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The Trees in My Forest
by Bernd Heinrich

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

October 13, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Ina book destined to become a classic, biologist and acclaimed nature writer Bernd Heinrich takes readers on an eye-opening journey through the hidden life of a forest.</p>
Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier...
by Earl Swift

Language

English

Pages

446

Publication Date

August 07, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A brilliant, soulful, and timely portrait of a two-hundred-year-old crabbing community in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay as it faces extinction </strong></p><p>"BEAUTIFUL, HAUNTING AND TRUE." — Hampton Sides •  “GORGEOUS. A TRULY REMARKABLE BOOK.” — Beth Macy • "GRIPPING. FANTASTIC." — <em>Outside</em> • "CAPTIVATING." — <em>Washington Post</em> • "POWERFUL." — Bill McKibben • "VIVID. HARROWING AND MOVING." —<em> Science </em>• "WONDERFUL, POETIC, STIRRING." — Callum Roberts • "A MASTERFUL NARRATIVE." — <em>Christian Science Monitor</em></p><p><strong>A <em>Washington Post</em> and an Indie bestseller • An Indie Next List selection • A <em>Washington Post </em>"Notable Book of the Year" </strong><strong>• </strong><strong>An Amazon and <em>Christian Science Monitor</em> "Best Book of the Month" • One of <em>Esquire</em>'s "Best Nonfiction Books of 2018 (So Far)" and <em>Outside</em>'s “Best New Adventure Books for Fall”  • An NPR <em>All Things Considered</em> "Summer Reading List" and Axios "Book Club" pick</strong></p><p>Tangier Island, Virginia, is a community unique on the American landscape. Mapped by John Smith in 1608, settled during the American Revolution, the tiny sliver of mud is home to 470 hardy people who live an isolated and challenging existence, with one foot in the 21<sup>st</sup> century and another in times long passed. They are separated from their countrymen by the nation’s largest estuary, and a twelve-mile boat trip across often tempestuous water—the same water that for generations has made Tangier’s fleet of small fishing boats a chief source for the rightly prized Chesapeake Bay blue crab, and has lent the island its claim to fame as the softshell crab capital of the world.</p><p>Yet for all of its long history, and despite its tenacity, Tangier is disappearing. The very water that has long sustained it is erasing the island day by day, wave by wave. It has lost two-thirds of its land since 1850, and still its shoreline retreats by fifteen feet a year—meaning this storied place will likely succumb first among U.S. towns to the effects of climate change. Experts reckon that, barring heroic intervention by the federal government, islanders could be forced to abandon their home within twenty-five years. Meanwhile, the graves of their forebears are being sprung open by encroaching tides, and the conservative and deeply religious Tangiermen ponder the end times.    </p><p><em>Chesapeake Requiem</em> is an intimate look at the island’s past, present and tenuous future, by an acclaimed journalist who spent much of the past two years living among Tangier’s people, crabbing and oystering with its watermen, and observing its long traditions and odd ways. What emerges is the poignant tale of a world that has, quite nearly, gone by—and a leading-edge report on the coming fate of countless coastal communities.</p>
How to Read Water: Clues and Patterns from Puddles to the Sea
by Tristan Gooley

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

September 11, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>A <I>New York Times</I> Bestseller<BR /> A <I>Forbes</I> Top 10 Conservation and Environment Book of 2016</B><BR /><BR /><B>Read the sea like a Viking and interpret ponds like a Polynesian—with a little help from the “natural navigator”!</B><BR />  <BR /> In his eye-opening books <I>The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs</I> and <I>The Natural Navigator</I>, Tristan Gooley helped readers reconnect with nature by finding direction from the trees, stars, clouds, and more. Now, he turns his attention to our most abundant—yet perhaps least understood—resource.<BR />  <BR /> Distilled from his far-flung adventures—sailing solo across the Atlantic, navigating with Omani tribespeople, canoeing in Borneo, and walking in his own backyard—Gooley shares hundreds of techniques in <I>How to Read Water</I>. Readers will:<BR />  <ul><li>Find north using puddles</li><li>Forecast the weather from waves</li><li>Decode the colors of ponds</li><li>Spot dangerous water in the dark</li><li>Decipher wave patterns on beaches, and more!</li></ul></DIV>
The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last Tr...
by Michael Finkel

Language

English

Pages

226

Publication Date

March 07, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Many people dream of escaping modern life, but most will never act on it. This is the remarkable true story of a man who lived alone in the woods of Maine for 27 years, making this dream a reality—not out of anger at the world, but simply because he preferred to live on his own.</b> <br /><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i> bestseller</b><br /><br />In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death. He broke into nearby cottages for food, clothing, reading material, and other provisions, taking only what he needed but terrifying a community never able to solve the mysterious burglaries. Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life—why did he leave? what did he learn?—as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.
The Final Frontiersman: Heimo Korth and His Family, Alone in Alas...
by James Campbell

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

November 01, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The inspiration for <i>The Last Alaskans</i>—the eight-part documentary series on the Discovery Channel! Called “[one of] the greatest life-or-death-tales ever told” (<i>Esquire</i>), James Campbell’s inimitable insider account of a family’s nomadic life in the unshaped Arctic wilderness “is an icily gripping, intimate profile that stands up well beside Krakauer’s classic [<i>Into the Wild</i>], and it stands too, as a kind of testament to the rough beauty of improbably wild dreams” (<i>Men’s Journal</i>).<BR><BR>Hundreds of hardy people have tried to carve a living in the Alaskan bush, but few have succeeded as consistently as Heimo Korth. Originally from Wisconsin, Heimo traveled to the Arctic wilderness in his feverous twenties. Now, more than three decades later, Heimo lives with his wife and two daughters approximately 200 miles from civilization—a sustainable, nomadic life bounded by the migrating caribou, the dangers of swollen rivers, and by the very exigencies of daily existence.<BR> <BR>In <i>The Final Frontiersman</i>, Heimo’s cousin James Campbell chronicles the Korth family’s amazing experience, their adventures, and the tragedy that continues to shape their lives. With a deft voice and in spectacular, at times unimaginable detail, Campbell invites us into Heimo’s heartland and home. The Korths wait patiently for a small plane to deliver their provisions, listen to distant chatter on the radio, and go sledding at 44° below zero—all the while cultivating the hard-learned survival skills that stand between them and a terrible fate.<BR> <BR>Awe-inspiring and memorable, <i>The Final Frontiersman</i> reads like a rustic version of the American Dream and reveals for the first time a life undreamed by most of us: amid encroaching environmental pressures, apart from the herd, and alone in a stunning wilderness that for now, at least, remains the final frontier.
The Eye of the Elephant: An Epic Adventure in the African Wildern...
by , Delia Owens

Language

English

Pages

324

Publication Date

October 29, 1993

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The authors of <I>Secrets of the Sahara</I> battle the elephant poachers of Zambia in this “exciting . . . part adventure story, part wildlife tale” (<I>The Boston Globe</I>).</B><BR /><BR /> Intelligent, majestic, and loyal, with lifespans matching our own, elephants are among the greatest of the wonders gracing the African wilds. Yet, in the 1970s and 1980s, about a thousand of these captivating creatures were slaughtered in Zambia each year, killed for their valuable ivory tusks. When biologists Mark and Delia Owens, residing in Africa to study lions, found themselves in the middle of a poaching fray, they took the only side they morally could: that of the elephants.<BR />  <BR /><I>The Eye of the Elephant</I> recounts the Owens’ struggle to save these innocent animals from decimation, a journey not only to supply the natives with ways of supporting their villages, but also to cultivate support around the globe for the protection of elephants. Filled with daring exploits among disgruntled hunters, arduous labor on the African plains, and vivid depictions of various wildlife, this remarkable tale is at once an adventure story, a travelogue, a preservationist call to action, and a fascinating examination of both human and animal nature.</DIV>
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder ...
by Sy Montgomery

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

July 12, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Finalist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction * <i>New York Times </i>Bestseller * Starred <i>Booklist</i> and <i>Library Journal </i>Editors’ Spring Pick * A <i>Huffington Post</i> Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year * One of the Best Books of the Month on <i>Goodreads * Library Journal </i>Best Sci-Tech Book of the Year * An American Library Association Notable Book of the Year</b><BR> <BR> <b>“Sy Montgomery’s <i>The Soul of an Octopus</i> does for the creature what Helen Macdonald’s <i>H Is for Hawk</i> did for raptors.” —<i>New Statesman</i>, UK</b><BR> <BR> <b>“One of the best science books of the year.” —<i>Science Friday</i>, NPR</b><BR> <BR> Another <i>New York Times</i> bestseller from the author of <i>The Good Good Pig</i>, this “fascinating…touching…informative…entertaining” (<i>Daily Beast</i>) book explores the emotional and physical world of the octopus—a surprisingly complex, intelligent, and spirited creature—and the remarkable connections it makes with humans.<BR><BR>In pursuit of the wild, solitary, predatory octopus, popular naturalist Sy Montgomery has practiced true immersion journalism. From New England aquarium tanks to the reefs of French Polynesia and the Gulf of Mexico, she has befriended octopuses with strikingly different personalities—gentle Athena, assertive Octavia, curious Kali, and joyful Karma. Each creature shows her cleverness in myriad ways: escaping enclosures like an orangutan; jetting water to bounce balls; and endlessly tricking companions with multiple “sleights of hand” to get food.<BR> <BR>Scientists have only recently accepted the intelligence of dogs, birds, and chimpanzees but now are watching octopuses solve problems and are trying to decipher the meaning of the animal’s color-changing techniques. With her “joyful passion for these intelligent and fascinating creatures” (<i>Library Journal</i> Editors’ Spring Pick), Montgomery chronicles the growing appreciation of this mollusk as she tells a unique love story. By turns funny, entertaining, touching, and profound, <i>The Soul of an Octopus </i>reveals what octopuses can teach us about the meeting of two very different minds.
Flat Broke with Two Goats: A Memoir
by Jennifer McGaha

Language

English

Pages

370

Publication Date

January 23, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>When life gets your goat, bring in the herd</strong></p><p>Jennifer McGaha never expected to own a goat named Merle. Or to be setting Merle up on dates and naming his doeling Merlene. She didn't expect to be buying organic yogurt for her chickens. She never thought she would be pulling camouflage carpet off her ceiling or rescuing opossums from her barn and calling it "date night." Most importantly, Jennifer never thought she would only have $4.57 in her bank account.</p><p>When Jennifer discovered that she and her husband owed back taxes—a lot of back taxes—her world changed. Now desperate to save money, they foreclosed on their beloved suburban home and moved their family to a one-hundred-year-old cabin in a North Carolina holler. Soon enough, Jennifer's life began to more closely resemble her Appalachian ancestors than her upper-middle-class upbringing. But what started as a last-ditch effort to settle debts became a journey that revealed both the joys and challenges of living close to the land.</p><p>Told with bold wit, unflinching honesty, and a firm foot in the traditions of Appalachia, <em>Flat Broke with Two Goats</em> blends stories of homesteading with the journey of two people rediscovering the true meaning of home.<br /></p>
American Buffalo: In Search of a Lost Icon
by Steven Rinella

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

December 02, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the host of the Travel Channel’s “The Wild Within.”</b><br /><br />A hunt for the American buffalo—an adventurous, fascinating examination of an animal that has haunted the American imagination.<br /> <br />In 2005, Steven Rinella won a lottery permit to hunt for a wild buffalo, or American bison, in the Alaskan wilderness. Despite the odds—there’s only a 2 percent chance of drawing the permit, and fewer than 20 percent of those hunters are successful—Rinella managed to kill a buffalo on a snow-covered mountainside and then raft the meat back to civilization while being trailed by grizzly bears and suffering from hypothermia. Throughout these adventures, Rinella found himself contemplating his own place among the 14,000 years’ worth of buffalo hunters in North America, as well as the buffalo’s place in the American experience. At the time of the Revolutionary War, North America was home to approximately 40 million buffalo, the largest herd of big mammals on the planet, but by the mid-1890s only a few hundred remained. Now that the buffalo is on the verge of a dramatic ecological recovery across the West, Americans are faced with the challenge of how, and if, we can dare to share our land with a beast that is the embodiment of the American wilderness. <br /><br /> <i>American Buffalo</i> is a narrative tale of Rinella’s hunt. But beyond that, it is the story of the many ways in which the buffalo has shaped our national identity. Rinella takes us across the continent in search of the buffalo’s past, present, and future: to the Bering Land Bridge, where scientists search for buffalo bones amid artifacts of the New World’s earliest human inhabitants; to buffalo jumps where Native Americans once ran buffalo over cliffs by the thousands; to the Detroit Carbon works, a “bone charcoal” plant that made fortunes in the late 1800s by turning millions of tons of buffalo bones into bone meal, black dye, and fine china; and even to an abattoir turned fashion mecca in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, where a depressed buffalo named Black Diamond met his fate after serving as the model for the American nickel.<br /><br /> Rinella’s erudition and exuberance, combined with his gift for storytelling, make him the perfect guide for a book that combines outdoor adventure with a quirky blend of facts and observations about history, biology, and the natural world. Both a captivating narrative and a book of environmental and historical significance, <i>American Buffalo</i> tells us as much about ourselves as Americans as it does about the creature who perhaps best of all embodies the American ethos.

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