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Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
by Alfred Lansing

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 29, 2014

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Customer Reviews
<b>The harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to reach the South Pole, one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age.</b><br /> <br />In August 1914, polar explorer Ernest Shackleton boarded the <i>Endurance </i>and set sail for Antarctica, where he planned to cross the last uncharted continent on foot. In January 1915, after battling its way through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day's sail short of its destination, the <i>Endurance </i>became locked in an island of ice. Thus began the legendary ordeal of Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men. When their ship was finally crushed between two ice floes, they attempted a near-impossible journey over 850 miles of the South Atlantic's heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization.<br /> <br />In <i>Endurance</i>, the definitive account of Ernest Shackleton's fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing and miraculous voyage that has defined heroism for the modern age.<br />
A Dream of Wings: Americans and the Airplane, 1875-1905: American...
by Tom D. Crouch

Language

English

Pages

351

Publication Date

February 17, 2002

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>The story of the talented American engineers and adventurers who labored to conquer gravity in a flying machine.</strong></p><br /><p>When Orville and Wilbur Wright soared over Kill Devil Hills in North Carolina's outer banks and solved the problem of aerial navigation, they wrote the last chapter in a long story. For decades prior, a small community of engineers, scientists, and dreamers—men named Chanute and Langley and Herring—had tried to make the ascent in every conceivable craft, from kites and gliders to an assortment of powered flying models.</p><br /><p>These imaginative people and their wonderful contraptions are brought to life in Tom Crouch's classic <em>A Dream of Wings</em>. In the quest for flight, aeronautical societies were formed and broke apart, successes were celebrated, hopes rose and fell, and lessons were learned and built upon. The dreamers who blazed the path to a flying machine are bravely realized in these delightful pages.</p>
Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

450

Publication Date

March 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 New York Times Bestseller<br /><br />From the bestselling author and master of narrative nonfiction comes the enthralling story of the sinking of the <i>Lusitania</i></b><br /><br />On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the <i>Lusitania</i> was one of the era’s great transatlantic “Greyhounds”—the fastest liner then in service—and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. <br /><br />Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of <i>Unterseeboot</i>-20, was happy to oblige. Meanwhile, an ultra-secret British intelligence unit tracked Schwieger’s U-boat, but told no one. As U-20 and the <i>Lusitania</i> made their way toward Liverpool, an array of forces both grand and achingly small—hubris, a chance fog, a closely guarded secret, and more—all converged to produce one of the great disasters of history.<br /><br /> It is a story that many of us think we know but don’t, and Erik Larson tells it thrillingly, switching between hunter and hunted while painting a larger portrait of America at the height of the Progressive Era. Full of glamour and suspense, <i>Dead Wake</i> brings to life a cast of evocative characters, from famed Boston bookseller Charles Lauriat to pioneering female architect Theodate Pope to President Woodrow Wilson, a man lost to grief, dreading the widening war but also captivated by the prospect of new love. <br /><br /> Gripping and important, <i>Dead Wake</i> captures the sheer drama and emotional power of a disaster whose intimate details and true meaning have long been obscured by history.
Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greates...
by Dava Sobel

Language

English

Pages

191

Publication Date

July 05, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The dramatic human story of an epic scientific quest and of one man's forty-year obsession to find a solution to the thorniest scientific dilemma of the day--"the longitude problem."</b><br /><br />Anyone alive in the eighteenth century would have known that "the longitude problem" was the thorniest scientific dilemma of the day-and had been for centuries. Lacking the ability to measure their longitude, sailors throughout the great ages of exploration had been literally lost at sea as soon as they lost sight of land. Thousands of lives and the increasing fortunes of nations hung on a resolution. One man, John Harrison, in complete opposition to the scientific community, dared to imagine a mechanical solution-a clock that would keep precise time at sea, something no clock had ever been able to do on land. <br /><i><br /></i><i>Longitude</i> is the dramatic human story of an epic scientific quest and of Harrison's forty-year obsession with building his perfect timekeeper, known today as the chronometer. Full of heroism and chicanery, it is also a fascinating brief history of astronomy, navigation, and clockmaking, and opens a new window on our world.
Ships, Clocks, and Stars: The Quest for Longitude
by , Rebekah Higgitt

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

November 04, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A tale of eighteenth-century invention and competition, commerce and conflict, this is a lively, illustrated, and accurate chronicle of the search to solve “the longitude problem,” the question of how to determine a ship’s position at sea—and one that changed the history of mankind.</p><p><em>Ships, Clocks, and Stars</em> brings into focus one of our greatest scientific stories: the search to accurately measure a ship’s position at sea. The incredible, illustrated volume reveals why longitude mattered to seafaring nations, illuminates the various solutions that were proposed and tested, and explores the invention that revolutionized human history and the man behind it, John Harrison. Here, too, are the voyages of Captain Cook that put these revolutionary navigational methods to the test.</p><p>Filled with astronomers, inventors, politicians, seamen, and satirists, <em>Ships, Clocks, and Stars </em>explores the scientific, political, and commercial battles of the age, as well as the sailors, ships, and voyages that made it legend—from Matthew Flinders and George Vancouver to the voyages of the <em>Bounty </em>and the <em>Beagle</em>.</p><p>Featuring more than 150 photographs specially commissioned from Britain’s National Maritime Museum, this evocative, detailed, and thoroughly fascinating history brings this age of exploration and enlightenment vividly to life.</p><p></p>
Undaunted Valor: An Assault Helicopter Unit in Vietnam
by Colonel Matt Jackson

Language

English

Pages

372

Publication Date

October 27, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>…American troops are in contact…</strong></p><p><strong>The UH-1H helicopter swoops in to bail them out…</strong></p><p><strong>…Tracer fire everywhere, the windshield shatters, the door gunners returning fire…</strong></p><p>Will Colonel Cory’s helicopter be able to rescue the pinned down soldiers?</p><p>Undaunted Valor is the first hand account of helicopter pilot, Colonel Dan Cory as he flies combat missions in the jungles of Vietnams. From dodging enemy ground fire and RPGs, to constant mortar and rocket attacks on his base, Colonel Cory stared down the enemy to bring his fellow soldiers’ home.</p><p>Join Colonel Cory as he recounts some of the most intense helicopter and ground combat of the Vietnam war from the eyes of a man who spent two combat tours there. From being shot down by enemy fire, to leading his air crew to repel an enemy assault, Colonel Cory’s firsthand accounts of the Vietnam War are awe inspiring. Awarded the Silver Star, and two Bronze Stars for Valor, Cory’s hair-raising accounts of what it was like to fly over the Jungles of Vietnam will make you feel as if you are right there with him.</p><p><strong>Grab your copy of this gripping, true-life story of an American war hero today!!</strong></p><p><br /></p><p><strong>Praise for Undaunted Valor –</strong> “If you ever wanted to know what it’s like to fly a helicopter in combat or what goes through the minds of those who do, you have to read this book. Incredible story of an American Hero!” – <em>Author James Rosone of the Red Storm Series</em></p>
Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"
by Zora Neale Hurston

Language

English

Pages

210

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller •  <em>TIME M</em>agazine<em>’s</em> Best Nonfiction Book of 2018 • New York Public Library’s Best Book of 2018 • NPR’s Book Concierge Best Book of 2018 • <em>Economist </em>Book of the Year • SELF.com’s Best Books of 2018 • Audible’s Best of the Year • BookRiot’s Best Audio Books of 2018 • The Atlantic’s Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered • Atlanta Journal Constitution, Best Southern Books 2018  • The Christian Science Monitor’s Best Books 2018</strong><strong> • </strong></p><p></p><p></p><p><strong>“A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—<em>New York Times</em></strong></p><p><strong>“One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison</strong></p><p><strong>“Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a <em>Maestrapiece</em>.”—Alice Walker</strong></p><p><strong>A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic <em>Their Eyes Were Watching God, </em>with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States.</strong></p><p>In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.</p><p>In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the <em>Clotilda</em>, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.</p><p>Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, <em>Barracoon</em> masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.</p><p></p><p></p><p></p>
The Wright Brothers
by David McCullough

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

May 05, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestseller from David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize—the dramatic story-behind-the-story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly—Wilbur and Orville Wright.<br /><br />On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two brothers—bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio—changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe that the age of flight had begun, with the first powered machine carrying a pilot.<br /> <br />Orville and Wilbur Wright were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity. When they worked together, no problem seemed to be insurmountable. Wilbur was unquestionably a genius. Orville had such mechanical ingenuity as few had ever seen. That they had no more than a public high school education and little money never stopped them in their mission to take to the air. Nothing did, not even the self-evident reality that every time they took off, they risked being killed.<br /> <br />In this “enjoyable, fast-paced tale” (<i>The Economist</i>), master historian David McCullough “shows as never before how two Ohio boys from a remarkable family taught the world to fly” (<i>The Washington Post) </i>and “captures the marvel of what the Wrights accomplished” (<i>The Wall Street Journal</i>). He draws on the extensive Wright family papers to profile not only the brothers but their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them. Essential reading, this is “a story of timeless importance, told with uncommon empathy and fluency…about what might be the most astonishing feat mankind has ever accomplished…<i>The Wright Brothers</i> soars” (<i>The New York Times Book Review</i>).
Island of the Lost: An Extraordinary Story of Survival at the Edg...
by Joan Druett

Language

English

Pages

299

Publication Date

June 08, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>“Riveting.”</i> —<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b> <b>Hundreds of miles from civilization, two ships wreck on opposite ends of the same deserted island in this true story of human nature at its best—and at its worst.</b><br /><br /> It is 1864, and Captain Thomas Musgrave’s schooner, the <i>Grafton</i>, has just wrecked on Auckland Island, a forbidding piece of land 285 miles south of New Zealand. Battered by year-round freezing rain and constant winds, it is one of the most inhospitable places on earth. To be shipwrecked there means almost certain death.<br /><br /> Incredibly, at the same time on the opposite end of the island, another ship runs aground during a storm. Separated by only twenty miles and the island’s treacherous, impassable cliffs, the crews of the <i>Grafton</i> and the <i>Invercauld</i> face the same fate. And yet where the <i>Invercauld</i>’s crew turns inward on itself, fighting, starving, and even turning to cannibalism, Musgrave’s crew bands together to build a cabin and a forge—and eventually, to find a way to escape. <br /><br /> Using the survivors’ journals and historical records, award-winning maritime historian Joan Druett brings to life this extraordinary untold story about leadership and the fine line between order and chaos.
Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviatio...
by Keith O'Brien

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

August 07, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A <i>New York Times</i> Bestseller * An Amazon Best Book of the Year * A <i>New York Times Book Review</i> Editors’ Choice * A <i>Time</i> Best Book for Summer<br />  <br /> Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. While male pilots were lauded as heroes, the few women who dared to fly were more often ridiculed—until a cadre of women pilots banded together to break through the entrenched prejudice.<br /><br /><i>Fly Girls</i> weaves together the stories of five remarkable women: Florence Klingensmith, a high school dropout from Fargo, North Dakota; Ruth Elder, an Alabama divorcée; Amelia Earhart, the most famous, but not necessarily the most skilled; Ruth Nichols, who chafed at her blue blood family’s expectations; and Louise Thaden, the young mother of two who got her start selling coal in Wichita. Together, they fought for the chance to fly and race airplanes—and in 1936, one of them would triumph, beating the men in the toughest air race of them all.

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