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Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter, and Our Search for Meaning i...
by Brian Greene

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

February 18, 2020

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<b>From the world-renowned physicist and best-selling author of <i>The Elegant Universe </i>comes this captivating exploration of deep time and humanity's search for purpose.</b><br /><br /><i>Until the End of Time</i> is Brian Greene's breathtaking new exploration of the cosmos and our quest to understand it. Greene takes us on a journey across time, from our most refined understanding of the universe's beginning, to the closest science can take us to the very end. He explores how life and mind emerged from the initial chaos, and how our minds, in coming to understand their own impermanence, seek in different ways to give meaning to experience: in narrative, myth, religion, creative expression, science, the quest for truth, and our longing for the eternal. Through a series of nested stories that explain distinct but interwoven layers of reality--from quantum mechanics to consciousness to black holes--Greene provides us with a clearer sense of how we came to be, a finer picture of where we are now, and a firmer understanding of where we are headed. With this grand tour of the universe, beginning to end, Brian Greene allows us all to grasp and appreciate our fleeting but utterly exquisite moment in the cosmos.
Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Pr...
by Steven Pinker

Language

English

Pages

576

Publication Date

February 13, 2018

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<b><b>INSTANT <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER <br />A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018<br />ONE OF <i>THE ECONOMIST'S</i> BOOKS OF THE YEAR<br /></b><br /><b>"My new favorite book of all time." --Bill Gates </b><br /><br />If you think the world is coming to an end, think again: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science.</b><br /><br />Is the world really falling apart? Is the ideal of progress obsolete? In this elegant assessment of the human condition in the third millennium, cognitive scientist and public intellectual Steven Pinker urges us to step back from the gory headlines and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, follow the data: In seventy-five jaw-dropping graphs, Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West, but worldwide. This progress is not the result of some cosmic force. It is a gift of the Enlightenment: the conviction that reason and science can enhance human flourishing.<br /><br />Far from being a naïve hope, the Enlightenment, we now know, has worked. But more than ever, it needs a vigorous defense. The Enlightenment project swims against currents of human nature--tribalism, authoritarianism, demonization, magical thinking--which demagogues are all too willing to exploit. Many commentators, committed to political, religious, or romantic ideologies, fight a rearguard action against it. The result is a corrosive fatalism and a willingness to wreck the precious institutions of liberal democracy and global cooperation. <br /><br />With intellectual depth and literary flair, <i>Enlightenment Now</i> makes the case for reason, science, and humanism: the ideals we need to confront our problems and continue our progress.
American Sherlock: Murder, Forensics, and the Birth of American C...
by Kate Winkler Dawson

Language

English

Pages

335

Publication Date

February 11, 2020

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<b>From the acclaimed author of <i>Death in the Air</i> ("Not since <i>Devil in the White City</i> has a book told such a harrowing tale"--Douglas Preston) comes the riveting story of the birth of criminal investigation in the twentieth century.</b><br /><br />Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with curiosities--beakers, microscopes, Bunsen burners, and hundreds upon hundreds of books--sat an investigator who would go on to crack at least two thousand cases in his forty-year career. Known as the "American Sherlock Holmes," Edward Oscar Heinrich was one of America's greatest--and first--forensic scientists, with an uncanny knack for finding clues, establishing evidence, and deducing answers with a skill that seemed almost supernatural.<br /><br />Heinrich was one of the nation's first expert witnesses, working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence. However with his brilliance, and commanding presence in both the courtroom and at crime scenes, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. His work, though not without its serious--some would say fatal--flaws, changed the course of American criminal investigation. <br /><br />Based on years of research and thousands of never-before-published primary source materials, <i>American Sherlock </i>captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon--as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them.
Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and ...
by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Language

English

Pages

410

Publication Date

September 16, 2013

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As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In <i>Braiding Sweetgrass</i>, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).<br /><br /> Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in Histo...
by John M. Barry

Language

English

Pages

555

Publication Date

October 04, 2005

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<b>"Monumental... an authoritative and disturbing morality tale."—<i>Chicago Tribune </i></b><br /> <b><br /> The definitive account of the 1918 Flu Epidemic. <br /> </b><br /> At the height of WWI, history’s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. <br />  <br /> Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, <i>The Great Influenza</i> is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
by Rebecca Skloot

Language

English

Pages

393

Publication Date

January 28, 2010

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<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • “The story of modern medicine and bioethics—and, indeed, race relations—is refracted beautifully, and movingly.”—<i>Entertainment Weekly</i></b><br /><br /><b>NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE FROM HBO® STARRING OPRAH WINFREY AND ROSE BYRNE • ONE OF THE “MOST INFLUENTIAL” (CNN), “DEFINING” (<i>LITHUB</i>), AND “BEST” (<i>THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER</i>) BOOKS OF THE DECADE • WINNER OF THE <i>CHICAGO TRIBUNE </i>HEARTLAND PRIZE FOR NONFICTION </b><br /><br /><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>The New York Times Book Review </i>• <i>Entertainment Weekly </i>• <i>O: The Oprah Magazine </i>• NPR • <i>Financial Times </i>• <i>New York </i>• <i>Independent </i>(U.K.) • <i>Times </i>(U.K.) • <i>Publishers Weekly </i>• <i>Library Journal </i>• <i>Kirkus Reviews </i>• <i>Booklist </i>• <i>Globe and Mail</i></b><br /><br />Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine: The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, which are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. <br /><br />Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave.<br /><br />Henrietta’s family did not learn of her “immortality” until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. And though the cells had launched a multimillion-dollar industry that sells human biological materials, her family never saw any of the profits. As Rebecca Skloot so brilliantly shows, the story of the Lacks family—past and present—is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of. <br /><br />Over the decade it took to uncover this story, Rebecca became enmeshed in the lives of the Lacks family—especially Henrietta’s daughter Deborah. Deborah was consumed with questions: Had scientists cloned her mother? Had they killed her to harvest her cells? And if her mother was so important to medicine, why couldn’t her children afford health insurance? <br /><br />Intimate in feeling, astonishing in scope, and impossible to put down, <i>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</i> captures the beauty and drama of scientific discovery, as well as its human consequences.
Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future
by Ashlee Vance

Language

English

Pages

399

Publication Date

May 19, 2015

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In <i>Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future</i>, veteran technology journalist Ashlee Vance provides the first inside look into the extraordinary life and times of Silicon Valley's most audacious entrepreneur. Written with exclusive access to Musk, his family and friends, the book traces the entrepreneur's journey from a rough upbringing in South Africa to the pinnacle of the global business world. Vance spent over 40 hours in conversation with Musk and interviewed close to 300 people to tell the tumultuous stories of Musk's world-changing companies: PayPal, Tesla Motors, SpaceX and SolarCity, and to characterize a man who has renewed American industry and sparked new levels of innovation while making plenty of enemies along the way. <br /><br />        Vance uses Musk's story to explore one of the pressing questions of our time: can the nation of inventors and creators which led the modern world for a century still compete in an age of fierce global competition? He argues that Musk--one of the most unusual and striking figures in American business history--is a contemporary amalgam of legendary inventors and industrialists like Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Howard Hughes, and Steve Jobs. More than any other entrepreneur today, Musk has dedicated his energies and his own vast fortune to inventing a future that is as rich and far-reaching as the visionaries of the golden age of science-fiction fantasy.
The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Unde...
by Susannah Cahalan

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

November 05, 2019

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<b>"One of America's most courageous young journalists" and the author of the #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling memoir <i>Brain on Fire</i> investigates the shocking mystery behind the dramatic experiment that revolutionized modern medicine (NPR<i>).</i></b><br /><br />Doctors have struggled for centuries to define insanity--how do you diagnose it, how do you treat it, how do you even know what <i>it </i>is? In search of an answer, in the 1970s a Stanford psychologist named David Rosenhan and seven other people--sane, healthy, well-adjusted members of society--went undercover into asylums around America to test the legitimacy of psychiatry's labels. Forced to remain inside until they'd "proven" themselves sane, all eight emerged with alarming diagnoses and even more troubling stories of their treatment. Rosenhan's watershed study broke open the field of psychiatry, closing down institutions and changing mental health diagnosis forever. <br /><br /> But, as Cahalan's explosive new research shows in this real-life detective story, very little in this saga is exactly as it seems. What really happened behind those closed asylum doors?
The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe: How to Know What's Really Re...
by Dr. Steven Novella

Language

English

Pages

473

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The <i>USA TODAY</i> bestseller </b><b>is now in paperback with a new chapter on Global Warming! This</b><b> all-encompassing guide to skeptical thinking from podcast host and academic neurologist at Yale University School of Medicine Steven Novella and his SGU co-hosts</b><b>, which Richard Wiseman calls "the perfect primer for anyone who wants to separate fact from fiction."</b><b><br /></b>It is intimidating to realize that we live in a world overflowing with misinformation, bias, myths, deception, and flawed knowledge. There really are no ultimate authority figures-no one has the secret, and there is no place to look up the definitive answers to our questions (not even Google).<br /> Luckily, THE SKEPTICS' GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE is your map through this maze of modern life. Here Dr. Steven Novella-along with Bob Novella, Cara Santa Maria, Jay Novella, and Evan Bernstein-will explain the tenets of skeptical thinking and debunk some of the biggest scientific myths, fallacies, and conspiracy theories-from anti-vaccines to homeopathy, UFO sightings to N- rays. You'll learn the difference between science and pseudoscience, essential critical thinking skills, ways to discuss conspiracy theories with that crazy co- worker of yours, and how to combat sloppy reasoning, bad arguments, and superstitious thinking. <br /><br /> So are you ready to join them on an epic scientific quest, one that has taken us from huddling in dark caves to setting foot on the moon? (Yes, we really did that.) DON'T PANIC! With THE SKEPTICS' GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE, we can do this together.<br /><br /><b>"Thorough, informative, and enlightening, <i>The Skeptic's Guide to the Universe</i> inoculates you against the frailties and shortcomings of human cognition. If this book does not become required reading for us all, we may well see modern civilization unravel before our eyes."</b><b>--Neil deGrasse Tyson</b><br /><b>"In this age of real and fake information, your ability to reason, to think in scientifically skeptical fashion, is the most important skill you can have. Read <i>The Skeptics' Guide Universe</i>; get better at reasoning. And if this claim about the importance of reason is wrong, <i>The Skeptics' Guide </i>will help you figure that out, too." </b><b>--Bill Nye<br /></b><br />
A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition
by Bill Bryson

Language

English

Pages

692

Publication Date

November 30, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>This new edition of the acclaimed bestseller is lavishly illustrated to convey, in pictures as in words, Bill Bryson’s exciting, informative journey into the world of science.</b><i><br /></i><br />In <i>A Short History of Nearly Everything</i>, the bestselling author of <i>A Walk in the Woods </i>and<i> The Body,</i> confronts his greatest challenge yet: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as his territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being <i>us</i>. The result is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.<br /><br />Now, in this handsome new edition, Bill Bryson’s words are supplemented by full-color artwork that explains in visual terms the concepts and wonder of science, at the same time giving face to the major players in the world of scientific study. Eloquently and entertainingly described, as well as richly illustrated, science has never been more involving or entertaining.

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