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The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alz...
by , Peter V. Rabins

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

April 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<P>Through five editions, <I>The 36-Hour Day </I>has been an essential resource for families who love and care for people with Alzheimer disease. Whether a person has Alzheimer disease or another form of dementia, he or she will face a host of problems. <I>The 36-Hour Day</I> will help family members and caregivers address these challenges and simultaneously cope with their own emotions and needs.</P><P>Featuring useful takeaway messages and informed by recent research into the causes of and the search for therapies to prevent or cure dementia, this edition includes new information on</P><P>• devices to make life simpler and safer for people who have dementia• strategies for delaying behavioral and neuropsychiatric symptoms• changes in Medicare and other health care insurance laws• palliative care, hospice care, durable power of attorney, and guardianship• dementia due to traumatic brain injury• choosing a residential care facility• support groups for caregivers, friends, and family members</P><P>The central idea underlying the book—that much can be done to improve the lives of people with dementia and of those caring for them—remains the same. <I>The 36-Hour Day </I>is the definitive dementia care guide.</P>
Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss
by Renkl Margaret

Language

English

Pages

248

Publication Date

July 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From <i>New York Times</i> opinion writer Margaret Renkl comes an unusual, captivating portrait of a family—and of the cycles of joy and grief that inscribe human lives within the natural world.<br /><br /><br /><br />Growing up in Alabama, Renkl was a devoted reader, an explorer of riverbeds and red-dirt roads, and a fiercely loved daughter. Here, in brief essays, she traces a tender and honest portrait of her complicated parents—her exuberant, creative mother; her steady, supportive father—and of the bittersweet moments that accompany a child’s transition to caregiver.<br /><br /><br /><br />And here, braided into the overall narrative, Renkl offers observations on the world surrounding her suburban Nashville home. Ringing with rapture and heartache, these essays convey the dignity of bluebirds and rat snakes, monarch butterflies and native bees. As these two threads haunt and harmonize with each other, Renkl suggests that there is astonishment to be found in common things: in what seems ordinary, in what we all share. For in both worlds—the natural one and our own—“the shadow side of love is always loss, and grief is only love’s own twin.”<br /><br /><br /><br />Gorgeously illustrated by the author’s brother, Billy Renkl, <i>Late Migrations</i> is an assured and memorable debut.
Motherland: A Memoir of Love, Loathing, and Longing
by Elissa Altman

Language

English

Pages

249

Publication Date

August 06, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“I’m reading this book right now and loving it!”—Cheryl Strayed, #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Wild</i></b><br /><br /><b>How can a mother and daughter who love (but don’t always like) each other coexist without driving each other crazy? </b><br /><br /><b>“A wry and moving meditation on aging and the different kinds of love between women.”—<i>O: The Oprah Magazine </i>(“2019’s Best LGBTQ Books”)</b><br /><br /> After surviving a traumatic childhood in nineteen-seventies New York and young adulthood living in the shadow of her flamboyant mother, Rita, a makeup-addicted former television singer, Elissa Altman has managed to build a very different life, settling in Connecticut with her wife of nearly twenty years. After much time, therapy, and wine, Elissa is at last in a healthy place, still orbiting around her mother but keeping far enough away to preserve the stable, independent world she has built as a writer and editor. Then Elissa is confronted with the unthinkable: Rita, whose days are spent as a flâneur, traversing Manhattan from the Clinique counters at Bergdorf to Bloomingdale’s and back again, suffers an incapacitating fall, leaving her completely dependent upon her daughter.<br /><br /> Now Elissa is forced to finally confront their profound differences, Rita’s yearning for beauty and glamour, her view of the world through her days in the spotlight, and the money that has mysteriously disappeared in the name of preserving youth. To sustain their fragile mother-daughter bond, Elissa must navigate the turbulent waters of their shared lives, the practical challenges of caregiving for someone who refuses to accept it, the tentacles of narcissism, and the mutual, frenetic obsession that has defined their relationship.<br /><br /> <i>Motherland</i> is a story that touches every home and every life, mapping the ferocity of maternal love, moral obligation, the choices women make about motherhood, and the possibility of healing. Filled with tenderness, wry irreverence, and unforgettable characters, it is an exploration of what it means to escape from the shackles of the past only to have to face them all over again.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Motherland</i></b><br /><br />“Rarely has a mother-daughter relationship been excavated with such honesty. Elissa Altman is a beautiful, big-hearted writer who mines her most central subject: her gorgeous, tempestuous, difficult mother, and the terrain of their shared life. The result is a testament to the power of love and family.”<b>—Dani Shapiro, author of <i>Inheritance<br /><br /></i></b>“Vibrating with emotion, this deeply honest account strikes a chord.”<b>—<i>People</i></b>
I Feel Bad About My Neck
by Nora Ephron

Language

English

Pages

160

Publication Date

August 01, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice, and dry sense of humor, Nora Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in <i>I Feel Bad About My Neck</i>, a candid, hilarious look at women who are getting older and dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and life itself.</p><p>Ephron chronicles her life as an obsessed cook, passionate city dweller, and hapless parent. But mostly she speaks frankly and uproariously about life as a woman of a certain age. Utterly courageous, uproariously funny, and unexpectedly moving in its truth telling, <i>I Feel Bad About My Neck</i> is a scrumptious, irresistible treat of a book, full of truths, laugh out loud moments that will appeal to readers of all ages.</p>
The Last Ocean: A Journey Through Memory and Forgetting
by Nicci Gerrard

Language

English

Pages

266

Publication Date

August 13, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the award-winning journalist and author, a lyrical, raw and humane investigation of dementia that explores both the journeys of the people who live with the condition and those of their loved ones</b><br /><br />After a diagnosis of dementia, Nicci Gerrard’s father, John, continued to live life on his own terms, alongside the disease. But when an isolating hospital stay precipitated a dramatic turn for the worse, Gerrard, an award-winning journalist and author, recognized that it was not just the disease, but misguided protocol and harmful practices that cause such pain at the end of life. Gerrard was inspired to seek a better course for all who suffer because of the disease. <br /><br /> <i>The Last Ocean</i> is Gerrard’s investigation into what dementia does to both the person who lives with the condition and to their caregivers. Dementia is now one of the leading causes of death in the West, and this necessary book will offer both comfort and a map to those walking through it. While she begins with her father’s long slip into forgetting, Gerrard expands to examine dementia writ large. Gerrard gives raw but literary shape both to the unimaginable loss of one’s own faculties, as well as to the pain of their loved ones. Her lens is unflinching, but Gerrard honors her subjects and finds the beauty and the humanity in their seemingly diminished states. <br /><br /> In so doing, she examines the philosophy of what it means to have a self, as well as how we can offer dignity and peace to those who suffer with this terrible disease. Not only will it aid those walking with dementia patients, <i>The Last Ocean</i> will prompt all of us to think on the nature of a life well lived.
A Chance to Say Goodbye: Reflections on Losing a Parent
by Lisa J. Shultz

Language

English

Pages

244

Publication Date

July 14, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Award winning author, Lisa J. Shultz, is of the Baby Boomer generation and lost her father, age 89 in 2015. She embraces a challenging and often avoided topic of facing the end-of-life stage of a loved one. With courage, vulnerability and love, she recounts her dad's storied life, including its difficult ending. Wrought with what she felt was unnecessary suffering in for all involved at the end, she strives to help others find a more peaceful final chapter of life.<br /><br />She begins her book by providing the background of her father, a World War II veteran. Their relationship was tenuous in Lisa's youth because she was disappointed and angered by his behavior, distancing herself from him and blaming him for the sudden end to their intact comfortable family life. As a young adult and after her father's sudden heart attack, Lisa was given a second chance to heal their relationship. Over the next three decades, they became closer, enjoying time together, including travel. When her dad entered his eighties, and while still raising her own children, Lisa found herself unprepared for his steady health decline. Suddenly, she was thrust into the role of overseeing his care as he began to experience increasing disability and the beginnings of dementia.<br /><br />Not having prepared for or anticipated such a role, Lisa floundered as she attempted to address his ever-changing situation. The closeness and healing they had achieved was challenged as her father resisted conversations about his failing health and his care, exacerbated by a western medical system that fell short to prepare them for the end of his life.<br /><br />After her father's death, Lisa began researching and compiling information aimed at educating and supporting others who may not be equipped for the challenges and decisions that arise when those we love begin to lose their health and mental clarity. The book also reminds us of our own mortality and inspires conversation and preparation to potentially ease the suffering for ourselves and those we leave behind.<br /><br />A moving tribute to a remarkable man and a daughter's experience of losing her dad, A Chance to Say Goodbye gives rise to reflections about what is important in living and dying.
Still With It!: The Funny Side of Growing Older
by Peter Buckman

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

September 17, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Heartfelt and humorous: An A to Z companion to growing older, filled with the unfiltered opinions and preoccupations of seniors today</b><br /><br /> When do we become “senior”? At age sixty? At retirement? Or, the moment we can’t do something that was previously simple? While there are endless books on “staying young,” there are precious few on embracing your age. Enter brilliant new aphorist Peter Buckman!<br /><br /> In this appealing guide, Buckman distills over 200 A-to-Z topics into sage wisdom, such as: “<i>Secrets </i>are not all that safe when we grow forgetful about who we’re not supposed to share them with.” And, “<i>Respect </i>should be accorded us for our sheer survival, if not for our achievements!”<br /><br /> Wry and revealing, <i>Still With It!</i> thoroughly examines the preoccupations of today’s seniors, and encourages readers of all ages to view elders in a brighter light: not just older, but also most certainly wiser.
Leisureville: Adventures in a World Without Children
by Andrew D. Blechman

Language

English

Pages

268

Publication Date

July 14, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>This revealing profile “disappears down the rabbit hole [into] the largest gated retirement community in the world” and what it discovers is “fascinating” (<i>The New York Times</i>).</b><br />  <br /> When his next-door neighbors pick up and move from New England to an age-restricted “active adult” development in Florida called The Villages, Andrew D. Blechman is astonished by their stories—and determined to investigate. Sprawling across two zip codes, with a golf course for every day of the month, two downtowns, its own newspaper, radio, and TV station, The Villages is a prefab paradise for retired Baby Boomers, where “not having children around seems to free [them] to act like adolescents” (<i>The New York Times</i>).<br />  <br /> In the critically acclaimed <i>Leisureville</i>, Blechman delves into this senior utopia, offering a hilarious firsthand report on everything from ersatz nostalgia to the residents’ surprisingly active sex life. Blechman also traces the history of this phenomenon, travelling to Arizona to find out what pioneering developments like Sun City and Youngtown have become after decades of segregation.<br />  <br /> Blending incisive social commentary and colorful reportage, “Blechman describes this brave new world with determined good humor and considerable bemusement” (Katherine A. Powers, <i>The Boston Globe</i>).
Halftime: Changing Your Game Plan from Success to Significance
by Bob Buford

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

March 08, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Updated and expanded for a new generation of leaders, Bob Buford’s bestseller shows you how to make the second half of life more rewarding than the first.</strong></p><p>Are you ready to move into the second half of your life? Bob Buford believes the second half of your life can be better than the first. Much better. But first, you need time to figure out what you want to <em>do</em> with the rest of your life.</p><p>In <em>Halftime</em>, Buford focuses on this important time of transition—the time when, as he says, a person moves beyond the first half of the game of life. It’s halftime, a time of revitalization and for catching a new vision for living the second half, the half where life can be lived at its most rewarding. As Buford explains, “My passion is to multiply all that God has given me, and in the process, give it back.”</p><p>Features of this newly updated and expanded 20<sup>th</sup> Anniversary edition include a foreword by Jim Collins, the bestselling author of <em>Good to Great</em>; new questions for reflection or discussion at the end of each chapter; brand new “halftime” stories of men and women enjoying a second half of significance; specific halftime assignments to guide readers into their second-half mission; an essay by Bob on “The Wisdom of Peter Drucker”; a special update from the author on how the halftime movement is growing nationally, and links to outstanding resources.</p>
Old Friends
by Tracy Kidder

Language

English

Pages

358

Publication Date

May 20, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A Pulitzer Prize–winning author’s “touching, funny and inspiring” true story of daily life in a New England nursing home (<i>The New York Times</i>).</b><br />  <br /> Ninety-year-old Lou quit school after the eighth grade, worked for the rest of his life, and stayed with the same woman for nearly seventy years. Seventy-two-year-old Joe was chief probation officer in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, holds a law degree, and has faced the death of a son and the raising of a mentally challenged daughter. Now, the two men are roommates in a nursing home. Despite coming from very different backgrounds, the two become close friends.<br />  <br /> Focusing on these two men as well as introducing us to the other aging residents of Linda Manor in Northampton, Massachusetts, literary journalist Tracy Kidder examines the sorrows and joys of growing older and the universal struggle to find meaning in the face of mortality. From the <i>New York Times</i>–bestselling author and National Book Award–winning author of <i>The Soul of a New Machine</i>, this is an extraordinary look inside an often-hidden world.<br />  <br /> “As in his Pulitzer Prize-winning <i>The Soul of a New Machine</i>, <i>House</i>, and the best-selling <i>Among Schoolchildren</i>, Kidder reveals his extraordinary talent as a storyteller by taking the potentially unpalatable subject of life in a nursing home and making it into a highly readable, engrossing account.” —<i>Library Journal</i><br />  <br /> “Rich detail and true-to-the-ear dialogue let the brave and determined elderly speak for themselves—and for the continually surprising potential of the human spirit.” —<i>Kirkus Reviews</i>

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