Categories

 > Sports & Outdoors > Baseball

4,333 results were found

Sort by:

The Big Fella: Babe Ruth and the World He Created
by Jane Leavy

Language

English

Pages

656

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • </strong><strong>From Jane Leavy, the award-winning, <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author of <em>The Last Boy</em> and <em>Sandy Koufax</em>, comes the definitive biography of Babe Ruth—the man Roger Angell dubbed "the model for modern celebrity."</strong><strong></strong></p><p><strong>A </strong><em><strong>Publishers Weekly</strong></em><strong> Best Book of 2018</strong><strong></strong></p><p><strong>“Leavy’s newest masterpiece…. A major work of American history by an author with a flair for mesmerizing story-telling.” </strong><strong>—<em>Forbes</em></strong><em></em></p><p><p>He lived in the present tense—in the camera’s lens. There was no frame he couldn’t or wouldn’t fill. He swung the heaviest bat, earned the most money, and incurred the biggest fines. Like all the new-fangled gadgets then flooding the marketplace—radios, automatic clothes washers, Brownie cameras, microphones and loudspeakers—Babe Ruth "made impossible events happen." Aided by his crucial partnership with Christy Walsh—business manager, spin doctor, damage control wizard, and surrogate father, all stuffed into one tightly buttoned double-breasted suit—Ruth drafted the blueprint for modern athletic stardom.</p><p>His was a life of journeys and itineraries—from uncouth to couth, spartan to spendthrift, abandoned to abandon; from Baltimore to Boston to New York, and back to Boston at the end of his career for a finale with the only team that would have him. There were road trips and hunting trips; grand tours of foreign capitals and post-season promotional tours, not to mention those 714 trips around the bases.</p><p>After hitting his 60th home run in September 1927—a total that would not be exceeded until 1961, when Roger Maris did it with the aid of the extended modern season—he embarked on the mother of all barnstorming tours, a three-week victory lap across America, accompanied by Yankee teammate Lou Gehrig. Walsh called the tour a "Symphony of Swat." The <em>Omaha World Herald</em> called it "the biggest show since Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey, and seven other associated circuses offered their entire performance under one tent." In <em>The Big Fella</em>, acclaimed biographer Jane Leavy recreates that 21-day circus and in so doing captures the romp and the pathos that defined Ruth’s life and times. </p><p>Drawing from more than 250 interviews, a trove of previously untapped documents, and Ruth family records, Leavy breaks through the mythology that has obscured the legend and delivers the man.</p><p></p>
Baseball Cop
by Eddie Dominguez

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

August 28, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Exposing trafficking, theft, fraud, and gambling in the major leagues, a founding member of the MLB's Department of Investigations reveals a news-breaking true story of power and corruption.</b><br /><br /> In the wake of 2005's sometimes contentious, sometimes comical congressional hearings on performance-enhancing drugs in baseball and the subsequent Mitchell Report, Major League Baseball established the Department of Investigations (DOI). An internal and autonomous unit, it was created to not only eliminate the use of steroids, but also to rid baseball of any other illegal, unsavory, or unethical activities. The DOI would investigate the dark side of the national pastime--gambling, age and identity fraud, human trafficking, cover-ups, and more--with the singular purpose of cleaning up the game.<br /><br /> Eduardo Dominguez Jr. was a founding member of that first DOI team, leaving a stellar career with the Boston Police Department to join four other "supercops"--a group that included a 9/11 hero, a mob-buster, and narcotics experts--keeping watch over Major League Baseball.<br /><br />A decorated detective as well as a member of an FBI task force, Dominguez was initially reluctant to leave his law-enforcement career to work full-time in baseball. He had already seen the game's underbelly when he worked as a resident security agent (RSA) for the Boston Red Sox in 1999 and become wary of the game's commitment to any kind of reform. Only at the persuasion a widely respected NYPD detective tapped to lead the DOI did Dominguez agree to join the unit, which was the first--and last--of its kind in major American sports. "We could clean up this game," his new boss promised.<br /><br />In <i>Baseball Cop</i>, Dominguez shares the shocking revelations he confronted every day for six years with the DOI and nine as an RSA. He shines a light on the inner workings of the commissioner's office and the complicity of baseball's bosses in dealing with the misdeeds compromising the integrity of the game. Dominguez details the investigations and the obstacles--from the Biogenesis scandal to the perilous trafficking of Cuban players now populating the game to the theft of prospects' signing bonuses by <i>buscones</i>, street agents, and even clubs' employees. He further reveals how the mandates of former senator George Mitchell's report were modified or ignored altogether.<br /><br /> Bracing and eye-opening, <i>Baseball Cop </i>is a wake-up call for anyone concerned about America's national pastime.
The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect
by , Dana Mackenzie

Language

English

Pages

423

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>A Turing Award-winning computer scientist and statistician shows how understanding causality has revolutionized science and will revolutionize artificial intelligence</b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div>"Correlation is not causation." This mantra, chanted by scientists for more than a century, has led to a virtual prohibition on causal talk. Today, that taboo is dead. The causal revolution, instigated by Judea Pearl and his colleagues, has cut through a century of confusion and established causality--the study of cause and effect--on a firm scientific basis. His work explains how we can know easy things, like whether it was rain or a sprinkler that made a sidewalk wet; and how to answer hard questions, like whether a drug cured an illness. Pearl's work enables us to know not just whether one thing causes another: it lets us explore the world that is and the worlds that could have been. It shows us the essence of human thought and key to artificial intelligence. Anyone who wants to understand either needs <i>The Book of Why</i>.<br /><br /></div><div><br /></div>
Power Ball: Anatomy of a Modern Baseball Game
by Rob Neyer

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

October 09, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The former ESPN columnist and analytics pioneer dramatically recreates an action-packed 2017 game between the Oakland A’s and eventual World Series Champion Houston Astros to reveal the myriad ways in which Major League Baseball has changed over the last few decades.</p><p>On September 8, 2017, the Oakland A’s faced off against the Houston Astros in a game that would signal the passing of the <em>Moneyball</em> mantle. Though this was only one regular season game, the match-up of these two teams demonstrated how Major League Baseball has changed since the early days of Athletics general manager Billy Beane and the publication of Michael Lewis’ classic book.</p><p>Over the past twenty years, power and analytics have taken over the game, driving carefully calibrated teams like the Astros to victory. Seemingly every pitcher now throws mid-90s heat and studiously compares their mechanics against the ideal. Every batter in the lineup can crack homers and knows their launch angles. Teams are relying on unorthodox strategies, including using power-losing—purposely tanking a few seasons to get the best players in the draft.</p><p>As he chronicles each inning and the unfolding drama as these two teams continually trade the lead—culminating in a 9-8 Oakland victory in the bottom of the ninth—Neyer considers the players and managers, the front office machinations, the role of sabermetrics, and the current thinking about what it takes to build a great team, to answer the most pressing questions fans have about the sport today.</p>
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game
by Michael Lewis

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

March 17, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"This delightfully written, lesson-laden book deserves a place of its own in the Baseball Hall of Fame." —<em>Forbes</em></strong></p><br /><em>Moneyball</em> is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis follows the low-budget Oakland A's, visionary general manager Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball theorists. They are all in search of new baseball knowledge—insights that will give the little guy who is willing to discard old wisdom the edge over big money.
Astroball: The New Way to Win It All
by Ben Reiter

Language

English

Pages

261

Publication Date

July 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</b><br /><br />When <i>Sports Illustrated</i> declared on the cover of a June 2014 issue that the Houston Astros would win the World Series in 2017, people thought Ben Reiter, the article’s author, was crazy. The Astros were the worst baseball team in half a century, but they were more than just bad. They were an embarrassment, a club that didn’t even appear to be trying to win. The cover story, combined with the specificity of Reiter’s claim, met instant and nearly universal derision. But three years later, the critics were proved improbably, astonishingly wrong. How had Reiter predicted it so accurately? And, more important, how had the Astros pulled off the impossible?<br /><br /><i>Astroball</i> is the inside story of how a gang of outsiders went beyond the stats to find a new way to win—and not just in baseball. When new Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow and his top analyst, the former rocket scientist Sig Mejdal, arrived in Houston in 2011, they had already spent more than half a decade trying to understand how human instinct and expertise could be blended with hard numbers such as on-base percentage and strikeout rate to guide their decision-making. In Houston, they had free rein to remake the club. No longer would scouts, with all their subjective, hard-to-quantify opinions, be forced into opposition with the stats guys. Instead, Luhnow and Sig wanted to correct for the biases inherent in human observation, and then roll their scouts’ critical thoughts into their process. The numbers had value—but so did the gut.<br /><br />The strategy paid off brilliantly, and surprisingly quickly. It pointed the Astros toward key draft picks like Carlos Correa and Alex Bregman; offered a path for developing George Springer, José Altuve, and Dallas Keuchel; and showed them how veterans like Carlos Beltrán and Justin Verlander represented the last piece in the puzzle of fielding a championship team.<br /><br />Sitting at the nexus of sports, business, and innovation—and written with years of access to the team’s stars and executives—<i>Astroball</i> is the story of the next wave of thinking in baseball and beyond, at once a remarkable underdog story and a fascinating look at the cutting edge of evaluating and optimizing human potential.
October 1964
by David Halberstam

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

December 18, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The “compelling” <I>New York Times </I>bestseller by the Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, capturing the 1964 World Series between the Yankees and Cardinals (<I>Newsweek</I>).</B><BR />  </DIV><DIV>David Halberstam, an avid sports writer with an investigative reporter’s tenacity, superbly details the end of the fifteen-year reign of the New York Yankees in <I>October 1964</I>. That October found the Yankees going head-to-head with the St. Louis Cardinals for the World Series pennant. Expertly weaving the narrative threads of both teams’ seasons, Halberstam brings the major personalities on the field—from switch-hitter Mickey Mantle to pitcher Bob Gibson—to life. Using the teams’ subcultures, Halberstam also analyzes the cultural shifts of the sixties. The result is a unique blend of sports writing and cultural history as engrossing as it is insightful.</DIV><DIV> </DIV><DIV><I>This ebook features an extended biography of David Halberstam.</I></DIV>
Color Blind: The Forgotten Team That Broke Baseball's Color Line
by Tom Dunkel

Language

English

Pages

386

Publication Date

April 02, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>“One of the great untold stories about baseball history, one that almost sounds too good to be true” (<I>Chicago Tribune</I>).</B><BR />  <BR /> A 2013 CASEY Award Finalist for Best Baseball Book of the Year<BR />  <BR /> When baseball swept America in the years after the Civil War, independent, semipro, and municipal leagues sprouted up everywhere. With civic pride on the line, rivalries were fierce and teams often signed ringers to play alongside the town dentist, insurance salesman, and teen prodigy. In drought-stricken Bismarck, North Dakota during the Great Depression, one of the most improbable teams in the history of baseball was assembled by one of the sport’s most unlikely champions. A decade before Jackie Robinson broke into the Major Leagues, car dealer Neil Churchill signed the best players he could find, regardless of race, and fielded an integrated squad that took on all comers in spectacular fashion.<BR />  <BR /><I>Color Blind</I> immerses the reader in the wild and wonderful world of early independent baseball, with its tough competition and its novelty. Dunkel traces the rise of the Bismarck squad, focusing on the 1935 season and the first National Semipro Tournament. This is an entertaining, must-read for anyone interested in the history of baseball.<BR />  <BR /> “A tale as fantastic as it is true.” —<I>The Boston Globe</I><BR />  <BR /> “It is funny, it is sad, it is spellbinding, required reading for anyone who loves baseball, who loves a vivid story well-told.” —<I>Philadelphia Daily News</I><BR />  </DIV>
The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams
by Ben Bradlee Jr.

Language

English

Pages

807

Publication Date

December 03, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From acclaimed journalist Ben Bradlee Jr., comes the epic biography of Boston Red Sox legend Ted Williams that baseball fans have been waiting for. </b><br /><br />Williams was the best hitter in baseball history. His batting average of .406 in 1941 has not been topped since, and no player who has hit more than 500 home runs has a higher career batting average. Those totals would have been even higher if Williams had not left baseball for nearly five years in the prime of his career to serve as a Marine pilot in WWII and Korea. He hit home runs farther than any player before him--and traveled a long way himself, as Ben Bradlee, Jr.'s grand biography reveals. Born in 1918 in San Diego, Ted would spend most of his life disguising his Mexican heritage. During his 22 years with the Boston Red Sox, Williams electrified crowds across America--and shocked them, too: His notorious clashes with the press and fans threatened his reputation. Yet while he was a God in the batter's box, he was profoundly human once he stepped away from the plate. His ferocity came to define his troubled domestic life. While baseball might have been straightforward for Ted Williams, life was not.<br /><br />THE KID is biography of the highest literary order, a thrilling and honest account of a legend in all his glory and human complexity. In his final at-bat, Williams hit a home run. Bradlee's marvelous book clears the fences, too.
Find Your Yellow Tux: How to Be Successful by Standing Out
by Jesse Cole

Language

English

Pages

308

Publication Date

December 20, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Stop standing still. Start standing out.<br /><br />Whether in school, factories, or corporate offices, people are in a mad rush to the middle, going about their business and fitting in. The problem is, while you may feel as if you’re doing your own thing, you’re not—you’re doing what’s expected of you. To stand out, take whatever you think is normal, and do the exact opposite.<br /><br />In Find Your Yellow Tux, Jesse Cole, in-demand speaker and baseball ringleader, shares how you can achieve amazing things by doing the unexpected. Using examples from his life and the lives of his heroes—P. T. Barnum, Walt Disney, and MLB owner Bill Veeck—Cole shows how to reinvigorate your goals, reignite your passions, and excel in business and beyond.<br /><br />The time to break the mold is now—with Find Your Yellow Tux, you'll discover how to find joy and success in everything you do.

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldnt have due to the Kindle eliminating sp...

David Foster Wallace Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. Ive found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found adve...

Ernest Hemingway The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen Kings On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But Kings prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of Kings greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. Kings On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft that resu...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

$25 Amazon.com Gift Card giveaway

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com