer Jon Krakauer, standing on the summit of Mt. Everest, saw nothing that "suggested that a murderous storm was bearing down." He was wrong. The storm, which claimed five lives and left countless more--including Krakauer's--in guilt-ridden disarray, would also provide the impetus for <b>Into Thin Air</b>, Krakauer's epic account of the May 1996 disaster.<br /><br />By writing <b>Into Thin Air</b>, Krakauer may have hoped to exorcise some of his own demons and lay to rest some of the painful questions that still surround the event. He takes great pains to provide a balanced picture of the people and events he witnessed and gives due credit to the tireless and dedicated Sherpas. He also avoids blasting easy targets such as Sandy Pittman, the wealthy socialite who brought an espresso maker along on the expedition. Krakauer's highly personal inquiry into the catastrophe provides a great deal of insight into what went wrong. But for Krakauer himself, further interviews and investigations only lead him to the conclusion that his perceived failures were directly responsible for a fellow climber's death. Clearly, Krakauer remains haunted by the disaster, and although he relates a number of incidents in which he acted selflessly and even heroically, he seems unable to view those instances objectively. In the end, despite his evenhanded and even generous assessment of others' actions, he reserves a full measure of vitriol for himself. <br /><br />This updated edition of <b>Into Thin Air</b> includes an extensive new postscript that sheds fascinating light on the acrimonious debate that flared between Krakauer and Everest guide Anatoli Boukreev in the wake of the tragedy.  "I have no doubt that Boukreev's intentions were good on summit day," writes Krakauer in the postscript, dated August 1999. "What disturbs me, though, was Boukreev's refusal to acknowledge the possibility that he made even a single poor decision. Never did he indicate that perhaps it wasn't the best choice to climb without gas or go down ahead of his clients." As usual, Krakauer supports his points with dogged research and a good dose of humility. But rather than continue the heated discourse that has raged since <b>Into Thin Air</b>'s denouncement of guide Boukreev, Krakauer's tone is conciliatory; he points most of his criticism at G. Weston De Walt, who coauthored <b>The Climb</b>, Boukreev's version of events. And in a touching conclusion, Krakauer recounts his last conversation with the late Boukreev, in which the two weathered climbers agreed to disagree about certain points. Krakauer had great hopes to patch things up with Boukreev, but the Russian later died in an avalanche on another Himalayan peak, Annapurna I. <br /><br />In 1999, Krakauer received an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters--a prestigious prize intended "to honor writers of exceptional accomplishment."  According to the Academy's citation, "Krakauer combines the tenacity and courage of the finest tradition of investigative journalism with the stylish subtlety and profound insight of the born writer.  His account of an ascent of Mount Everest has led to a general reevaluation of climbing and of the commercialization of what was once a romantic, solitary sport; while his account of the life and death of Christopher McCandless, who died of starvation after challenging the Alaskan wilderness, delves even more deeply and disturbingly into the fascination of nature and the devastating effects of its lure on a young and curious mind."
Born to Run
by Christopher McDougall

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

May 04, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The astonishing national bestseller and hugely entertaining story that completely changed the way we run.</b><br /><br />An epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt?<br /> <br />Isolated by Mexico's deadly Copper Canyons, the blissful Tarahumara Indians have honed the ability to run hundreds of miles without rest or injury. In a riveting narrative, award-winning journalist and often-injured runner Christopher McDougall sets out to discover their secrets. In the process, he takes his readers from science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultra-runners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to a climactic race in the Copper Canyons that pits America’s best ultra-runners against the tribe. McDougall’s incredible story will not only engage your mind but inspire your body when you realize that you, indeed all of us, were born to run.
Wild (Oprah's Book Club 2.0 Digital Edition): From Lost to Found ...
by Cheryl Strayed

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

June 01, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER<br /></b><br />At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life. With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State—and she would do it alone. Told with suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, <i>Wild</i> powerfully captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.<br /><br />Oprah's Book Club 2.0 selection: This special eBook edition of Cheryl Strayed’s national best seller, <i>Wild</i>, features exclusive content, including Oprah’s personal notes highlighted within the text, and a reading group guide. <br /><br /><b>One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, <i>The Boston Globe</i>, <i>Entertainment Weekly,</i> <i>Vogue, <i>St. Louis Dispatch </i></i></b>
Into the Wild
by Jon Krakauer

Language

English

Pages

231

Publication Date

September 21, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter.  How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of <i>Into the Wild</i>.<br /><br />Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir.  In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his  cash.  He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and , unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented.  Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away.  Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild.<br /><br />Jon Krakauer constructs a clarifying prism through which he reassembles the disquieting facts of McCandless's short life.  Admitting an interst that borders on obsession, he searches for the clues to the dries and desires that propelled McCandless.  Digging deeply, he takes an inherently compelling mystery and unravels the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons.<br /><br />When McCandless's innocent mistakes turn out to be irreversible and fatal, he becomes the stuff of tabloid headlines and is dismissed for his naiveté, pretensions, and hubris.  He is said  to have had a death wish but wanting to die is a very different thing from being compelled to look over the edge. Krakauer brings McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows, and the peril, adversity , and renunciation sought by this enigmatic young man are illuminated with a rare understanding--and not an ounce of sentimentality. Mesmerizing, heartbreaking, <i>Into the Wild</i> is a <i>tour de force</i>. The power and luminosity of Jon Krakauer's stoytelling blaze through every page.
To Shake the Sleeping Self: A Journey from Oregon to Patagonia, a...
by Jedidiah Jenkins

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER • “With winning candor, Jedidiah Jenkins takes us with him as he bicycles across two continents and delves deeply into his own beautiful heart.”<i>—</i>Cheryl Strayed, author of <i>Wild </i>and <i>Tiny Beautiful Things</i></b><br /> <br />On the eve of turning thirty, terrified of being funneled into a life he didn’t choose, Jedidiah Jenkins quit his dream job and spent sixteen months cycling from Oregon to Patagonia. He chronicled the trip on Instagram, where his photos and reflections drew hundreds of thousands of followers, all gathered around the question: What makes a life worth living? <br /><br />In this unflinchingly honest memoir, Jed narrates his adventure—the people and places he encountered on his way to the bottom of the world—as well as the internal journey that started it all. As he traverses cities, mountains, and inner boundaries, Jenkins grapples with the question of what it means to be an adult, his struggle to reconcile his sexual identity with his conservative Christian upbringing, and his belief in travel as a way to wake us up to life back home.<br /><br />A soul-stirring read for the wanderer in each of us, <i>To Shake the Sleeping Self </i>is an unforgettable reflection on adventure, identity, and a life lived without regret.<br /> <br /><b>Praise for <i>To Shake the Sleeping Self</i></b><br /><br />“[Jenkins is] a guy deeply connected to his personal truth and just so refreshingly present.”<b><i>—</i>Rich Roll, author of <i>Finding Ultra</i></b><br /> <br />“This is much more than a book about a bike ride. This is a deep soul deepening us. Jedidiah Jenkins is a mystic disguised as a millennial.”<b>—Tom Shadyac, author of <i>Life’s Operating Manual</i></b><br /><br />“Thought-provoking and inspirational . . . This uplifting memoir and travelogue will remind readers of the power of movement for the body and the soul.”<b><i>—Publishers Weekly<br /></i></b>
Rick Steves Italy 2020 (Rick Steves Travel Guide)
by Rick Steves

Language

English

Pages

1242

Publication Date

December 17, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the Mediterranean to the Alps, from fine art to fine pasta, experience Italy with Rick Steves! Inside <i>Rick Steves Italy 2020</i> you'll find:</b><br /><ul><li><b>Comprehensive coverage </b>for planning a <b>multi-week trip</b> to Italy</li><li><b>Rick's strategic advice</b> on how to get the most out of your time and money, with rankings of his must-see favorites</li><li><b>Top sights and hidden gems, </b>from the Colosseum and Michelangelo's David to corner trattorias and that perfect scoop of gelato</li><li><b>How to connect with local culture: </b>Walk in Caesar's footsteps through the ruins of the Forum, discover the relaxed rhythms of sunny Cinque Terre, or chat with fans about the latest soccer match (<i>calcio</i>, to locals) </li><li><b>Beat the crowds, skip the lines, and avoid tourist traps</b> with Rick's candid, humorous insight</li><li><b>The best places to eat, sleep, and experience <i>la dolce far niente</i></b></li><li><b>Self-guided walking tours</b> of lively neighborhoods and museums</li><li><b>Vital trip-planning tools, </b>like how to link destinations, build your itinerary, and get from place to place </li><li><b>Detailed maps,</b> including a <b>fold-out map</b> for exploring on the go</li><li><b>Useful resources </b>including a packing list, Italian phrase book, a historical overview, and recommended reading</li><li><b>Over 1,000 bible-thin pages</b> include everything worth seeing without weighing you down</li><li><b>Annually updated information</b> on Venice, Padua, the Dolomites, Lake Country, Milan, the Italian Riviera, Florence, Pisa, Lucca, Hill Towns of Central Italy, Siena, Tuscany, Rome, Naples, Pompeii, Capri, the Amalfi Coast, and much more</li></ul><b>Make the most of every day and every dollar with <i>Rick Steves Italy 2020</i>.</b><br /><br />Planning a one- to two-week trip? Check out <i>Rick Steves Best of Italy</i>.
The Art of Travel (Vintage International)
by Alain de Botton

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

November 19, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Any Baedeker will tell us <i>where</i> we ought to travel, but only Alain de Botton will tell us <i>how</i> and <i>why. </i>With the same intelligence and insouciant charm he brought to <b>How Proust Can Save Your Life</b><i>, </i>de Botton considers the pleasures of anticipation; the allure of the exotic, and the value of noticing everything from a seascape in Barbados to the takeoffs at Heathrow. <br /><br />Even as de Botton takes the reader along on his own peregrinations, he also cites such distinguished fellow-travelers as Baudelaire, Wordsworth, Van Gogh, the biologist Alexander von Humboldt, and the 18th-century eccentric Xavier de Maistre, who catalogued the wonders of his bedroom. <b>The Art of Travel</b> is a wise and utterly original book. Don’t leave home without it.

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