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An American Marriage: A Novel (Oprah's Book Club 2018 Selection)
by Tayari Jones

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

February 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>THE INSTANT <I>NEW YORK TIMES</I> BESTSELLER!<BR /><BR /> OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB 2018 SELECTION<BR /><BR /> “One of my favorite parts of summer is deciding what to read when things slow down just a bit, whether it’s on a vacation with family or just a quiet afternoon . . . <I>An American Marriage</I> by Tayari Jones is a moving portrayal of the effects of a wrongful conviction on a young African-American couple.” —Barack Obama<BR /><BR /> “Haunting . . . Beautifully written.” —<I>The New York Times Book Review</I><BR />  <BR /> “Brilliant and heartbreaking . . . Unforgettable.” —<I>USA Today</I><BR />  <BR /> “A tense and timely love story . . . Packed with brave questions about race and class.” —<I>People</I><BR />  <BR /> “Compelling.” —<I>The Washington Post</I><BR />  <BR /> “Epic . . . Transcendent . . . Triumphant.” —<I>Elle</I></B><BR /><BR /> Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy’s time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.<BR />  <BR /> This stirring love story is a profoundly insightful look into the hearts and minds of three people who are at once bound and separated by forces beyond their control. <I>An American Marriage</I> is a masterpiece of storytelling, an intimate look deep into the souls of people who must reckon with the past while moving forward<B>—</B>with hope and pain<B>—</B>into the future.</DIV>
The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth Book 1)
by N. K. Jemisin

Language

English

Pages

500

Publication Date

August 04, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"Intricate and extraordinary." - <i>New York Times </i>on<i> The Fifth Season </i>(A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book of 2015)<br /><br /> <b>WINNER OF THE HUGO AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL 2016</b><div><b><br /></b><br /><b><i>This is the way the world ends...for the last time.</i></b></div><div><b><i><br /></i></b> A season of endings has begun. <br /><br /> It starts with the great red rift across the heart of the world's sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun. <br /><br /> It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter. <br /><br /> It starts with betrayal, and long dormant wounds rising up to fester. <br /><br /> This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy. <br /> <br /><br /> For more from N. K. Jemisin, check out:<br /><br /> <b>The Inheritance Trilogy </b><br /> <i>The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms</i><br /> <i>The Broken Kingdoms</i><br /> <i>The Kingdom of Gods</i><br /><br /> <i>The Inheritance Trilogy </i>(omnibus edition) <br /> <i>Shades in Shadow: An Inheritance Triptych</i> (e-only short fiction) <br /> <i>The Awakened Kingdom </i>(e-only novella) <br /><br /> <b>Dreamblood Duology</b><br /> <i>The Killing Moon</i><br /> <i>The Shadowed Sun</i><br /><div> </div> </div><div><i><br /></i></div><div><b>The Broken Earth</b></div><div><i>The Fifth Season</i></div><div><i>The Obelisk Gate</i></div>
The Invention of Wings: A Novel (Original Publisher's Edition-No ...
by Sue Monk Kidd

Language

English

Pages

450

Publication Date

January 07, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the celebrated author of<i> The Secret Life of Bees</i>, a #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling novel about two unforgettable American women.</b><p>Writing at the height of her narrative and imaginative gifts, Sue Monk Kidd presents a masterpiece of hope, daring, the quest for freedom, and the desire to have a voice in the world.</p><p>Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.</p><p>Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid. We follow their remarkable journeys over the next thirty five years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love.</p><p>As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women’s rights movements.</p><p>Inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke, Kidd goes beyond the record to flesh out the rich interior lives of all of her characters, both real and invented, including Handful’s cunning mother, Charlotte, who courts danger in her search for something better.</p><p>This exquisitely written novel is a triumph of storytelling that looks with unswerving eyes at a devastating wound in American history, through women whose struggles for liberation, empowerment, and expression will leave no reader unmoved.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
The Color Purple
by Alice Walker

Language

English

Pages

302

Publication Date

September 20, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, this novel about a resilient and courageous woman has become a Broadway show and a cultural phenomenon.<BR /><BR /> A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick</B><BR /><BR /> Celie has grown up poor in rural Georgia, despised by the society around her and abused by her own family. She strives to protect her sister, Nettie, from a similar fate, and while Nettie escapes to a new life as a missionary in Africa, Celie is left behind without her best friend and confidante, married off to an older suitor, and sentenced to a life alone with a harsh and brutal husband.<BR />  <BR /> In an attempt to transcend a life that often seems too much to bear, Celie begins writing letters directly to God. The letters, spanning twenty years, record a journey of self-discovery and empowerment guided by the light of a few strong women. She meets Shug Avery, her husband’s mistress and a jazz singer with a zest for life, and her stepson’s wife, Sophia, who challenges her to fight for independence. And though the many letters from Celie’s sister are hidden by her husband, Nettie’s unwavering support will prove to be the most breathtaking of all.<BR />  <BR /><I>The Color Purple</I> has sold more than five million copies, inspired an Academy Award–nominated film starring Oprah Winfrey and directed by Steven Spielberg, and been adapted into a Tony-nominated Broadway musical. Lauded as a literary masterpiece, this is the groundbreaking novel that placed Walker “in the company of Faulkner” (<I>The </I><I>Nation</I>), and remains a wrenching—yet intensely uplifting—experience for new generations of readers.<BR /><BR /><I>This ebook features a new introduction written by the author on the twenty-fifth anniversary of publication, and an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.</I><BR /><BR /> The Color Purple <I>is the 1st book in the Color Purple Collection, which also includes </I>The Temple of My Familiar<I> and</I> Possessing the Secret of Joy.</DIV>
Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel
by Jesmyn Ward

Language

English

Pages

305

Publication Date

September 05, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>WINNER of the NATIONAL BOOK AWARD and A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> TOP 10 BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR</b><BR> <BR> A finalist for the Kirkus Prize, Andrew Carnegie Medal, Aspen Words Literary Prize, and a <i>New York Times </i>bestseller, this majestic, stirring, and widely praised novel from two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, the story of a family on a journey through rural Mississippi, is a “tour de force” (<i>O, the Oprah Magazine</i>) and a timeless work of fiction that is destined to become a classic.<BR><BR>Jesmyn Ward’s historic second National Book Award–winner is “perfectly poised for the moment” (<i>The New York Times</i>), an intimate portrait of three generations of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle. “Ward’s writing throbs with life, grief, and love… this book is the kind that makes you ache to return to it” (<i>Buzzfeed</i>).<BR> <BR>Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager.<BR> <BR>His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister’s lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children’s father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances.<BR> <BR>When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another thirteen-year-old boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love.<BR> <BR>Rich with Ward’s distinctive, lyrical language, <i>Sing, Unburied, Sing </i>is a majestic and unforgettable family story and “an odyssey through rural Mississippi’s past and present” (<i>The Philadelphia Inquirer</i>).
Americanah (Ala Notable Books for Adults)
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Language

English

Pages

610

Publication Date

May 14, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>The bestselling novel—and one of Barack Obama’s summer reading picks—from the award-winning author of <i>We Should All Be Feminists</i> and <i>Dear Ijeawele</i>.<br /></b><br /> <b>“From one of the world’s great contemporary writers comes the story of two Nigerians making their way in the U.S. and the UK, raising universal questions of race and belonging, the overseas experience for the African diaspora, and the search for identity and a home.” —Barack Obama<br /></b><br /> <i>Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read</i><br /><br />Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland. </p>
The Underground Railroad (Pulitzer Prize Winner) (National Book A...
by Colson Whitehead

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

August 02, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, the #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestseller from Colson Whitehead, a magnificent tour de force chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South</b><br /><br /> Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood—where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned—Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.<br />      In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor—engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.<br />      Like the protagonist of <i>Gulliver’s Travels,</i> Cora encounters different worlds at each stage of her journey—hers is an odyssey through time as well as space. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre–Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. <i>The Underground Railroad</i> is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.
Homegoing: A novel
by Yaa Gyasi

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

June 07, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Winner of the NBCC's John Leonard First Book Prize<br />A <i>New York Times </i>2016 Notable Book<br />One of Oprah’s 10 Favorite Books of 2016<br />NPR's Debut Novel of the Year<br />One of Buzzfeed's Best Fiction Books Of 2016<br />One of <i>Time</i>'s Top 10 Novels of 2016<br /><br />“<i>Homegoing </i>is an inspiration.” —Ta-Nehisi Coates </b><br /><br /><br />The unforgettable <i>New York Times</i> best seller begins with the story of two half-sisters, separated by forces beyond their control: one sold into slavery, the other married to a British slaver. Written with tremendous sweep and power, <i>Homegoing </i>traces the generations of family who follow, as their destinies lead them through two continents and three hundred years of history, each life indeliably drawn, as the legacy of slavery is fully revealed in light of the present day.<br />            <br />Effia and Esi are born into different villages in eighteenth-century Ghana. Effia is married off to an Englishman and lives in comfort in the palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle. Unbeknownst to Effia, her sister, Esi, is imprisoned beneath her in the castle’s dungeons, sold with thousands of others into the Gold Coast’s booming slave trade, and shipped off to America, where her children and grandchildren will be raised in slavery. One thread of <i>Homegoing</i> follows Effia’s descendants through centuries of warfare in Ghana, as the Fante and Asante nations wrestle with the slave trade and British colonization. The other thread follows Esi and her children into America. From the plantations of the South to the Civil War and the Great Migration, from the coal mines of Pratt City, Alabama, to the jazz clubs and dope houses of twentieth-century Harlem, right up through the present day, <i>Homegoing</i> makes history visceral, and captures, with singular and stunning immediacy, how the memory of captivity came to be inscribed in the soul of a nation.
Between Black and White (McMurtrie and Drake Legal Thrillers Book...
by Robert Bailey

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

March 15, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>In 1966 in Pulaski, Tennessee, Bocephus Haynes watched in horror as his father was brutally murdered by ten local members of the Ku Klux Klan. As an African American lawyer practicing in the birthplace of the Klan years later, Bo has spent his life pursuing justice in his father’s name. But when Andy Walton, the man believed to have led the lynch mob forty-five years earlier, ends up murdered in the same spot as Bo’s father, Bo becomes the prime suspect.</p><p>Retired law professor Tom McMurtrie, Bo’s former teacher and friend, is a year removed from returning to the courtroom. Now McMurtrie and his headstrong partner, Rick Drake, must defend Bo on charges of capital murder while hunting for Andy Walton’s true killer. In a courtroom clash that will put their reputations and lives at stake, can McMurtrie and Drake release Bo from a lifetime of despair? Or will justice remain hidden somewhere between black and white?</p>
John Woman
by Walter Mosley

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

September 04, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A convention-defying novel by bestselling writer Walter Mosley, <i>John Woman</i> recounts the transformation of an unassuming boy named Cornelius Jones into John Woman, an unconventional history professor—while the legacy of a hideous crime lurks in the shadows.<p> <br /><br />At twelve years old, Cornelius, the son of an Italian-American woman and an older black man from Mississippi named Herman, secretly takes over his father’s job at a silent film theater in New York’s East Village. Five years later, as Herman lives out his last days, he shares his wisdom with his son, explaining that the person who controls the narrative of history controls their own fate. After his father dies and his mother disappears, Cornelius sets about reinventing himself—as Professor John Woman, a man who will spread Herman’s teachings into the classrooms of his unorthodox southwestern university and beyond. But there are other individuals who are attempting to influence the narrative of John Woman, and who might know something about the facts of his hidden past.<p><br /><br />Engaging with some of the most provocative ideas of recent intellectual history, <i>John Woman</i> is a compulsively readable, deliciously unexpected novel about the way we tell stories, and whether the stories we tell have the power to change the world.

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