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Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are (The MIT Press)
by Robert Plomin

Language

English

Pages

280

Publication Date

October 26, 2018

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<P><B>A top behavioral geneticist makes the case that DNA inherited from our parents at the moment of conception can predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses.</B></P><P>In <I>Blueprint</I>, behavioral geneticist Robert Plomin describes how the DNA revolution has made DNA personal by giving us the power to predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses from birth. A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent life-long sources of our psychological individuality—the blueprint that makes us who we are. This, says Plomin, is a game changer. </P><P>Plomin has been working on these issues for almost fifty years, conducting longitudinal studies of twins and adoptees. He reports that genetics explains more of the psychological differences among people than all other factors combined. Genetics accounts for fifty percent of psychological differences—not just mental health and school achievement but all psychological traits, from personality to intellectual abilities. Nature, not nurture is what makes us who we are.</P><P>Plomin explores the implications of this, drawing some provocative conclusions—among them that parenting styles don't really affect children's outcomes once genetics is taken into effect. Neither tiger mothers nor attachment parenting affects children's ability to get into Harvard. After describing why DNA matters, Plomin explains what DNA does, offering readers a unique insider's view of the exciting synergies that came from combining genetics and psychology.</P>
The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life
by David Quammen

Language

English

Pages

480

Publication Date

August 14, 2018

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<b>Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction and A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book of 2018</b><BR> <BR> <b>Nonpareil science writer David Quammen explains how recent discoveries in molecular biology can change our understanding of evolution and life’s history, with powerful implications for human health and even our own human nature. </b><BR><BR>In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field—the study of life’s diversity and relatedness at the molecular level—is horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the movement of genes across species lines. It turns out that HGT has been widespread and important. For instance, we now know that roughly eight percent of the human genome arrived not through traditional inheritance from directly ancestral forms, but sideways by viral infection—a type of HGT.<BR> <BR> In <i>The </i><i>Tangled Tree</i> David Quammen, “one of that rare breed of science journalists who blends exploration with a talent for synthesis and storytelling” (<i>Nature</i>), chronicles these discoveries through the lives of the researchers who made them—such as Carl Woese, the most important little-known biologist of the twentieth century; Lynn Margulis, the notorious maverick whose wild ideas about “mosaic” creatures proved to be true; and Tsutomu Wantanabe, who discovered that the scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a direct result of horizontal gene transfer, bringing the deep study of genome histories to bear on a global crisis in public health.<BR> <BR> “Quammen is no ordinary writer. He is simply astonishing, one of that rare class of writer gifted with verve, ingenuity, humor, guts, and great heart” (<i>Elle</i>). Now, in <i>The Tangled Tree</i>, he explains how molecular studies of evolution have brought startling recognitions about the tangled tree of life—including where we humans fit upon it. Thanks to new technologies such as CRISPR, we now have the ability to alter even our genetic composition—through sideways insertions, as nature has long been doing. <i>The Tangled Tree </i>is a brilliant guide to our transformed understanding of evolution, of life’s history, and of our own human nature.
Dr. Gundry's Diet Evolution: Turn Off the Genes That Are Killing ...
by Dr. Steven R. Gundry

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

March 11, 2008

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Customer Reviews
"Dr. Gundry has crafted a wise program with a powerful track record.” <br />–Mehmet Oz, M.D.<br /><br />Does losing weight and staying healthy feel like a battle? Well, it’s really a war. Your enemies are your own genes, backed by millions of years of evolution, and the only way to win is to outsmart them. Renowned surgeon and founder of Gundry MD, Dr. Steven Gundry’s revolutionary book shares the health secrets other doctors won’t tell you:<br /><br />• Why plants are “good” for you because they’re “bad” for you, and meat is “bad” because it’s “good” for you<br />• Why plateauing on this diet is actually a sign that you’re on the right track<br />• Why artificial sweeteners have the same effects as sugar on your health and your waistline<br />• Why taking antacids, statins, and drugs for high blood pressure and arthritis masks health issues instead of addressing them<br /><br />Along with the meal planner, 70 delicious recipes, and inspirational stories, Dr. Gundry’s easy-to-memorize tips will keep you healthy and on course.
She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potentia...
by Carl Zimmer

Language

English

Pages

672

Publication Date

May 29, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Heredity is redefined in this sweeping, resonating overview of a force that shaped human society—a force set to shape our future even more radically.</b><br /><br /><b>One of <i>New York Times</i> 100 Notable Books for 2018</b><br /><b>One of <i>Publishers Weekly</i>'s Top Ten Books of 2018<br />One of <i>Kirkus</i>'s Best Books of 2018 <br />One of Mental Floss's Best Books of 2018<br />One of Science Friday's Best Science Books of 2018</b><br /><b>“Extraordinary”—</b><i>New York Times Book Review   <br /></i><b>"Magisterial"<b>—</b></b><i>The Atlantic</i><b><br />"Engrossing"<b>—</b></b><i>Wired</i><b><br />"Leading contender as the most outstanding nonfiction work of the year"<b>—</b></b><i>Minneapolis Star-Tribune<br /></i><br />Award-winning, celebrated <i>New York Times</i> columnist and science writer Carl Zimmer presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. Charles Darwin played a crucial part in turning heredity into a scientific question, and yet he failed spectacularly to answer it. The birth of genetics in the early 1900s seemed to do precisely that. Gradually, people translated their old notions about heredity into a language of genes. As the technology for studying genes became cheaper, millions of people ordered genetic tests to link themselves to missing parents, to distant ancestors, to ethnic identities...<br /><br />But, Zimmer writes, “Each of us carries an amalgam of fragments of DNA, stitched together from some of our many ancestors. Each piece has its own ancestry, traveling a different path back through human history. A particular fragment may sometimes be cause for worry, but most of our DNA influences who we are—our appearance, our height, our penchants—in inconceivably subtle ways.” Heredity isn’t just about genes that pass from parent to child. Heredity continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of cells that make up our bodies. We say we inherit genes from our ancestors—using a word that once referred to kingdoms and estates—but we inherit other things that matter as much or more to our lives, from microbes to technologies we use to make life more comfortable. We need a new definition of what heredity is and, through Carl Zimmer’s lucid exposition and storytelling, this resounding tour de force delivers it. <br /><br />Weaving historical and current scientific research, his own experience with his two daughters, and the kind of original reporting expected of one of the world’s best science journalists, Zimmer ultimately unpacks urgent bioethical quandaries arising from new biomedical technologies, but also long-standing presumptions about who we really are and what we can pass on to future generations.
Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science o...
by David Reich

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

March 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A groundbreaking book about how ancient DNA has profoundly changed our understanding of human history.</b><br /> <br />Geneticists like David Reich have made astounding advances in the field of genomics, which is proving to be as important as archeology, linguistics, and written records as a means to understand our ancestry. <br /> <br />In <i>Who We Are and How We Got Here</i>, Reich allows readers to discover how the human genome provides not only all the information a human embryo needs to develop but also the hidden story of our species. Reich delves into how the genomic revolution is transforming our understanding of modern humans and how DNA studies reveal deep inequalities among different populations, between the sexes, and among individuals. Provocatively, Reich’s book suggests that there might very well be biological differences among human populations but that these differences are unlikely to conform to common stereotypes.<br /> <br />Drawing upon revolutionary findings and unparalleled scientific studies, <i>Who We Are and How We Got Here</i> is a captivating glimpse into humankind—where we came from and what that says about our lives today.
The Selfish Gene: 40th Anniversary edition (Oxford Landmark Scien...
by Richard Dawkins

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

June 02, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The million copy international bestseller, critically acclaimed and translated into over 25 languages.<br /><br />As influential today as when it was first published, The Selfish Gene has become a classic exposition of evolutionary thought. Professor Dawkins articulates a gene's eye view of evolution - a view giving centre stage to these persistent units of information, and in which organisms can be seen as vehicles for their replication. This imaginative, powerful, and stylistically brilliant work not only brought the insights of Neo-Darwinism to a wide audience, but galvanized the biology<br />community, generating much debate and stimulating whole new areas of research. Forty years later, its insights remain as relevant today as on the day it was published.<br /><br />This 40th anniversary edition includes a new epilogue from the author discussing the continuing relevance of these ideas in evolutionary biology today, as well as the original prefaces and foreword, and extracts from early reviews.<br /><br />Oxford Landmark Science books are 'must-read' classics of modern science writing which have crystallized big ideas, and shaped the way we think.
Change Your Genes, Change Your Life: Creating Optimal Health with...
by Kenneth R. Pelletier

Language

English

Pages

230

Publication Date

October 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><P>Our biology is no longer destiny. Our genes respond to everything we do, according to the revolutionary new science of epigenetics. In other words, our inherited DNA doesn’t rigidly determine our health and disease prospects as the previous generation of geneticists believed. Especially in the last ten years, scientists have confirmed that the vast majority of our genes are actually fluid and dynamic. An endless supply of new studies prove that our health is an expression of how we live our lives—that what we eat and think and how we handle daily stress, plus the toxicity of our immediate environment—creates an internal biochemistry that can actually turn genes on or off. Managing these biochemical effects on our genome is the new key to radiant wellness and healthy longevity.</P><P>Now gaining broad credibility among scientists, the study of epigenetics is at the forefront of modern medicine. According to the author, the real upshot of the epigenetic revolution is that it opens the door to what futurists call personalized medicine. For the first time in a trade book, Dr. Pelletier explains in layperson’s language the genetic biomarkers that will become the standard reference for measuring which specific lifestyle changes are required to optimize a given individual’s health. In the very near future, each person’s state-of-the-art genetic and epigenetic profile—matched with other precise indicators such as assays of the gut microbiome—will guide their daily health practices.</P><P>This short but profound book by a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine introduces readers to this exciting new field, and reveals the steps that each of us can take today to change our genetic expression and thereby optimize our health for a lifetime.</P></DIV>
The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy
by Blaine Bettinger

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

October 13, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>Unlock the secrets in your DNA!</b><br /><br /> Discover the answers to your family history mysteries using the most-cutting edge tool available. This plain-English guide is a one-stop resource for how to use DNA testing for genealogy. Inside, you'll find guidance on what DNA tests are available, plus the methodologies and pros and cons of the three major testing companies and advice on choosing the right test to answer your specific genealogy questions. And once you've taken a DNA test, this guide will demystify the often-overwhelming subject and explain how to interpret DNA test results, including how to understand ethnicity estimates and haplogroup designations, navigate suggested cousin matches, and use third-party tools like GEDmatch to further analyze your data. To give you a holistic view of genetic testing for ancestry, the book also discusses the ethics and future of genetic genealogy, as well as how adoptees and others who know little about their ancestry can especially benefit from DNA testing.<br /><br /> The book features:<ul><li>Colorful diagrams and expert definitions that explain key DNA terms and concepts such as haplogroups and DNA inheritance patterns</li><li>Detailed guides to each of the major kinds of DNA tests and which tests can solve which family mysteries, with case studies showing how each can be useful</li><li>Information about third-party tools you can use to more thoroughly analyze your test results once you've received them</li><li>Test comparison guides and research forms to help you select the most appropriate DNA test and organize your results and research once you've been tested</li></ul>Whether you've just heard of DNA testing or you've tested at all three major companies, this guide will give you the tools you need to unpuzzle your DNA and discover what it can tell you about your family tree.</div>
Gene Machine: The Race to Decipher the Secrets of the Ribosome
by Venki Ramakrishnan

Language

English

Pages

289

Publication Date

November 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A Nobel Prize-winning biologist tells the riveting story of his race to discover the inner workings of biology's most important molecule</b><div><b><br /></b></div><div><b>"Ramakrishnan's writing is so honest, lucid and engaging that I could not put this book down until I had read to the very end."</b></div><div><b>--Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of <i>The Emperor of All Maladies </i>and <i>The Gene</i></b><br /><div><b><br /></b> Everyone has heard of DNA. But by itself, DNA is just an inert blueprint for life. It is the ribosome--an enormous molecular machine made up of a million atoms--that makes DNA come to life, turning our genetic code into proteins and therefore into us. <i>Gene Machine</i> is an insider account of the race for the structure of the ribosome, a fundamental discovery that both advances our knowledge of all life and could lead to the development of better antibiotics against life-threatening diseases. But this is also a human story of Ramakrishnan's unlikely journey, from his first fumbling experiments in a biology lab to being the dark horse in a fierce competition with some of the world's best scientists. In the end, <i>Gene Machine</i> is a frank insider's account of the pursuit of high-stakes science.<br /><br /> </div> </div>
A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Human Story Retol...
by Adam Rutherford

Language

English

Pages

420

Publication Date

September 25, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>National Book Critics Circle Award—2017 Nonfiction Finalist<BR /><BR /> “Nothing less than a tour de force—a heady amalgam of science, history, a little bit of anthropology and plenty of nuanced, captivating storytelling.”—<I><B>The New York Times Book Review</B></I><B>, Editor's Choice</B><BR /><BR /> A <I>National Geographic</I> Best Book of 2017</B><BR /><BR /> In our unique genomes, every one of us carries the story of our species—births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration, and a lot of sex. But those stories have always been locked away—until now. Who are our ancestors? Where did they come from? Geneticists have suddenly become historians, and the hard evidence in our DNA has blown the lid off what we thought we knew. Acclaimed science writer Adam Rutherford explains exactly how genomics is completely rewriting the human story—from 100,000 years ago to the present.</DIV>

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