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AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order
by Kai-Fu Lee

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

September 25, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>THE </B><I><B>NEW YORK TIMES</B></I><B>, </B><I><B>USA TODAY</B></I><B>, AND </B><I><B>WALL STREET JOURNAL</B></I><B> BESTSELLER</B><BR /><BR /><B>Dr. Kai-Fu Lee—one of the world’s most respected experts on AI and China—reveals that China has suddenly caught up to the US at an astonishingly rapid and unexpected pace.  </B><BR /><BR /> In <I>AI Superpowers</I>, Kai-fu Lee argues powerfully that because of these unprecedented developments in AI, dramatic changes will be happening much sooner than many of us expected. Indeed, as the US-Sino AI competition begins to heat up, Lee urges the US and China to both accept and to embrace the great responsibilities that come with significant technological power. Most experts already say that AI will have a devastating impact on blue-collar jobs. But Lee predicts that Chinese and American AI will have a strong impact on white-collar jobs as well. Is universal basic income the solution? In Lee’s opinion, probably not.  But he provides  a clear description of which jobs will be affected and how soon, which jobs can be enhanced with AI, and most importantly, how we can provide solutions to some of the most profound changes in human history that are coming soon.</DIV>
The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870...
by David McCullough

Language

English

Pages

704

Publication Date

October 27, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The National Book Award–winning epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal, a first-rate drama of the bold and brilliant engineering feat that was filled with both tragedy and triumph, told by master historian David McCullough.<BR><BR>From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of <I>Truman</I>, here is the national bestselling epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal. In The Path Between the Seas, acclaimed historian David McCullough delivers a first-rate drama of the sweeping human undertaking that led to the creation of this grand enterprise.<BR> <BR><I>The Path Between the Seas</I> tells the story of the men and women who fought against all odds to fulfill the 400-year-old dream of constructing an aquatic passageway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a story of astonishing engineering feats, tremendous medical accomplishments, political power plays, heroic successes, and tragic failures. Applying his remarkable gift for writing lucid, lively exposition, McCullough weaves the many strands of the momentous event into a comprehensive and captivating tale.<BR> <BR>Winner of the National Book Award for history, the Francis Parkman Prize, the Samuel Eliot Morison Award, and the Cornelius Ryan Award (for the best book of the year on international affairs), <I>The Path Between the Seas</I> is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, the history of technology, international intrigue, and human drama.
The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern Wo...
by Simon Winchester

Language

English

Pages

411

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The revered <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author traces the development of technology from the Industrial Age to the Digital Age to explore the single component crucial to advancement—precision—in a superb history that is both an homage and a warning for our future.</p><p>The rise of manufacturing could not have happened without an attention to precision. At the dawn of the Industrial Revolution in eighteenth-century England, standards of measurement were established, giving way to the development of machine tools—machines that make machines. Eventually, the application of precision tools and methods resulted in the creation and mass production of items from guns and glass to mirrors, lenses, and cameras—and eventually gave way to further breakthroughs, including gene splicing, microchips, and the Hadron Collider.</p><p>Simon Winchester takes us back to origins of the Industrial Age, to England where he introduces the scientific minds that helped usher in modern production: John Wilkinson, Henry Maudslay, Joseph Bramah, Jesse Ramsden, and Joseph Whitworth. It was Thomas Jefferson who later exported their discoveries to the fledgling United States, setting the nation on its course to become a manufacturing titan. Winchester moves forward through time, to today’s cutting-edge developments occurring around the world, from America to Western Europe to Asia.</p><p>As he introduces the minds and methods that have changed the modern world, Winchester explores fundamental questions. Why is precision important? What are the different tools we use to measure it? Who has invented and perfected it? Has the pursuit of the ultra-precise in so many facets of human life blinded us to other things of equal value, such as an appreciation for the age-old traditions of craftsmanship, art, and high culture? Are we missing something that reflects the world as it is, rather than the world as we think we would wish it to be? And can the precise and the natural co-exist in society?</p>
Into the Storm: Two Ships, a Deadly Hurricane, and an Epic Battle...
by Tristram Korten

Language

English

Pages

264

Publication Date

April 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>“An intense, immersive deep dive into a wild, dangerous, and unknown world, written with the pace and appeal of a great thriller. This is nonfiction at its very best.”—Lee Child</b><br /><br />The true story of two doomed ships and a daring search-and-rescue operation that shines a light on the elite Coast Guard swimmers trained for the most dangerous ocean missions</b><br /><br /> In late September 2015, Hurricane Joaquin swept past the Bahamas and swallowed a pair of cargo vessels in its destructive path: <i>El Faro</i>, a 790-foot American behemoth with a crew of thirty-three, and the <i>Minouche</i>, a 230-foot freighter with a dozen sailors aboard. From the parallel stories of these ships and their final journeys, Tristram Korten weaves a remarkable tale of two veteran sea captains from very different worlds, the harrowing ordeals of their desperate crews, and the Coast Guard’s extraordinary battle against a storm that defied prediction.<br /><br /> When the Coast Guard received word from Captain Renelo Gelera that the <i>Minouche </i>was taking on water on the night of October 1, the servicemen on duty helicoptered through Joaquin to the sinking ship. Rescue swimmer Ben Cournia dropped into the sea—in the middle of a raging tropical cyclone, in the dark—and churned through the monstrous swells, loading survivors into a rescue basket dangling from the helicopter as its pilot struggled against the tempest. With pulsating narrative skill in the tradition of Sebastian Junger and Jon Krakauer, Korten recounts the heroic efforts by Cournia and his fellow guardsmen to haul the <i>Minouche’</i>s crew to safety.<br /><br /> Tragically, things would not go as well for Captain Michael Davidson and <i>El Faro</i>. Despite exhaustive searching by her would-be rescuers, the loss of the vessel became the largest U.S. maritime disaster in decades. As Korten narrates the ships’ fates, with insights drawn from insider access to crew members, Coast Guard teams, and their families, he delivers a moving and propulsive story of men in peril, the international brotherhood of mariners, and the breathtaking power of nature.<br /><b><br />Praise for <i>Into the Storm<br /></i></b><br />“The story [Tristram] Korten tells is impressively multifaceted, exploring everything from timely issues such as climate change to timeless themes such as man’s struggle against the ocean’s fury.”<b>—<i>Miami New Times</i></b><br /><br />“<i>Into the Storm</i> reads like more than just the chronicle of one maritime disaster—and may be a warning claxon against the possibility of more such disasters coming this hurricane season.”<b>—<i>Open Letters Review</i></b>
Island of the Lost: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World
by Joan Druett

Language

English

Pages

299

Publication Date

June 08, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Auckland Island is a godforsaken place in the middle of the Southern Ocean, 285 miles south of New Zealand. With year-round freezing rain and howling winds, it is one of the most forbidding places in the world. To be shipwrecked there means almost certain death.<br /> <br /> In 1864 Captain Thomas Musgrave and his crew of four aboard the schooner <em>Grafton</em> wreck on the southern end of the island. Utterly alone in a dense coastal forest, plagued by stinging blowflies and relentless rain, Captain Musgrave—rather than succumb to this dismal fate—inspires his men to take action. With barely more than their bare hands, they build a cabin and, remarkably, a forge, where they manufacture their tools. Under Musgrave's leadership, they band together and remain civilized through even the darkest and most terrifying days.<br /> <br /> Incredibly, at the same time on the opposite end of the island—twenty miles of impassable cliffs and chasms away—the <em>Invercauld</em> wrecks during a horrible storm. Nineteen men stagger ashore. Unlike Captain Musgrave, the captain of the <em>Invercauld</em> falls apart given the same dismal circumstances. His men fight and split up; some die of starvation, others turn to cannibalism. Only three survive. Musgrave and all of his men not only endure for nearly two years, they also plan their own astonishing escape, setting off on one of the most courageous sea voyages in history.<br /> <br /> Using the survivors' journals and historical records, award-winning maritime historian Joan Druett brings this extraordinary untold story to life, a story about leadership and the fine line between order and chaos.
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women
by Kate Moore

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A<em> New York Times</em>, <em>USA Today, </em>and<em> Wall Street Journal</em> Bestseller!</strong><br /><strong>Emma Watson's Our Shared Shelf Bookclub Selection - May/June 2018 </strong></p><p>"<strong>the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still</strong>."—NPR Books </p><p><em>The incredible true story of the women who fought America's Undark danger</em></p><p>The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.</p><p>Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these "shining girls" are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.</p><p>But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women's cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America's early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers' rights that will echo for centuries to come. </p><p>Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, <em>The Radium Girls</em> fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the "wonder" substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...</p>
Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War
by Paul Scharre

Language

English

Pages

448

Publication Date

April 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A Bill Gates Top Five Book of 2018<br /><br /><br /><br />A Pentagon defense expert and former U.S. Army Ranger explores what it would mean to give machines authority over the ultimate decision of life or death.</strong></p><br /><p>What happens when a Predator drone has as much autonomy as a Google car? Or when a weapon that can hunt its own targets is hacked? Although it sounds like science fiction, the technology already exists to create weapons that can attack targets without human input. Paul Scharre, a leading expert in emerging weapons technologies, draws on deep research and firsthand experience to explore how these next-generation weapons are changing warfare.</p><br /><p>Scharre’s far-ranging investigation examines the emergence of autonomous weapons, the movement to ban them, and the legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. He spotlights artificial intelligence in military technology, spanning decades of innovation from German noise-seeking Wren torpedoes in World War II—antecedents of today’s homing missiles—to autonomous cyber weapons, submarine-hunting robot ships, and robot tank armies. Through interviews with defense experts, ethicists, psychologists, and activists, Scharre surveys what challenges might face "centaur warfighters" on future battlefields, which will combine human and machine cognition. We’ve made tremendous technological progress in the past few decades, but we have also glimpsed the terrifying mishaps that can result from complex automated systems—such as when advanced F-22 fighter jets experienced a computer meltdown the first time they flew over the International Date Line.</p><br /><p>At least thirty countries already have defensive autonomous weapons that operate under human supervision. Around the globe, militaries are racing to build robotic weapons with increasing autonomy. The ethical questions within this book grow more pressing each day. To what extent should such technologies be advanced? And if responsible democracies ban them, would that stop rogue regimes from taking advantage? At the forefront of a game-changing debate, <em>Army of None</em> engages military history, global policy, and cutting-edge science to argue that we must embrace technology where it can make war more precise and humane, but without surrendering human judgment. When the choice is life or death, there is no replacement for the human heart.</p>
Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"
by Zora Neale Hurston

Language

English

Pages

193

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>Amazon's Best History Book of the Year 2018</strong></p><p><strong><em>TIME M</em>agazine<em>’s</em> Best Nonfiction Book of 2018</strong></p><p><strong>New York Public Library’s Best Book of 2018</strong></p><p><strong>NPR’s Book Concierge Best Book of 2018</strong></p><p><strong><em>Economist </em>Book of the Year</strong></p><p><strong>SELF.com’s Best Books of 2018</strong></p><p><strong>Audible’s Best of the Year</strong></p><p><strong>BookRiot’s Best Audio Books of 2018</strong></p><p><p><strong>The Atlantic’s Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered</strong></p><p><strong>Atlanta Journal Constitution, Best Southern Books 2018 </strong></p><p><strong>The Christian Science Monitor’s Best Books 2018</strong></p><p><strong>Barnes & Noble’s Best Books of the Year</strong> </p><p><p><p><strong>“A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—<em>New York Times</em></strong></p><p><strong>“One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison</strong></p><p><strong>“Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a <em>Maestrapiece</em>.”—Alice Walker</strong></p><p><strong>A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic <em>Their Eyes Were Watching God, </em>with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States.</strong></p><p>In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.</p><p>In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the <em>Clotilda</em>, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.</p><p>Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, <em>Barracoon</em> masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.</p><p></p><p></p><p></p>
Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life
by Helen Czerski

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

January 10, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>“[Czerski’s] quest to enhance humanity’s everyday scientific literacy is timely and imperative.”<em>—Science</em></strong></p><br /><p><em>Storm in a Teacup</em> is Helen Czerski’s lively, entertaining, and richly informed introduction to the world of physics. Czerski provides the tools to alter the way we see everything around us by linking ordinary objects and occurrences, like popcorn popping, coffee stains, and fridge magnets, to big ideas like climate change, the energy crisis, or innovative medical testing. She provides answers to vexing questions: How do ducks keep their feet warm when walking on ice? Why does it take so long for ketchup to come out of a bottle? Why does milk, when added to tea, look like billowing storm clouds? In an engaging voice at once warm and witty, Czerski shares her stunning breadth of knowledge to lift the veil of familiarity from the ordinary.</p>
Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
by Alfred Lansing

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 29, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>The harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to reach the South Pole, one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age.</b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div>In August 1914, polar explorer Ernest Shackleton boarded the Endurance and set sail for Antarctica, where he planned to cross the last uncharted continent on foot. In January 1915, after battling its way through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day's sail short of its destination, the Endurance became locked in an island of ice. Thus began the legendary ordeal of Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men.</div><div><br /></div><div>For ten months the ice-moored Endurance drifted northwest before it was finally crushed between two ice floes. With no options left, Shackleton and a skeleton crew attempted a near-impossible journey over 850 miles of the South Atlantic's heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization. Their survival, and the survival of the men they left behind, depended on their small lifeboat successfully finding the island of South Georgia--a tiny dot of land in a vast and hostile ocean.</div><div><br /></div><div>In <i>Endurance</i>, the definitive account of Ernest Shackleton's fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing and miraculous voyage that has defined heroism for the modern age.</div>

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