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Calypso
by David Sedaris

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

May 29, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book.<br /><br /></b>If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with <i>Calypso.</i> You'd be wrong. <br /><br />When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself.<br /><br />With <i>Calypso,</i> Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny--it's a book that can make you laugh 'til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris's powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future.<br /><br />This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke. <i>Calypso</i> is simultaneously Sedaris's darkest and warmest book yet--and it just might be his very best.<br />
State by State: A Panoramic Portrait of America
by , Sean Wilsey

Language

English

Pages

608

Publication Date

October 19, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>See America with 50 of Our Finest, Funniest, and Foremost Writers Anthony Bourdain chases the fumigation truck in Bergen County, New Jersey</p><p>Dave Eggers tells it straight: <em>Illinois is Number 1</em> </p><p>Louise Erdrich loses her bikini top in North Dakota </p><p>Jonathan Franzen gets waylaid by New York's publicist...and personal attorney...and historian...and geologist</p><p>John Hodgman explains why there is no such thing as a "Massachusettsean"</p><p>Edward P. Jones makes the case: <em>D.C. should be a state!</em> </p><p>Jhumpa Lahiri declares her reckless love for the Rhode Island coast</p><p>Rick Moody explores the dark heart of Connecticut's Merritt Parkway, exit by exit </p><p>Ann Patchett makes a pilgrimage to the Civil War site at Shiloh, Tennessee</p><p>William T. Vollmann visits a San Francisco S&M club and Many More!</p>
I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution
by Emily Nussbaum

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

June 25, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From <i>The New Yorker</i>’s fiercely original, Pulitzer Prize-winning culture critic, a provocative collection of new and previously published essays arguing that we are what we watch.</b><br /><b><br />“Emily Nussbaum is the perfect critic—smart, engaging, funny, generous, and insightful.”—David Grann, author of <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i></b><br /><br /> From her creation of the “Approval Matrix” in <i>New York </i>magazine in 2004 to her Pulitzer Prize–winning columns for <i>The New Yorker,</i> Emily Nussbaum has argued for a new way of looking at TV. In this collection, including two never-before-published essays, Nussbaum writes about her passion for television, beginning with <i>Buffy the Vampire Slayer,</i> the show that set her on a fresh intellectual path. She explores the rise of the female screw-up, how fans warp the shows they love, the messy power of sexual violence on TV, and the year that jokes helped elect a reality-television president. There are three big profiles of television showrunners—Kenya Barris, Jenji Kohan, and Ryan Murphy—as well as examinations of the legacies of Norman Lear and Joan Rivers. The book also includes a major new essay written during the year of #MeToo, wrestling with the question of what to do when the artist you love is a monster.<br /><br />More than a collection of reviews, the book makes a case for toppling the status anxiety that has long haunted the “idiot box,” even as it transformed. Through it all, Nussbaum recounts her fervent search, over fifteen years, for a new kind of criticism, one that resists the false hierarchy that elevates one kind of culture (violent, dramatic, gritty) over another (joyful, funny, stylized). <i>I Like to Watch</i> traces her own struggle to punch through stifling notions of “prestige television,” searching for a more expansive, more embracing vision of artistic ambition—one that acknowledges many types of beauty and complexity and opens to more varied voices. It’s a book that celebrates television <i>as</i> television, even as each year warps the definition of just what that might mean.<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for </b><i><b>I Like to Watch</b></i><br /><br />“This collection, including some powerful new work, proves once and for all that there’s no better American critic of anything than Emily Nussbaum. But <i>I Like to Watch</i> turns out to be even greater than the sum of its brilliant parts—it’s the most incisive, intimate, entertaining, authoritative guide to the shows of this golden television age.”<b>—Kurt Andersen, author of <i>Fantasyland</i></b><br /><br />“Reading Emily Nussbaum makes us smarter not just about what we watch, but about how we live, what we love, and who we are. <i>I Like to Watch </i>is a joy.”<b>—Rebecca Traister</b>
The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son on Life, Love, and L...
by , Gloria Vanderbilt

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

January 31, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Though Anderson Cooper has always considered himself close to his mother, his intensely busy career as a journalist for CNN and CBS<em> </em>affords him little time to spend with her. After she suffers a brief but serious illness at the age of ninety-one, they resolve to change their relationship by beginning a year-long conversation unlike any they had ever had before. The result is a correspondence of surprising honesty and depth in which they discuss their lives, the things that matter to them, and what they still want to learn about each other.</p><p>Both a son’s love letter to his mother and an unconventional mom’s life lessons for her grown son, <em>The Rainbow Comes and Goes</em> offers a rare window into their close relationship and fascinating life stories, including their tragedies and triumphs. In these often humorous and moving exchanges, they share their most private thoughts and the hard-earned truths they’ve learned along the way. In their words their distinctive personalities shine through—Anderson’s journalistic outlook on the world is a sharp contrast to his mother’s idealism and unwavering optimism.</p>An appealing memoir with inspirational advice, <em>The Rainbow Comes and Goes</em> is a beautiful and affectionate celebration of the universal bond between a parent and a child, and a thoughtful reflection on life, reminding us of the precious insight that remains to be shared, no matter our age.
White
by Bret Easton Ellis

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

April 16, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Own it, snowflakes: you've <i>lost </i>everything you claim to hold dear.</b><br /><br /><i>White </i>is Bret Easton Ellis's first work of nonfiction. Already the bad boy of American literature, from<i> Less Than Zero</i> to <i>American Psycho</i>, Ellis has also earned the wrath of right-thinking people everywhere with his provocations on social media, and here he escalates his admonishment of received truths as expressed by today's version of "the left." Eschewing convention, he embraces views that will make many in literary and media communities cringe, as he takes aim at the relentless anti-Trump fixation, coastal elites, corporate censorship, Hollywood, identity politics, Generation Wuss, "woke" cultural watchdogs, the obfuscation of ideals once both cherished and clear, and the fugue state of American democracy. In a young century marked by hysterical correctness and obsessive fervency on both sides of an aisle that's taken on the scale of the Grand Canyon, <i>White</i> is a clarion call for freedom of speech and artistic freedom.<br /> <i> </i><br /> "The central tension in Ellis's art—or his life, for that matter—is that while [his] aesthetic is the cool reserve of his native California, detachment over ideology, he can't stop generating heat.... He's hard-wired to break furniture."—Karen Heller, <i>The Washington Post</i><br /> <i> </i><br />"Sweating with rage . . . humming with paranoia."—Anna Leszkiewicz, <i>The Guardian</i><br /> <i> </i><br />"Snowflakes on both coasts in withdrawal from Rachel Maddow's nightly Kremlinology lesson can purchase a whole book to inspire paroxysms of rage . . . a veritable thirst trap for the easily microaggressed. It's all here. Rants about Trump derangement syndrome; MSNBC; #MeToo; safe spaces."—Bari Weiss<i>, The New York Times</i><br /> <i> </i>
Southern Lady Code: Essays
by Helen Ellis

Language

English

Pages

175

Publication Date

April 16, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>"I loved it." —Ann Patchett<i> </i></b><br /><br />The bestselling author of <i>American Housewife </i>("Dark, deadpan and truly inventive." -<i>-The New York Times Book Review</i>) is back with a fiercely funny collection of essays on marriage and manners, thank-you notes and three-ways, ghosts, gunshots, gynecology, and the Calgon-scented, onion-dipped, monogrammed art of living as a Southern Lady.</b><br /><br />Helen Ellis has a mantra: "If you don't have something nice to say, say something not-so-nice in a nice way." Say "weathered" instead of "she looks like a cake left out in the rain." Say "early-developed" instead of "brace face and B cups." And for the love of Coke Salad, always say "Sorry you saw something that offended you" instead of "Get that stick out of your butt, Miss Prissy Pants." In these twenty-three raucous essays Ellis transforms herself into a dominatrix Donna Reed to save her marriage, inadvertently steals a $795 Burberry trench coat, witnesses a man fake his own death at a party, avoids a neck lift, and finds a black-tie gown that gives her the confidence of a drag queen. While she may have left her home in Alabama, married a New Yorker, forgotten how to drive, and abandoned the puffy headbands of her youth, Helen Ellis is clinging to her Southern accent like mayonnaise to white bread, and offering readers a hilarious, completely singular view on womanhood for both sides of the Mason-Dixon.
We Wanted to Be Writers: Life, Love, and Literature at the Iowa W...
by , Glenn Schaeffer

Language

English

Pages

345

Publication Date

August 16, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
We Wanted to be Writers is a rollicking and insightful blend of original interviews, commentary, advice, gossip, anecdotes, analyses, history, and asides with nearly thirty graduates and teachers at the now legendary Iowa Writers' Workshop between 1974 and 1978. Among the talents that emerged in those years-writing, criticizing, drinking, and debating in the classrooms and barrooms of Iowa City-were the younger versions of writers who became John Irving, Jane Smiley, T. C. Boyle, Michelle Huneven, Allan Gurganus, Sandra Cisneros, Jayne Anne Phillips, Jennie Fields, Joy Harjo, Joe Haldeman, and many others. It is chock full of insights and a treasure trove of inspiration for all writers, readers, history lovers, and anyone who ever "wanted to be a writer."<BR> Jane Smiley on the Iowa writers' workshop: "In that period, the teachers tended to be men of a certain age, with the idea that competition was somehow the key-the Norman Mailer period. The story was that if you disagreed with Norman, or gave him a bad review, he'd punch you in the nose. You were supposed to get in fights in restaurants."<BR><BR> T.C. Boyle on his short story "Drowning": "I got $25 for it, which was wonderful . . . You know, getting $25 for the product of your own brain? You could buy a lot of beer in Iowa City back then for that."
Mr. Know-It-All: The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder
by John Waters

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

May 21, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>No one knows more about everything—especially everything rude, clever, and offensively compelling—than John Waters. The man in the pencil-thin mustache, auteur of the transgressive movie classics <i>Pink Flamingos</i>, <i>Polyester</i>, <i>Hairspray</i>, <i>Cry-Baby</i>, and <i>A Dirty Shame</i>, is one of the world’s great sophisticates, and in <i>Mr. Know-It-All</i> he serves it up raw: how to fail upward in Hollywood; how to develop musical taste, from Nervous Norvus to Maria Callas; how to build a home so ugly and trendy that no one but you would dare live in it; more important, how to tell someone you love them without emotional risk; and yes, how to cheat death itself. Through it all, Waters swears by one undeniable truth: “Whatever you might have heard, there is absolutely no downside to being famous. None at all.”</p><p>Studded with cameos, from Divine and Mink Stole to Johnny Depp, Kathleen Turner, Patricia Hearst, and Tracey Ullman, and illustrated with unseen photos from the author's personal collection, <i>Mr. Know-It-All</i> is Waters’ most hypnotically readable, upsetting, revelatory book—another instant Waters classic.</p><p>“Waters doesn’t kowtow to the received wisdom, he flips it the bird . . . [Waters] has the ability to show humanity at its most ridiculous and make that funny rather than repellent.” —Jonathan Yardley, <i>The Washington Post</i></p><p>“<i>Carsick</i> becomes a portrait not just of America’s desolate freeway nodes—though they’re brilliantly evoked—but of American fame itself.” —Lawrence Osborne,<i> The New York Times Book Review</i></p>
D DAY Through German Eyes - The Hidden Story of June 6th 1944
by Holger Eckhertz

Language

English

Pages

330

Publication Date

April 09, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This is the hidden side of D Day which has fascinated readers around the world.<br /><br />Almost all accounts of D Day are told from the Allied perspective, with the emphasis on how German resistance was overcome on June 6th 1944. But what was it like to be a German soldier in the bunkers and gun emplacements of the Normandy coast, facing the onslaught of the mightiest seaborne invasion in history? <br />What motivated the German defenders, what were their thought processes - and how did they fight from one strong point to another, among the dunes and fields, on that first cataclysmic day? What were their experiences on facing the tanks, the flamethrowers and the devastating air superiority of the Allies?<br /><br />This book sheds fascinating light on these questions, bringing together statements made by German survivors after the war, when time had allowed them to reflect on their state of mind, their actions and their choices of June 6th. <br /><br />We see a perspective of D Day which deserves to be added to the historical record, in which ordinary German troops struggled to make sense of the onslaught that was facing them, and emerged stunned at the weaponry and sheer determination of the Allied soldiers. We see, too, how the Germans fought in the great coastal bunkers, perceived as impregnable fortresses, but in reality often becoming tombs for their crews. <br /><br />Above all, we now have the unheard human voices of the individual German soldiers - the men who are so often portrayed as a faceless mass.<br /><br />
Notes to Self: Essays
by Emilie Pine

Language

English

Pages

173

Publication Date

June 11, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The international sensation that illuminates the experiences women are supposed to hide—from addiction, anger, sexual assault, and infertility to joy, sensuality, and love.</b><br /><br /><b>WINNER OF THE AN POST IRISH BOOK OF THE YEAR • “Emilie Pine’s voice is razor-sharp and raw; her story is utterly original yet as familiar as my own breath.”—Glennon Doyle, #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author of <i>Love Warrior</i></b><br /><br />In this dazzling debut, Emilie Pine speaks to the events that have marked her life—those emotional disruptions for which our society has no adequate language, at once bittersweet, clandestine, and ordinary. She writes with radical honesty on the unspeakable grief of infertility, on caring for an alcoholic parent, on taboos around female bodies and female pain, on sexual violence and violence against the self. This is the story of one woman, and of all women.<br /><br /> Devastating, poignant, and wise—and joyful against the odds—<i>Notes to Self </i>is an unforgettable exploration of what it feels like to be alive, and a daring act of rebellion against a society that is more comfortable with women’s silence.<br /><br /><b>Praise for </b><i><b>Notes to Self</b></i><br /><br />“<i>Notes to Self</i> begins as a deceptively simple catalogue of the injustices of modern female life and slyly emerges as a screaming treatise on just what it means to make your own rules, turning the hand you’ve been dealt into the coolest game in town. Emilie Pine is like your best friend—if your best friend was so sharp she drew blood.”<b>—Lena Dunham, #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author of <i>Not That Kind of Girl</i></b><br /><br />“To read these essays is to understand the human condition more clearly, to reassess one’s place in the world, and to reclaim one’s own experiences as real and valid.”<b>—<i>Sunday Independent</i></b><br /><br /> “Harrowing, clear-eyed . . . Everyone should consider [this] priority reading.”<b>—</b><i><b>Sunday Business Post</b><br /></i><br /> “Incredible and insightful—an absolute must-read.”<b>—<i>The Skinny</i> </b><br /><br /> “Agonizing, uncompromising, starkly brilliant. . . . [A] short, gleamingly instructive book, both memoir and psychological exploration—a platform for that insistent internal voice that almost any woman . . . wishes they had ignored.”<b>—<i>Financial Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Do not read this book in public. It will make you cry.”<b>—Anne Enright</b>

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