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Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society
by Nicholas A. Christakis

Language

English

Pages

442

Publication Date

March 26, 2019

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<b>"A dazzlingly erudite synthesis of history, philosophy, anthropology, genetics, sociology, economics, epidemiology, statistics, and more" (Frank Bruni, <i>New York Times</i>), <i>Blueprint</i> shows how and why evolution has placed us on a humane path -- and how we are united by our common humanity. </b><br /><br /><div>For too long, scientists have focused on the dark side of our biological heritage: our capacity for aggression, cruelty, prejudice, and self-interest. But natural selection has given us a suite of beneficial social features, including our capacity for love, friendship, cooperation, and learning. Beneath all our inventions -- our tools, farms, machines, cities, nations -- we carry with us innate proclivities to make a good society. </div><div><br /></div><div>In <i>Blueprint</i>, Nicholas A. Christakis introduces the compelling idea that our genes affect not only our bodies and behaviors, but also the ways in which we make societies, ones that are surprisingly similar worldwide. </div><div><br /></div><div>With many vivid examples -- including diverse historical and contemporary cultures, communities formed in the wake of shipwrecks, commune dwellers seeking utopia, online groups thrown together by design or involving artificially intelligent bots, and even the tender and complex social arrangements of elephants and dolphins that so resemble our own -- Christakis shows that, despite a human history replete with violence, we cannot escape our social blueprint for goodness. </div><div><br /></div><div>In a world of increasing political and economic polarization, it's tempting to ignore the positive role of our evolutionary past. But by exploring the ancient roots of goodness in civilization, <i>Blueprint </i>shows that our genes have shaped societies for our welfare and that, in a feedback loop stretching back many thousands of years, societies have shaped, and are still shaping, our genes today. </div>
Dr. Gundry's Diet Evolution: Turn Off the Genes That Are Killing ...
by Dr. Steven R. Gundry

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

March 11, 2008

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"Dr. Gundry has crafted a wise program with a powerful track record.” <br />–Mehmet Oz, M.D.<br /><br />Does losing weight and staying healthy feel like a battle? Well, it’s really a war. Your enemies are your own genes, backed by millions of years of evolution, and the only way to win is to outsmart them. Renowned surgeon and founder of Gundry MD, Dr. Steven Gundry’s revolutionary book shares the health secrets other doctors won’t tell you:<br /><br />• Why plants are “good” for you because they’re “bad” for you, and meat is “bad” because it’s “good” for you<br />• Why plateauing on this diet is actually a sign that you’re on the right track<br />• Why artificial sweeteners have the same effects as sugar on your health and your waistline<br />• Why taking antacids, statins, and drugs for high blood pressure and arthritis masks health issues instead of addressing them<br /><br />Along with the meal planner, 70 delicious recipes, and inspirational stories, Dr. Gundry’s easy-to-memorize tips will keep you healthy and on course.
The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life
by David Quammen

Language

English

Pages

480

Publication Date

August 14, 2018

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<b>Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction and A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book of 2018</b><BR> <BR> <b>Nonpareil science writer David Quammen explains how recent discoveries in molecular biology can change our understanding of evolution and life’s history, with powerful implications for human health and even our own human nature. </b><BR><BR>In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field—the study of life’s diversity and relatedness at the molecular level—is horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the movement of genes across species lines. It turns out that HGT has been widespread and important. For instance, we now know that roughly eight percent of the human genome arrived not through traditional inheritance from directly ancestral forms, but sideways by viral infection—a type of HGT.<BR> <BR> In <i>The </i><i>Tangled Tree</i> David Quammen, “one of that rare breed of science journalists who blends exploration with a talent for synthesis and storytelling” (<i>Nature</i>), chronicles these discoveries through the lives of the researchers who made them—such as Carl Woese, the most important little-known biologist of the twentieth century; Lynn Margulis, the notorious maverick whose wild ideas about “mosaic” creatures proved to be true; and Tsutomu Wantanabe, who discovered that the scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a direct result of horizontal gene transfer, bringing the deep study of genome histories to bear on a global crisis in public health.<BR> <BR> “Quammen is no ordinary writer. He is simply astonishing, one of that rare class of writer gifted with verve, ingenuity, humor, guts, and great heart” (<i>Elle</i>). Now, in <i>The Tangled Tree</i>, he explains how molecular studies of evolution have brought startling recognitions about the tangled tree of life—including where we humans fit upon it. Thanks to new technologies such as CRISPR, we now have the ability to alter even our genetic composition—through sideways insertions, as nature has long been doing. <i>The Tangled Tree </i>is a brilliant guide to our transformed understanding of evolution, of life’s history, and of our own human nature.
The Selfish Gene: 40th Anniversary edition (Oxford Landmark Scien...
by Richard Dawkins

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

June 02, 2016

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The million copy international bestseller, critically acclaimed and translated into over 25 languages.<br /><br />As influential today as when it was first published, The Selfish Gene has become a classic exposition of evolutionary thought. Professor Dawkins articulates a gene's eye view of evolution - a view giving centre stage to these persistent units of information, and in which organisms can be seen as vehicles for their replication. This imaginative, powerful, and stylistically brilliant work not only brought the insights of Neo-Darwinism to a wide audience, but galvanized the biology<br />community, generating much debate and stimulating whole new areas of research. Forty years later, its insights remain as relevant today as on the day it was published.<br /><br />This 40th anniversary edition includes a new epilogue from the author discussing the continuing relevance of these ideas in evolutionary biology today, as well as the original prefaces and foreword, and extracts from early reviews.<br /><br />Oxford Landmark Science books are 'must-read' classics of modern science writing which have crystallized big ideas, and shaped the way we think.
Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science o...
by David Reich

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

March 27, 2018

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<b>A groundbreaking book about how ancient DNA has profoundly changed our understanding of human history.</b><br /> <br />Geneticists like David Reich have made astounding advances in the field of genomics, which is proving to be as important as archeology, linguistics, and written records as a means to understand our ancestry. <br /> <br />In <i>Who We Are and How We Got Here</i>, Reich allows readers to discover how the human genome provides not only all the information a human embryo needs to develop but also the hidden story of our species. Reich delves into how the genomic revolution is transforming our understanding of modern humans and how DNA studies reveal deep inequalities among different populations, between the sexes, and among individuals. Provocatively, Reich’s book suggests that there might very well be biological differences among human populations but that these differences are unlikely to conform to common stereotypes.<br /> <br />Drawing upon revolutionary findings and unparalleled scientific studies, <i>Who We Are and How We Got Here</i> is a captivating glimpse into humankind—where we came from and what that says about our lives today.
Deep Learning for the Life Sciences: Applying Deep Learning to Ge...
by , Vijay Pande

Language

English

Pages

238

Publication Date

April 10, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><p>Deep learning has already achieved remarkable results in many fields. Now it’s making waves throughout the sciences broadly and the life sciences in particular. This practical book teaches developers and scientists how to use deep learning for genomics, chemistry, biophysics, microscopy, medical analysis, and other fields.</p><p>Ideal for practicing developers and scientists ready to apply their skills to scientific applications such as biology, genetics, and drug discovery, this book introduces several deep network primitives. You’ll follow a case study on the problem of designing new therapeutics that ties together physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine—an example that represents one of science’s greatest challenges.</p><ul><li>Learn the basics of performing machine learning on molecular data</li><li>Understand why deep learning is a powerful tool for genetics and genomics</li><li>Apply deep learning to understand biophysical systems</li><li>Get a brief introduction to machine learning with DeepChem</li><li>Use deep learning to analyze microscopic images</li><li>Analyze medical scans using deep learning techniques</li><li>Learn about variational autoencoders and generative adversarial networks</li><li>Interpret what your model is doing and how it’s working</li></ul></div>
At Our Wits' End: Why We're Becoming Less Intelligent and What it...
by Edward Dutton

Language

English

Pages

180

Publication Date

December 20, 2018

Product Description
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We are becoming less intelligent. This is the shocking yet fascinating message of At Our Wits' End. The authors take us on a journey through the growing body of evidence that we are significantly less intelligent now than we were a hundred years ago. The research proving this is, at once, profoundly thought-provoking, highly controversial, and it’s currently only read by academics. But the authors are passionate that it cannot remain ensconced in the ivory tower any longer. With At Our Wits’ End, they present the first ever popular scientific book on this crucially important issue. They prove that intelligence — which is strongly genetic — was increasing up until the breakthrough of the Industrial Revolution, because we were subject to the rigors of Darwinian Selection, meaning that lots of surviving children was the preserve of the cleverest. But since then, they show, intelligence has gone into rapid decline, because large families are increasingly the preserve of the least intelligent. The book explores how this change has occurred and, crucially, what its consequences will be for the future. Can we find a way of reversing the decline of our IQ? Or will we witness the collapse of civilization and the rise of a new Dark Age?
Growth Factors and Their Receptors in Cell Differentiation, Cance...
by G V Sherbet

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

July 12, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Recent years have seen a considerable emphasis on growth factors and the elucidation of their mode of function, which has led to the recognition that growth factors, their receptors as well as downstream elements of signalling associated with their function might be potential targets in therapeutic management of human diseases. Humanised monoclonal antibodies raised against growth factor receptors have proved to be valuable for targeted cancer treatment and in patient management.</p> <p>This book reviews the latest developments providing insights into the signalling processes involved in morphogenesis and pathogenesis with emphasis on using the elements of the signalling cascades as targets for therapeutic deployment.</p><ul><li>Provides a fundamental understanding of the basic functions of growth factors and their receptors, describing how they are linked in biological processes</li><li>Aids the development of therapeutic treatments for cancer</li><li>Focuses on the interrelationships and convergence of growth factors and their receptors in development and pathogenesis and encourages greater cooperation and integration in the areas of developmental, cancer and cancer therapeutic research</li></ul>
Humanimal: How Homo sapiens Became Nature's Most Paradoxical Crea...
by Adam Rutherford

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

March 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The bestselling author of <I>A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived</I> investigates what it means to be human—and animal</B><BR /><BR /> Publisher’s note: <I>Humanimal </I>was published in the UK under the title <I>The Book of Humans.</I><BR /><BR /> Evolutionary theory has long established that humans are animals: Modern <I>Homo sapiens</I> are primates who share an ancestor with monkeys and other great apes. Our genome is 98 percent identical to a chimpanzee’s. And yet we think of ourselves as exceptional. <I>Are we?</I><BR /><BR /> In this original and entertaining tour of life on Earth, Adam Rutherford explores the profound paradox of the “human animal.” Looking for answers across the animal kingdom, he finds that many things once considered exclusively human are not: In Australia, raptors have been observed starting fires to scatter prey; in Zambia, a chimp named Julie even started a “fashion” of wearing grass in one ear. We aren’t the only species that communicates, makes tools, or has sex for reasons other than procreation. But we <I>have</I> developed a culture far more complex than any other we’ve observed. Why has that happened, and what does it say about us?<BR /><BR /><I>Humanimal</I> is a new evolutionary history—a synthesis of the latest research on genetics, sex, migration, and much more. It reveals what unequivocally makes us animals—and also why we <I>are</I> truly extraordinary.</DIV>
She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potentia...
by Carl Zimmer

Language

English

Pages

672

Publication Date

May 29, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>2019 PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award Finalist<br />"Science book of the year"<b>—</b><i>The Guardian</i></b><br /><b>One of <i>New York Times</i> 100 Notable Books for 2018</b><br /><b>One of <i>Publishers Weekly</i>'s Top Ten Books of 2018<br />One of <i>Kirkus</i>'s Best Books of 2018 <br />One of Mental Floss's Best Books of 2018<br />One of Science Friday's Best Science Books of 2018</b><br /><b>“Extraordinary”—</b><i>New York Times Book Review   <br /></i><b>"Magisterial"<b>—</b></b><i>The Atlantic</i><b><br />"Engrossing"<b>—</b></b><i>Wired</i><b><br />"Leading contender as the most outstanding nonfiction work of the year"<b>—</b></b><i>Minneapolis Star-Tribune<br /></i><br />Celebrated <i>New York Times</i> columnist and science writer Carl Zimmer presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. Charles Darwin played a crucial part in turning heredity into a scientific question, and yet he failed spectacularly to answer it. The birth of genetics in the early 1900s seemed to do precisely that. Gradually, people translated their old notions about heredity into a language of genes. As the technology for studying genes became cheaper, millions of people ordered genetic tests to link themselves to missing parents, to distant ancestors, to ethnic identities...<br /><br />But, Zimmer writes, “Each of us carries an amalgam of fragments of DNA, stitched together from some of our many ancestors. Each piece has its own ancestry, traveling a different path back through human history. A particular fragment may sometimes be cause for worry, but most of our DNA influences who we are—our appearance, our height, our penchants—in inconceivably subtle ways.” Heredity isn’t just about genes that pass from parent to child. Heredity continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of cells that make up our bodies. We say we inherit genes from our ancestors—using a word that once referred to kingdoms and estates—but we inherit other things that matter as much or more to our lives, from microbes to technologies we use to make life more comfortable. We need a new definition of what heredity is and, through Carl Zimmer’s lucid exposition and storytelling, this resounding tour de force delivers it. <br /><br />Weaving historical and current scientific research, his own experience with his two daughters, and the kind of original reporting expected of one of the world’s best science journalists, Zimmer ultimately unpacks urgent bioethical quandaries arising from new biomedical technologies, but also long-standing presumptions about who we really are and what we can pass on to future generations.

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