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Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
by John Carreyrou

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

May 21, 2018

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Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BEST SELLER •  NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY: NPR,<i> The New York Times Book Review</i>, <i>Time</i>, <i>Wall Street Journal, Washington Post</i> • The McKinsey Business Book of the Year </b><br />  <br /> <b>The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos, the one-time multibillion-dollar biotech startup founded by Elizabeth Holmes—now the subject of the HBO documentary <i>The Inventor—</i>by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end.<br /><br /> “The story is even crazier than I expected, and I found myself unable to put it down once I started. This book has everything: elaborate scams, corporate intrigue, magazine cover stories, ruined family relationships, and the demise of a company once valued at nearly $10 billion.” —Bill Gates</b><br /><br /> In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup “unicorn” promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes’s worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn’t work.<br /><br /> A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator
by Timothy C. Winegard

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

August 06, 2019

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Customer Reviews
<b>“Hugely impressive, a major work.”—<i>NPR<br /></i><br />A pioneering and groundbreaking work of narrative nonfiction that offers a dramatic new perspective on the history of humankind, showing how through millennia, the mosquito has been the single most powerful force in determining humanity’s fate.</b><br />  <br /> Why was gin and tonic the cocktail of choice for British colonists in India and Africa? What does Starbucks have to thank for its global domination? What has protected the lives of popes for millennia? Why did Scotland surrender its sovereignty to England? What was George Washington's secret weapon during the American Revolution? <br /><br /> The answer to all these questions, and many more, is the mosquito.<br />  <br /> Across our planet since the dawn of humankind, this nefarious pest, roughly the size and weight of a grape seed, has been at the frontlines of history as the grim reaper, the harvester of human populations, and the ultimate agent of historical change. As the mosquito transformed the landscapes of civilization, humans were unwittingly required to respond to its piercing impact and universal projection of power.<br />  <br /> The mosquito has determined the fates of empires and nations, razed and crippled economies, and decided the outcome of pivotal wars, killing nearly half of humanity along the way. She (only females bite) has dispatched an estimated 52 billion people from a total of 108 billion throughout our relatively brief existence. As the greatest purveyor of extermination we have ever known, she has played a greater role in shaping our human story than any other living thing with which we share our global village.<br />  <br /> Imagine for a moment a world without deadly mosquitoes, or any mosquitoes, for that matter? Our history and the world we know, or think we know, would be completely unrecognizable.<br />  <br /> Driven by surprising insights and fast-paced storytelling, <i>The Mosquito</i> is the extraordinary untold story of the mosquito’s reign through human history and her indelible impact on our modern world order.
Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams
by Matthew Walker

Language

English

Pages

369

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>New York Times </i>bestseller and international sensation, this “stimulating and important book” (<i>Financial Times</i>) from the director of UC Berkeley’s Center for Human Sleep Science is a fascinating dive into the purpose and power of slumber. As the <i>Guardian</i> said, Walker explains “how a good night's shut-eye can make us cleverer, more attractive, slimmer, happier, healthier, and ward off cancer.”</b><br /><br />With two appearances on <i>CBS This Morning </i>and <i>Fresh Air</i>'s most popular interview of 2017, Matthew Walker has made abundantly clear that sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life. Until very recently, science had no answer to the question of why we sleep, or what good it served, or why we suffer such devastating health consequences when it is absent. Compared to the other basic drives in life—eating, drinking, and reproducing—the purpose of sleep remains more elusive.<br /> <br /> Within the brain, sleep enriches a diversity of functions, including our ability to learn, memorize, and make logical decisions. It recalibrates our emotions, restocks our immune system, fine-tunes our metabolism, and regulates our appetite. Dreaming creates a virtual reality space in which the brain melds past and present knowledge, inspiring creativity.<br /> <br /> In this “compelling and utterly convincing” (<i>The Sunday Times</i>) book, preeminent neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker provides a revolutionary exploration of sleep, examining how it affects every aspect of our physical and mental well-being. Charting the most cutting-edge scientific breakthroughs, and marshalling his decades of research and clinical practice, Walker explains how we can harness sleep to improve learning, mood and energy levels, regulate hormones, prevent cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes, slow the effects of aging, and increase longevity. He also provides actionable steps towards getting a better night’s sleep every night.<br /> <br /> Clear-eyed, fascinating, and accessible, <i>Why We Sleep</i> is a crucial and illuminating book. Written with the precision of Atul Gawande, Andrew Solomon, and Sherwin Nuland, it is “recommended for night-table reading in the most pragmatic sense” (<i>The</i> <i>New York Times Book Review</i>).
The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World
by Steve Brusatte

Language

English

Pages

401

Publication Date

April 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A sweeping and groundbreaking history of the age of dinosaurs, from one of our finest young scientists</strong></p><p><em>The dinosaurs. </em>66 million years ago, the Earth’s most fearsome and spectacular creatures vanished. Today their extraordinary true story remains one of our planet’s great mysteries. </p><p>In this stunning narrative spanning more than 200 million years, Steve Brusatte, a young American paleontologist who has emerged as one of the foremost stars of the field—discovering ten new species and leading groundbreaking scientific studies and fieldwork—masterfully tells the complete, surprising, and <em>new </em>history of the dinosaurs, drawing on cutting-edge science to dramatically bring to life their lost world and illuminate their enigmatic origins, spectacular flourishing, astonishing diversity, cataclysmic extinction, and startling living legacy. Captivating and revelatory, <em>The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs</em> is a book for the ages.</p><p>Brusatte traces the evolution of dinosaurs from their inauspicious start as small shadow dwellers—themselves the beneficiaries of a mass extinction caused by volcanic eruptions at the beginning of the Triassic period—into the dominant array of species every wide-eyed child memorizes today, <em>T. rex</em>,<em> Triceratops</em>, <em>Brontosaurus</em>, and more. This gifted scientist and writer re-creates the dinosaurs’ peak during the Jurassic and Cretaceous, when thousands of species thrived, and winged and feathered dinosaurs, the prehistoric ancestors of modern birds, emerged. The story continues to the end of the Cretaceous period, when a giant asteroid or comet struck the planet and nearly every dinosaur species (but not all) died out, in the most extraordinary extinction event in earth’s history, one full of lessons for today as we confront a “sixth extinction.”</p><p>Brusatte also recalls compelling stories from his globe-trotting expeditions during one of the most exciting eras in dinosaur research—which he calls “a new golden age of discovery”—and offers thrilling accounts of some of the remarkable findings he and his colleagues have made, including primitive human-sized tyrannosaurs; monstrous carnivores even larger than <em>T. rex</em>; and paradigm-shifting feathered raptors from China.</p><p>An electrifying scientific history that unearths the dinosaurs’ epic saga, <em>The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs</em> will be a definitive and treasured account for decades to come.</p>
The Talent Code: Greatness Isn't Born. It's Grown. Here's How.
by Daniel Coyle

Language

English

Pages

258

Publication Date

April 16, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>What is the secret of talent? How do we unlock it? This groundbreaking work provides readers with tools they can use to maximize potential in themselves and others.</b><br /><br />Whether you’re coaching soccer or teaching a child to play the piano, writing a novel or trying to improve your golf swing, this revolutionary book shows you how to grow talent by tapping into a newly discovered brain mechanism.</p><p>Drawing on cutting-edge neurology and firsthand research gathered on journeys to nine of the world’s talent hotbeds—from the baseball fields of the Caribbean to a classical-music academy in upstate New York—Coyle identifies the three key elements that will allow you to develop your gifts and optimize your performance in sports, art, music, math, or just about anything.</p><p>• Deep Practice Everyone knows that practice is a key to success. What everyone doesn’t know is that specific kinds of practice can increase skill up to ten times faster than conventional practice.</p><p>• Ignition We all need a little motivation to get started. But what separates truly high achievers from the rest of the pack? A higher level of commitment—call it passion—born out of our deepest unconscious desires and triggered by certain primal cues. Understanding how these signals work can help you ignite passion and catalyze skill development.</p><p>• Master Coaching What are the secrets of the world’s most effective teachers, trainers, and coaches? Discover the four virtues that enable these “talent whisperers” to fuel passion, inspire deep practice, and bring out the best in their students.</p><p>These three elements work together within your brain to form myelin, a microscopic neural substance that adds vast amounts of speed and accuracy to your movements and thoughts. Scientists have discovered that myelin might just be the holy grail: the foundation of all forms of greatness, from Michelangelo’s to Michael Jordan’s. The good news about myelin is that it isn’t fixed at birth; to the contrary, it grows, and like anything that grows, it can be cultivated and nourished.</p><p>Combining revelatory analysis with illuminating examples of regular people who have achieved greatness, this book will not only change the way you think about talent, but equip you to reach your own highest potential.</p>
Lab Girl
by Hope Jahren

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

April 05, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>National Bestseller<br /><br />“A beautifully written memoir about the life of a woman in science, a brilliant friendship, and the profundity of trees. Terrific.”—Barack Obama<br /><br /><b> <b><b>Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography</b><br /><br />A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book</b></b><br /><br /></b>Geobiologist Hope Jahren has spent her life studying trees, flowers, seeds, and soil.<i> Lab Girl </i>is her revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also a celebration of the lifelong curiosity, humility, and passion that drive every scientist. In these pages, Hope takes us back to her Minnesota childhood, where she spent hours in unfettered play in her father’s college laboratory. She tells us how she found a sanctuary in science, learning to perform lab work “with both the heart and the hands.” She introduces us to Bill, her brilliant, eccentric lab manager. And she extends the mantle of <i>scientist </i>to each one of her readers, inviting us to join her in observing and protecting our environment. Warm, luminous, compulsively readable, <i>Lab Girl</i> vividly demonstrates the mountains that we can move when love and work come together. <br /><b><b><br /> <br />Winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru <i>Science Books & Film</i> Prize for Excellence in Science Books <br /><br />Finalist for the <b>PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award</b> <br /><br />One of the Best Books of the Year: <i>The Washington Post</i>, TIME.com, NPR, <i>Slate</i>, <i>Entertainment Weekly</i>, <i>Newsday</i>, <i>Minneapolis Star Tribune, Kirkus Reviews</i></b></b>
The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human B...
by Sam Kean

Language

English

Pages

392

Publication Date

May 06, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>The author of the bestseller <i>The Disappearing Spoon</i> reveals the secret inner workings of the brain through strange but true stories.<br /><br /></strong>Early studies of the human brain used a simple method: wait for misfortune to strike -- strokes, seizures, infectious diseases, horrendous accidents -- and see how victims coped. In many cases their survival was miraculous, if puzzling. Observers were amazed by the transformations that took place when different parts of the brain were destroyed, altering victims' personalities. Parents suddenly couldn't recognize their own children. Pillars of the community became pathological liars. Some people couldn't speak but could still sing. <br /><br />In <i>The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons</i>, Sam Kean travels through time with stories of neurological curiosities: phantom limbs, Siamese twin brains, viruses that eat patients' memories, blind people who see through their tongues. He weaves these narratives together with prose that makes the pages fly by, to create a story of discovery that reaches back to the 1500s and the high-profile jousting accident that inspired this book's title.* With the lucid, masterful explanations and razor-sharp wit his fans have come to expect, Kean explores the brain's secret passageways and recounts the forgotten tales of the ordinary people whose struggles, resilience, and deep humanity made neuroscience possible. <br /><br />*"The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons" refers to the case of French king Henri II, who in 1559 was lanced through the skull during a joust, resulting in one of the most significant cases in neuroscience history. For hundreds of years scientists have gained important lessons from traumatic accidents and illnesses, and such misfortunes still represent their greatest resource for discovery.
Crisis in the Red Zone: The Story of the Deadliest Ebola Outbreak...
by Richard Preston

Language

English

Pages

369

Publication Date

July 23, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • The 2013–2014 Ebola epidemic was the deadliest ever—but the outbreaks continue. Now comes a gripping account of the doctors and scientists fighting to protect us, an urgent wake-up call about the future of emerging viruses—from the #1 bestselling author of <i>The Hot Zone, </i>now a National Geographic original miniseries.</b><br /><br /> This time, Ebola started with a two-year-old child who likely had contact with a wild creature and whose entire family quickly fell ill and died. The ensuing global drama activated health professionals in North America, Europe, and Africa in a desperate race against time to contain the viral wildfire. By the end—as the virus mutated into its deadliest form, and spread farther and faster than ever before—30,000 people would be infected, and the dead would be spread across eight countries on three continents.<br /><br /> In this taut and suspenseful medical drama, Richard Preston deeply chronicles the outbreak, in which we saw for the first time the specter of Ebola jumping continents, crossing the Atlantic, and infecting people in America. Rich in characters and conflict—physical, emotional, and ethical—<i>Crisis in the Red Zone</i> is an immersion in one of the great public health calamities of our time.<br /><br /> Preston writes of doctors and nurses in the field putting their own lives on the line, of government bureaucrats and NGO administrators moving, often fitfully, to try to contain the outbreak, and of pharmaceutical companies racing to develop drugs to combat the virus. He also explores the charged ethical dilemma over who should and did receive the rare doses of an experimental treatment when they became available at the peak of the disaster.<br /><br /> <i> Crisis in the Red Zone</i> makes clear that the outbreak of 2013–2014 is a harbinger of further, more severe outbreaks, and of emerging viruses heretofore unimagined—in any country, on any continent. In our ever more interconnected world, with roads and towns cut deep into the jungles of equatorial Africa, viruses both familiar and undiscovered are being unleashed into more densely populated areas than ever before.  <br /><br /> The more we discover about the virosphere, the more we realize its deadly potential. <i>Crisis in the Red Zone</i> is an exquisitely timely book, a stark warning of viral outbreaks to come.
The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate-Di...
by Peter Wohlleben

Language

English

Pages

290

Publication Date

September 13, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>The first book in <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author Peter Wohlleben’s The Mysteries of Nature Trilogy. Book two, <em>The Inner Life of Animals</em>, is available now, and the third book, <em>The Secret Wisdom of Nature</em>, is coming in Spring 2019.</strong></p><br /><p>Are trees social beings? In this international bestseller, forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.<br /><br />After learning about the complex life of trees, a walk in the woods will never be the same again.<br /><br /><em>Includes a Note From a Forest Scientist, by Dr.Suzanne Simard</em></p><p><em>Published in partnership with the David Suzuki Institute.</em></p>
Written in Stone: Evolution, the Fossil Record, and Our Place in ...
by Brian Switek

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

November 30, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<i>Written In Stone</i> is the first book to tell the story of the fossils that mapped out evolutionary history. 150 years after Darwin's <i>Origin</i> was published, scientists are beginning to understand how whales walked into the sea, how horses stood up on their tip-toes, how feathered dinosaurs took to the air, and how our ancestors came down from the trees.

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