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Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms,a...
by Simon Winchester

Language

English

Pages

495

Publication Date

November 02, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>"Variably genial, cautionary, lyrical, admonitory, terrifying, horrifying and inspiring…A lifetime of thought, travel, reading, imagination and memory inform this affecting account." —<em>Kirkus Reviews</em> (starred review)</p><p>Blending history and anecdote, geography and reminiscence, science and exposition, <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author Simon Winchester tells the breathtaking saga of the Atlantic Ocean. A gifted storyteller and consummate historian, Winchester sets the great blue sea's epic narrative against the backdrop of mankind's intellectual evolution, telling not only the story of an ocean, but the story of civilization. Fans of Winchester's <em>Krakatoa, The Man Who Loved China</em>, and <em>The Professor and the Madman</em> will love this masterful, penetrating, and resonant tale of humanity finding its way across the ocean of history.</p>
Beneath the Surface: Killer Whales, SeaWorld, and the Truth Beyon...
by , Howard Chua-Eoan

Language

English

Pages

282

Publication Date

March 24, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>*Now a <i>New York Times</i> Best Seller*</b></p><p>Over the course of two decades, John Hargrove worked with 20 different whales on two continents and at two of SeaWorld's U.S. facilities. For Hargrove, becoming an orca trainer fulfilled a childhood dream. However, as his experience with the whales deepened, Hargrove came to doubt that their needs could ever be met in captivity. When two fellow trainers were killed by orcas in marine parks, Hargrove decided that SeaWorld's wildly popular programs were both detrimental to the whales and ultimately unsafe for trainers.</p><p>After leaving SeaWorld, Hargrove became one of the stars of the controversial documentary Blackfish. The outcry over the treatment of SeaWorld's orca has now expanded beyond the outlines sketched by the award-winning documentary, with Hargrove contributing his expertise to an advocacy movement that is convincing both federal and state governments to act.</p><p>In Beneath the Surface, Hargrove paints a compelling portrait of these highly intelligent and social creatures, including his favorite whales Takara and her mother Kasatka, two of the most dominant orcas in SeaWorld. And he includes vibrant descriptions of the lives of orcas in the wild, contrasting their freedom in the ocean with their lives in SeaWorld.</p><p>Hargrove's journey is one that humanity has just begun to take-toward the realization that the relationship between the human and animal worlds must be radically rethought.</p>
The Eye of the Elephant: An Epic Adventure in the African Wildern...
by , Mark Owens

Language

English

Pages

324

Publication Date

October 29, 1993

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The authors of <I>Secrets of the Sahara</I> battle the elephant poachers of Zambia in this “exciting . . . part adventure story, part wildlife tale” (<I>The Boston Globe</I>).</B><BR /><BR /> Intelligent, majestic, and loyal, with lifespans matching our own, elephants are among the greatest of the wonders gracing the African wilds. Yet, in the 1970s and 1980s, about a thousand of these captivating creatures were slaughtered in Zambia each year, killed for their valuable ivory tusks. When biologists Mark and Delia Owens, residing in Africa to study lions, found themselves in the middle of a poaching fray, they took the only side they morally could: that of the elephants.<BR />  <BR /><I>The Eye of the Elephant</I> recounts the Owens’ struggle to save these innocent animals from decimation, a journey not only to supply the natives with ways of supporting their villages, but also to cultivate support around the globe for the protection of elephants. Filled with daring exploits among disgruntled hunters, arduous labor on the African plains, and vivid depictions of various wildlife, this remarkable tale is at once an adventure story, a travelogue, a preservationist call to action, and a fascinating examination of both human and animal nature.</DIV>
The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California
by Mark Arax

Language

English

Pages

577

Publication Date

May 21, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>"[An] exhaustive, deeply reported account... Few other journalists could have written a book as personal and authoritative... As Arax makes plain in this important book, it's been the same story in California for almost two centuries now: When it comes to water, 'the resource is finite. The greed isn't.'"--Gary Krist, </b><b><i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b><b></b><br /><br />A vivid, searching journey into California's capture of water and soil--the epic story of a people's defiance of nature and the wonders, and ruin, it has wrought</b><br /><br />Mark Arax is from a family of Central Valley farmers, a writer with deep ties to the land who has watched the battles over water intensify even as California lurches from drought to flood and back again. In <i>The Dreamt Land, </i>he travels the state to explore the one-of-a-kind distribution system, built in the 1940s, '50s and '60s, that is straining to keep up with California's relentless growth.<br /><br />This is a heartfelt, beautifully written book about the land and the people who have worked it--from gold miners to wheat ranchers to small fruit farmers and today's Big Ag. Since the beginning, Californians have redirected rivers, drilled ever-deeper wells and built higher dams, pushing the water supply past its limit.<br /><br /><i>The Dreamt Land </i>weaves reportage, history and memoir to confront the "Golden State" myth in riveting fashion. No other chronicler of the West has so deeply delved into the empires of agriculture that drink so much of the water. The nation's biggest farmers--the nut king, grape king and citrus queen--tell their story here for the first time.<br />This is a tale of politics and hubris in the arid West, of imported workers left behind in the sun and the fatigued earth that is made to give more even while it keeps sinking. But when drought turns to flood once again, all is forgotten as the farmers plant more nuts and the developers build more houses.<br /><br />Arax, the native son, is persistent and tough as he treks from desert to delta, mountain to valley. What he finds is hard earned, awe-inspiring, tragic and revelatory. In the end, his compassion for the land becomes an elegy to the dream that created California and now threatens to undo it.
Cry of the Kalahari
by , Delia Owens

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

April 22, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><P><B>“A remarkable story beautifully told…Among such classics as Goodall’s <I>In the Shadow of Man </I>and Fossey’s <I>Gorillas in the Mist</I>.”—<I>Chicago Tribune</I></B><BR /><BR /> Carrying little more than a change of clothes and a pair of binoculars, two young Americans, Mark and Delia Owens, caught a plane to Africa, bought a thirdhand Land Rover, and drove deep into the Kalahari Desert. There they lived for seven years, in an unexplored area with no roads, no people, and no source of water for thousands of square miles. In this vast wilderness the Owenses began their zoology research, working along animals that had never before been exposed to humans.<BR /><BR /> An international bestseller, Cry of the Kalahari is the story of the Owenses’s life with lions, brown hyenas, jackals, giraffes, and the many other creatures they came to know. It is also a gripping account of how they survived the dangers of living in one of the last and largest pristine areas on Earth.</P></DIV>
Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consci...
by Peter Godfrey-Smith

Language

English

Pages

271

Publication Date

December 06, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Although mammals and birds are widely regarded as the smartest creatures on earth, it has lately become clear that a very distant branch of the tree of life has also sprouted higher intelligence: the cephalopods, consisting of the squid, the cuttlefish, and above all the octopus. In captivity, octopuses have been known to identify individual human keepers, raid neighboring tanks for food, turn off lightbulbs by spouting jets of water, plug drains, and make daring escapes. How is it that a creature with such gifts evolved through an evolutionary lineage so radically distant from our own? What does it mean that evolution built minds not once but at least twice? The octopus is the closest we will come to meeting an intelligent alien. What can we learn from the encounter? </p><p>In <i>Other Minds</i>, Peter Godfrey-Smith, a distinguished philosopher of science and a skilled scuba diver, tells a bold new story of how subjective experience crept into being—how nature became aware of itself. As Godfrey-Smith stresses, it is a story that largely occurs in the ocean, where animals first appeared. Tracking the mind’s fitful development, Godfrey-Smith shows how unruly clumps of seaborne cells began living together and became capable of sensing, acting, and signaling. As these primitive organisms became more entangled with others, they grew more complicated. The first nervous systems evolved, probably in ancient relatives of jellyfish; later on, the cephalopods, which began as inconspicuous mollusks, abandoned their shells and rose above the ocean floor, searching for prey and acquiring the greater intelligence needed to do so. Taking an independent route, mammals and birds later began their own evolutionary journeys. </p><p>But what kind of intelligence do cephalopods possess? Drawing on the latest scientific research and his own scuba-diving adventures, Godfrey-Smith probes the many mysteries that surround the lineage. How did the octopus, a solitary creature with little social life, become so smart? What is it like to have eight tentacles that are so packed with neurons that they virtually “think for themselves”? What happens when some octopuses abandon their hermit-like ways and congregate, as they do in a unique location off the coast of Australia?</p><p>By tracing the question of inner life back to its roots and comparing human beings with our most remarkable animal relatives, Godfrey-Smith casts crucial new light on the octopus mind—and on our own.</p>
Crazy-White-Man (Sha-ga-na-she Wa-du-kee)
by Richard Morenus

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

January 28, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2><b>“a book that is a little classic of the rugged life.” <em>Chicago Tribune</em></h2><br /><br />Have you thought of escaping from life in the “Big City”?<br /><br />Have you dreamed of stepping off the treadmill of work and leaving behind the tedious office job?</b><br /><br />Unhappy with his life in New York, Richard Morenus did just that.<br /><br />Taking along his dog and some equipment he left the humdrum life in the city for the wilderness.<br /><br />When he first arrived in the beautiful backwoods of Canada some Native Americans saw how unprepared he was for his new life and gave him the name Sha-ga-na-she Wa-du-kee, which translates to Crazy-White-Man.<br /><br />The first few months of his life in the bitter cold of a Canadian winter were a fight for survival for Morenus, but as the years went by he became more competent and began to thrive in the beautiful landscape.<br /><br /><em>Crazy-White-Man</em> is a brilliant account of Richard Morenus’ search for a new life in the Canadian wilderness. It is told in a down-to-earth style that is sure to appeal to any reader who dreams of an adventure.<br /><br />“As a story of the indomitable spirit of men and women pitted against the overwhelming forces of nature, ‘Crazy-White-Man’ is an inspiring one; as a tale of pure adventure, it will be hard to put down.” <em>Chicago Tribune</em><br /><br />“Respect for Mr. Morenus’ courage and hardihood grows with every page we read . . . it emerges as a valuable addition to the small number of books about the Canadian bush.” <em>The New York Times</em><br /><br />“Anyone from young to old who has wanted to toss the soft life of today into the discard and live as our ancestors did will enjoy this book. To those who have lived under frontier conditions it will be equally refreshing—and that cannot be said for many of this type.” <em>Colorado Spring Free Press</em><br /><br />“one of the best tales of escape from city pressures ... It is a vivid close-up of the Ontario bush—written down with the vividness and gaiety of a man who knew he was free.” <em>Christian Science Monitor</em><br /><br />Richard Morenus was a New York writer for radio and magazines when he left his old life for a new one in the wilderness of Ontario. He spent the next six years of his life there. His book <em>Crazy-White-Man</em> was first published in 1956 and he passed away in 1968.<br />
Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier...
by Earl Swift

Language

English

Pages

446

Publication Date

August 07, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A brilliant, soulful, and timely portrait of a two-hundred-year-old crabbing community in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay as it faces extinction. </strong></p><p><strong>A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: </strong><strong><em>Washington Post,</em></strong> <strong>NPR, <em>Outside,</em> </strong><em><strong>Smithsonian,</strong></em> <strong><em>Popular Science,</em> <em>Bloomberg,</em> <em>Christian Science Monitor, Chicago Review of Books,</em> <em>Science Friday,</em> and <em>Kirkus</em> </strong></p><p>"BEAUTIFUL, HAUNTING AND TRUE." — Hampton Sides •  “GORGEOUS. A TRULY REMARKABLE BOOK.” — Beth Macy • "GRIPPING. FANTASTIC." — <em>Outside</em> • "CAPTIVATING." — <em>Washington Post</em> • "POWERFUL." — Bill McKibben • "VIVID. HARROWING AND MOVING." —<em> Science </em>• "A MASTERFUL NARRATIVE." — <em>Christian Science Monitor </em>•<em> </em>"THE BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR."  —<em> </em>Stephen L. Carter/<em>Bloomberg</em></p><p><strong>A <em>Washington Post</em> bestseller • </strong><strong>An Indie Next List selection</strong><strong> • An NPR <em>All Things Considered</em> and Axios "Book Club" pick </strong></p><p>Tangier Island, Virginia, is a community unique on the American landscape. Mapped by John Smith in 1608, settled during the American Revolution, the tiny sliver of mud is home to 470 hardy people who live an isolated and challenging existence, with one foot in the 21<sup>st</sup> century and another in times long passed. They are separated from their countrymen by the nation’s largest estuary, and a twelve-mile boat trip across often tempestuous water—the same water that for generations has made Tangier’s fleet of small fishing boats a chief source for the rightly prized Chesapeake Bay blue crab, and has lent the island its claim to fame as the softshell crab capital of the world.</p><p>Yet for all of its long history, and despite its tenacity, Tangier is disappearing. The very water that has long sustained it is erasing the island day by day, wave by wave. It has lost two-thirds of its land since 1850, and still its shoreline retreats by fifteen feet a year—meaning this storied place will likely succumb first among U.S. towns to the effects of climate change. Experts reckon that, barring heroic intervention by the federal government, islanders could be forced to abandon their home within twenty-five years. Meanwhile, the graves of their forebears are being sprung open by encroaching tides, and the conservative and deeply religious Tangiermen ponder the end times.    </p><p><em>Chesapeake Requiem</em> is an intimate look at the island’s past, present and tenuous future, by an acclaimed journalist who spent much of the past two years living among Tangier’s people, crabbing and oystering with its watermen, and observing its long traditions and odd ways. What emerges is the poignant tale of a world that has, quite nearly, gone by—and a leading-edge report on the coming fate of countless coastal communities.</p>
Master Recipes from the Herbal Apothecary: 375 Tinctures, Salves,...
by JJ Pursell

Language

English

Pages

293

Publication Date

March 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>“This incredible, in-depth, and easy-to-access resource is a must for all of us who wish to learn more about healing ourselves through the plant world.” </B>—Shiva Rose, actress, activist, and founder of The Local Rose<BR /><BR /> JJ Pursell, the bestselling author of <I>The Herbal Apothecary</I>, is back with a complete, one-stop resource for herbal remedies that heal and nurture the whole family. <I>Master Recipes from the Herbal Apothecary </I>offers safe, trusted natural remedies written by a board-certified naturopathic physician. It starts with master recipes for tinctures, salves, teas, capsules, oils, washes, and more. Once you understand how to make these basic formulations, you can access the more than 375 specific recipes that address a range of health concerns from the common cold and headaches to insomnia and digestive issues. Comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and beautifully packaged, <I>Master Recipes from the Herbal Apothecary</I> will become your go-to guide for sustained health and wellness.<BR />  </DIV>
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p>

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