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The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington
by , Josh Mensch

Language

English

Pages

410

Publication Date

January 08, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Taking place during the most critical period of our nation’s birth, <i>The First Conspiracy</i> tells a remarkable and previously untold piece of American history that not only reveals George Washington’s character, but also illuminates the origins of America’s counterintelligence movement that led to the modern day CIA.</b><br /><b></b><br /><b></b>In 1776, an elite group of soldiers were handpicked to serve as George Washington’s bodyguards. Washington trusted them; relied on them. But unbeknownst to Washington, some of them were part of a treasonous plan. In the months leading up to the Revolutionary War, these traitorous soldiers, along with the Governor of New York, William Tryon, and Mayor David Mathews, launched a deadly plot against the most important member of the military: George Washington himself.</p><p>This is the story of the secret plot and how it was revealed. It is a story of leaders, liars, counterfeiters, and jailhouse confessors. It also shows just how hard the battle was for George Washington and how close America was to losing the Revolutionary War.</p><p>In this historical page-turner, <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Brad Meltzer teams up with American history writer and documentary television producer, Josh Mensch to unravel the shocking true story behind what has previously been a footnote in the pages of history. Drawing on extensive research, Meltzer and Mensch capture in riveting detail how George Washington not only defeated the most powerful military force in the world, but also uncovered the secret plot against him in the tumultuous days leading up to July 4, 1776. </p><br /><p>Praise for <i>The First Conspiracy</i>:</p><p>"This is American history at its finest, a gripping story of spies, killers, counterfeiters, traitors?and a mysterious prostitute who may or may not have even existed. Anyone with an interest in American history will love this book." —Douglas Preston, #1 bestselling author of <i>The Lost City of the Monkey God</i></p><p>“A wonderful book about leadership?and it shows why George Washington and his moral lessons are just as vital today. What a book. You’ll love it.” —President George H.W. Bush</p><p>“This is an important book: a fascinating largely unknown chapter of our hazardous beginning, a reminder of why counterintelligence matters, and a great read.” —President Bill Clinton</p>
The Library Book
by Susan Orlean

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK</b><BR> <BR><b>A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR </b> * <b>A</b> <b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER and <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“A constant pleasure to read…Everybody who loves books should check out <i>The Library Book</i>.” —<i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR><b>“CAPTIVATING…DELIGHTFUL.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i> * “EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING.” —<i>The New York Times</i> * “MESMERIZING…RIVETING.” —<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><BR> <BR><b>A dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries—from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by <i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>.</b><BR><BR>On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?<BR> <BR> Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>reporter and <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Library Book</i>, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.<BR> <BR> Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.<BR> <BR> Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, <i>The Library Book </i>is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

580

Publication Date

February 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg </strong></p><p>From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”</p><p>One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?</p><p>Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, <em>Sapiens</em> integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.</p><p>Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?</p><p>Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.</p>
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
by Benjamin Franklin

Language

English

Pages

47

Publication Date

January 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><P><B>Read about the fascinating life of Benjamin Franklin, prolific philosopher, inventor, and Founding Father of the United States, in this beautifully illustrated version of his autobiography.</B></P><P>American icon <B>Benjamin Franklin is known for many things</B>: he published the famous <I>Poor Richard's Almanack</I>, helped found the world-famous University of Pennsylvania, and was the first Postmaster General of the United States. His iconography is everywhere. His likeness adorns, among other things, the United States' hundred-dollar bill. Franklin was a <B>wildly intriguing personality</B>, as his autobiography makes plain. From his hoarding of his pay as a <B>teenager to buy books</B>, to his disapproval of habits like drinking beer, from his <B>work as a printer,</B> to his <B>experiments with electricity</B>, this is the story of Franklin's life--told as only he could tell it--in the years before the American Revolution.</P><P>Benjamin Franklin's writings represent a <B>career of literary</B>, <B>scientific</B>, and <B>political efforts</B> which extended nearly the entire eighteenth century and the birth of the United States. This <B>heavily illustrated version of Franklin's autobiography</B> includes his reflections on diverse questions such as philosophy and religion, social status, electricity, American national characteristics, war, and the status of women.</P><P>A<B> classic in the American canon</B>, Franklin's autobiography is a <B>must-read for any serious</B> student of American history.</P></DIV>
The Fifth Risk
by Michael Lewis

Language

English

Pages

221

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller<br /><br /><br /><br />What are the consequences if the people given control over our government have no idea how it works?</strong></p><br /><p>"The election happened," remembers Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, then deputy secretary of the Department of Energy. "And then there was radio silence." Across all departments, similar stories were playing out: Trump appointees were few and far between; those that did show up were shockingly uninformed about the functions of their new workplace. Some even threw away the briefing books that had been prepared for them.</p><br /><p>Michael Lewis’s brilliant narrative takes us into the engine rooms of a government under attack by its own leaders. In Agriculture the funding of vital programs like food stamps and school lunches is being slashed. The Commerce Department may not have enough staff to conduct the 2020 Census properly. Over at Energy, where international nuclear risk is managed, it’s not clear there will be enough inspectors to track and locate black market uranium before terrorists do.</p><br /><p>Willful ignorance plays a role in these looming disasters. If your ambition is to maximize short-term gains without regard to the long-term cost, you are better off not knowing those costs. If you want to preserve your personal immunity to the hard problems, it’s better never to really understand those problems. There is upside to ignorance, and downside to knowledge. Knowledge makes life messier. It makes it a bit more difficult for a person who wishes to shrink the world to a worldview.</p><br /><p>If there are dangerous fools in this book, there are also heroes, unsung, of course. They are the linchpins of the system—those public servants whose knowledge, dedication, and proactivity keep the machinery running. Michael Lewis finds them, and he asks them what keeps them up at night.</p>
The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold...
by Ben Macintyre

Language

English

Pages

345

Publication Date

September 18, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER<br /></b>“The best true spy story I have ever read.”<b>—<b>JOHN LE CARRÉ</b><br /><br />The celebrated author of <i>Double Cross</i> and <i>Rogue Heroes</i> returns with his greatest spy story yet, a thrilling <i>Americans</i>-era tale of Oleg Gordievsky, the Russian whose secret work helped hasten the end of the Cold War.</b><br /><br /> If anyone could be considered a Russian counterpart to the infamous British double-agent Kim Philby, it was Oleg Gordievsky. The son of two KGB agents and the product of the best Soviet institutions, the savvy, sophisticated Gordievsky grew to see his nation's communism as both criminal and philistine. He took his first posting for Russian intelligence in 1968 and eventually became the Soviet Union's top man in London, but from 1973 on he was secretly working for MI6. For nearly a decade, as the Cold War reached its twilight, Gordievsky helped the West turn the tables on the KGB, exposing Russian spies and helping to foil countless intelligence plots, as the Soviet leadership grew increasingly paranoid at the United States's nuclear first-strike capabilities and brought the world closer to the brink of war. Desperate to keep the circle of trust close, MI6 never revealed Gordievsky's name to its counterparts in the CIA, which in turn grew obsessed with figuring out the identity of Britain's obviously top-level source. Their obsession ultimately doomed Gordievsky: the CIA officer assigned to identify him was none other than Aldrich Ames, the man who would become infamous for secretly spying for the Soviets. <br /><br /> Unfolding the delicious three-way gamesmanship between America, Britain, and the Soviet Union, and culminating in the gripping cinematic beat-by-beat of Gordievsky's nail-biting escape from Moscow in 1985, Ben Macintyre's latest may be his best yet. Like the greatest novels of John le Carré, it brings readers deep into a world of treachery and betrayal, where the lines bleed between the personal and the professional, and one man's hatred of communism had the power to change the future of nations.
The Woman Who Smashed Codes: A True Story of Love, Spies, and the...
by Jason Fagone

Language

English

Pages

464

Publication Date

September 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>NATIONAL BESTSELLER</strong></p><p><strong>NPR Best Book of 2017 </strong></p><p><strong>“Not all superheroes wear capes, and Elizebeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of a future Wonder Woman movie.” — <em>The New York Times</em></strong></p><p>Joining the ranks of <em>Hidden Figures</em> and In the Garden of Beasts, the incredible true story of the greatest codebreaking duo that ever lived, an American woman and her husband who invented the modern science of cryptology together and used it to confront the evils of their time, solving puzzles that unmasked Nazi spies and helped win World War II.</p><p>In 1916, at the height of World War I, brilliant Shakespeare expert Elizebeth Smith went to work for an eccentric tycoon on his estate outside Chicago. The tycoon had close ties to the U.S. government, and he soon asked Elizebeth to apply her language skills to an exciting new venture: code-breaking. There she met the man who would become her husband, groundbreaking cryptologist William Friedman. Though she and Friedman are in many ways the "Adam and Eve" of the NSA, Elizebeth’s story, incredibly, has never been told.</p><p>In <em>The Woman Who Smashed Codes</em>, Jason Fagone chronicles the life of this extraordinary woman, who played an integral role in our nation’s history for forty years. After World War I, Smith used her talents to catch gangsters and smugglers during Prohibition, then accepted a covert mission to discover and expose Nazi spy rings that were spreading like wildfire across South America, advancing ever closer to the United States. As World War II raged, Elizebeth fought a highly classified battle of wits against Hitler’s Reich, cracking multiple versions of the Enigma machine used by German spies. Meanwhile, inside an Army vault in Washington, William worked furiously to break Purple, the Japanese version of Enigma—and eventually succeeded, at a terrible cost to his personal life.</p><p>Fagone unveils America’s code-breaking history through the prism of Smith’s life, bringing into focus the unforgettable events and colorful personalities that would help shape modern intelligence. Blending the lively pace and compelling detail that are the hallmarks of Erik Larson’s bestsellers with the atmosphere and intensity of <em>The Imitation Game, The Woman Who Smashed Codes</em> is page-turning popular history at its finest.</p>
Grant
by Ron Chernow

Language

English

Pages

1097

Publication Date

October 10, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestseller.<br /><br /><b><i>New York Times Book Review</i> 10 Best Books of 2017</b></b><br /><br /><b>Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Chernow returns with a sweeping and dramatic portrait of one of our most compelling generals and presidents, Ulysses S. Grant.</b><br />  <br /> Ulysses S. Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and an inept businessman, or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Chernow shows in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency.<br />  <br /> Before the Civil War, Grant was flailing. His business ventures had ended dismally, and despite distinguished service in the Mexican War he ended up resigning from the army in disgrace amid recurring accusations of drunkenness. But in war, Grant began to realize his remarkable potential, soaring through the ranks of the Union army, prevailing at the battle of Shiloh and in the Vicksburg campaign, and ultimately defeating the legendary Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Along the way, Grant endeared himself to President Lincoln and became his most trusted general and the strategic genius of the war effort. Grant’s military fame translated into a two-term presidency, but one plagued by corruption scandals involving his closest staff members.<br /><br /> More important, he sought freedom and justice for black Americans, working to crush the Ku Klux Klan and earning the admiration of Frederick Douglass, who called him “the vigilant, firm, impartial, and wise protector of my race.” After his presidency, he was again brought low by a dashing young swindler on Wall Street, only to resuscitate his image by working with Mark Twain to publish his memoirs, which are recognized as a masterpiece of the genre. <br />  <br /> With lucidity, breadth, and meticulousness, Chernow finds the threads that bind these disparate stories together, shedding new light on the man whom Walt Whitman described as “nothing heroic... and yet the greatest hero.” Chernow’s probing portrait of Grant's lifelong struggle with alcoholism transforms our understanding of the man at the deepest level. This is America's greatest biographer, bringing movingly to life one of our finest but most underappreciated presidents. The definitive biography, <i>Grant</i> is a grand synthesis of painstaking research and literary brilliance that makes sense of all sides of Grant's life, explaining how this simple Midwesterner could at once be so ordinary and so extraordinary.<br /><br /><b>Named one of the best books of the year by Goodreads •<i> </i>Amazon <i>• The New York Times</i> <i>• Newsday</i> <i>• </i>BookPage <i>• </i>Barnes and Noble <i>• Wall Street Journal</i> </b>
Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World
by Eric Metaxas

Language

English

Pages

493

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER<br /><br />“Metaxas is a scrupulous chronicler and has an eye for a good story. . . . full, instructive, and pacey.” <i>—The Washington Post</i><br /><br />From #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes a brilliant and inspiring biography of the most influential man in modern history, Martin Luther, in time for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation</b><br />  <br /> On All Hallow’s Eve in 1517, a young monk named Martin Luther posted a document he hoped would spark an academic debate, but that instead ignited a conflagration that would forever destroy the world he knew. Five hundred years after Luther’s now famous Ninety-five Theses appeared, Eric Metaxas, acclaimed biographer of the bestselling <i>Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy</i> and <i>Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery</i>, paints a startling portrait of the wild figure whose adamantine faith cracked the edifice of Western Christendom and dragged medieval Europe into the future. Written in riveting prose and impeccably researched, <i>Martin Luther</i> tells the searing tale of a humble man who, by bringing ugly truths to the highest seats of power, caused the explosion whose sound is still ringing in our ears. Luther’s monumental faith and courage gave birth to the ideals of liberty, equality, and individualism that today lie at the heart of all modern life.
21 Lessons for the 21st Century
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

356

Publication Date

September 04, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER </b>• <b>In<i> Sapiens, </i>he explored our past. In <i>Homo Deus, </i>he looked to our future<i>. </i>Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today’s most pressing issues.</b><br /><br /><b>“Fascinating . . . a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the twenty-first century.”—Bill Gates, <i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /><br /><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>FINANCIAL TIMES </i>AND <b>PAMELA PAUL, KQED </b></b><br /><br /> How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children? <br /><br />Yuval Noah Harari’s <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i> is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.<br /><br /> In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?<br /><br /> Harari’s unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i> is essential reading.<br /><b><br />“If there were such a thing as a required instruction manual for politicians and thought leaders, Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari’s <i>21 Lessons for the 21st Century</i> would deserve serious consideration. In this collection of provocative essays, Harari . . . tackles a daunting array of issues, endeavoring to answer a persistent question: ‘What is happening in the world today, and what is the deep meaning of these events?’”—<i>BookPage </i>(top pick)</b>

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