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The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remakin...
by Jeff Goodell

Language

English

Pages

332

Publication Date

October 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>An eye-opening and essential tour of the vanishing world </strong><br /><br />What if Atlantis wasn't a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional coastal villages. With each crack in the great ice sheets of the Arctic and Antarctica, and each tick upwards of Earth's thermometer, we are moving closer to the brink of broad disaster.<br /><br />By century's end, hundreds of millions of people will be retreating from the world's shores as our coasts become inundated and our landscapes transformed. From island nations to the world's major cities, coastal regions will disappear. Engineering projects<b> </b>to hold back the water are bold and may buy some time. Yet despite international efforts and tireless research, there is no permanent solution-no barriers to erect or walls to build-that will protect us in the end from the drowning of the world as we know it.<br /><br /><i>The Water Will Come</i> is the definitive account of the coming water, why and how this will happen, and what it will all mean. As he travels across twelve countries and reports from the front lines, acclaimed journalist Jeff Goodell employs fact, science, and first-person, on-the-ground journalism to show vivid scenes from what already is becoming a water world.
Lab Girl
by Hope Jahren

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

April 05, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography</b></b><br />A <i>New York Times </i>2016 Notable Book<br />National Best Seller<br />Named one of <i>TIME</i> magazine’s "100 Most Influential People"<br />An Amazon Top 20 Best Book of 2016<br />A <i>Washington Post</i> Best Memoir of 2016<br /><b>A <i>TIME</i> and <i>Entertainment Weekly </i>Best Book of 2016 <br /></b></b><br />An illuminating debut memoir of a woman in science; a moving portrait of a longtime friendship; and a stunningly fresh look at plants that will forever change how you see the natural world<br /> <br />Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. <br /><i><br />Lab Girl</i> is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work.<br /><br />Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home. <br /><br />Jahren’s probing look at plants, her astonishing tenacity of spirit, and her acute insights on nature enliven every page of this extraordinary book. <i>Lab Girl</i> opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal. Here is an eloquent demonstration of what can happen when you find the stamina, passion, and sense of sacrifice needed to make a life out of what you truly love, as you discover along the way the person you were meant to be.
Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greates...
by Dava Sobel

Language

English

Pages

191

Publication Date

July 05, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Anyone alive in the eighteenth century would have known that "the longitude problem" was the thorniest scientific dilemma of the day-and had been for centuries. Lacking the ability to measure their longitude, sailors throughout the great ages of exploration had been literally lost at sea as soon as they lost sight of land. Thousands of lives, and the increasing fortunes of nations, hung on a resolution. The scientific establishment of Europe-from Galileo to Sir Isaac Newton-had mapped the heavens in both hemispheres in its certain pursuit of a celestial answer. In stark contrast, one man, John Harrison, dared to imagine a mechanical solution-a clock that would keep precise time at sea, something no clock had ever been able to do on land. Longitude is the dramatic human story of an epic scientific quest, and of Harrison's forty-year obsession with building his perfect timekeeper, known today as the chronometer. Full of heroism and chicanery, it is also a fascinating brief history of astronomy, navigation, and clockmaking, and opens a new window on our world.
Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in Hist...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

October 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf.<br /><br />That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not.<br /><br />In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced.<br /><br />In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.<br /><br />And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss.<br /><br />Meticulously researched and vividly written, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> carries a warning for our time.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>ONE OF THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW'S</i> 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b></p><p><b>A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes</b> <br />Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and <i>New Yorker</i> writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.</p>
Granite Mountain: The First-Hand Account of a Tragic Wildfire, It...
by Brendan McDonough

Language

English

Pages

260

Publication Date

May 03, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>The true story behind the events that inspired the major motion picture <i>Only the Brave</i>.<i><br /><br /></i> A </strong><strong>"unique and bracing" (<em>Booklist</em>) first-person account by the sole survivor of Arizona's disastrous 2013 Yarnell Hill Fire, which took the lives of 19 "hotshots"--firefighters trained specifically to battle wildfires.<br /><br /></strong>Brendan McDonough was on the verge of becoming a hopeless, inveterate heroin addict when he, for the sake of his young daughter, decided to turn his life around. He enlisted in the Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team of elite firefighters based in Prescott, Arizona. Their leader, Eric Marsh, was in a desperate crunch after four hotshots left the unit, and perhaps seeing a glimmer of promise in the skinny would-be recruit, he took a chance on the unlikely McDonough, and the chance paid off. Despite the crew's skepticism, and thanks in large part to Marsh's firm but loving encouragement, McDonough unlocked a latent drive and dedication, going on to successfully battle a number of blazes and eventually win the confidence of the men he came to call his brothers.<br /><br />Then, on June 30, 2013, while McDonough--"Donut" as he'd been dubbed by his team--served as lookout, they confronted a freak, 3,000-degree inferno in nearby Yarnell, Arizona. The relentless firestorm ultimately trapped his hotshot brothers, tragically killing all 19 of them within minutes. Nationwide, it was the greatest loss of firefighter lives since the 9/11 attacks. <br /><br /><i>Granite Mountain</i> is a gripping memoir that traces McDonough's story of finding his way out of the dead end of drugs, finding his purpose among the Granite Mountain Hotshots, and the minute-by-minute account of the fateful day he lost the very men who had saved him. A harrowing and redemptive tale of resilience in the face of tragedy, <i>Granite Mountain</i> is also a powerful reminder of the heroism of the people who put themselves in harm's way to protect us every day.<br />
Electric Earth Science discharge expansion hollow (Japanese Editi...
by miura kazunori

Language

Japanese

Pages

Publication Date

November 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
重力波の観測は間違いだったをはじめとして、従来の科学を17世紀に戻って見直しました。<br />科学の歴史を紐解くと、科学は一様に進歩してきたとは言えないことがわかります。多くの古代文明が精密な宇宙の運行を独自の天文学で把握して、暦を作っています。マヤ文明の暦は紀元前5世紀から使われており、天体の運動はコペルニクスやガリレオより早く解明され、粘土板や壁画に刻まれました。アステカの精巧な暦は24トンもある花崗岩に彫刻されました。しかしヨーロッパでは天文学は後退してしまい数世紀もの間、太陽と地球は主導権が転倒していました。偉大な太陽はちっぽけな地球の周りを回っていたのです。<br />21世紀に生きる現代の私たちは、近代科学以前の常識を、宗教的であるとか、非科学的であるとして、ときに嘲笑します。近代科学は、弾丸より速い飛行機を飛ばし、月や宇宙に人間を送り込んでいます。20世紀は人類の飛躍の世紀でした。近代科学の詳細を知らない一般の人でも、近代科学の持つ優位性を無条件で確信しています。<br />しかし17世紀に始まった科学革命が途中で方向を見失い、誤った袋小路に入ってしまったとするとどうでしょうか? 20世紀の科学を支えた相対性理論は21世紀になり、重力波が観測され、もはや疑うことはないと信じられています。相対性理論はニュートン力学を超えるセオリーとして認められてきました。本当でしょうか?<br />本書では、19世紀の古典科学に立ち返り、基本的力である重力を再検討します。そして地球科学の柱であるプレートテクトニクスを地球膨張説で置き換える試みをしました。その結果である地球内部の広大な空間の発見は、地球空洞説の科学的証明であると考えています。また、重力や圧力で説明されてきた天体現象、太陽系を駆動する動力源から地震までを電磁気現象として捉えなおします。<br /><br />現在の地球科学の常識を見てみましょう。地球の大きさは半径が6400km、ほぼ球体です。地表から、地殻、マントル、外核、内核と構造があるとされます。地殻には、花崗岩、玄武岩などの岩石、マントルはカンラン石などの比重の重い岩石、外核はニッケル、鉄が溶けている状態、内核はニッケル、鉄が固体になっている。内部に行くにしたがって圧力が重力により高くなっています。<br />高温の外核はマントルを加熱します。マントルは固体ですが、不思議なことに非常にゆっくりと対流します。マントルの対流は、地殻との間にある、玄武岩、ハンレイ岩の厚い岩盤をゆっくりと動かします。プレートテクトニクスです。プレートの移動は地殻にひずみをもたらし、堅い岩石にバネのようにひずみを蓄積します。この岩石に蓄えられたひずみの解放が地震です。<br />プレートの移動は、大陸の地殻を動かし、衝突したプレートは山脈を作ります。海底から拡大したプレートは、大陸の下にもぐっていきます。軽いはずのプレートが比重の重いマントルに沈むのです。<br />プレートが沈んでいる場所では、地殻にひずみがたまり地震が多く起きます。マントルからの熱が上昇してくるので、マグマによる火山活動が活発になります。<br />ほとんどの読者は、以上のような地球へのイメージを持っていると思います。しかし、これらはすべて実証されたものではないのです。仮定の上に仮定を積み上げた推論です。本書は、地球科学の大本までさかのぼり、既存の科学にとらわれずに、地球の本当の姿を考えたものです。<br /><br /><br />目次<br /><br />1.重力は神話? 否妄想に過ぎない<br />おかしな重力<br />キャベンディッシュの間違いに気づいたファラデー<br />次々と提唱される新重力理論<br />重力は2種類ある<br />コラム 宇宙船内での人工重力の作り方<br /><br />2.地球はなぜ丸い? 空洞の発見<br />科学を停滞させる重力神話<br />地球内部に重力はない?<br />空洞の存在が見えてきた<br />コラム 重力波の観測はSLFという電波をまちがえた<br /><br />3.電流はなぜ流れる?<br />プラズマとは何か?<br />電子と電流<br /><br />4.膨張する地球<br />シンクホール 地球膨張による穴<br />岩石、水が湧いてくる<br />コラム 太陽は空っぽかもしれない<br /><br />5.地球膨張のメカニズム 海と大気の起源<br />マグマオーシャンはなかった<br />相転移による体積拡大<br />コラム 日本海海底の不思議なスジ<br /><br />6.星を生む木星<br />星は糸を巻いたようにできている<br />木星わたあめ製造機<br />海底に残る筋<br />コラム 丸い石→石が丸くなる→惑星の卵?<br /><br />7.地球の内部構造<br />遠心力で岩石が湧いて大陸になった<br /><br />8.公転・自転と地球磁気<br />電気で動く地球<br />電気引力・反発力による公転<br />自転はファラデーモーター<br />コラム 空が青いのはなぜ?<br /><br />9.地震は放電現象<br />岩石が圧電効果で変形する<br />津波は海中での放電<br />コラム 地震避雷針<br /><br />10.地形はどうやってできた?<br />膨張による地形形成<br />放電で作られた山々<br />自転が作る地形<br />コラム 太陽フレアと地震、台風<br /><br />11.古代文明と小惑星帯<br />鉄鉱石、化石<br />惑星の崩壊とフェイトン<br />惑星間移住<br />ピラミッドは超光速通信機<br /><br />
Quakeland: On the Road to America's Next Devastating Earthquake
by Kathryn Miles

Language

English

Pages

367

Publication Date

August 29, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A journey around the United States in search of the truth about the threat of earthquakes leads to spine-tingling discoveries, unnerving experts, and ultimately the kind of preparations that will actually help guide us through disasters. It’s a road trip full of surprises.</b><br /> <b><i> </i></b><br /> Earthquakes. You need to worry about them only if you’re in San Francisco, right? Wrong. We have been making enormous changes to subterranean America, and Mother Earth, as always, has been making some of her own. . . . The consequences for our real estate, our civil engineering, and our communities will be huge because they will include earthquakes most of us do not expect and cannot imagine—at least not without reading <i>Quakeland</i>. Kathryn Miles descends into mines in the Northwest, dissects Mississippi levee engineering studies, uncovers the horrific risks of an earthquake in the Northeast, and interviews the seismologists, structual engineers, and emergency managers around the country who are addressing this ground shaking threat. <br /><br />As Miles relates, the era of human-induced earthquakes began in 1962 in Colorado after millions of gallons of chemical-weapon waste was pumped underground in the Rockies. More than 1,500 quakes over the following seven years resulted. The Department of Energy plans to dump spent nuclear rods in the same way. Evidence of fracking’s seismological impact continues to mount. . . . Humans as well as fault lines built our “quakeland”.<br /><br /> What will happen when Memphis, home of FedEx's 1.5-million-packages-a-day hub, goes offline as a result of an earthquake along the unstable Reelfoot Fault? FEMA has estimated that a modest 7.0 magnitude quake (twenty of these happen per year around the world) along the Wasatch Fault under Salt Lake City would put a $33 billion dent in our economy. When the Fukushima  reactor melted down, tens of thousands were displaced. If New York’s Indian Point nuclear power plant blows, ten million people will be displaced. How would that evacuation even begin?<br /><br /> Kathryn Miles’ tour of our land is as fascinating and frightening as it is irresistibly compelling.
Climate Change: The Facts 2017
by , Craig Idso

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

August 09, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
PLEASE NOTE FULL COLOUR GRAPHS BEST READ ON KINDLE APP (MAY BE DIFFICULT TO INTERPRET IN GREYSCALE ON KINDLE DEVICES)<br /><br />There are certain things best not discussed with neighbours over the fence, at barbeques and at gatherings of the extended family; these topics used to include sex and politics, but more recently climate change has become a sensitive issue and has, consequently, crept onto the best-to-avoid list. At the same time as climate change has assumed this status, it has become a topic more likely to be included in a church sermon. Indeed, while once considered the concern of scientific institutions, climate change is now increasingly incorporated into faith-based initiatives with even Pope Francis weighing in, issuing an encyclical on the subject as explained in chapter 16 by Paul Driessen.<br /><br />There are those who believe Pope Francis, and admire another climate change exponent, Al Gore – who marketed An Inconvenient Truth with comment, ‘the fact of global warming is not in question’ and that ‘its consequences for the world we live in will be disastrous if left unchecked’. And then there are the die-hard sceptics who dare to doubt. Many claim that these climate sceptics and their support base have an undue political influence, successfully thwarting attempts to implement necessary public policy change.<br /><br />This book is a collection of chapters by so-called climate sceptics. Each writer was asked to write on an aspect of the topic in which they are considered to have some expertise. None of them deny that climate change is real, but instead, they point out how extremely complex the topic of Earth’s climate is, with some of the contributors also querying the, often generally accepted, solutions.<br /><br />As you will see, this is not a book with just one message, except perhaps that there is a need for more scrutiny of the data, and of our own prejudices. This book’s reason for being is to give pause for thought, and to throw some alternative ideas and considerations into the mix.<br />
The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America
by Timothy Egan

Language

English

Pages

349

Publication Date

October 19, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Timothy Egan turns his historian's eye to the largest-ever forest fire in America and offers an epic, cautionary tale for our time. </B></P><P>On the afternoon of August 20, 1910, a battering ram of wind moved through the drought-stricken national forests of Washington, Idaho, and Montana, whipping the hundreds of small blazes burning across the forest floor into a roaring inferno that jumped from treetop to ridge as it raged, destroying towns and timber in the blink of an eye. Forest rangers had assembled nearly ten thousand men to fight the fires, but no living person had seen anything like those flames, and neither the rangers nor anyone else knew how to subdue them. Egan recreates the struggles of the overmatched rangers against the implacable fire with unstoppable dramatic force, and the larger story of outsized president Teddy Roosevelt and his chief forester, Gifford Pinchot, that follows is equally resonant. Pioneering the notion of conservation, Roosevelt and Pinchot did nothing less than create the idea of public land as our national treasure, owned by every citizen. Even as TR's national forests were smoldering they were saved: The heroism shown by his rangers turned public opinion permanently in favor of the forests, though it changed the mission of the forest service in ways we can still witness today.</P><P>This e-book includes a sample chapter of SHORT NIGHTS OF THE SHADOW CATCHER.</P></DIV>

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