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Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded: August 27, 1883
by Simon Winchester

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

February 05, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Simon Winchester, <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author of <em>The Professor and the Madman</em>, examines the legendary annihilation in 1883 of the volcano-island of Krakatoa, which was followed by an immense tsunami that killed nearly forty thousand people. The effects of the immense waves were felt as far away as France. Barometers in Bogotá and Washington, D.C., went haywire. Bodies were washed up in Zanzibar. The sound of the island's destruction was heard in Australia and India and on islands thousands of miles away. Most significant of all -- in view of today's new political climate -- the eruption helped to trigger in Java a wave of murderous anti-Western militancy among fundamentalist Muslims, one of the first outbreaks of Islamic-inspired killings anywhere. <em>Krakatoa</em> gives us an entirely new perspective on this fascinating and iconic event.</p><p>This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.</p>
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Annals of the Former World
by John McPhee

Language

English

Pages

716

Publication Date

June 15, 2000

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The Pulitzer Prize-winning view of the continent, across the fortieth parallel and down through 4.6 billion years</p><p>Twenty years ago, when John McPhee began his journeys back and forth across the United States, he planned to describe a cross section of North America at about the fortieth parallel and, in the process, come to an understanding not only of the science but of the style of the geologists he traveled with. The structure of the book never changed, but its breadth caused him to complete it in stages, under the overall title <i>Annals of the Former World</i>.</p><p>Like the terrain it covers, <i>Annals of the Former World</i> tells a multilayered tale, and the reader may choose one of many paths through it. As clearly and succinctly written as it is profoundly informed, this is our finest popular survey of geology and a masterpiece of modern nonfiction.</p><p><i>Annals of the Former World </i>is the winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction.</p>
Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation
by Dan Fagin

Language

English

Pages

562

Publication Date

March 19, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE • <b>Winner of The New York Public Library’s Helen Bernstein Book Award • “A new classic of science reporting.”—<i>The New York Times</i></b></b></b><i><b><br /></b></i><br />The riveting true story of a small town ravaged by industrial pollution, <i>Toms River</i> melds hard-hitting investigative reporting, a fascinating scientific detective story, and an unforgettable cast of characters into a sweeping narrative in the tradition of <i>A Civil Action, The Emperor of All Maladies, </i>and <i>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</i>.<br /><br />One of New Jersey’s seemingly innumerable quiet seaside towns, Toms River became the unlikely setting for a decades-long drama that culminated in 2001 with one of the largest legal settlements in the annals of toxic dumping. A town that would rather have been known for its Little League World Series champions ended up making history for an entirely different reason: a notorious cluster of childhood cancers scientifically linked to local air and water pollution. For years, large chemical companies had been using Toms River as their private dumping ground, burying tens of thousands of leaky drums in open pits and discharging billions of gallons of acid-laced wastewater into the town’s namesake river.<br /><br />In an astonishing feat of investigative reporting, prize-winning journalist Dan Fagin recounts the sixty-year saga of rampant pollution and inadequate oversight that made Toms River a cautionary example for fast-growing industrial towns from South Jersey to South China. He tells the stories of the pioneering scientists and physicians who first identified pollutants as a cause of cancer, and brings to life the everyday heroes in Toms River who struggled for justice: a young boy whose cherubic smile belied the fast-growing tumors that had decimated his body from birth; a nurse who fought to bring the alarming incidence of childhood cancers to the attention of authorities who didn’t want to listen; and a mother whose love for her stricken child transformed her into a tenacious advocate for change.<br /><br />A gripping human drama rooted in a centuries-old scientific quest, <i>Toms River</i> is a tale of dumpers at midnight and deceptions in broad daylight, of corporate avarice and government neglect, and of a few brave individuals who refused to keep silent until the truth was exposed.<br /><br /><b><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR AND <i>KIRKUS REVIEWS</i></b><br /><br /></b>“A thrilling journey full of twists and turns, <i>Toms River</i> is essential reading for our times. Dan Fagin handles topics of great complexity with the dexterity of a scholar, the honesty of a journalist, and the dramatic skill of a novelist.”<b>—Siddhartha Mukherjee, M.D., author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning <i>The Emperor of All Maladies</i></b><br /> <b> </b><br />“A complex tale of powerful industry, local politics, water rights, epidemiology, public health and cancer in a gripping, page-turning environmental thriller.”<b>—NPR</b><br /><br />“Unstoppable reading.”<b>—<i>The Philadelphia Inquirer</i></b><br />  <br /> “Meticulously researched and compellingly recounted . . . It’s every bit as important—and as well-written—as <i>A Civil Action</i> and <i>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</i>.”<b>—<i>The Star-Ledger</i></b><br />  <br /> “Fascinating . . . a gripping environmental thriller.”<b>—<i>Kirkus Reviews</i> (starred review)</b><br />  <br /> “An honest, thoroughly researched, intelligently written book.”<b>—<i>Slate</i></b><br />  <br /> “[A] hard-hitting account . . . a triumph.”<b>—<i>Nature</i></b><br /> <i> </i><br /> “Absorbing and thoughtful.”<b>—<i>USA Today</i></b><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
Faulted
by Jacqueline Druga

Language

English

Pages

213

Publication Date

September 19, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A meteor storm barreling towards earth ignites a chain reaction of devastating events that will bring the world to its knees.<br /><br />For the first time since his divorce, CJ will be able to take his son on a vacation. Along with his father, they make it a guys’ trip to the west coast. Little do they know their trip that is intended to be a lifetime of memories would include facing insurmountable odds.<br /><br />The lack of warning leaves everyone in the dark about what has occurred and vulnerable to all that unfolds. It doesn’t stop with the meteors. The disastrous events come one after another, a domino effect of annihilation.<br /><br />It isn’t just one place, it is everywhere. There’s nowhere to run. There’s nowhere to hide. Safety is a broken word. It doesn’t exist.<br /><br />Like billions of others across the world, CJ and his family are thrust into a life full of catastrophic events. <br /><br />Far from home, caught up in a whirlwind of a distraction, CJ soon discovers it’s not a matter of going anywhere…it’s a matter of staying alive until the events run their course - if that’s even possible.<br />
Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in Hist...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

October 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf.<br /><br />That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not.<br /><br />In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced.<br /><br />In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.<br /><br />And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss.<br /><br />Meticulously researched and vividly written, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> carries a warning for our time.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
Ship of Fools: An Anthology of Learned Nonsense about Primitive S...
by C.R. Hallpike

Language

English

Pages

186

Publication Date

September 30, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Dr. Hallpike spent his first ten years as an anthropologist living with mountain tribes in Ethiopia and Papua New Guinea and writing up his research for publication. He learned that primitive societies are very different from our modern industrialised societies and that it takes a considerable amount study to understand how they work.<br /><br />But since all Man's ancestors used to live in a similar manner, understanding these societies is essential to understanding the human race itself, especially when speculating about our prehistoric ancestors in East Africa. Unfortunately a wide variety of journalists and science writers, historians, linguists, biologists, and especially evolutionary psychologists erroneously believe they are qualified to write about primitive societies without knowing much about them.<br /><br />The result is that many of their superficial speculations have about as much scientific credibility as The Flintstones. The various critical studies contained in Ship of Fools: An Anthology of Learned Nonsense about Primitive Society examine some of the most popular of these speculations and evaluate their scientific merit.<br /><br />Among the learned fools whose works are critiqued are:<br /><br />Yuval Harari's Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind<br />Emma Byrne's Swearing is Good For You<br />René Girard’s theory of learned behavior<br />William Arens’s The Man-Eating Myth<br />Noam Chomsky's theory of universal grammar
Adventures of a Young Naturalist: The Zoo Quest Expeditions
by David Attenborough

Language

English

Pages

411

Publication Date

May 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>"A GREAT BOOK." --<i>THE NEW YORK TIMES</i></b></div><div><b><i><br /></i></b></div><div><b>"MARVELOUS." --<i>THE TELEGRAPH</i></b></div><div><b><i><br /></i></b></div><div><b>"A RARE GLIMPSE OF A FLEDGLING DAVID ATTENBOROUGH IN THE WILD." --<i>VANITY FAIR</i></b><br /></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div><b>Living legend and presenter of BBC's <i>Planet Earth</i> series Sir David Attenborough tells the story of his early career as a broadcaster and a naturalist in his own words.</b></div><div><br /></div> In 1954, David Attenborough, a young television presenter, was offered the opportunity of a lifetime--to travel the world finding rare and elusive animals for the London Zoo's collection, and to film the expedition for the BBC for a new show called <i>Zoo Quest.</i><br /><br />This is the story of those voyages. Staying with local tribes while trekking in search of giant anteaters in Guyana, Komodo dragons in Indonesia, and armadillos in Paraguay, he and the rest of the team contended with cannibal fish, aggressive tree porcupines, and escape-artist wild pigs, as well as treacherous terrain and unpredictable weather, to record the incredible beauty and biodiversity of these regions.<br /><br /> Written with his trademark wit and charm, <i>Adventures of a Young Naturalist </i>is not just the story of a remarkable adventure, but of the man who made us fall in love with the natural world and taught us the importance of protecting it--and who is still doing so today.
Origin Story: A Big History of Everything
by David Christian

Language

English

Pages

325

Publication Date

May 22, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"I have long been a fan of David Christian. In <i>Origin Story</i>, he elegantly weaves evidence and insights from many scientific and historical disciplines into a single, accessible historical narrative." --Bill Gates<br /><br /><i>A captivating history of the universe -- from before the dawn of time through the far reaches of the distant future.</i></b><br /><br />Most historians study the smallest slivers of time, emphasizing specific dates, individuals, and documents. But what would it look like to study the whole of history, from the big bang through the present day -- and even into the remote future? How would looking at the full span of time change the way we perceive the universe, the earth, and our very existence?<br /><br />These were the questions David Christian set out to answer when he created the field of "Big History," the most exciting new approach to understanding where we have been, where we are, and where we are going. In <i>Origin Story</i>, Christian takes readers on a wild ride through the entire 13.8 billion years we've come to know as "history." By focusing on defining events (thresholds), major trends, and profound questions about our origins, Christian exposes the hidden threads that tie everything together -- from the creation of the planet to the advent of agriculture, nuclear war, and beyond.<br /><br />With stunning insights into the origin of the universe, the beginning of life, the emergence of humans, and what the future might bring, <i>Origin Story</i> boldly reframes our place in the cosmos.<br /><br />
Lab Girl
by Hope Jahren

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

April 05, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography</b></b><br />A <i>New York Times </i>2016 Notable Book<br />National Best Seller<br />Named one of <i>TIME</i> magazine’s "100 Most Influential People"<br />An Amazon Top 20 Best Book of 2016<br />A <i>Washington Post</i> Best Memoir of 2016<br /><b>A <i>TIME</i> and <i>Entertainment Weekly </i>Best Book of 2016 <br /></b></b><br />An illuminating debut memoir of a woman in science; a moving portrait of a longtime friendship; and a stunningly fresh look at plants that will forever change how you see the natural world<br /> <br />Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. <br /><i><br />Lab Girl</i> is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work.<br /><br />Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home. <br /><br />Jahren’s probing look at plants, her astonishing tenacity of spirit, and her acute insights on nature enliven every page of this extraordinary book. <i>Lab Girl</i> opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal. Here is an eloquent demonstration of what can happen when you find the stamina, passion, and sense of sacrifice needed to make a life out of what you truly love, as you discover along the way the person you were meant to be.

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