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The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remakin...
by Jeff Goodell

Language

English

Pages

332

Publication Date

October 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><strong>A <i>New York Times</i> Critics' Top Book of 2017</strong></div> <div><strong>One of <i>Washington Post's</i> 50 Notable Works of Nonfiction in 2017</strong></div> <div><strong>One of <i>Booklist's</i> Top 10 Science Books of 2017 </strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><strong>"An immersive, mildly gonzo and depressingly well-timed book about the drenching effects of global warming, and a powerful reminder that we can bury our heads in the sand about climate change for only so long before the sand itself disappears." (Jennifer Senior, <i>New York Times) </i></strong></div> <div><strong><i><br /></i></strong></div>What if Atlantis wasn't a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional coastal villages. With each crack in the great ice sheets of the Arctic and Antarctica, and each tick upwards of Earth's thermometer, we are moving closer to the brink of broad disaster.<br /><br />By century's end, hundreds of millions of people will be retreating from the world's shores as our coasts become inundated and our landscapes transformed. From island nations to the world's major cities, coastal regions will disappear. Engineering projects<b> </b>to hold back the water are bold and may buy some time. Yet despite international efforts and tireless research, there is no permanent solution-no barriers to erect or walls to build-that will protect us in the end from the drowning of the world as we know it.<br /><br /><i>The Water Will Come</i> is the definitive account of the coming water, why and how this will happen, and what it will all mean. As he travels across twelve countries and reports from the front lines, acclaimed journalist Jeff Goodell employs fact, science, and first-person, on-the-ground journalism to show vivid scenes from what already is becoming a water world.
Lab Girl
by Hope Jahren

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

April 05, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography</b></b><br />A <i>New York Times </i>2016 Notable Book<br />National Best Seller<br />Named one of <i>TIME</i> magazine’s "100 Most Influential People"<br />An Amazon Top 20 Best Book of 2016<br />A <i>Washington Post</i> Best Memoir of 2016<br /><b>A <i>TIME</i> and <i>Entertainment Weekly </i>Best Book of 2016 <br /></b></b><br />An illuminating debut memoir of a woman in science; a moving portrait of a longtime friendship; and a stunningly fresh look at plants that will forever change how you see the natural world<br /> <br />Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. <br /><i><br />Lab Girl</i> is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work.<br /><br />Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home. <br /><br />Jahren’s probing look at plants, her astonishing tenacity of spirit, and her acute insights on nature enliven every page of this extraordinary book. <i>Lab Girl</i> opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal. Here is an eloquent demonstration of what can happen when you find the stamina, passion, and sense of sacrifice needed to make a life out of what you truly love, as you discover along the way the person you were meant to be.
A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Tra...
by Bill Bryson

Language

English

Pages

305

Publication Date

September 08, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
</b><br />Back in America after twenty years in Britain, Bill Bryson decided to reacquaint himself with his native country by walking the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail, which stretches from Georgia to Maine. The AT offers an astonishing landscape of silent forests and sparkling lakes<b>—</b>and to a writer with the comic genius of Bill Bryson, it also provides endless opportunities to witness the majestic silliness of his fellow human beings.<br /><br />For a start there's the gloriously out-of-shape Stephen Katz, a buddy from Iowa along for the walk. Despite Katz's overwhelming desire to find cozy restaurants, he and Bryson eventually settle into their stride, and while on the trail they meet a bizarre assortment of hilarious characters. But <i>A Walk in the Woods</i> is more than just a laugh-out-loud hike. Bryson's acute eye is a wise witness to this beautiful but fragile trail, and as he tells its fascinating history, he makes a moving plea for the conservation of America's last great wilderness. An adventure, a comedy, and a celebration, <i>A Walk in the Woods</i> has become a modern classic of travel literature.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
1491 (Second Edition): New Revelations of the Americas Before Col...
by Charles C. Mann

Language

English

Pages

560

Publication Date

October 10, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>In this groundbreaking work of science, history, and archaeology, Charles C. Mann radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus in 1492.<br /> <br />Contrary to what so many Americans learn in school, the pre-Columbian Indians were not sparsely settled in a pristine wilderness; rather, there were huge numbers of Indians who actively molded and influenced the land around them. The astonishing Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan had running water and immaculately clean streets, and was larger than any contemporary European city. Mexican cultures created corn in a specialized breeding process that it has been called man’s first feat of genetic engineering. Indeed, Indians were not living lightly on the land but were landscaping and manipulating their world in ways that we are only now beginning to understand. Challenging and surprising, this a transformative new look at a rich and fascinating world we only thought we knew.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and ...
by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Language

English

Pages

410

Publication Date

September 16, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>Called the work of "a mesmerizing storyteller with deep compassion and memorable prose" (<I>Publishers Weekly</I>) and the book that, "anyone interested in natural history, botany, protecting nature, or Native American culture will love," by <I>Library Journal</I>, <I>Braiding Sweetgrass</I> is poised to be a classic of nature writing. As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer asks questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces indigenous teachings that consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take “us on a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert). Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices.<BR></div>
Mirrors and Mazes: a guide through the climate debate
by Howard Brady

Language

English

Pages

178

Publication Date

November 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Here is a book on climate written for people from all walks of life, not just science boffins. The reader is invited to enter the climate debate, likened to a twisting maze or hall of mirrors, with dead-ends, illusions, traps - that are the lies, misinformation, over-simplifications and false prophecies on both sides. <br /><br />The book was written by an award-winning scientist, who went on 4 expeditions to Antarctica with the United States Office of Polar Programs.<br /><br />Very soon, the reader learns that the debate is not just simply about carbon dioxide, which many would have us think...<br /><br />A clever book that poses questions and will challenge your thinking about the climate debate.<br /><br />For more information, visit www.mirrorsandmazes.com.au<br />----<br />“Mirrors and Mazes is written for intelligent laymen who like to think for themselves. The book reviews all of the issues that touch on the current climate debate: the nature of greenhouse gases; clouds; the sun; sea level; extreme weather; polar ice; etc.<br /><br />I am especially fond of Mirrors and Mazes. It would be an excellent addition to the personal library of anyone who wants to understand climate facts, stripped of propaganda and emotion.”<br /><br />William Happer<br />Cyrus Fogg Brackett Professor of Physics Emeritus<br />Princeton University<br /><br />"Mirrors and Mazes is a beacon of light to see through the cloudy attempts to demonize CO2 as the satanic gas of our times. It is a must read and welcome contribution to the educational aspect of this hot scientific debate."<br /><br />Dr Willie Soon<br />Senior Researcher, Solar and Stellar Physics Division<br />Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics<br /><br />For more information, visit www.mirrorsandmazes.com.au
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>ONE OF THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW'S</i> 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b></p><p><b>A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes</b> <br />Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and <i>New Yorker</i> writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.</p>
Kiss the Ground: How the Food You Eat Can Reverse Climate Change,...
by Josh Tickell

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

November 14, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Discover the hidden power soil has to reverse climate change, and how a regenerative farming diet not only delivers us better health and wellness, but also rebuilds our most precious resource--the very ground that feeds us. The story of life in the soil teaches you how clean eating and supporting regenerative farming are recipes for a healthier life and a healthier world. Healing the soil is the path to healing ourselves and the planet.<br /><br /><br />Josh Tickell, one of America's most celebrated documentary filmmakers and director of Fuel, has dedicated most of his life to saving the environment. Now, in <i>Kiss the Ground</i>, he explains an incredible truth: by changing our diets to a soil-nourishing, regenerative agriculture diet, we can reverse global warming, harvest healthy, abundant food, and eliminate the poisonous substances that are harming our children, pets, bodies, and ultimately our planet.<br /><br /><br />Through fascinating and accessible interviews with celebrity chefs, ranchers, farmers, and top scientists, this remarkable book, soon to be a full-length documentary film narrated by Woody Harrelson, will teach you how to become an agent in humanity's single most important and time sensitive mission. Reverse climate change and effectively save the world--all through the choices you make in how and what to eat.<span> </span>
The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors
by David George Haskell

Language

English

Pages

302

Publication Date

April 04, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The author of the Pulitzer Prize finalist <i>The Forest Unseen</i> visits with nature’s most magnificent networkers — trees <br /></b><br /><b>“Fluent, compelling, and intoxicatingly rich.” – <i>Times Literary Supplement</i></b><br /><br /><b>SELECTED by NPR's "Science Friday" and "Brainpickings" as one of the best science books of 2017</b><br /><br />David Haskell has won acclaim for eloquent writing and deep engagement with the natural world. Now, he brings his powers of observation to the biological networks that surround all species, including humans. Haskell repeatedly visits a dozen trees, exploring  connections with people, microbes, fungi, and other plants and animals. He takes us to  trees in cities (from Manhattan to Jerusalem), forests (Amazonian, North American, and boreal) and areas on the front lines of environmental change (eroding coastlines, burned mountainsides, and war zones.)  In each place he shows how human history, ecology, and well-being are intimately intertwined with the lives of trees.<br />  <br /> Scientific, lyrical, and contemplative, Haskell reveals the biological connections that underpin all life.  In a world beset by barriers, he reminds us that life’s substance and beauty emerge from relationship and interdependence.
Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in Hist...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

October 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf.<br /><br />That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not.<br /><br />In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced.<br /><br />In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.<br /><br />And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss.<br /><br />Meticulously researched and vividly written, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, <b>Isaac's Storm</b> carries a warning for our time.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>

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