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Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion
by Jia Tolentino

Language

English

Pages

303

Publication Date

August 06, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • “From <i>The New Yorker</i>’s beloved cultural critic comes a bold, unflinching collection of essays about self-deception, examining everything from scammer culture to reality television.”<i>—Esquire</i><br /><i> </i><br />“A whip-smart, challenging book.”—Zadie Smith • “Jia Tolentino could be the Joan Didion of our time.”<i>—Vulture</i></b><br /><br /><b><b><b><b>FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE’S JOHN LEONARD PRIZE FOR BEST FIRST BOOK • </b></b></b>NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY AND <i>HARVARD CRIMSON </i>AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>The New York Times Book Review </i>• <i>Time </i>• <i>Chicago Tribune</i> • <i>The Washington Post</i> • NPR • <i>Variety</i> • <i>Esquire </i>• <i>Vox</i> • <i>Elle </i>• <i>Glamour</i> • <i>GQ</i> • <i>Good Housekeeping </i>• <i>The Paris Review</i> • <i>Paste</i> • <i>Town & Country </i>• <i>BookPage </i>• <i>Kirkus Reviews</i> • <i>BookRiot </i>• <i>Shelf Awareness</i></b><br /><br /> Jia Tolentino is a peerless voice of her generation, tackling the conflicts, contradictions, and sea changes that define us and our time. Now, in this dazzling collection of nine entirely original essays, written with a rare combination of give and sharpness, wit and fearlessness, she delves into the forces that warp our vision, demonstrating an unparalleled stylistic potency and critical dexterity.<br /><br /> <i>Trick Mirror</i> is an enlightening, unforgettable trip through the river of self-delusion that surges just beneath the surface of our lives. This is a book about the incentives that shape us, and about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly through a culture that revolves around the self. In each essay, Tolentino writes about a cultural prism: the rise of the nightmare social internet; the advent of scamming as the definitive millennial ethos; the literary heroine’s journey from brave to blank to bitter; the punitive dream of optimization, which insists that everything, including our bodies, should become more efficient and beautiful until we die. Gleaming with Tolentino’s sense of humor and capacity to elucidate the impossibly complex in an instant, and marked by her desire to treat the reader with profound honesty, <i>Trick Mirror</i> is an instant classic of the worst decade yet.<br /><br /><b>LONGLISTED FOR THE PEN/DIAMONSTEIN-SPIELVOGEL AWARD FOR THE ART OF THE ESSAY</b>
Little Weirds
by Jenny Slate

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

November 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER. </b><b>Step into Jenny Slate's wild, unfiltered imagination in this "magical" (Mindy Kaling), "delicious" (Amy Sedaris), and "poignant" (John Mulaney) collection about love, heartbreak, and being alive -- "this book is something new and wonderful" (George Saunders).</b><b><br /></b>You may "know" Jenny Slate from her new Netflix special, "Stage Fright," or as the creator of Marcel the Shell, or as the star of "Obvious Child." But you don't really <i>know</i> Jenny Slate until you get bonked on the head by her absolutely singular writing style. To see the world through Jenny's eyes is to see it as though for the first time, shimmering with strangeness and possibility.<b> </b>As she will remind you, we live on an ancient ball that rotates around a bigger ball made up of lights and gasses that are science gasses, not farts (don't be immature). Heartbreak, confusion, and misogyny stalk this blue-green sphere, yes, but it is also a place of wild delight and unconstrained vitality, a place where we can start living as soon as we are born, and we can be born at any time. In her dazzling, impossible-to-categorize debut, Jenny channels the pain and beauty of life in writing so fresh, so new, and so burstingly alive, we catch her vision like a fever and bring it back out into the bright day with us, and everything has changed.<br /><br />
The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians
by David M. Rubenstein

Language

English

Pages

407

Publication Date

October 29, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Co-founder of The Carlyle Group and patriotic philanthropist David M. Rubenstein takes readers on a sweeping journey across the grand arc of the American story through revealing conversations with our greatest historians.</b><br /><br />In these lively dialogues, the biggest names in American history explore the subjects they've come to so intimately know and understand.<br /> <br /> -- <b>David McCullough</b> on John Adams<br /> -- <b>Jon Meacham</b> on Thomas Jefferson<br /> -- <b>Ron Chernow</b> on Alexander Hamilton<br /> -- <b>Walter Isaacson</b> on Benjamin Franklin<br /> -- <b>Doris Kearns Goodwin</b> on Abraham Lincoln<br /> -- <b>A. Scott Berg</b> on Charles Lindbergh<br /> -- <b>Taylor Branch</b> on Martin Luther King<br /> -- <b>Robert Caro</b> on Lyndon B. Johnson<br /> -- <b>Bob Woodward</b> on Richard Nixon<br /> --<b>And many others, including a special conversation with Chief Justice John Roberts </b><br /> <br /> Through his popular program <i>The David Rubenstein Show</i>, David Rubenstein has established himself as one of our most thoughtful interviewers. Now, in <i>The American Story,</i> David captures the brilliance of our most esteemed historians, as well as the souls of their subjects. The book features introductions by Rubenstein as well as a foreword by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, the first woman and the first African American to lead our national library. Richly illustrated with archival images from the Library of Congress, the book is destined to become a classic for serious readers of American history.<br /> <br /> Through these captivating exchanges, these bestselling and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors offer fresh insight on pivotal moments from the Founding Era to the late 20th century.
Crazy Salad and Scribble Scribble: Some Things About Women and No...
by Nora Ephron

Language

English

Pages

450

Publication Date

July 18, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Two classic collections of Nora Ephron’s uproarious essays—tackling everything from feminism to the media, from politics to beauty products, with her inimitable charm and distinctive wit—now available in one book for the first time. <br /> <br />This edition brings together some of Ephron’s most famous writing on a generation of women (and men) who helped shape the way we live now, and on events ranging from the Watergate scandal to the Pillsbury Bake-Off. In these sharp, hilariously entertaining, and vividly observed pieces, Ephron illuminates an era with wicked honesty and insight. From the famous “A Few Words About Breasts” to important pieces on her time working for the <i>New York Post</i> and <i>Gourmet Magazine</i>, these essays show Ephron at her very best.
Calypso
by David Sedaris

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

May 29, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book.<br /><br /></b>If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with <i>Calypso.</i> You'd be wrong. <br /><br />When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself.<br /><br />With <i>Calypso,</i> Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny--it's a book that can make you laugh 'til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris's powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future.<br /><br />This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke. <i>Calypso</i> is simultaneously Sedaris's darkest and warmest book yet--and it just might be his very best.<br />
The Longing for Less: Living with Minimalism
by Kyle Chayka

Language

English

Pages

264

Publication Date

January 21, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"More than just a story of an abiding cultural preoccupation, <i>The Longing For Less</i> peels back the commodified husk of minimalism to reveal something surprising and thoroughly alive." -Jenny Odell, author of </b><i><b>How to Do Nothing</b> </i><br /><i><br /></i><b>"Thoughtful and absorbing . . . A superb outing from a gifted young critic that will spark joy in many readers." -<i>Kirkus Reviews, </i>starred review </b><br /><b> </b><br />“Less is more”: Everywhere we hear the mantra. Marie Kondo and other decluttering gurus promise that shedding our stuff will solve our problems. We commit to cleanse diets and strive for inbox zero. Amid the frantic pace and distraction of everyday life, we covet silence-and airy, Instagrammable spaces in which to enjoy it. The popular term for this brand of upscale austerity, “minimalism,” has mostly come to stand for things to buy and consume. But minimalism has richer, deeper, and altogether more valuable gifts to offer. <br /> <br />Kyle Chayka is one of our sharpest cultural observers. After spending years covering minimalist trends for leading publications, he now delves beneath this lifestyle's glossy surface, seeking better ways to claim the time and space we crave. He shows that our longing for less goes back further than we realize. His search leads him to the philosophical and spiritual origins of minimalism, and to the stories of artists such as Agnes Martin and Donald Judd; composers such as John Cage and Julius Eastman; architects and designers; visionaries and misfits. As Chayka looks anew at their extraordinary lives and explores the places where they worked-from Manhattan lofts to the Texas high desert and the back alleys of Kyoto-he reminds us that what we most require is presence, not absence. The result is an elegant new synthesis of our minimalist desires and our profound emotional needs.
One Long River of Song: Notes on Wonder
by Brian Doyle

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

December 03, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1<i> SEATTLE TIMES BESTSELLER</i></b><b><i></i><br /></b><b>A playful and moving book of essays by a "born storyteller" (<i>Seattle Times</i>) who invites us into the miraculous and transcendent moments of the everyday</b><b></b><i></i><u></u><sub></sub><sup></sup><strike></strike><b></b><b></b><b></b><br />When Brian Doyle passed away at the age of sixty after a bout with brain cancer, he left behind a cult-like following of devoted readers who regard his writing as one of the best-kept secrets of the twenty-first century. Doyle writes with a delightful sense of wonder about the sanctity of everyday things, and about love and connection in all their forms: spiritual love, brotherly love, romantic love, and even the love of a nine-foot sturgeon.<br />At a moment when the world can sometimes feel darker than ever, Doyle's writing, which constantly evokes the humor and even bliss that life affords, is a balm. His essays manage to find, again and again, exquisite beauty in the quotidian, whether it's the awe of a child the first time she hears a river, or a husband's whiskers that a grieving widow misses seeing in her sink every morning. Through Doyle's eyes, nothing is dull. <br />David James Duncan sums up Doyle's sensibilities best in his introduction to the collection: "Brian Doyle lived the pleasure of bearing daily witness to quiet glories hidden in people, places and creatures of little or no size, renown, or commercial value, and he brought inimitably playful or soaring or aching or heartfelt language to his tellings." A life's work, <i>One Long River of Song</i> invites readers to experience joy and wonder in ordinary moments that become, under Doyle's rapturous and exuberant gaze, extraordinary.<br />
The Practicing Stoic: A Philosophical User's Manual
by Ward Farnsworth

Language

English

Pages

260

Publication Date

October 05, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Stoicism is the most helpful and practical philosophy ever devised. Its intention is to help people find happiness by thinking differently about their lives and their problems. The advice the Stoics provided centuries ago is still the best anyone has offered, and it’s as useful today as it was then—or more. When anyone today says something really wise, the Stoics usually said it first. Today the word “stoicism” is often used to mean suffering without complaint, but the true ideas, and ideals, of the Stoics are far more powerful and interesting. Stoicism means knowing the difference between what we can control and we can’t, and not worrying about the latter. The Stoics were masters of perspective, always taking the long view while remembering that life is short. And they were deep and insightful students of human nature, understanding how we manage to make ourselves miserable as well as how we seek and can find fulfillment. The great insights of the Stoics are spread over a wide range of ancient sources. This book brings them all together for the first time. It systematically presents what the various Stoic philosophers said on every important topic, accompanied by an eloquent commentary that is clear and concise. The result is a set of philosophy lessons for everyone—the most valuable wisdom of ages past made available for our times, and for all time.
Serious Noticing: Selected Essays, 1997-2019
by James Wood

Language

English

Pages

512

Publication Date

January 14, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>The definitive collection of literary essays by <i>The New Yorker</i>’s award-winning longtime book critic</b><br /><b></b><br />Ever since the publication of his first essay collection, <i>The Broken Estate</i>, in 1999, James Wood has been widely regarded as a leading literary critic of the English-speaking world. His essays on canonical writers (Gustav Flaubert, Herman Melville), recent legends (Don DeLillo, Marilynne Robinson) and significant contemporaries (Zadie Smith, Elena Ferrante) have established a standard for informed and incisive appreciation, composed in a distinctive literary style all their own.</p><p>Together, Wood’s essays, and his bestselling <i>How Fiction Works</i>, share an abiding preoccupation with how fiction tells its own truths, and with the vocation of the writer in a world haunted by the absence of God. In <i>Serious Noticing</i>, Wood collects his best essays from two decades of his career, supplementing earlier work with autobiographical reflections from his book <i>The Nearest Thing to Life</i> and recent essays from <i>The New Yorker</i> on young writers of extraordinary promise. The result is an essential guide to literature in the new millennium.</p>
Family Papers: A Sephardic Journey Through the Twentieth Century
by Sarah Abrevaya Stein

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

November 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Named one of the best books of 2019 by <i>The Economist </i>and a <i>New York Times Book Review </i>Editors' Choice. A National Jewish Book Award finalist.</b><br /><b></b><br /><b>"A superb and touching book about the frailty of ties that hold together places and people." --<i>T</i><i>he New York Times Book Review</i></b></p><p><b>An award-winning historian shares the true story of a frayed and diasporic Sephardic Jewish family preserved in thousands of letters</b></p><p>For centuries, the bustling port city of Salonica was home to the sprawling Levy family. As leading publishers and editors, they helped chronicle modernity as it was experienced by Sephardic Jews across the Ottoman Empire. The wars of the twentieth century, however, redrew the borders around them, in the process transforming the Levys from Ottomans to Greeks. Family members soon moved across boundaries and hemispheres, stretching the familial diaspora from Greece to Western Europe, Israel, Brazil, and India. In time, the Holocaust nearly eviscerated the clan, eradicating whole branches of the family tree. </p><p>In <i>Family Papers</i>, the prizewinning Sephardic historian Sarah Abrevaya Stein uses the family’s correspondence to tell the story of their journey across the arc of a century and the breadth of the globe. They wrote to share grief and to reveal secrets, to propose marriage and to plan for divorce, to maintain connection. They wrote because they were family. And years after they frayed, Stein discovers, what remains solid is the fragile tissue that once held them together: neither blood nor belief, but papers.</p><p>With meticulous research and care, Stein uses the Levys' letters to tell not only their history, but the history of Sephardic Jews in the twentieth century.</p>

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