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The Body: A Guide for Occupants
by Bill Bryson

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

424

Publication Date

October 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>A <i>New York Times </i>Bestseller<i><br /></i><br />"Glorious. . .You will marvel at the brilliance and vast weirdness of your design." <b>—<i>The Washington Post </i></b><br /><br />Bill Bryson, bestselling author of <i>A Short History of Nearly Everything</i>, takes us on a head-to-toe tour of the marvel that is the human body. As addictive as it is comprehensive, this is Bryson at his very best, a must-read owner's manual for everybody.</b></b><br /><br />Bill Bryson once again proves himself to be an incomparable companion as he guides us through the human body--how it functions, its remarkable ability to heal itself, and (unfortunately) the ways it can fail. Full of extraordinary facts (your body made a million red blood cells since you started reading this) and irresistible Bryson-esque anecdotes, <i>The Body</i> will lead you to a deeper understanding of the miracle that is life in general and you in particular. As Bill Bryson writes, "We pass our existence within this wobble of flesh and yet take it almost entirely for granted." <i>The Body</i> will cure that indifference with generous doses of wondrous, compulsively readable facts and information.
Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams
by Matthew Walker

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

369

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>New York Times </i>bestseller and international sensation, this “stimulating and important book” (<i>Financial Times</i>) from the director of UC Berkeley’s Center for Human Sleep Science is a fascinating dive into the purpose and power of slumber. As the <i>Guardian</i> said, Walker explains “how a good night's shut-eye can make us cleverer, more attractive, slimmer, happier, healthier, and ward off cancer.”</b><br /><br />With two appearances on <i>CBS This Morning </i>and <i>Fresh Air</i>'s most popular interview of 2017, Matthew Walker has made abundantly clear that sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life. Until very recently, science had no answer to the question of why we sleep, or what good it served, or why we suffer such devastating health consequences when it is absent. Compared to the other basic drives in life—eating, drinking, and reproducing—the purpose of sleep remains more elusive.<br /> <br /> Within the brain, sleep enriches a diversity of functions, including our ability to learn, memorize, and make logical decisions. It recalibrates our emotions, restocks our immune system, fine-tunes our metabolism, and regulates our appetite. Dreaming creates a virtual reality space in which the brain melds past and present knowledge, inspiring creativity.<br /> <br /> In this “compelling and utterly convincing” (<i>The Sunday Times</i>) book, preeminent neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker provides a revolutionary exploration of sleep, examining how it affects every aspect of our physical and mental well-being. Charting the most cutting-edge scientific breakthroughs, and marshalling his decades of research and clinical practice, Walker explains how we can harness sleep to improve learning, mood and energy levels, regulate hormones, prevent cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes, slow the effects of aging, and increase longevity. He also provides actionable steps towards getting a better night’s sleep every night.<br /> <br /> Clear-eyed, fascinating, and accessible, <i>Why We Sleep</i> is a crucial and illuminating book. Written with the precision of Atul Gawande, Andrew Solomon, and Sherwin Nuland, it is “recommended for night-table reading in the most pragmatic sense” (<i>The</i> <i>New York Times Book Review</i>).
Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World
by Maryanne Wolf

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

277

Publication Date

August 14, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>The author of the acclaimed <em>Proust and the Squid</em> follows up with a lively, ambitious, and deeply informative book that considers the future of the reading brain and our capacity for critical thinking, empathy, and reflection as we become increasingly dependent on digital technologies.</strong><br /></p><p>A decade ago, Maryanne Wolf’s <em>Proust and the Squid</em> revealed what we know about how the brain learns to read and how reading changes the way we think and feel. Since then, the ways we process written language have changed dramatically with many concerned about both their own changes and that of children. New research on the reading brain chronicles these changes in the brains of children and adults as they learn to read while immersed in a digitally dominated medium.</p><p>Drawing deeply on this research, this book comprises a series of letters Wolf writes to us—her beloved readers—to describe her concerns and her hopes about what is happening to the reading brain as it unavoidably changes to adapt to digital mediums. Wolf raises difficult questions, including:</p><ul><li>Will children learn to incorporate the full range of "deep reading" processes that are at the core of the expert reading brain?</li><li>Will the mix of a seemingly infinite set of distractions for children’s attention and their quick access to immediate, voluminous information alter their ability to think for themselves?</li><li>With information at their fingertips, will the next generation learn to build their own storehouse of knowledge, which could impede the ability to make analogies and draw inferences from what they know?</li><li>Will all these influences, in turn, change the formation in children and the use in adults of "slower" cognitive processes like critical thinking, personal reflection, imagination, and empathy that comprise deep reading and that influence both how we think and how we live our lives?</li><li>Will the chain of digital influences ultimately influence the use of the critical analytical and empathic capacities necessary for a democratic society?</li><li>How can we preserve deep reading processes in future iterations of the reading brain?</li><li>Who are the "good readers" of every epoch?</li></ul><p>Concerns about attention span, critical reasoning, and over-reliance on technology are never just about children—Wolf herself has found that, though she is a reading expert, her ability to read deeply has been impacted as she has become, inevitably, increasingly dependent on screens.</p><p>Wolf draws on neuroscience, literature, education, technology, and philosophy and blends historical, literary, and scientific facts with down-to-earth examples and warm anecdotes to illuminate complex ideas that culminate in a proposal for a biliterate reading brain. Provocative and intriguing, <em>Reader, Come Home</em> is a roadmap that provides a cautionary but hopeful perspective on the impact of technology on our brains and our most essential intellectual capacities—and what this could mean for our future.</p>
Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst
by Robert M. Sapolsky

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

798

Publication Date

May 02, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Why do we do the things we do?<br /><br />Over a decade in the making, this game-changing book is Robert Sapolsky's genre-shattering attempt to answer that question as fully as perhaps only he could, looking at it from every angle. Sapolsky's storytelling concept is delightful but it also has a powerful intrinsic logic: he starts by looking at the factors that bear on a person's reaction in the precise moment a behavior occurs, and then hops back in time from there, in stages, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its genetic inheritance.<br /><br />And so the first category of explanation is the neurobiological one. What goes on in a person's brain a second before the behavior happens? Then he pulls out to a slightly larger field of vision, a little earlier in time: What sight, sound, or smell triggers the nervous system to produce that behavior? And then, what hormones act hours to days earlier to change how responsive that individual is to the stimuli which trigger the nervous system? By now, he has increased our field of vision so that we are thinking about neurobiology and the sensory world of our environment and endocrinology in trying to explain what happened.<br /><br />Sapolsky keeps going--next to what features of the environment affected that person's brain, and then back to the childhood of the individual, and then to their genetic makeup. Finally, he expands the view to encompass factors larger than that one individual. How culture has shaped that individual's group, what ecological factors helped shape that culture, and on and on, back to evolutionary factors thousands and even millions of years old.<br /><br />The result is one of the most dazzling tours de horizon of the science of human behavior ever attempted, a majestic synthesis that harvests cutting-edge research across a range of disciplines to provide a subtle and nuanced perspective on why we ultimately do the things we do...for good and for ill. Sapolsky builds on this understanding to wrestle with some of our deepest and thorniest questions relating to tribalism and xenophobia, hierarchy and competition, morality and free will, and war and peace. Wise, humane, often very funny, Behave is a towering achievement, powerfully humanizing, and downright heroic in its own right.
The Case Against Reality: Why Evolution Hid the Truth from Our Ey...
by Donald Hoffman

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

August 13, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Can we trust our senses to tell us the truth?</strong></p><br /><p>Challenging leading scientific theories that claim that our senses report back objective reality, cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman argues that while we should take our perceptions seriously, we should not take them literally. How can it be possible that the world we see is not objective reality? And how can our senses be useful if they are not communicating the truth? Hoffman grapples with these questions and more over the course of this eye-opening work.</p><br /><p>Ever since <em>Homo sapiens</em> has walked the earth, natural selection has favored perception that hides the truth and guides us toward useful action, shaping our senses to keep us alive and reproducing. We observe a speeding car and do not walk in front of it; we see mold growing on bread and do not eat it. These impressions, though, are not objective reality. Just like a file icon on a desktop screen is a useful symbol rather than a genuine representation of what a computer file looks like, the objects we see every day are merely icons, allowing us to navigate the world safely and with ease.</p><br /><p>The real-world implications for this discovery are huge. From examining why fashion designers create clothes that give the illusion of a more “attractive” body shape to studying how companies use color to elicit specific emotions in consumers, and even dismantling the very notion that spacetime is objective reality, <em>The Case Against Reality</em> dares us to question everything we thought we knew about the world we see.</p>
Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife
by Eben Alexander III M.D.

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

209

Publication Date

October 23, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A SCIENTIST’S CASE FOR THE AFTERLIFE<P> <P>Near-death experiences, or NDEs, are controversial. Thousands of people have had them, but many in the scientific community have argued that they are impossible. Dr. Eben Alexander was one of those people. <P><P>A highly trained neurosurgeon who had operated on thousands of brains in the course of his career, Alexander knew that what people of faith call the “soul” is really a product of brain chemistry. NDEs, he would have been the first to explain, might feel real to the people having them, but in truth they are simply fantasies produced by brains under extreme stress. <P><P>Then came the day when Dr. Alexander’s own brain was attacked by an extremely rare illness. The part of the brain that controls thought and emotion—and in essence makes us human— shut down completely. For seven days Alexander lay in a hospital bed in a deep coma. Then, as his doctors weighed the possibility of stopping treatment, Alexander’s eyes popped open. He had come back. <P><P>Alexander’s recovery is by all accounts a medical miracle. But the real miracle of his story lies elsewhere. While his body lay in coma, Alexander journeyed beyond this world and encountered an angelic being who guided him into the deepest realms of super-physical existence. There he met, and spoke with, the Divine source of the universe itself. <P><P>This story sounds like the wild and wonderful imaginings of a skilled fantasy writer. But it is not fantasy. Before Alexander underwent his journey, he could not reconcile his knowledge of neuroscience with any belief in heaven, God, or the soul. That difficulty with belief created an empty space that no professional triumph could erase. Today he is a doctor who believes that true health can be achieved only when we realize that God and the soul are real and that death is not the end of personal existence but only a transition. <P><P>This story would be remarkable no matter who it happened to. That it happened to Dr. Alexander makes it revolutionary. No scientist or person of faith will be able to ignore it. Reading it will change your life.
Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Eve...
by Joshua Foer

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

317

Publication Date

March 03, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The blockbuster phenomenon that charts an amazing journey of the mind while revolutionizing our concept of memory<br /><br /></b>An instant bestseller that is poised to become a classic, <i>Moonwalking with Einstein</i> recounts Joshua Foer's yearlong quest to improve his memory under the tutelage of top "mental athletes." He draws on cutting-edge research, a surprising cultural history of remembering, and venerable tricks of the mentalist's trade to transform our understanding of human memory. From the United States Memory Championship to deep within the author's own mind, this is an electrifying work of journalism that reminds us that, in every way that matters, we are the sum of our memories.<b><br /></b>
The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from t...
by Norman Doidge

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

448

Publication Date

March 15, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p> </p><p>What is neuroplasticity? Is it possible to change your brain? Norman Doidge’s inspiring guide to the new brain science explains all of this and more<br /><br />An astonishing new science called neuroplasticity is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable, and proving that it is, in fact, possible to change your brain. Psychoanalyst, Norman Doidge, M.D., traveled the country to meet both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity, its healing powers, and the people whose lives they’ve transformed—people whose mental limitations, brain damage or brain trauma were seen as unalterable. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, blind people who learn to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, stroke patients learning to speak, children with cerebral palsy learning to move with more grace, depression and anxiety disorders successfully treated, and lifelong character traits changed. Using these marvelous stories to probe mysteries of the body, emotion, love, sex, culture, and education, Dr. Doidge has written an immensely moving, inspiring book that will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.</p>
The Feeling of Life Itself: Why Consciousness Is Widespread but C...
by Christof Koch

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

280

Publication Date

September 06, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An argument that consciousness, more widespread than previously assumed, is the feeling of being alive, not a type of computation or a clever hack.</b></p><p>In <i>The Feeling of Life Itself</i>, Christof Koch offers a straightforward definition of consciousness as any subjective experience, from the most mundane to the most exalted—the feeling of being alive. </p><p>Psychologists study which cognitive operations underpin a given conscious perception. Neuroscientists track the neural correlates of consciousness in the brain, the organ of the mind. But why the brain and not, say, the liver? How can the brain, three pounds of highly excitable matter, a piece of furniture in the universe, subject to the same laws of physics as any other piece, give rise to subjective experience? Koch argues that what is needed to answer these questions is a quantitative theory that starts with experience and proceeds to the brain. In <i>The Feeling of Life Itself</i>, Koch outlines such a theory, based on integrated information.</p><p>Koch describes how the theory explains many facts about the neurology of consciousness and how it has been used to build a clinically useful consciousness meter. The theory predicts that many, and perhaps all, animals experience the sights and sounds of life; consciousness is much more widespread than conventionally assumed. Contrary to received wisdom, however, Koch argues that programmable computers will not have consciousness. Even a perfect software model of the brain is not conscious. Its simulation is fake consciousness. Consciousness is not a special type of computation—it is not a clever hack. Consciousness is about being.<br /></p>
Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You ...
by , Doug McGuff

Price : $20 or less

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

December 17, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Building muscle has never been faster or easier than with this revolutionary once-a-week training program</b></p> <p>In <i>Body By Science</i>, bodybuilding powerhouse John Little teams up with fitness medicine expert Dr. Doug McGuff to present a scientifically proven formula for maximizing muscle development in just 12 minutes a week. Backed by rigorous research, the authors prescribe a weekly high-intensity program for increasing strength, revving metabolism, and building muscle for a total fitness experience.</p>

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