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Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion
by Jia Tolentino

Language

English

Pages

303

Publication Date

August 06, 2019

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Customer Reviews
<b>“From <i>The New Yorker</i>’s beloved cultural critic comes a bold, unflinching collection of essays about self-deception, examining everything from scammer culture to reality television.” <i>—Esquire</i><br /><i> </i><br />“A whip-smart, challenging book.” —Zadie Smith • “Jia Tolentino could be the Joan Didion of our time.” <i>—Vulture</i></b><br /><br /> Jia Tolentino is a peerless voice of her generation, tackling the conflicts, contradictions, and sea changes that define us and our time. Now, in this dazzling collection of nine entirely original essays, written with a rare combination of give and sharpness, wit and fearlessness, she delves into the forces that warp our vision, demonstrating an unparalleled stylistic potency and critical dexterity.<br /><br /> <i>Trick Mirror</i> is an enlightening, unforgettable trip through the river of self-delusion that surges just beneath the surface of our lives. This is a book about the incentives that shape us, and about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly through a culture that revolves around the self. In each essay, Tolentino writes about a cultural prism: the rise of the nightmare social internet; the advent of scamming as the definitive millennial ethos; the literary heroine’s journey from brave to blank to bitter; the punitive dream of optimization, which insists that everything, including our bodies, should become more efficient and beautiful until we die. Gleaming with Tolentino’s sense of humor and capacity to elucidate the impossibly complex in an instant, and marked by her desire to treat the reader with profound honesty, <i>Trick Mirror</i> is an instant classic of the worst decade yet.<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for <i>Trick Mirror</i></b><br /><br />“Jia Tolentino is the best young essayist at work in the United States, one I’ve consistently admired and learned from, and I was exhilarated to get a whole lot of her at once in <i>Trick Mirror</i>. In these nine essays, she rethinks troubling ingredients of modern life, from the internet to mind-altering drugs to wedding culture. All through the book, single sentences flash like lightning to show something familiar in a startling way, but she also builds extended arguments with her usual, unusual blend of lyricism and skepticism. In the end, we have a picture of America that was as missing as it was needed.” <b>—Rebecca Solnit, author of <i>Men Explain Things to Me</i><br /></b>
Calypso
by David Sedaris

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

May 29, 2018

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Customer Reviews
<b>David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book.<br /><br /></b>If you've ever laughed your way through David Sedaris's cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you're getting with <i>Calypso.</i> You'd be wrong. <br /><br />When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it's impossible to take a vacation from yourself.<br /><br />With <i>Calypso,</i> Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny--it's a book that can make you laugh 'til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris's powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future.<br /><br />This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke. <i>Calypso</i> is simultaneously Sedaris's darkest and warmest book yet--and it just might be his very best.<br />
The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditat...
by Toni Morrison

Language

English

Pages

369

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

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Customer Reviews
<b>Arguably the most celebrated and revered writer of our time now gives us a new nonfiction collection--a rich gathering of her essays, speeches, and meditations on society, culture, and art, spanning four decades.</b><br /><br /><i>The Source of Self-Regard</i> is brimming with all the elegance of mind and style, the literary prowess and moral compass that are Toni Morrison's inimitable hallmark. It is divided into three parts: the first is introduced by a powerful prayer for the dead of 9/11; the second by a searching meditation on Martin Luther King Jr., and the last by a heart-wrenching eulogy for James Baldwin. In the writings and speeches included here, Morrison takes on contested social issues: the foreigner, female empowerment, the press, money, "black matter(s)," and human rights. She looks at enduring matters of culture: the role of the artist in society, the literary imagination, the Afro-American presence in American literature, and in her Nobel lecture, the power of language itself. And here too is piercing commentary on her own work (including <i>The Bluest Eye, Sula, Tar Baby, Jazz, Beloved,</i> and <i>Paradise)</i> and that of others, among them, painter and collagist Romare Bearden, author Toni Cade Bambara, and theater director Peter Sellars. In all, <i>The Source of Self-Regard</i> is a luminous and essential addition to Toni Morrison's oeuvre.
The World As I See It
by Albert Einstein

Language

English

Pages

128

Publication Date

March 14, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>One of the world’s greatest minds addresses religion and science, war and peace, and the treatment of minorities in this authorized collection.</b><br /><br /> In the aftermath of the First World War, Albert Einstein writes about his hopes for the League of Nations, his feelings as a German citizen about the growing anti-Semitism and nationalism of his country, and his myriad opinions about the current affairs of his day. In addition to these political perspectives, <i>The World As I See It</i> reveals the idealistic, spiritual, and witty side of this great intellectual as he approaches topics including “Good and Evil,” “Religion and Science,” “Active Pacifism,” “Christianity and Judaism,” and “Minorities.”<br /><br /> Including letters, speeches, articles, and essays written before 1935, this collection offers a complete portrait of Einstein as a humanitarian and as a human being trying to make sense of the changing world around him.<br /><br /> This authorized ebook features a new introduction by Neil Berger, PhD, and an illustrated biography of Albert Einstein, which includes rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the Albert Einstein Archives at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.</p>
Raised in Captivity: Fictional Nonfiction
by Chuck Klosterman

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

July 16, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Microdoses of the straight dope, stories so true they had to be wrapped in fiction for our own protection, from the best-selling author of <i>But What if We're Wrong?</i></b><br /><br />A man flying first class discovers a puma in the lavatory. A new coach of a small-town Oklahoma high school football team installs an offense comprised of only one, very special, play. A man explains to the police why he told the employee of his local bodega that his colleague looked like the lead singer of Depeche Mode, a statement that may or may not have led in some way to a violent crime. A college professor discusses with his friend his difficulties with the new generation of students. An obscure power pop band wrestles with its new-found fame when its song "Blizzard of Summer" becomes an anthem for white supremacists. A couple considers getting a medical procedure that will transfer the pain of childbirth from the woman to her husband. A woman interviews a hit man about killing her husband but is shocked by the method he proposes. A man is recruited to join a secret government research team investigating why coin flips are no longer exactly 50/50. A man sees a whale struck by lightning, and knows that everything about his life has to change. A lawyer grapples with the unintended side effects of a veterinarian's rabies vaccination. <br /><br />Fair warning: <i>Raised in Captivity</i> does not slot into a smooth preexisting groove. If Saul Steinberg and Italo Calvino had adopted a child from a Romanian orphanage and raised him on Gary Larsen and Thomas Bernhard, he would still be nothing like Chuck Klosterman. They might be good company, though. Funny, wise and weird in equal measure, <i>Raised in Captivity</i> bids fair to be one of the most original and exciting story collections in recent memory, a fever graph of our deepest unvoiced hopes, fears and preoccupations. Ceaselessly inventive, hostile to corniness in all its forms, and mean only to the things that really deserve it, it marks a cosmic leap forward for one of our most consistently interesting writers.
I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution
by Emily Nussbaum

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

June 25, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From <i>The New Yorker</i>’s fiercely original, Pulitzer Prize-winning culture critic, a provocative collection of new and previously published essays arguing that we are what we watch.</b><br /><b><br />“Emily Nussbaum is the perfect critic—smart, engaging, funny, generous, and insightful.”—David Grann, author of <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i></b><br /><br /> From her creation of the “Approval Matrix” in <i>New York </i>magazine in 2004 to her Pulitzer Prize–winning columns for <i>The New Yorker,</i> Emily Nussbaum has argued for a new way of looking at TV. In this collection, including two never-before-published essays, Nussbaum writes about her passion for television, beginning with <i>Buffy the Vampire Slayer,</i> the show that set her on a fresh intellectual path. She explores the rise of the female screw-up, how fans warp the shows they love, the messy power of sexual violence on TV, and the year that jokes helped elect a reality-television president. There are three big profiles of television showrunners—Kenya Barris, Jenji Kohan, and Ryan Murphy—as well as examinations of the legacies of Norman Lear and Joan Rivers. The book also includes a major new essay written during the year of #MeToo, wrestling with the question of what to do when the artist you love is a monster.<br /><br />More than a collection of reviews, the book makes a case for toppling the status anxiety that has long haunted the “idiot box,” even as it transformed. Through it all, Nussbaum recounts her fervent search, over fifteen years, for a new kind of criticism, one that resists the false hierarchy that elevates one kind of culture (violent, dramatic, gritty) over another (joyful, funny, stylized). <i>I Like to Watch</i> traces her own struggle to punch through stifling notions of “prestige television,” searching for a more expansive, more embracing vision of artistic ambition—one that acknowledges many types of beauty and complexity and opens to more varied voices. It’s a book that celebrates television <i>as</i> television, even as each year warps the definition of just what that might mean.<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for </b><i><b>I Like to Watch</b></i><br /><br />“This collection, including some powerful new work, proves once and for all that there’s no better American critic of anything than Emily Nussbaum. But <i>I Like to Watch</i> turns out to be even greater than the sum of its brilliant parts—it’s the most incisive, intimate, entertaining, authoritative guide to the shows of this golden television age.”<b>—Kurt Andersen, author of <i>Fantasyland</i></b><br /><br />“Reading Emily Nussbaum makes us smarter not just about what we watch, but about how we live, what we love, and who we are. <i>I Like to Watch </i>is a joy.”<b>—Rebecca Traister</b>
Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Polit...
by Charles Krauthammer

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

October 22, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From America’s preeminent columnist, named by the</b> <b><i>Financial Times </i>the most influential commentator in the nation, a must-have collection of Charles Krauthammer’s essential, timeless writings.</b><br /><b> </b><br />A brilliant stylist known for an uncompromising honesty that challenged conventional wisdom at every turn, Krauthammer dazzled readers for decades with his keen insight into politics and government. His weekly column was a must-read in Washington and across the country. Don’t miss the best of Krauthammer’s intelligence, erudition and wit collected in one volume.<br />  <br /> Readers will find here not only the country’s leading conservative thinker offering a pas­sionate defense of limited government, but also a highly independent mind whose views—on feminism, evolution and the death penalty, for example—defy ideological convention. <i>Things That Matter </i>also features several of Krautham­mer’s major path-breaking essays—on bioeth­ics, on Jewish destiny and on America’s role as the world’s superpower—that have pro­foundly influenced the nation’s thoughts and policies. And finally, the collection presents a trove of always penetrating, often bemused re­flections on everything from border collies to Halley’s Comet, from Woody Allen to Win­ston Churchill, from the punishing pleasures of speed chess to the elegance of the perfectly thrown outfield assist.<br />  <br /> With a special, highly autobiographical in­troduction in which Krauthammer reflects on the events that shaped his career and political philosophy, this indispensible chronicle takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the fashions and follies, the tragedies and triumphs, of the last three decades of American life.
Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves
by Glory Edim

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

October 30, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>NOMINATED FOR AN NAACP IMAGE AWARD • </b>An inspiring collection of essays by black women writers, curated by the founder of the popular book club Well-Read Black Girl, on the importance of recognizing ourselves in literature.</b><br /><b> <br />“Yes, <i>Well-Read Black Girl</i> is as good as it sounds. . . . [Glory Edim] gathers an all-star cast of contributors—among them Lynn Nottage, Jesmyn Ward, and Gabourey Sidibe.”<b><i>—O: The Oprah Magazine </i></b><i><br /></i></b><br /> Remember that moment when you first encountered a character who seemed to be written just for you? That feeling of belonging remains with readers the rest of their lives—but not everyone regularly sees themselves in the pages of a book. In this timely anthology, Glory Edim brings together original essays by some of our best black women writers to shine a light on how important it is that we all—regardless of gender, race, religion, or ability—have the opportunity to find ourselves in literature.<br /><br /> <b>Contributors include Jesmyn Ward (<i>Sing, Unburied, Sing</i>), Lynn Nottage (<i>Sweat</i>), Jacqueline Woodson (<i>Another Brooklyn</i>), Gabourey Sidibe (<i>This Is Just My Face</i>), Morgan Jerkins (<i>This Will Be My Undoing</i>), Tayari Jones (<i>An American Marriage</i>), Rebecca Walker (<i>Black, White and Jewish</i>), and Barbara Smith (<i>Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology</i>)</b><br /><br /> Whether it’s learning about the complexities of femalehood from Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison, finding a new type of love in <i>The Color Purple,</i> or using mythology to craft an alternative black future, the subjects of each essay remind us why we turn to books in times of both struggle and relaxation. As she has done with her book club–turned–online community Well-Read Black Girl, in this anthology Glory Edim has created a space in which black women’s writing and knowledge and life experiences are lifted up, to be shared with all readers who value the power of a story to help us understand the world and ourselves.<br /><b><br />Praise for <i>Well-Read Black Girl</i></b><br /><br />“Each essay can be read as a dispatch from the vast and wonderfully complex location that is black girlhood and womanhood. . . . They present literary encounters that may at times seem private and ordinary—hours spent in the children’s section of a public library or in a college classroom—but are no less monumental in their impact.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “A wonderful collection of essays.”<b>—<i>Essence</i></b>
The Fire Next Time (Vintage International)
by James Baldwin

Language

English

Pages

130

Publication Date

September 17, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A national bestseller when it first appeared in 1963, <b>The Fire Next Time</b> galvanized the nation and gave passionate voice to the emerging civil rights movement. At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin's early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, the book is an intensely personal and provocative document. It consists of two "letters," written on the occasion of the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, that exhort Americans, both black and white, to attack the terrible legacy of racism. Described by The New York Times Book Review as "sermon, ultimatum, confession, deposition, testament, and chronicle...all presented in searing, brilliant prose," The Fire Next Time stands as a classic of our literature.
The Book of Delights: Essays
by Ross Gay

Language

English

Pages

289

Publication Date

February 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>“Ross Gay’s eye lands upon wonder at every turn, bolstering my belief in the countless small miracles that surround us.” —Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winner and U.S. Poet Laureate<BR /><BR /> The winner of the NBCC Award for Poetry offers up a spirited collection of short lyric essays, written daily over a tumultuous year, reminding us of the purpose and pleasure of praising, extolling, and celebrating ordinary wonders.</B><BR /><BR /> In <I>The Book of Delights</I>, one of today’s most original literary voices offers up a genre-defying volume of lyric essays written over one tumultuous year. The first nonfiction book from award-winning poet Ross Gay is a record of the small joys we often overlook in our busy lives. Among Gay’s funny, poetic, philosophical delights: a friend’s unabashed use of air quotes, cradling a tomato seedling aboard an airplane, the silent nod of acknowledgment between the only two black people in a room. But Gay never dismisses the complexities, even the terrors, of living in America as a black man or the ecological and psychic violence of our consumer culture or the loss of those he loves. More than anything other subject, though, Gay celebrates the beauty of the natural world--his garden, the flowers peeking out of the sidewalk, the hypnotic movements of a praying mantis.<BR /><BR /><I>The Book of Delights</I> is about our shared bonds, and the rewards that come from a life closely observed. These remarkable pieces serve as a powerful and necessary reminder that we can, and should, stake out a space in our lives for delight.</DIV>

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