Categories

 > Science & Math > History & Philosophy

8,701 results were found

Sort by:

The Idea of Science
by Gene Callahan

Language

English

Pages

152

Publication Date

May 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This is a collection of essays and book reviews on the philosophy and the history of science.
Of Time and Lamentation
by Professor Raymond Tallis

Language

English

Pages

672

Publication Date

May 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13.3333px;">Time’s mysteries seem to resist comprehension and what remains, once the familiar metaphors are stripped away, can stretch even the most profound philosopher. In Of Time and Lamentation, Raymond Tallis rises to this challenge and explores the nature and meaning of time and how best to understand it. The culmination of some twenty years of thinking, writing and wondering about (and within) time, it is a bold, original and thought-provoking work. With characteristic fearlessness, Tallis seeks to reclaim time from the jaws of physics. For most of us, time is composed of mornings, afternoons and evenings and expressed in hurry, hope, longing, waiting, enduring, planning, joyful expectation and grief. Thinking about it is to meditate on our own mortality. Yet, physics has little or nothing to say about this time, the time as it is lived. The story told by caesium clocks, quantum theory and Lorentz coordinates, Tallis argues, needs to be supplemented by one of moss on rocks, tears on faces and the long narratives of our human journey. Our temporal lives deserve a richer attention than is afforded by the equations of mathematical physics. For anyone who has puzzled over the nature of becoming, wondered whether time is inseparable from change, whether time is punctuate or continuous, or even whether time, itself, is real, the book will provoke and entertain. Those who seek to find a place at which the scientific and humanistic views of humanity can be reconciled, will celebrate his placing of human consciousness at the heart of time.</span>
The Demotic Magical Papyrus Of Leyden (The Leyden Papyrus)
by F. Griffith

Language

English

Pages

80

Publication Date

May 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Dating to the second or third century C.E., this papyrus was key to the decipherment of the Demotic Ancient Egyptian dialect. It is also of great importance for the study of magic in antiquity. Included are spells to cure diseases, obtain visions, raise the dead, etc., as well as a number of spells for erotic purposes. The text contains invocations to a wide range of deities and other entities, with names drawn from the Ancient Egyptian pantheon and the Gnostic Aeons.
Grande Morale, La - Aristote (French Edition)
by ARISTOTE

Language

French

Pages

147

Publication Date

May 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Extrait : <br />De la nature de la morale. Elle fait partie de la politique. — Il faut étudier la vertu surtout à un point de vue <br />pratique, afin de la connaître et de l’acquérir. — Travaux antérieurs : Pythagore, Socrate, Platon ; défauts de <br />leurs théories. L’auteur essaiera de les compléter. — Principes généraux sur le bien. La politique qui est le premier <br />des arts, doit étudier le bien applicable à l’homme. De l’idée du bien. Du bien réel et commun dans les choses. — Rôle <br />de la définition et de l’induction dans cette étude. — La politique et la morale n’ont point à s’occuper de l’idée <br />absolue du bien : le bien est dans toutes les catégories, et chaque bien spécial est l’objet d’un art spécial. — Erreur <br />de Socrate qui prenait la vertu pour une science...<br />
Before Copernicus: The Cultures and Contexts of Scientific Learni...
by MQUP

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

June 12, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In 1984, Noel Swerdlow and Otto Neugebauer argued that Nicolaus Copernicus (1473–1543) explained planetary motion by using mathematical devices and astronomical models originally developed by Islamic astronomers in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Was this a parallel development, or did Copernicus somehow learn of the work of his predecessors, and if so, how? And if Copernicus did use material from the Islamic world, how then should we understand the European context of his innovative cosmology? Although Copernicus’s work has been subject to a number of excellent studies, there has been little attention paid to the sources and diverse cultures that might have inspired him. <br /><br />Foregrounding the importance of interactions between Islamic and European astronomers and philosophers, Before Copernicus explores the multi-cultural, multi-religious, and multi-lingual context of learning on the eve of the Copernican revolution, determining the relationship between Copernicus and his predecessors. Essays by Christopher Celenza and Nancy Bisaha delve into the European cultural and intellectual contexts of the fifteenth century, revealing both the profound differences between “them” and “us,” and the nascent attitudes that would mark the turn to modernity. Michael Shank, F. Jamil Ragep, Sally Ragep, and Robert Morrison depict the vibrant and creative work of astronomers in the Christian, Islamic, and Jewish worlds. In other essays, Rivka Feldhay, Raz Chen-Morris, and Edith Sylla demonstrate the importance of shifting outlooks that were critical for the emergence of a new worldview.<br /><br />Highlighting the often-neglected intercultural exchange between Islam and early modern Europe, Before Copernicus reimagines the scientific revolution in a global context.
Einstein’s Unfinished Symphony: The Story of a Gamble, Two Blac...
by Marcia Bartusiak

Language

English

Pages

296

Publication Date

June 27, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>An updated classic that recounts the long hunt for Einstein’s predicted gravitational waves—and celebrates their recent discovery</B><BR /><BR /> In February 2016, astronomers announced that they had verified the last remaining prediction of Einstein’s general theory of relativity—vibrations in space-time, called gravitational waves. Humanity can now tune in to a cosmic orchestra. We have heard the chirp of two black holes dancing toward a violent union. We will hear the cymbal crashes from exploding stars, the periodic drumbeats from swiftly rotating pulsars, and maybe even the echoes from the Big Bang itself.<BR />  <BR /> Marcia Bartusiak was one of the first to report on the new generation of observatories, showing the motivations of the detectors’ creators and the gamble they made to prove Einstein right when all other attempts had failed. She traces the quest of astronomers to build the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, the most accurate measuring devices humans have created, and the discovery of gravitational waves, revealing the brilliance, personalities, and luck required to start a new age of astronomy.</DIV>
Conquest of Body: Biopower with Biotechnology (SpringerBriefs in ...
by Polona Tratnik

Language

English

Pages

100

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>This book reflects on the phenomenon of biotechnology and how it affects the body and discusses a number of related issues, including visualization, mediation, and epistemology.</p><p>The author offers a compelling thesis, arguing that the exploration of the human body has one ultimate aim: to gain knowledge of it and to conquer it. Exploration of body has an intrinsic link to power, since knowledge is constitutive for the power over the body. Ultimately the conquest of body means the power to intervene into life processes.</p><p>The book breaks new ground with its study of body visualizations, from the Renaissance drawings to the medical imaging. In particular, it investigates their complex mediality. It also considers the extension and the reach of biopower that is now possible thanks to a wide range of engineering applications.</p><p> </p><p>The author originally questions the research approach by rethinking the relationship between mental and sensual examination. She takes into consideration the epistemological problem of the two modes of exploration: obtaining knowledge from empirical exploration and projecting that knowledge to the object of exploration.</p><p></p>
Trial and Error: The American Controversy Over Creation and Evolu...
by Edward J. Larson

Language

English

Pages

303

Publication Date

January 23, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<em>Trial and Error</em> traces the coverage or lack thereof, of evolution in textbooks used in American public schools from the mid-1800s to the present. While the teaching of Darwinian evolution was common and not controversial in the late 19th century and into the early 20th century, the debates between evolutionists and creationists, those who argue that the Biblical theory of origins deserves equal treatment, have flared throughout the twentieth century--first in the 1920s, most famously in the Scopes trial; again in the 1960s, when the regional legislation banning the teaching of evolution was overturned, notably in Arkansas and Louisiana; and throughout the 1980s with various controversies over science textbooks, including California. Larson proposes to bring the subject up to the present through a discussion of recent trends, including the "intelligent design" movement, led by Phillip Johnson, a revised form of anti-evolutionism that gained popularity on college campuses; the impact of Michael Behe's versions of evolution; and debates over what counts as evidence for and against evolution--all of which have influenced debates over science standards, particularly at state and local levels. This new chapter will chronicle anti-evolution actions in Kansas and elsewhere and counter-actions by the National Academy of Science and other anti-creationist groups. This updated classic work presents a balanced historical interpretation of legal and educational debates over evolutionism, and will appeal to those interested in the fields of history, religion, science, and law.
Making Things Up
by Karen Bennett

Language

English

Pages

317

Publication Date

June 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A certain kind of talk is ubiquitous among both philosophers and so-called "ordinary people": talk of one phenomenon generating or giving rise to another, or talk of one phenomenon being based in or constructed from another. For example, your computer screen is built of atoms in a complex configuration, and the picture on the screen is based in the local illumination of various individual pixels. Karen Bennett calls the family of relations invoked by such talk<br />'building relations'. Grounding is one currently popular such relation; so too are composition, property realization, and-controversially-causation. In chapters 2 and 3 Bennett argues that despite their differences, building relations form an interestingly unified family, and characterizes what all<br />building relations have in common. In chapter 4 she argues that it's a mistake to think there is a strict divide between causal and noncausal determination. Chapters 5 and 6 turn to the connections between building and fundamentality. Bennett argues at length that both absolute and relative fundamentality are best understood in terms of building, and that to say that one thing is more fundamental than another is to say no more than that certain patterns of building obtain. In chapter 7<br />Bennett argues that facts about what builds what must be themselves built: if a builds b, there is something in virtue of which that is the case. She also argues that the answer is a itself. Finally, in chapter 8 she defends an assumption that runs throughout the rest of the book, namely that there<br />indeed are nonfundamental, built entities. Doing so involves substantive discussion about the scope of Ockham's Razor. Bennett argues that some nonfundamentalia are among the proper subject-matter of metaphysics, and thus that metaphysics is not best understood as the study of the fundamental nature of reality.
The Ethics of Technology: A Geometric Analysis of Five Moral Prin...
by Martin Peterson

Language

English

Pages

466

Publication Date

June 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Autonomous cars, drones, and electronic surveillance systems are examples of technologies that raise serious ethical issues. In this analytic investigation, Martin Peterson articulates and defends five moral principles for addressing ethical issues related to new and existing technologies: the cost-benefit principle, the precautionary principle, the sustainability principle, the autonomy principle, and the fairness principle. It is primarily the method developed by Peterson for articulating and analyzing the five principles that is novel. He argues that geometric concepts such as points, lines, and planes can be put to work for clarifying the structure and scope of these and other moral principles. This geometric account is based on the Aristotelian dictum that like cases should be treated alike, meaning that the degree of similarity between different cases can be represented as a distance in moral space. The more similar a pair of cases are from a moral point of view, the closer is their location in moral space. A case that lies closer in moral space to a paradigm case for some principle p than to any paradigm for any other principle should be analyzed by applying principle p. The book also presents empirical results from a series of experimental studies in which experts (philosophers) and laypeople (engineering students) have been asked to apply the geometric method to fifteen real-world cases. The empirical findings indicate that experts and laypeople do in fact apply geometrically construed moral principles in roughly, but not exactly, the manner advocates of the geometric method believe they ought to be applied.

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

Kind Reader Monthly Drawing (March 2017)

Congratulations to February 2017's winner Henry H. of New York, USA.

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com