Categories

 > Science & Math > Nature & Ecology

21,862 results were found

Sort by:

The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder ...
by Sy Montgomery

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

May 12, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Finalist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction * <i>New York Times </i>Bestseller * Starred <i>Booklist</i> and <i>Library Journal </i>Editors’ Spring Pick * A <i>Huffington Post</i> Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year * One of the Best Books of the Month on <i>Goodreads * Library Journal </i>Best Sci-Tech Book of the Year * An American Library Association Notable Book of the Year</b><br /> <br /> <b>“Sy Montgomery’s <i>The Soul of an Octopus</i> does for the creature what Helen Macdonald’s <i>H Is for Hawk</i> did for raptors.” —<i>New Statesman</i>, UK</b><br /> <br /> <b>“One of the best science books of the year.” —<i>Science Friday</i>, NPR</b><br /> <br /> Another <i>New York Times</i> bestseller from the author of <i>The Good Good Pig</i>, this “fascinating…touching…informative…entertaining” (<i>Daily Beast</i>) book explores the emotional and physical world of the octopus—a surprisingly complex, intelligent, and spirited creature—and the remarkable connections it makes with humans.<br /><br />In pursuit of the wild, solitary, predatory octopus, popular naturalist Sy Montgomery has practiced true immersion journalism. From New England aquarium tanks to the reefs of French Polynesia and the Gulf of Mexico, she has befriended octopuses with strikingly different personalities—gentle Athena, assertive Octavia, curious Kali, and joyful Karma. Each creature shows her cleverness in myriad ways: escaping enclosures like an orangutan; jetting water to bounce balls; and endlessly tricking companions with multiple “sleights of hand” to get food.<br /> <br />Scientists have only recently accepted the intelligence of dogs, birds, and chimpanzees but now are watching octopuses solve problems and are trying to decipher the meaning of the animal’s color-changing techniques. With her “joyful passion for these intelligent and fascinating creatures” (<i>Library Journal</i> Editors’ Spring Pick), Montgomery chronicles the growing appreciation of this mollusk as she tells a unique love story. By turns funny, entertaining, touching, and profound, <i>The Soul of an Octopus </i>reveals what octopuses can teach us about the meeting of two very different minds.
The Source: How Rivers Made America and America Remade Its Rivers
by Martin Doyle

Language

English

Pages

335

Publication Date

February 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>“An original and thought-provoking exploration of the sinuous course that water has carved through our economic and political landscape.” —Gerard Helferich, <em>Wall Street Journal</em></strong></p><br /><p>In a powerful work of environmental history, Martin Doyle tells the epic story of America and its rivers, from the U.S. Constitution’s roots in interstate river navigation, to the failure of the levees in Hurricane Katrina and the water wars in the west. Through his own travels and his encounters with experts all over the country—a Mississippi River tugboat captain, an Erie Canal lock operator, a project manager buying water rights for farms along the Colorado River—Doyle reveals the central role rivers have played in American history and how vital they are to its future.</p>
The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier
by Ian Urbina

Language

English

Pages

513

Publication Date

August 20, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"<b>A riveting, terrifying, thrilling story of a netherworld that few people know about, and fewer will ever see . . . The soul of this book is as wild as the ocean itself." --Susan Casey, best-selling author of </b><b><i>The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean</i></b><br /><br /><br /><b>A riveting, adrenaline-fueled tour of a vast, lawless and rampantly criminal world that few have ever seen: the high seas.</b></b><br /><br />There are few remaining frontiers on our planet. But perhaps the wildest, and least understood, are the world's oceans: too big to police, and under no clear international authority, these immense regions of treacherous water play host to rampant criminality and exploitation.<br /><br />Traffickers and smugglers, pirates and mercenaries, wreck thieves and repo men, vigilante conservationists and elusive poachers, seabound abortion providers, clandestine oil-dumpers, shackled slaves and cast-adrift stowaways -- drawing on five years of perilous and intrepid reporting, often hundreds of miles from shore, Ian Urbina introduces us to the inhabitants of this hidden world. Through their stories of astonishing courage and brutality, survival and tragedy, he uncovers a globe-spanning network of crime and exploitation that emanates from the fishing, oil and shipping industries, and on which the world's economies rely. <br /><br />Both a gripping adventure story and a stunning exposé, this unique work of reportage brings fully into view for the first time the disturbing reality of a floating world that connects us all, a place where anyone can do anything because no one is watching.
The Death and Life of the Great Lakes
by Dan Egan

Language

English

Pages

381

Publication Date

March 07, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller<br /><br />Winner of the <em>Los Angeles Times</em> Book Prize<br /><br />Winner of the J. Anthony Lukas Award<br /><br /><br /><br />"Nimbly splices together history, science, reporting and personal experiences into a taut and cautiously hopeful narrative.… Egan’s book is bursting with life (and yes, death)." —Robert Moor, <em>New York Times Book Review</em></strong></p><br /><p>The Great Lakes—Erie, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Superior—hold 20 percent of the world’s supply of surface fresh water and provide sustenance, work, and recreation for tens of millions of Americans. But they are under threat as never before, and their problems are spreading across the continent. <em>The Death and Life of the Great Lakes</em> is prize-winning reporter Dan Egan’s compulsively readable portrait of an ecological catastrophe happening right before our eyes, blending the epic story of the lakes with an examination of the perils they face and the ways we can restore and preserve them for generations to come.</p>
American Buffalo: In Search of a Lost Icon
by Steven Rinella

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

December 02, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the host of the Travel Channel’s “The Wild Within.”</b><br /><br />A hunt for the American buffalo—an adventurous, fascinating examination of an animal that has haunted the American imagination.<br /> <br />In 2005, Steven Rinella won a lottery permit to hunt for a wild buffalo, or American bison, in the Alaskan wilderness. Despite the odds—there’s only a 2 percent chance of drawing the permit, and fewer than 20 percent of those hunters are successful—Rinella managed to kill a buffalo on a snow-covered mountainside and then raft the meat back to civilization while being trailed by grizzly bears and suffering from hypothermia. Throughout these adventures, Rinella found himself contemplating his own place among the 14,000 years’ worth of buffalo hunters in North America, as well as the buffalo’s place in the American experience. At the time of the Revolutionary War, North America was home to approximately 40 million buffalo, the largest herd of big mammals on the planet, but by the mid-1890s only a few hundred remained. Now that the buffalo is on the verge of a dramatic ecological recovery across the West, Americans are faced with the challenge of how, and if, we can dare to share our land with a beast that is the embodiment of the American wilderness. <br /><br /> <i>American Buffalo</i> is a narrative tale of Rinella’s hunt. But beyond that, it is the story of the many ways in which the buffalo has shaped our national identity. Rinella takes us across the continent in search of the buffalo’s past, present, and future: to the Bering Land Bridge, where scientists search for buffalo bones amid artifacts of the New World’s earliest human inhabitants; to buffalo jumps where Native Americans once ran buffalo over cliffs by the thousands; to the Detroit Carbon works, a “bone charcoal” plant that made fortunes in the late 1800s by turning millions of tons of buffalo bones into bone meal, black dye, and fine china; and even to an abattoir turned fashion mecca in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, where a depressed buffalo named Black Diamond met his fate after serving as the model for the American nickel.<br /><br /> Rinella’s erudition and exuberance, combined with his gift for storytelling, make him the perfect guide for a book that combines outdoor adventure with a quirky blend of facts and observations about history, biology, and the natural world. Both a captivating narrative and a book of environmental and historical significance, <i>American Buffalo</i> tells us as much about ourselves as Americans as it does about the creature who perhaps best of all embodies the American ethos.
The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last Tr...
by Michael Finkel

Language

English

Pages

226

Publication Date

March 07, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Many people dream of escaping modern life, but most will never act on it. This is the remarkable true story of a man who lived alone in the woods of Maine for 27 years, making this dream a reality—not out of anger at the world, but simply because he preferred to live on his own.</b> <br /><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i> bestseller</b><br /><br />In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death. He broke into nearby cottages for food, clothing, reading material, and other provisions, taking only what he needed but terrifying a community never able to solve the mysterious burglaries. Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life—why did he leave? what did he learn?—as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p>
Cry of the Kalahari
by , Delia Owens

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

April 22, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>“A remarkable story beautifully told…Among such classics as Goodall’s <i>In the Shadow of Man </i>and Fossey’s <i>Gorillas in the Mist</i>.”—<i>Chicago Tribune</i></b><br /><br /> Carrying little more than a change of clothes and a pair of binoculars, two young Americans, Mark and Delia Owens, caught a plane to Africa, bought a thirdhand Land Rover, and drove deep into the Kalahari Desert. There they lived for seven years, in an unexplored area with no roads, no people, and no source of water for thousands of square miles. In this vast wilderness the Owenses began their zoology research, working along animals that had never before been exposed to humans.<br /><br /> An international bestseller, Cry of the Kalahari is the story of the Owenses’s life with lions, brown hyenas, jackals, giraffes, and the many other creatures they came to know. It is also a gripping account of how they survived the dangers of living in one of the last and largest pristine areas on Earth.</p>
Tree Wisdom: A Year of Healing Among the Trees
by Vincent Karche

Language

English

Pages

209

Publication Date

December 17, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Twelve lessons that trees can teach us to achieve inner calm, with mindfulness and journaling exercises.</b><br /><br /><b>Forest bathing, tree hugging, 'earthing' and nature retreats--more and more, we are craving a return to nature, to peace, and simplicity. This book shows the way.</b><br /><br />When international opera tenor and forester Vincent Karche lost his voice, he was instructed by a shamanic healer that, to regain it, he would have to find himself again first. Thus began a journey into the heart of the forest.<br /><br />In this book, Vincent mirrors the cyclical nature of the seasons to help us reconnect to our natural rhythm, find inner peace, and activate physical and emotional healing. Just as a tree anchors its roots into the earth to weather storms, so too can we learn to cultivate resilience; to find instant relief from stress, we need only breathe slowly in and out as a tree would; and we can forge stronger relationships by encouraging symbiotic links with all beings, giving and taking only what we need as trees and plants do.<br /><br />In this poetic exploration of the unbreakable bond between nature and human, Vincent reminds us that we are both the forest and the tree: each unique in our being and yet part of a Divine natural creation.
Civilized to Death: The Price of Progress
by Christopher Ryan

Language

English

Pages

298

Publication Date

October 01, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The <i>New York Times</i> bestselling coauthor of <i>Sex at Dawn</i> explores the ways in which “progress” has perverted the way we live: how we eat, learn, feel, mate, parent, communicate, work, and die.</b><br /><br />Most of us have instinctive evidence the world is ending—balmy December days, face-to-face conversation replaced with heads-to-screens zomboidism, a world at constant war, a political system in disarray. We hear some myths and lies so frequently that they feel like truths: <i>Civilization is humankind’s greatest accomplishment. Progress is undeniable. Count your blessings. You’re lucky to be alive here and now. </i>Well, maybe we are and maybe we aren’t. <i>Civilized to Death</i> counters the idea that progress is inherently good, arguing that the “progress” defining our age is analogous to an advancing disease.<br /> <br />Prehistoric life, of course, was not without serious dangers and disadvantages. Many babies died in infancy. A broken bone, infected wound, snakebite, or difficult pregnancy could be life-threatening. But ultimately, Ryan argues, were these pre-civilized dangers more murderous than modern scourges, such as car accidents, cancers, cardiovascular disease, and a technologically prolonged dying process? At a time when our ecology, our society, and our own sense of selves feels increasingly imperiled, an accurate understanding of our species’ long prelude to civilization is vital to a clear sense of the ultimate value of civilization—and its costs. In <i>Civilized to Death</i>, Ryan makes the claim that we should start looking backwards to find our way into a better future.

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay – Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldn’t have due to the Kindle eliminating ...

David Foster Wallace – Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz – The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. I’ve found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found ad...

Ernest Hemingway – The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen King’s On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But King’s prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of King’s greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. King’s On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft tha...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

$25 Amazon.com Gift Card giveaway

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com