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The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human B...
by Sam Kean

Language

English

Pages

392

Publication Date

May 06, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>The author of the bestseller <i>The Disappearing Spoon</i> reveals the secret inner workings of the brain through strange but true stories.<br /><br /></strong>Early studies of the human brain used a simple method: wait for misfortune to strike -- strokes, seizures, infectious diseases, horrendous accidents -- and see how victims coped. In many cases their survival was miraculous, if puzzling. Observers were amazed by the transformations that took place when different parts of the brain were destroyed, altering victims' personalities. Parents suddenly couldn't recognize their own children. Pillars of the community became pathological liars. Some people couldn't speak but could still sing. <br /><br />In <i>The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons</i>, Sam Kean travels through time with stories of neurological curiosities: phantom limbs, Siamese twin brains, viruses that eat patients' memories, blind people who see through their tongues. He weaves these narratives together with prose that makes the pages fly by, to create a story of discovery that reaches back to the 1500s and the high-profile jousting accident that inspired this book's title.* With the lucid, masterful explanations and razor-sharp wit his fans have come to expect, Kean explores the brain's secret passageways and recounts the forgotten tales of the ordinary people whose struggles, resilience, and deep humanity made neuroscience possible. <br /><br />*"The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons" refers to the case of French king Henri II, who in 1559 was lanced through the skull during a joust, resulting in one of the most significant cases in neuroscience history. For hundreds of years scientists have gained important lessons from traumatic accidents and illnesses, and such misfortunes still represent their greatest resource for discovery.
Periodic Tales: A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic ...
by Hugh Aldersey-Williams

Language

English

Pages

451

Publication Date

March 29, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In the spirit of <em>A Short History of Nearly Everything</em> comes <em>Periodic Tales</em>. Award-winning science writer Hugh Andersey-Williams offers readers a captivating look at the elements—and the amazing, little-known stories behind their discoveries. <em>Periodic Tales</em> is an energetic and wide-ranging book of innovations and innovators, of superstition and science and the myriad ways the chemical elements are woven into our culture, history, and language. It will delight readers of <em>Genome, Einstein’s Dreams</em>, <em>Longitude</em>, and <em>The Age of Wonder</em>.  <br />
Written in Stone: Evolution, the Fossil Record, and Our Place in ...
by Brian Switek

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

November 30, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<i>Written In Stone</i> is the first book to tell the story of the fossils that mapped out evolutionary history. 150 years after Darwin's <i>Origin</i> was published, scientists are beginning to understand how whales walked into the sea, how horses stood up on their tip-toes, how feathered dinosaurs took to the air, and how our ancestors came down from the trees.
Leonardo and Gabriel
by Tim Tigner

Language

English

Pages

144

Publication Date

July 01, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>LEONARDO DA VINCI HAS A PROBLEM. <br />A serious problem. <br />The soul-wrenching kind. <br />The career killing kind. <br />He needs to finish a piece for the Pope—but doesn’t know how.</b><br /><br />Alas, figuring it out is no trivial task. In fact, nobody ever has.<br /><br />Of all the great and grand quests that humans have undertaken, none has been more attempted or elusive than gaining a comprehensive grasp of God. When seeking to know Him with the head rather than the heart, to rely on reason rather than faith, the obstacles appear insurmountable.<br /><br /><I>If He is all powerful, and we are His children, why do so many suffer so horribly? Why would He punish people who don’t believe in Him? Why haven’t we seen or heard from Him for thousands of years?</I><br /><br />Join Leonardo and the Archangel Gabriel as they survey and surmount these stumbling blocks. Listen in as Gabriel reveals why obvious answers remain obscured. Follow along as he leads Leonardo all the way to an intuitive understanding of the Almighty.<br /><br />Set during Da Vinci’s struggle to give God a face in his masterpiece, The Last Supper, Leonardo and Gabriel is no less entertaining than it is educational. Although the framework is historically accurate, the conclusions of this original work are as unpredictable as they are compelling. Engage with an open mind—as Gabriel councils Leonardo to do—and it may even change your life.<br />_________________________<br /><br />Do you like logic puzzles? Pondering big philosophical questions? Are you open-minded and eager to learn life-improving lessons? Then this book’s for you. <br /><br />On the other hand, if you prefer to sit in the pews, repeating along while scripture is passionately delivered from the pulpit, then you should probably pass on this one.<br />_________________________<br /><br /><B>BEFORE YOU BUY, PLEASE NOTE TWO THINGS:<br /><br />1) This novella is considerably shorter than the author’s novels. The price reflects the caliber of the content, not the page count, and was selected to discourage impetuous purchase.<br /><br />2) This is essentially an entertaining self-help book, a philosophy text that reads like a thriller. It is intended to stimulate life-improving thought and adequately answer one of history’s most perplexing questions by creatively presenting original analysis on an important topic that touches us all.</B><br />_________________________<br /><br />The publisher recommends Leonardo and Gabriel for use in undergraduate logic and philosophy courses, and will make copies of the ebook available free of charge to the faculty and students of accredited academic institutions. Kindly Submit inquiries to edu@timtigner.com.
The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains
by Nicholas Carr

Language

English

Pages

289

Publication Date

June 06, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a <em>Silent Spring</em> for the literary mind.”—Michael Agger, <em>Slate</em></strong></p><br />“Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated <em>Atlantic Monthly</em> cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply?<br /><br /><br /><br />Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways.<br /><br /><br /><br />Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection.<br /><br /><br /><br />Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, <em>The Shallows</em> sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.
A Mind For Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (Even If You...
by Barbara Oakley

Language

English

Pages

332

Publication Date

July 31, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The companion book to COURSERA®'s wildly popular massive open online course "Learning How to Learn"</b><br /><br />Whether you are a student struggling to fulfill a math or science requirement, or you are embarking on a career change that requires a new skill set, <i>A Mind for Numbers</i> offers the tools you need to get a better grasp of that intimidating material. Engineering professor Barbara Oakley knows firsthand how it feels to struggle with math. She flunked her way through high school math and science courses, before enlisting in the army immediately after graduation. When she saw how her lack of mathematical and technical savvy severely limited her options—both to rise in the military and to explore other careers—she returned to school with a newfound determination to re-tool her brain to master the very subjects that had given her so much trouble throughout her entire life.<br />  <br /> In <i>A Mind for Numbers</i>, Dr. Oakley lets us in on the secrets to learning effectively—secrets that even dedicated and successful students wish they’d known earlier. Contrary to popular belief, math requires creative, as well as analytical, thinking. Most people think that there’s only one way to do a problem, when in actuality, there are often a number of different solutions—you just need the creativity to see them. For example, there are more than three hundred different known proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem. In short, studying a problem in a laser-focused way until you reach a solution is not an effective way to learn. Rather, it involves taking the time to step away from a problem and allow the more relaxed and creative part of the brain to take over. The learning strategies in this book apply not only to math and science, but to any subject in which we struggle. We all have what it takes to excel in areas that don't seem to come naturally to us at first, and learning them does not have to be as painful as we might think!
The World As I See It
by Albert Einstein

Language

English

Pages

128

Publication Date

March 14, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>One of the world’s greatest minds addresses religion and science, war and peace, and the treatment of minorities in this authorized collection.</b><br /><br /> In the aftermath of the First World War, Albert Einstein writes about his hopes for the League of Nations, his feelings as a German citizen about the growing anti-Semitism and nationalism of his country, and his myriad opinions about the current affairs of his day. In addition to these political perspectives, <i>The World As I See It</i> reveals the idealistic, spiritual, and witty side of this great intellectual as he approaches topics including “Good and Evil,” “Religion and Science,” “Active Pacifism,” “Christianity and Judaism,” and “Minorities.”<br /><br /> Including letters, speeches, articles, and essays written before 1935, this collection offers a complete portrait of Einstein as a humanitarian and as a human being trying to make sense of the changing world around him.<br /><br /> This authorized ebook features a new introduction by Neil Berger, PhD, and an illustrated biography of Albert Einstein, which includes rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the Albert Einstein Archives at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.</p>
The Constants of Nature: The Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secr...
by John Barrow

Language

English

Pages

370

Publication Date

May 04, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Reality as we know it is bound by a set of constants—numbers and values that dictate the strengths of forces like gravity, the speed of light, and the masses of elementary particles. In <b>The Constants of Nature</b>, Cambridge Professor and bestselling author John D.Barrow takes us on an exploration of these governing principles. Drawing on physicists such as Einstein and Planck, Barrow illustrates with stunning clarity our dependence on the steadfastness of these principles. But he also suggests that the basic forces may have been radically different during the universe’s infancy, and suggests that they may continue a deeply hidden evolution. Perhaps most tantalizingly, Barrow theorizes about the realities that might one day be found in a universe with different parameters than our own.
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
by Rebecca Skloot

Language

English

Pages

393

Publication Date

January 28, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>Now an HBO® Film starring Oprah Winfrey and Rose Byrne</b><br /><br />#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER<br /></b><br />Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.
The Bastard Brigade: The True Story of the Renegade Scientists an...
by Sam Kean

Language

English

Pages

465

Publication Date

July 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Sam Kean comes the gripping, untold story of a renegade group of scientists and spies determined to keep Adolf Hitler from obtaining the ultimate prize: a nuclear bomb</b><br /><br />Scientists have always kept secrets. But rarely have the secrets been as vital as they were during World War II. In the middle of building an atomic bomb, the leaders of the Manhattan Project were alarmed to learn that Nazi Germany was far outpacing the Allies in nuclear weapons research. Hitler, with just a few pounds of uranium, would have the capability to reverse the entire D-Day operation and conquer Europe. So they assembled a rough and motley crew of geniuses - dubbed the Alsos Mission - and sent them careening into Axis territory to spy on, sabotage, and even assassinate members of Nazi Germany's feared Uranium Club. <br />The details of the mission rival the finest spy thriller, but what makes this story sing is the incredible cast of characters-both heroes and rogues alike-including: <br /><b>Moe Berg</b> the major league catcher who abandoned the game for a career as a multilingual international spy; the strangest fellow to ever play professional baseball.<br /><b>Werner Heisenberg</b> the Nobel Prize-winning physicist credited as the discoverer of quantum mechanics; a key contributor to the Nazi's atomic bomb project and the primary target of the Alsos mission. <br /><b>Colonel Boris Pash </b>a high school science teacher and veteran of the Russian Revolution who fled the Sovit Union with a deep disdain for Communists and who later led the Alsos mission. <br /><b>Joe Kennedy Jr.</b> the charismatic, thrill-seeking older brother of JFK whose need for adventure led him to volunteer for the most dangerous missions the Navy had to offer. <br /><b>Samuel Goudsmit </b>a washed-up physics prodigy who spent his life huntinh Nazi scientist-and his parents, who had been swept into a concentration camp-across the globe. <br /><b>Ir</b><b>è</b><b>ne and Frederic Joliot-Curie</b> a physics Nobel-Prize winning power couple who used their unassuming status as scientists to become active members of the resistance. <br />Thrust into the dark world of international espionage, these scientists and soldiers played a vital and largely untold role in turning back one of the darkest tides in human history.

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