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Ball Four (RosettaBooks Sports Classics)
by Jim Bouton

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

March 20, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Ball Four: The Final Pitch is the original book plus all the updates, unlike the 20th Anniversary Edition paperback. <br /><br />When Ball Four was published in 1970, it created a firestorm. Bouton was called a Judas, a Benedict Arnold and a “social leper” for having violated the “sanctity of the clubhouse.” Baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn tried to force Bouton to sign a statement saying the book wasn’t true. Ballplayers, most of whom hadn’t read it, denounced the book. It was even banned by a few libraries.<br /><br />Almost everyone else, however, loved Ball Four. Fans liked discovering that athletes were real people--often wildly funny people. Many readers said it gave them strength to get through a difficult period in their lives. Serious critics called it an important document.<br /><br />David Halberstam, who won a Pulitzer for his reporting on Vietnam, wrote a piece in Harper’s that said of Bouton: “He has written… a book deep in the American vein, so deep in fact that it is by no means a sports book.”<br /><br />In 1999 Ball Four was selected by the New York Public Library as one of the “Books of the Century.” And Time magazine chose it as one of the “100 Greatest Non-Fiction” books.<br /><br />Besides changing the image of athletes, the book played a role in the economic revolution in pro sports. In 1975, Ball Four was accepted as legal evidence against the owners at the arbitration hearing, which lead to free agency in baseball and, by extension, to other sports.<br /><br />Today Ball Four has taken on another role--as a time capsule of life in the sixties. “It is not just a diary of Bouton's 1969 season with the Seattle Pilots and Houston Astros,” says sportswriter Jim Caple. “It's a vibrant, funny, telling history of an era that seems even further away than four decades. To call it simply a “tell all book” is like describing The Grapes of Wrath as a book about harvesting peaches in California.”<br /><br />This ebook version of Ball Four includes the first edition, the 1980, 1990 and 2000 updates, and 138 photos.<br /><br />ABOUT THE AUTHOR<br /><br />Jim Bouton was born in Newark, NJ, in 1939. He grew up in Rochelle Park, a blue-collar town that was too small for Little League. The result was that kids learned to play baseball without uniforms, parents, coaches, or umpires.<br /><br />In high school, his nickname was “warm up Bouton” because he never got into the games. Advised that becoming a major league pitcher was “unrealistic,” Bouton wrote his Careers Week report on the life of a forest ranger. He got a C on his report and an A on the cover--a nice drawing of a squirrel in a tree.<br /><br />Bouton was an All-Star pitcher and won 20 games for the Yankees in 1963. The next year he won 18 games and beat the Cardinals twice in the World Series. Eventually a sore arm got him sold to the Seattle Pilots--for a bag of batting practice balls. That’s when he began taking notes for his diary Ball Four, published in 1970.<br /><br />In the 1970s he was a top-rated TV sportscaster in New York City, acted in a Robert Altman film called The Long Goodbye, and made a brief comeback with the Atlanta Braves.<br /><br />In 2003 Bouton wrote and self-published Foul Ball, a diary of his battle to save a historic ballpark in Pittsfied, MA. Bouton says he only writes when he’s bursting to say something. “Ball Four was a book I wanted to write,” he says. “Foul Ball was a book I had to write.<br /><br />Today Bouton lives in a forest in western Massachusetts.
If These Walls Could Talk: Boston Red Sox
by , Sean McDonough

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

July 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>The Boston Red Sox are one of the most iconic teams in Major League Baseball, with eight World Series championships and countless greats who have donned the Sox uniform. In <I>If These Walls Could Talk: Boston Red Sox</I>, former player and longtime broadcaster Jerry Remy provides insight into the team's inner sanctum as only he can. Readers will gain the perspective of players, coaches, and personnel in moments of greatness as well as defeat, making for a keepsake no fan will want to miss.</DIV>
The MVP Machine: How Baseball's New Nonconformists Are Using Data...
by , Travis Sawchik

Language

English

Pages

385

Publication Date

June 04, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><a name="_Hlk533065213"><b>Move over, <i>Moneyball </i>-- </b><b>a cutting-edge look at major league baseball's next revolution: the high-tech quest to build better players.</b></div> <div><br /></div> <div>As bestselling authors Ben Lindbergh and Travis Sawchik reveal in <i>The MVP Machine</i>, the Moneyball era is over. Fifteen years after Michael Lewis brought the Oakland Athletics' groundbreaking team-building strategies to light, every front office takes a data-driven approach to evaluating players, and the league's smarter teams no longer have a huge advantage in valuing past performance.<br /><br />Lindbergh and Sawchik's behind-the-scenes reporting reveals:<div><ul><li>How the 2017 Astros and 2018 Red Sox used cutting-edge technology to win the World Series</li><li>How undersized afterthoughts José Altuve and Mookie Betts became big sluggers and MVPs</li><li>How polarizing pitcher Trevor Bauer made himself a Cy Young contender</li><li>How new analytical tools have overturned traditional pitching and hitting techniques</li><li>How a wave of young talent is making MLB both better than ever and arguably worse to watch</li></ul>Instead of out-drafting, out-signing, and out-trading their rivals, baseball's best minds have turned to out-<i>developing</i> opponents, gaining greater edges than ever by perfecting prospects and eking extra runs out of older athletes who were once written off. Lindbergh and Sawchik take us inside the transformation of former fringe hitters into home-run kings, show how washed-up pitchers have emerged as aces, and document how coaching and scouting are being turned upside down. <i>The MVP Machine</i> charts the future of a sport and offers a lesson that goes beyond baseball: Success stems not from focusing on finished products, but from making the most of untapped potential.</div></div>
For the Good of the Game: The Inside Story of the Surprising and ...
by Bud Selig

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

July 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Foreword by Doris Kearns Goodwin<br />The longtime Commissioner of Major League Baseball provides an unprecedented look inside professional baseball today, focusing on how he helped bring the game into the modern age and revealing his interactions with players, managers, fellow owners, and fans nationwide.</strong> <br /><br />More than a century old, the game of baseball is resistant to change—owners, managers, players, and fans all hate it. Yet, now more than ever, baseball needs to evolve—to compete with other professional sports, stay relevant, and remain America’s Pastime it must adapt. Perhaps no one knows this better than Bud Selig who, as the head of MLB for more than twenty years, ushered in some of the most important, and controversial, changes in the game’s history—modernizing a sport that had remained unchanged since the 1960s. </p><p>In this enlightening and surprising book, Selig goes inside the most difficult decisions and moments of his career, looking at how he worked to balance baseball’s storied history with the pressures of the twenty-first century to ensure its future. Part baseball story, part business saga, and part memoir, <em>For the Good of the Game</em> chronicles Selig’s career, takes fans inside locker rooms and board rooms, and offers an intimate, fascinating account of the frequently messy process involved in transforming an American institution. Featuring an all-star lineup of the biggest names from the last forty years of baseball, Selig recalls the vital games, private moments, and tense conversations he’s shared with Hall of Fame players and managers and the contentious calls he’s made. He also speaks candidly about hot-button issues the steroid scandal that threatened to destroy the game, telling his side of the story in full and for the first time.</p><p>As he looks back and forward, Selig outlines the stakes for baseball’s continued transformation—and why the changes he helped usher in must only be the beginning. </p><p>Illustrated with sixteen pages of photographs.</p>
K: A History of Baseball in Ten Pitches
by Tyler Kepner

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

April 02, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>From the</b><b><i> New York Times</i></b><b> baseball columnist, an enchanting, enthralling history of the national pastime as told through the craft of pitching, based on years of archival research and interviews with more than three hundred people from Hall of Famers to the stars of today</b></b><br /><br />The baseball is an amazing plaything. We can grip it and hold it so many different ways, and even the slightest calibration can turn an ordinary pitch into a weapon to thwart the greatest hitters in the world. Each pitch has its own history, evolving through the decades as the masters pass it down to the next generation. From the earliest days of the game, when Candy Cummings dreamed up the curveball while flinging clamshells on a Brooklyn beach, pitchers have never stopped innovating.<br /><br />In <i>K: A History of Baseball in Ten Pitches</i>, Tyler Kepner traces the colorful stories and fascinating folklore behind the ten major pitches. Each chapter highlights a different pitch, from the blazing fastball to the fluttering knuckleball to the slippery spitball. Infusing every page with infectious passion for the game, Kepner brings readers inside the minds of combatants sixty feet, six inches apart.<br /><br />Filled with priceless insights from many of the best pitchers in baseball history including twenty-two Hall of Famers--from Bob Gibson, Steve Carlton, and Nolan Ryan to Greg Maddux, Mariano Rivera, and Clayton Kershaw<i>--K</i> will be the definitive book on pitching and join such works as <i>The Glory of Their Times </i>and <i>Moneyball </i>as a classic of the genre.
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game
by Michael Lewis

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

March 17, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"This delightfully written, lesson-laden book deserves a place of its own in the Baseball Hall of Fame." —<em>Forbes</em></strong></p><br /><em>Moneyball</em> is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis follows the low-budget Oakland A's, visionary general manager Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball theorists. They are all in search of new baseball knowledge—insights that will give the little guy who is willing to discard old wisdom the edge over big money.
Ballpark: Baseball in the American City
by Paul Goldberger

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

May 14, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An exhilarating, splendidly illustrated, entirely new look at the history of baseball: told through the stories of the vibrant and ever-changing ballparks where the game was and is staged, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning architectural critic.</b><br /><br />From the earliest corrals of the mid-1800s (Union Grounds in Brooklyn was a "saloon in the open air"), to the much mourned parks of the early 1900s (Detroit's Tiger Stadium, Cincinnati's Palace of the Fans), to the stadiums we fill today, Paul Goldberger makes clear the inextricable bond between the American city and America's favorite pastime. In the changing locations and architecture of our ballparks, Goldberger reveals the manifestations of a changing society: the earliest ballparks evoked the Victorian age in their accommodations--bleachers for the riffraff, grandstands for the middle-class; the "concrete donuts" of the 1950s and '60s made plain television's grip on the public's attention; and more recent ballparks, like Baltimore's Camden Yards, signal a new way forward for stadium design and for baseball's role in urban development. Throughout, Goldberger shows us the way in which baseball's history is concurrent with our cultural history: the rise of urban parks and public transportation; the development of new building materials and engineering and design skills. And how the site details and the requirements of the game--the diamond, the outfields, the walls, the grandstands--shaped our most beloved ballparks. <br /><br />A fascinating, exuberant ode to the Edens at the heart of our cities--where dreams are as limitless as the outfields.
The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect
by , Dana Mackenzie

Language

English

Pages

423

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>A Turing Award-winning computer scientist and statistician shows how understanding causality has revolutionized science and will revolutionize artificial intelligence</b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div>"Correlation is not causation." This mantra, chanted by scientists for more than a century, has led to a virtual prohibition on causal talk. Today, that taboo is dead. The causal revolution, instigated by Judea Pearl and his colleagues, has cut through a century of confusion and established causality--the study of cause and effect--on a firm scientific basis. His work explains how we can know easy things, like whether it was rain or a sprinkler that made a sidewalk wet; and how to answer hard questions, like whether a drug cured an illness. Pearl's work enables us to know not just whether one thing causes another: it lets us explore the world that is and the worlds that could have been. It shows us the essence of human thought and key to artificial intelligence. Anyone who wants to understand either needs <i>The Book of Why</i>.<br /><br /></div><div><br /></div>
Astroball: The New Way to Win It All
by Ben Reiter

Language

English

Pages

261

Publication Date

July 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</b><br /><br />When <i>Sports Illustrated</i> declared on the cover of a June 2014 issue that the Houston Astros would win the World Series in 2017, people thought Ben Reiter, the article’s author, was crazy. The Astros were the worst baseball team in half a century, but they were more than just bad. They were an embarrassment, a club that didn’t even appear to be trying to win. The cover story, combined with the specificity of Reiter’s claim, met instant and nearly universal derision. But three years later, the critics were proved improbably, astonishingly wrong. How had Reiter predicted it so accurately? And, more important, how had the Astros pulled off the impossible?<br /><br /><i>Astroball</i> is the inside story of how a gang of outsiders went beyond the stats to find a new way to win—and not just in baseball. When new Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow and his top analyst, the former rocket scientist Sig Mejdal, arrived in Houston in 2011, they had already spent more than half a decade trying to understand how human instinct and expertise could be blended with hard numbers such as on-base percentage and strikeout rate to guide their decision-making. In Houston, they had free rein to remake the club. No longer would scouts, with all their subjective, hard-to-quantify opinions, be forced into opposition with the stats guys. Instead, Luhnow and Sig wanted to correct for the biases inherent in human observation, and then roll their scouts’ critical thoughts into their process. The numbers had value—but so did the gut.<br /><br />The strategy paid off brilliantly, and surprisingly quickly. It pointed the Astros toward key draft picks like Carlos Correa and Alex Bregman; offered a path for developing George Springer, José Altuve, and Dallas Keuchel; and showed them how veterans like Carlos Beltrán and Justin Verlander represented the last piece in the puzzle of fielding a championship team.<br /><br />Sitting at the nexus of sports, business, and innovation—and written with years of access to the team’s stars and executives—<i>Astroball</i> is the story of the next wave of thinking in baseball and beyond, at once a remarkable underdog story and a fascinating look at the cutting edge of evaluating and optimizing human potential.
The Model Thinker: What You Need to Know to Make Data Work for Yo...
by Scott E. Page

Language

English

Pages

398

Publication Date

November 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>How anyone can become a data ninja</b><br /><br /> From the stock market to genomics laboratories, census figures to marketing email blasts, we are awash with data. But as anyone who has ever opened up a spreadsheet packed with seemingly infinite lines of data knows, numbers aren't enough: we need to know how to make those numbers talk. In <i>The Model Thinker</i>, social scientist Scott E. Page shows us the mathematical, statistical, and computational models--from linear regression to random walks and far beyond--that can turn anyone into a genius. At the core of the book is Page's "many-model paradigm," which shows the reader how to apply multiple models to organize the data, leading to wiser choices, more accurate predictions, and more robust designs. <i>The Model Thinker </i>provides a toolkit for business people, students, scientists, pollsters, and bloggers to make them better, clearer thinkers, able to leverage data and information to their advantage.<br /><br /></div>

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