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To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment
by , Joshua Matz

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

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<div><div><b>The history and future of our democracy's ultimate sanction, presidential impeachment, and a guide to how it should be used now</b></div><div> </div><div><i><br /></i></div><div><i>To End a Presidency</i> addresses one of today's most urgent questions: when and whether to impeach a president. Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz provide an authoritative guide to impeachment's past and a bold argument about its proper role today. In an era of expansive presidential power and intense partisanship, we must rethink impeachment for the twenty-first century.</div><div> </div><div><br /></div><div>Of impeachments, one Constitutional Convention delegate declared, </div><div>"A good magistrate will not fear them. A bad one will be kept in fear of them." <i>To End a Presidency</i> is an essential book for all Americans seeking to understand how this crucial but fearsome power should be exercised.</div></div>
Impeachment: A Citizen's Guide
by Cass R. Sunstein

Language

English

Pages

202

Publication Date

October 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Cass Sunstein considers actual and imaginable arguments for a president’s removal, explaining why some cases are easy and others hard, why some arguments for impeachment are judicious and others not. In direct and approachable terms, he dispels the fog surrounding impeachment so that all Americans may use their ultimate civic authority wisely.
White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
by Carol Anderson Ph.D.

Language

English

Pages

248

Publication Date

May 31, 2016

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Customer Reviews
<b>National Book Critics Circle Award Winner</b><br /><b><i>New York Times</i><i> </i>Bestseller</b><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i><i> </i>Notable Book of the Year</b><br /><b>A <i>Washington Post</i> Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year</b><br /><b>A <i>Boston Globe</i> Best Book of 2016</b><br /><b>A <i>Chicago Review of Books</i> Best Nonfiction Book of 2016</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.</b><br /><br />As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in <i>The Washington Post</i> suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling."<br /> <br /> Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 <i>Brown v. Board of Education</i> decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. <br /> <br /> Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, <i>White Rage</i> will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Righ...
by Adam Winkler

Language

English

Pages

495

Publication Date

February 27, 2018

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Customer Reviews
<p><em>We the Corporations</em> chronicles the revelatory story of one of the most successful, yet least known, “civil rights movements” in American history.</p><br /><p><em>We the Corporations</em> chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known “civil rights movements” in American history. Hardly oppressed like women and minorities, business corporations, too, have fought since the nation’s earliest days to gain equal rights under the Constitution—and today have nearly all the same rights as ordinary people.</p><br /><p>Exposing the historical origins of <em>Citizens United</em> and <em>Hobby Lobby</em>, Adam Winkler explains how those controversial Supreme Court decisions extending free speech and religious liberty to corporations were the capstone of a centuries-long struggle over corporate personhood and constitutional protections for business. Beginning his account in the colonial era, Winkler reveals the profound influence corporations had on the birth of democracy and on the shape of the Constitution itself. Once the Constitution was ratified, corporations quickly sought to gain the rights it guaranteed. The first Supreme Court case on the rights of corporations was decided in 1809, a half-century before the first comparable cases on the rights of African Americans or women. Ever since, corporations have waged a persistent and remarkably fruitful campaign to win an ever-greater share of individual rights.</p><br /><p>Although corporations never marched on Washington, they employed many of the same strategies of more familiar civil rights struggles: civil disobedience, test cases, and novel legal claims made in a purposeful effort to reshape the law. Indeed, corporations have often been unheralded innovators in constitutional law, and several of the individual rights Americans hold most dear were first secured in lawsuits brought by businesses.</p><br /><p>Winkler enlivens his narrative with a flair for storytelling and a colorful cast of characters: among others, Daniel Webster, America’s greatest advocate, who argued some of the earliest corporate rights cases on behalf of his business clients; Roger Taney, the reviled Chief Justice, who surprisingly fought to limit protections for corporations—in part to protect slavery; and Roscoe Conkling, a renowned politician who deceived the Supreme Court in a brazen effort to win for corporations the rights added to the Constitution for the freed slaves. Alexander Hamilton, Teddy Roosevelt, Huey Long, Ralph Nader, Louis Brandeis, and even Thurgood Marshall all played starring roles in the story of the corporate rights movement.</p><br /><p>In this heated political age, nothing can be timelier than Winkler’s <em>tour de force</em>, which shows how America’s most powerful corporations won our most fundamental rights and turned the Constitution into a weapon to impede the regulation of big business.</p>
Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech (New Forum...
by Keith Whittington

Language

English

Pages

220

Publication Date

April 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Why free speech is the lifeblood of colleges and universities</b></p><p>Free speech is under attack at colleges and universities today, with critics on and off campus challenging the value of open inquiry and freewheeling intellectual debate. Too often speakers are shouted down, professors are threatened, and classes are disrupted. In <i>Speak Freely</i>, Keith Whittington argues that universities must protect and encourage free speech because vigorous free speech is the lifeblood of the university. Without free speech, a university cannot fulfill its most basic, fundamental, and essential purposes, including fostering freedom of thought, ideological diversity, and tolerance.</p><br /><p>Examining such hot-button issues as trigger warnings, safe spaces, hate speech, disruptive protests, speaker disinvitations, the use of social media by faculty, and academic politics, <i>Speak Freely</i> describes the dangers of empowering campus censors to limit speech and enforce orthodoxy. It explains why free speech and civil discourse are at the heart of the university’s mission of creating and nurturing an open and diverse community dedicated to learning. It shows why universities must make space for voices from both the left and right. And it points out how better understanding why the university lives or dies by free speech can help guide everyone—including students, faculty, administrators, and alumni—when faced with difficult challenges such as unpopular, hateful, or dangerous speech.</p><br /><p>Timely and vitally important, <i>Speak Freely</i> demonstrates why universities can succeed only by fostering more free speech, more free thought—and a greater tolerance for both.</p>
The Second Amendment: A Biography
by Michael Waldman

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

May 20, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Widely acclaimed at the time of its publication, the life story of the most controversial, volatile, misunderstood provision of the Bill of Rights.<BR><BR>At a time of increasing gun violence in America, Waldman’s book provoked a wide range of discussion. This book looks at history to provide some surprising, illuminating answers.<BR> <BR>The Amendment was written to calm public fear that the new national government would crush the state militias made up of all (white) adult men—who were required to own a gun to serve. Waldman recounts the raucous public debate that has surrounded the amendment from its inception to the present. As the country spread to the Western frontier, violence spread too. But through it all, gun control was abundant. In the twentieth century, with Prohibition and gangsterism, the first federal control laws were passed. In all four separate times the Supreme Court ruled against a constitutional right to own a gun.<BR> <BR>The present debate picked up in the 1970s—part of a backlash to the liberal 1960s and a resurgence of libertarianism. A newly radicalized NRA entered the campaign to oppose gun control and elevate the status of an obscure constitutional provision. In 2008, in a case that reached the Court after a focused drive by conservative lawyers, the US Supreme Court ruled for the first time that the Constitution protects an individual right to gun ownership. Famous for his theory of “originalism,” Justice Antonin Scalia twisted it in this instance to base his argument on contemporary conditions.<BR> <BR>In <I>The Second Amendment: A Biography</I>, Michael Waldman shows that our view of the amendment is set, at each stage, not by a pristine constitutional text, but by the push and pull, the rough and tumble of political advocacy and public agitation.
Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America
by Adam Winkler

Language

English

Pages

393

Publication Date

September 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A provocative history that reveals how guns—not abortion, race, or religion—are at the heart of America's cultural divide.</p><br /><em>Gunfight</em> is a timely work examining America’s four-centuries-long political battle over gun control and the right to bear arms. In this definitive and provocative history, Adam Winkler reveals how guns—not abortion, race, or religion—are at the heart of America’s cultural divide. Using the landmark 2008 case <em>District of Columbia v. Heller</em>—which invalidated a law banning handguns in the nation’s capital—as a springboard, Winkler brilliantly weaves together the dramatic stories of gun-rights advocates and gun-control lobbyists, providing often unexpected insights into the venomous debate that now cleaves our nation.
I Can't Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street
by Matt Taibbi

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

October 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A work of riveting literary journalism that explores the roots and repercussions of the infamous killing of Eric Garner by the New York City police—from the bestselling author of <i>The Divide</i></b><br /><br /><b>NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>THE WASHINGTON POST</i></b><br /><br /> On July 17, 2014, a forty-three-year-old black man named Eric Garner died on a Staten Island sidewalk after a police officer put him in what has been described as an illegal chokehold during an arrest for selling bootleg cigarettes. The final moments of Garner’s life were captured on video and seen by millions. His agonized last words, “I can’t breathe,” became a rallying cry for the nascent Black Lives Matter protest movement. A grand jury ultimately declined to indict the officer who wrestled Garner to the pavement.<br />  <br /> Matt Taibbi’s deeply reported retelling of these events liberates Eric Garner from the abstractions of newspaper accounts and lets us see the man in full—with all his flaws and contradictions intact. A husband and father with a complicated personal history, Garner was neither villain nor victim, but a fiercely proud individual determined to do the best he could for his family, bedeviled by bad luck, and ultimately subdued by forces beyond his control. <br />  <br /> In America, no miscarriage of justice exists in isolation, of course, and in <i>I Can’t Breathe</i> Taibbi also examines the conditions that made this tragedy possible. Featuring vivid vignettes of life on the street and inside our Kafkaesque court system, Taibbi’s kaleidoscopic account illuminates issues around policing, mass incarceration, the underground economy, and racial disparity in law enforcement. No one emerges unsullied, from the conservative district attorney who half-heartedly prosecutes the case to the progressive mayor caught between the demands of outraged activists and the foot-dragging of recalcitrant police officials. <br />  <br /> A masterly narrative of urban America and a scathing indictment of the perverse incentives built into our penal system, <i>I Can’t Breathe</i> drills down into the particulars of one case to confront us with the human cost of our broken approach to dispensing criminal justice.<br /><br /><b>“Brilliant . . . Taibbi is unsparing is his excoriation of the system, police, and courts. . . . This is a necessary and riveting work.”—<i>Booklist</i> (starred review)</b>
Blue Mafia: Police Brutality & Consent Decrees in Ohio
by Tim Tolka

Language

English

Pages

297

Publication Date

April 26, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Blue Mafia tells the backstory behind two federal investigations of police brutality in Steubenville and Warren, Ohio. The book explores the events leading up to the historic reform agreements and their outcomes, using the career of a local civil rights lawyer who filed lawsuits against the police and acted as an informant to federal investigators.<br />In Steubenville, when attorney Richard Olivito defends a drug dealer claiming police misconduct, he begins to feel hunted. Later, he acts as an informant and collaborator to Justice Department officials investigating the Steubenville police, which results in a consent decree, or court-enforced reform agreement, the 2nd in U.S. history. <br />A few years later, Olivito incites another federal Investigation in neighboring Warren, where residents have complained of police brutality for decades. This time is different because there Is a video. <br />Blue Mafia shows that some small towns have at least equally severe problem with police misconduct as many big cities, and it chronicles federal reform efforts on local police agencies during five U.S. presidential administrations, providing the most detailed account to date of police reform by consent decree and revealing the messy, sometimes tragic yet always human aspects of policing.
The Three Lives of James Madison: Genius, Partisan, President
by Noah Feldman

Language

English

Pages

800

Publication Date

October 31, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A sweeping reexamination of the Founding Father who transformed the United States in each of his political “lives”—as a revolutionary thinker, as a partisan political strategist, and as a president</b><br /><br /><b>“In order to understand America and its Constitution, it is necessary to understand James Madison.”—Walter Isaacson, #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Leonardo da Vinci</i></b><br /><br /> Over the course of his life,<b> </b>James Madison changed the United States three times: First, he designed the Constitution, led the struggle for its adoption and ratification, then drafted the Bill of Rights. As an older, cannier politician he co-founded the original Republican party, setting the course of American political partisanship. Finally, having pioneered a foreign policy based on economic sanctions, he took the United States into a high-risk conflict, becoming the first wartime president and, despite the odds, winning.<br /><br />Now Noah Feldman offers an intriguing portrait of this elusive genius and the constitutional republic he created—and how both evolved to meet unforeseen challenges. Madison hoped to eradicate partisanship yet found himself giving voice to, and institutionalizing, the political divide. Madison’s lifelong loyalty to Thomas Jefferson led to an irrevocable break with George Washington, hero of the American Revolution. Madison closely collaborated with Alexander Hamilton on the<i> Federalist </i>papers—yet their different visions for the United States left them enemies.<br /><br /> Alliances defined Madison, too. The vivacious Dolley Madison used her social and political talents to win her husband new supporters in Washington—and define the diplomatic customs of the capital’s society. Madison’s relationship with James Monroe, a mixture of friendship and rivalry, shaped his presidency and the outcome of the War of 1812.<br /><br /> We may be more familiar with other Founding Fathers, but the United States today is in many ways Madisonian in nature. Madison predicted that foreign threats would justify the curtailment of civil liberties. He feared economic inequality and the power of financial markets over politics, believing that government by the people demanded resistance to wealth. Madison was the first Founding Father to recognize the importance of public opinion, and the first to understand that the media could function as a safeguard to liberty.<br /><br /> <i>The Three Lives of James Madison</i> is an illuminating biography of the man whose creativity and tenacity gave us America’s distinctive form of government. His collaborations, struggles, and contradictions define the United States to this day.

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