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The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>ONE OF THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW'S</i> 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR</b></p><p><b>A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes</b> <br />Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. In <i>The Sixth Extinction</i>, two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and <i>New Yorker</i> writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.</p>
The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
by David Wallace-Wells

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

February 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER • “<i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon.”—Andrew Solomon, author of <i>The Noonday Demon</i></b><br /><br />It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible—food shortages, refugee emergencies, climate wars and economic devastation.<br /><br /> An “epoch-defining book” (<i>The</i> <i>Guardian</i>) and “this generation’s <i>Silent Spring</i>” (<i>The Washington Post</i>), <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is both a travelogue of the near future and a meditation on how that future will look to those living through it—the ways that warming promises to transform global politics, the meaning of technology and nature in the modern world, the sustainability of capitalism and the trajectory of human progress.<br /><br /> <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is also an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation—today’s.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>The Uninhabitable Earth</i></b><br /><br /><i>“The Uninhabitable Earth</i> is the most terrifying book I have ever read. Its subject is climate change, and its method is scientific, but its mode is Old Testament. The book is a meticulously documented, white-knuckled tour through the cascading catastrophes that will soon engulf our warming planet.”<b>—Farhad Manjoo, <i>The New York Times</i></b><i><b><br /></b></i><br />“Riveting. . . . Some readers will find Mr. Wallace-Wells’s outline of possible futures alarmist. He is indeed alarmed. You should be, too.”<b>—The Economist</b><br /><br />“Potent and evocative. . . . Wallace-Wells has resolved to offer something other than the standard narrative of climate change. . . . He avoids the ‘eerily banal language of climatology’ in favor of lush, rolling prose.”<b>—Jennifer Szalai, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br />“The book has potential to be this generation’s <i>Silent Spring</i>.”<i><b>—The Washington Post</b></i><br /><br />“<i>The Uninhabitable Earth,</i> which has become a best seller, taps into the underlying emotion of the day: fear. . . . I encourage people to read this book.”<b>—Alan Weisman, <i>The New York Review of Books</i></b>
The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier
by Ian Urbina

Language

English

Pages

513

Publication Date

August 20, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"<b>A riveting, terrifying, thrilling story of a netherworld that few people know about, and fewer will ever see.... The soul of this book is as wild as the ocean itself."</b><br /><b>--Susan Casey, best-selling author of </b><b><i>The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean</i></b><br /><br /><br /><b>A riveting, adrenaline-fueled tour of a vast, lawless and rampantly criminal world that few have ever seen: the high seas.</b></b><br /><br />There are few remaining frontiers on our planet. But perhaps the wildest, and least understood, are the world's oceans: too big to police, and under no clear international authority, these immense regions of treacherous water play host to rampant criminality and exploitation.<br /><br />Traffickers and smugglers, pirates and mercenaries, wreck thieves and repo men, vigilante conservationists and elusive poachers, seabound abortion providers, clandestine oil-dumpers, shackled slaves and cast-adrift stowaways -- drawing on five years of perilous and intrepid reporting, often hundreds of miles from shore, Ian Urbina introduces us to the inhabitants of this hidden world. Through their stories of astonishing courage and brutality, survival and tragedy, he uncovers a globe-spanning network of crime and exploitation that emanates from the fishing, oil and shipping industries, and on which the world's economies rely. <br /><br />Both a gripping adventure story and a stunning exposé, this unique work of reportage brings fully into view for the first time the disturbing reality of a floating world that connects us all, a place where anyone can do anything because no one is watching.
Grandma Gatewood's Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Sav...
by Ben Montgomery

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 01, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Emma Gatewood was the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail alone, as well as the first person—man or woman—to walk it twice and three times and she did it all after the age of 65. This is the first and only biography of Grandma Gatewood, as the reporters called her, who became a hiking celebrity in the 1950s and '60s. She appeared on TV with Groucho Marx and Art Linkletter, and on the pages of Sports Illustrated. The public attention she brought to the little-known footpath was unprecedented. Her vocal criticism of the lousy, difficult stretches led to bolstered maintenance, and very likely saved the trail from extinction. Author Ben Montgomery was given unprecedented access to Gatewood's own diaries, trail journals, and correspondence. He also unearthed historic newspaper and magazine articles and interviewed surviving family members and hikers Gatewood met along the trail. The inspiring story of Emma Gatewood illustrates the full power of human spirit and determination.
Cry of the Kalahari
by , Delia Owens

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

April 22, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>“A remarkable story beautifully told…Among such classics as Goodall’s <i>In the Shadow of Man </i>and Fossey’s <i>Gorillas in the Mist</i>.”—<i>Chicago Tribune</i></b><br /><br /> Carrying little more than a change of clothes and a pair of binoculars, two young Americans, Mark and Delia Owens, caught a plane to Africa, bought a thirdhand Land Rover, and drove deep into the Kalahari Desert. There they lived for seven years, in an unexplored area with no roads, no people, and no source of water for thousands of square miles. In this vast wilderness the Owenses began their zoology research, working along animals that had never before been exposed to humans.<br /><br /> An international bestseller, Cry of the Kalahari is the story of the Owenses’s life with lions, brown hyenas, jackals, giraffes, and the many other creatures they came to know. It is also a gripping account of how they survived the dangers of living in one of the last and largest pristine areas on Earth.</p>
Lab Girl
by Hope Jahren

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

April 05, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>National Bestseller<br /><br />“A beautifully written memoir about the life of a woman in science, a brilliant friendship, and the profundity of trees. Terrific.”—Barack Obama<br /><br /><b> <b><b>Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography</b><br /><br />A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book</b></b><br /><br /></b>Geobiologist Hope Jahren has spent her life studying trees, flowers, seeds, and soil.<i> Lab Girl </i>is her revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also a celebration of the lifelong curiosity, humility, and passion that drive every scientist. In these pages, Hope takes us back to her Minnesota childhood, where she spent hours in unfettered play in her father’s college laboratory. She tells us how she found a sanctuary in science, learning to perform lab work “with both the heart and the hands.” She introduces us to Bill, her brilliant, eccentric lab manager. And she extends the mantle of <i>scientist </i>to each one of her readers, inviting us to join her in observing and protecting our environment. Warm, luminous, compulsively readable, <i>Lab Girl</i> vividly demonstrates the mountains that we can move when love and work come together. <br /><b><b><br /> <br />Winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science/Subaru <i>Science Books & Film</i> Prize for Excellence in Science Books <br /><br />Finalist for the <b>PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award</b> <br /><br />One of the Best Books of the Year: <i>The Washington Post</i>, TIME.com, NPR, <i>Slate</i>, <i>Entertainment Weekly</i>, <i>Newsday</i>, <i>Minneapolis Star Tribune, Kirkus Reviews</i></b></b>
Inconspicuous Consumption: The Environmental Impact You Don't Kno...
by Tatiana Schlossberg

Language

English

Pages

244

Publication Date

August 27, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From a former <i>New York Times </i>science writer, this urgent call to action will empower you to stand up to climate change and environmental pollution by making simple but impactful everyday choices.<br /><br /></b>With urgency and wit, Tatiana Schlossberg explains that far from being only a distant problem of the natural world created by the fossil fuel industry, climate change is all around us, all the time, lurking everywhere in our convenience-driven society, all without our realizing it.<br /><br /> By examining the unseen and unconscious environmental impacts in four areas-the Internet and technology, food, fashion, and fuel - Schlossberg helps readers better understand why climate change is such a complicated issue, and how it connects all of us: How streaming a movie on Netflix in New York burns coal in Virginia; how eating a hamburger in California might contribute to pollution in the Gulf of Mexico; how buying an inexpensive cashmere sweater in Chicago expands the Mongolian desert; how destroying forests from North Carolina is necessary to generate electricity in England.<br /><br /> Cataloging the complexities and frustrations of our carbon-intensive society with a dry sense of humor, Schlossberg makes the climate crisis and its solutions interesting and relevant to everyone who cares, even a little, about the planet. She empowers readers to think about their stuff and the environment in a new way, helping them make more informed choices when it comes to the future of our world.<br /><br /> Most importantly, this is a book about the power we have as voters and consumers to make sure that the fight against climate change includes all of us and all of our stuff, not just industry groups and politicians. If we have any hope of solving the problem, we all have to do it together.<br />
Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America
by Eliza Griswold

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

June 12, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction</b><br /><b></b><br /><b>In<i> Amity and Prosperity</i>, the prizewinning poet and journalist Eliza Griswold tells the story of the energy boom’s impact on a small town at the edge of Appalachia and one woman’s transformation from a struggling single parent to an unlikely activist.</b></p><p>Stacey Haney is a local nurse working hard to raise two kids and keep up her small farm when the fracking boom comes to her hometown of Amity, Pennsylvania. Intrigued by reports of lucrative natural gas leases in her neighbors’ mailboxes, she strikes a deal with a Texas-based energy company. Soon trucks begin rumbling past her small farm, a fenced-off drill site rises on an adjacent hilltop, and domestic animals and pets start to die. When mysterious sicknesses begin to afflict her children, she appeals to the company for help. Its representatives insist that nothing is wrong.</p><p>Alarmed by her children’s illnesses, Haney joins with neighbors and a committed husband-and-wife legal team to investigate what’s really in the water and air. Against local opposition, Haney and her allies doggedly pursue their case in court and begin to expose the damage that’s being done to the land her family has lived on for centuries. Soon a community that has long been suspicious of outsiders faces wrenching new questions about who is responsible for their fate, and for redressing it: The faceless corporations that are poisoning the land? The environmentalists who fail to see their economic distress? A federal government that is mandated to protect but fails on the job? Drawing on seven years of immersive reporting, Griswold reveals what happens when an imperiled town faces a crisis of values, and a family wagers everything on an improbable quest for justice.</p>
How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy
by Jenny Odell

Language

English

Pages

241

Publication Date

April 23, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A galvanizing critique of the forces vying for our attention—and our personal information—that redefines what we think of as productivity, reconnects us with the environment, and reveals all that we’ve been too distracted to see about ourselves and our world</b><br /><br />Nothing is harder to do these days than nothing. But in a world where our value is determined by our 24/7 data productivity . . . doing nothing may be our most important form of resistance. <br /><br />So argues artist and critic Jenny Odell in this field guide to doing nothing (at least as capitalism defines it). Odell sees our attention as the most precious—and overdrawn—resource we have. Once we can start paying a new kind of attention, she writes, we can undertake bolder forms of political action, reimagine humankind’s role in the environment, and arrive at more meaningful understandings of happiness and progress. <br /><br />Far from the simple anti-technology screed, or the back-to-nature meditation we read so often, <i>How to do Nothing</i> is an action plan for thinking outside of capitalist narratives of efficiency and techno-determinism. Provocative, timely, and utterly persuasive, this book is a four-course meal in the age of Soylent.
Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and ...
by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Language

English

Pages

410

Publication Date

September 16, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In <i>Braiding Sweetgrass</i>, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).<br /><br /> Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

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