Categories

 > Science & Math > Earth Sciences

35,473 results were found

Sort by:

Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of a Mysterious Continent
by Gabrielle Walker

Language

English

Pages

421

Publication Date

January 15, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Antarctica is the most alien place on the planet, the only part of the earth where humans could never survive unaided. Out of our fascination with it have come many books, most of which focus on only one aspect of its unique strangeness. None has managed to capture the whole story—until now.<br /><br />Drawing on her broad travels across the continent, in <i>Antarctica </i>Gabrielle Walker weaves all the significant threads of life on the vast ice sheet into an intricate tapestry, illuminating what it really feels like to be there and why it draws so many different kinds of people. With her we witness cutting-edge science experiments, visit the South Pole, lodge with American, Italian, and French researchers, drive snowdozers, drill ice cores, and listen for the message Antarctica is sending us about our future in an age of global warming.<br /><br />This is a thrilling trip to the farthest reaches of earth by one of the best science writers working today.</p>
Underland: A Deep Time Journey
by Robert Macfarlane

Language

English

Pages

495

Publication Date

June 04, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>National Bestseller • <em>New York Times</em> “100 Notable Books of the Year” • <em>NPR</em> “Favorite Books of 2019” • <em>Guardian</em> “100 Best Books of the 21st Century” • Winner of the National Outdoor Book Award<br /><br /><br /><br />From the best-selling, award-winning author of <em>Landmarks</em> and <em>The Old Ways</em>, a haunting voyage into the planet’s past and future.</strong></p><br /><p>Hailed as "the great nature writer of this generation" (<em>Wall Street Journal</em>), Robert Macfarlane is the celebrated author of books about the intersections of the human and the natural realms. In <em>Underland</em>, he delivers his masterpiece: an epic exploration of the Earth’s underworlds as they exist in myth, literature, memory, and the land itself.</p><br /><p>In this highly anticipated sequel to his international bestseller <em>The Old Ways</em>, Macfarlane takes us on an extraordinary journey into our relationship with darkness, burial, and what lies beneath the surface of both place and mind. Traveling through “deep time”—the dizzying expanses of geologic time that stretch away from the present—he moves from the birth of the universe to a post-human future, from the prehistoric art of Norwegian sea caves to the blue depths of the Greenland ice cap, from Bronze Age funeral chambers to the catacomb labyrinth below Paris, and from the underground fungal networks through which trees communicate to a deep-sunk “hiding place” where nuclear waste will be stored for 100,000 years to come. Woven through Macfarlane’s own travels are the unforgettable stories of descents into the underland made across history by explorers, artists, cavers, divers, mourners, dreamers, and murderers, all of whom have been drawn for different reasons to seek what Cormac McCarthy calls “the awful darkness within the world.”</p><br /><p>Global in its geography and written with great lyricism and power, <em>Underland</em> speaks powerfully to our present moment. Taking a deep-time view of our planet, Macfarlane here asks a vital and unsettling question: “Are we being good ancestors to the future Earth?” <em>Underland</em> marks a new turn in Macfarlane’s long-term mapping of the relations of landscape and the human heart. From its remarkable opening pages to its deeply moving conclusion, it is a journey into wonder, loss, fear, and hope. At once ancient and urgent, this is a book that will change the way you see the world.</p>
The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
by David Wallace-Wells

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

February 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER • “<i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon.”—Andrew Solomon, author of <i>The Noonday Demon</i></b><br /><br /><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>The New York Times Book Review </i>• <i>Time </i>• NPR • <i>Toronto Star </i>• <i>GQ</i> • <i>The Times Literary Supplement</i> • The New York Public Library • <i>Kirkus Reviews</i><br /></b><br />It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible—food shortages, refugee emergencies, climate wars and economic devastation.<br /><br /> An “epoch-defining book” (<i>The</i> <i>Guardian</i>) and “this generation’s <i>Silent Spring</i>” (<i>The Washington Post</i>), <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is both a travelogue of the near future and a meditation on how that future will look to those living through it—the ways that warming promises to transform global politics, the meaning of technology and nature in the modern world, the sustainability of capitalism and the trajectory of human progress.<br /><br /> <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is also an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation—today’s.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i></b><br /><br /><i>“The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet.”<b>—Farhad Manjoo, <i>The New York Times</i></b><i><b><br /></b></i><br />“Riveting. . . . Some readers will find Mr. Wallace-Wells’s outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.”<b>—The Economist</b><br /><br />“Potent and evocative. . . . Wallace-Wells has resolved to offer something other than the standard narrative of climate change. . . . He avoids the ‘eerily banal language of climatology’ in favor of lush, rolling prose.”<b>—Jennifer Szalai, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br />“The book has potential to be this generation’s <i>Silent Spring</i>.”<i><b>—The Washington Post</b></i><br /><br />“<i>The Uninhabitable Earth,</i> which has become a best seller, taps into the underlying emotion of the day: fear. . . . I encourage people to read this book.”<b>—Alan Weisman, <i>The New York Review of Books</i></b>
The Big Crazy: A Gripping Police Procedural Thriller (The Skip La...
by Julie Smith

Language

English

Pages

278

Publication Date

October 25, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h3>PHONES ARE OUT AND THE CITY’S UNDER WATER—<br />A FIELD DAY FOR CRIMINALS! AND LOTS OF THEM ARE COPS…</h3><p>August 29, 2005 - Doomsday: New Orleans is eighty per cent under water—no electricity, no phones, no 911 service, <i>no rules</i>. <b>Facing the complete breakdown of systems and normality, New Orleans homicide Detective Skip Langdon is on her own</b> to interpret and execute the only direction she’s given: <i>Get out there and keep the peace.</i></p><p>With communications down and all emergency services on search and rescue, <b>all Skip can hope to accomplish is helping the person right in front of her</b>. More than once that person turns out to be Billy, a gutsy 15-year-old from Treme who’s in greater danger of being swamped by his chaotic home life than the Cat 5 hurricane Skip shelters him from. </p><p> When she escorts him home and discovers the scene of a possible homicide, homicide detecting must take a back seat to maintaining order—if not peace. Outrageous rumors are swirling, stirring up unrest, but what really bothers her is the one about <b>a police department order to use the chaos as a cover for “cleaning up” by rounding up criminals and assassinating them</b>. Now that just can’t be true. <i>Can it?</i></p><p>But after she hears it for the third time, Skip teams up with <b>the only cop in the city she’s positive she can trust, her former partner</b>, movie-star handsome, kickass, praline-sweet Adam Abasolo. They may not be able to fix everything, but, as the bodies pile up, they are damn sure going to hit back at the guys who’re giving their department a black eye.</p><p>On any regular weekday, New Orleans lives up to its billing as The Big Crazy. In post-Katrina New Orleans, where the dirty cops and lunatics are running the asylum, author Julie Smith also takes us inside the <i>actual</i> asylum, Charity Hospital <b>emergency psych unit, an unexpected oasis of comfort</b> in stark contrast to endless amounts of ever-present filthy water and hordes of half-drowned people. </p><p><b>Smith strikes just the right note, capturing the massive tragedy of the events and the inevitable comedy</b> as the survivors struggle to make sense of the closest thing to hell squared that any of them has ever seen. </p><p><b>Mystery fans who love hard-boiled women sleuths, lots of action and adventure, and offbeat police procedurals will love Detective Skip Langdon.</b></p>
A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition
by Bill Bryson

Language

English

Pages

692

Publication Date

November 30, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>This new edition of the acclaimed bestseller is lavishly illustrated to convey, in pictures as in words, Bill Bryson’s exciting, informative journey into the world of science.</b><i><br /></i><br />In <i>A Short History of Nearly Everything</i>, the bestselling author of <i>A Walk in the Woods </i>and<i> The Body,</i> confronts his greatest challenge yet: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as his territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being <i>us</i>. The result is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.<br /><br />Now, in this handsome new edition, Bill Bryson’s words are supplemented by full-color artwork that explains in visual terms the concepts and wonder of science, at the same time giving face to the major players in the world of scientific study. Eloquently and entertainingly described, as well as richly illustrated, science has never been more involving or entertaining.
The Seine: The River that Made Paris
by Elaine Sciolino

Language

English

Pages

380

Publication Date

October 29, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A vibrant, enchanting tour of the Seine from longtime <em>New York Times</em> foreign correspondent and best-selling author Elaine Sciolino.</strong></p><br /><p>Elaine Sciolino came to Paris as a young foreign correspondent and was seduced by a river. In <em>The Seine</em>, she tells the story of that river from its source on a remote plateau of Burgundy to the wide estuary where its waters meet the sea, and the cities, tributaries, islands, ports, and bridges in between.</p><br /><p>Sciolino explores the Seine through its rich history and lively characters: a bargewoman, a riverbank bookseller, a houseboat dweller, a famous cinematographer known for capturing the river’s light. She discovers the story of Sequana—the Gallo-Roman healing goddess who gave the Seine its name—and follows the river through Paris, where it determined the city’s destiny and now snakes through all aspects of daily life. She patrols with river police, rows with a restorer of antique boats, sips champagne at a vineyard along the river, and even dares to go for a swim. She finds the Seine in art, literature, music, and movies from Renoir and <em>Les Misérables</em> to Puccini and <em>La La Land</em>. Along the way, she reveals how the river that created Paris has touched her own life. A powerful afterword tells the dramatic story of how water from the depths of the Seine saved Notre-Dame from destruction during the devastating fire in April 2019.</p><br /><p>A “storyteller at heart” (June Sawyers, <em>Chicago Tribune</em>) with a “sumptuous eye for detail” (Sinclair McKay, <em>Daily Telegraph</em>), Sciolino braids memoir, travelogue, and history through the Seine’s winding route. <em>The Seine</em> offers a love letter to Paris and the most romantic river in the world, and invites readers to explore its magic for themselves.</p>
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>ONE OF THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW'S</i> 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b></p><p><b>A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes</b> <br />Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and <i>New Yorker</i> writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.</p>
Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise an...
by Les Standiford

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

August 05, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The fast-paced and gripping true account of the extraordinary construction and spectacular demise of the Key West Railroad—one of the greatest engineering feats ever undertaken, destroyed in one fell swoop by the strongest storm ever to hit U.S. shores. </b><br /><br /> In 1904, the brilliant and driven entrepreneur Henry Flagler, partner to John D. Rockefeller, dreamed of a railway connecting the island of Key West to the Florida mainland, crossing a staggering 153 miles of open ocean—an engineering challenge beyond even that of the Panama Canal. Many considered the project impossible, but build it they did. The railroad stood as a magnificent achievement for more than twenty-two years, heralded as “the Eighth Wonder of the World,” until its total destruction in 1935's deadly storm of the century. <br /><br />In<i> Last Train to Paradise, </i>Standiford celebrates this crowning achievement of Gilded Age ambition, bringing to life a sweeping tale of the powerful forces of human ingenuity colliding with the even greater forces of nature’s wrath.
Following the Water: A Hydromancer's Notebook
by David M. Carroll

Language

English

Pages

207

Publication Date

August 12, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>A nature journal of New Hampshire wetlands life, from an author Annie Dillard calls “a national treasure.”</b><br />  <br /><i>Following the Water </i>is the intensely observed chronicle of a naturalist’s annual March-to-November wetlands immersion—from the joy of the first turtle sighting in March to the gorgeously described, vibrant trilling of tree frogs in late May to the ancient sense of love and loss experienced each autumn, when it is time once again to part with open water.<br />  <br /> Illustrated with the author’s fine pen-and-ink drawings, <i>Following the Water </i>is a gorgeous evocation of nature, illuminating the ecology and life histories of hawks, foxes, rare wood and spotted turtles, and more, from an author who was a recipient of a MacArthur “genius grant” as well as a John Burroughs Medal for his book <i>Swampwalker’s Journal</i>.<br />  </p>
Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us
by Ruth Kassinger

Language

English

Pages

323

Publication Date

June 11, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“No organisms are more important to life as we know it than algae. In <i>Slime</i>, Ruth Kassinger gives this under-appreciated group its due.”</b> —<b>Elizabeth Kolbert<br /><br /> Say “algae” and most people think of pond scum. What they don’t know is that without algae, none of us would exist.</b><br /><br /> There are as many algae on Earth as stars in the universe, and they have been essential to life on our planet for eons. Algae created the Earth we know today, with its oxygen-rich atmosphere, abundant oceans, and coral reefs. Crude oil is made of dead algae, and algae are the ancestors of all plants. Today, seaweed production is a multi-billion dollar industry, with algae hard at work to make your sushi, chocolate milk, beer, paint, toothpaste, shampoo and so much more.<br />  <br /> In <i>Slime</i> we’ll meet the algae innovators working toward a sustainable future: from seaweed farmers in South Korea, to scientists using it to clean the dead zones in our waterways, to the entrepreneurs fighting to bring algae fuel and plastics to market.<br />  <br /> With a multitude of lively, surprising science and history, Ruth Kassinger takes readers on an around-the-world, behind-the-scenes, and into-the-kitchen tour. Whether you thought algae was just the gunk in your fish tank or you eat seaweed with your oatmeal, <i>Slime</i> will delight and amaze with its stories of the good, the bad, and the up-and-coming.

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay – Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldn’t have due to the Kindle eliminating ...

David Foster Wallace – Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz – The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. I’ve found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found ad...

Ernest Hemingway – The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen King’s On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But King’s prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of King’s greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. King’s On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft tha...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

$25 Amazon.com Gift Card giveaway

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com