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The Mueller Report: The Comprehensive Findings of the Special Cou...
by Robert Mueller

Language

English

Pages

527

Publication Date

April 21, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In the future, The Mueller Report may be judged as the most important document of our time. And no matter where you reside on the American political spectrum, you will probably agree that it will have far-reaching implications for the balance of power among the three coequal branches of government that create, administer, and apply the laws of our republic. With forewords by Lt. Col. Allen B. West (Ret.), and the Hon. Dan Boren, both former congressmen who served on opposite sides of the aisle while Robert Mueller served as director of the FBI, they hold insight into the leadership of the organization created expressly to investigate the questions answered by this report.
Handbook for a Post-Roe America
by Robin Marty

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

January 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The end of Roe v. Wade is coming. How will you prepare? <br /><br /></b><br /><i>Handbook for a Post-Roe America </i>is a comprehensive and user-friendly manual for understanding and preparing for the looming changes to reproductive rights law, and getting the healthcare you need—by any means necessary. Activist and writer Robin Marty guides readers through various worst-case scenarios of a post-<i>Roe</i> America, and offers ways to fight back, including: how to acquire financial support, how to use existing networks and create new ones, and how to, when required, work outside existing legal systems. She details how to plan for your own emergencies, how to start organizing now, what to know about self-managed abortion care with pills and/or herbs, and how to avoid surveillance. The only guidebook of its kind, <i>Handbook for a Post-Roe America</i> includes an extensive, detailed resource guide for all pregnant people (whether cis, trans, or non-binary) of clinics, action groups, abortion funds, and practical support groups in each state, so wherever you live, you can get involved.<br />        With a newly right-wing Supreme Court and a Republican Senate, <i>Roe</i> is under threat. Robin Marty observes: "When we say abortion will be illegal in half the states in the nation, we are no longer talking about some hypothetical future—we are talking about just years down the road. We have to act now to secure what access remains, shore up the networks supporting those who need care, and decide what risks we are willing to take to ensure that any person who wants a termination can still end that pregnancy—with or without the government's permission."
Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation ...
by Springer

Language

English

Pages

697

Publication Date

May 16, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>This book tells a story of Taiwan’s transformation from an authoritarian regime to a democratic system where human rights are protected as required by international human rights treaties. There were difficult times for human rights protection during the martial law era; however, there has also been remarkable transformation progress in human rights protection thereafter. The book reflects the transformation in Taiwan and elaborates whether or not it is facilitated or hampered by its Confucian tradition. There are a number of institutional arrangements, including the Constitutional Court, the Control Yuan, and the yet-to-be-created National Human Rights Commission, which could play or have already played certain key roles in human rights protections. Taiwan’s voluntarily acceptance of human rights treaties through its implementation legislation and through the Constitutional Court’s introduction of such treaties into its constitutional interpretation are also fully expounded in the book. Taiwan’s NGOs are very active and have played critical roles in enhancing human rights practices. In the areas of civil and political rights, difficult human rights issues concerning the death penalty remain unresolved. But regarding the rights and freedoms in the spheres of personal liberty, expression, privacy, and fair trial (including lay participation in criminal trials), there are in-depth discussions on the respective developments in Taiwan that readers will find interesting. In the areas of economic, social, and cultural rights, the focuses of the book are on the achievements as well as the problems in the realization of the rights to health, a clean environment, adequate housing, and food. The protections of vulnerable groups, including indigenous people, women, LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) individuals, the disabled, and foreigners in Taiwan, are also the areas where Taiwan has made recognizable achievements, but still encounters problems. The comprehensive coverage of this book should be able to give readers a well-rounded picture of Taiwan’s human rights performance. Readers will find appealing the story of the effort to achieve high standards of human rights protection in a jurisdiction barred from joining international human rights conventions.</p><p></p>
White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
by Carol Anderson Ph.D.

Language

English

Pages

248

Publication Date

May 31, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>National Book Critics Circle Award Winner</b><br /><b><i>New York Times</i><i> </i>Bestseller</b><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i><i> </i>Notable Book of the Year</b><br /><b>A <i>Washington Post</i> Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year</b><br /><b>A <i>Boston Globe</i> Best Book of 2016</b><br /><b>A <i>Chicago Review of Books</i> Best Nonfiction Book of 2016</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.</b><br /><br />As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as “black rage,” historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in <i>The Washington Post</i> suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling."<br /> <br /> Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 <i>Brown v. Board of Education</i> decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. <br /> <br /> Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, <i>White Rage</i> will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
The Chief: The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Rob...
by Joan Biskupic

Language

English

Pages

377

Publication Date

March 26, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>An incisive biography of the Supreme Court's enigmatic Chief Justice, taking us inside the momentous legal decisions of his tenure so far</b></div> <div><br /></div> <div>John Roberts was named to the Supreme Court in 2005 claiming he would act as a neutral umpire in deciding cases. His critics argue he has been anything but, pointing to his conservative victories on voting rights and campaign finance. Yet he broke from orthodoxy in his decision to preserve Obamacare. How are we to understand the motives of the most powerful judge in the land? </div> <div><br /></div> <div></div> <div>In <i>The Chief</i>, award-winning journalist Joan Biskupic contends that Roberts is torn between two, often divergent, priorities: to carry out a conservative agenda, and to protect the Court's image and his place in history. Biskupic shows how Roberts's dual commitments have fostered distrust among his colleagues, with major consequences for the law. Trenchant and authoritative, The Chief reveals the making of a justice and the drama on this nation's highest court. </div> <div><br /></div>
Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution
by Myron Magnet

Language

English

Pages

158

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>When Clarence Thomas joined the Supreme Court in 1991, he found with dismay that it was interpreting a very different Constitution from the one the framers had written—the one that had established a federal government manned by the people’s own elected representatives, charged with protecting citizens’ inborn rights while leaving them free to work out their individual happiness themselves, in their families, communities, and states. He found that his predecessors on the Court were complicit in the first step of this transformation, when in the 1870s they defanged the Civil War amendments intended to give full citizenship to his fellow black Americans. In the next generation, Woodrow Wilson, dismissing the framers and their work as obsolete, set out to replace laws made by the people’s representatives with rules made by highly educated, modern, supposedly nonpartisan “experts,” an idea Franklin Roosevelt supersized in the New Deal agencies that he acknowledged had no constitutional warrant. Then, under Chief Justice Earl Warren in the 1950s and 1960s, the Nine set about realizing Wilson’s dream of a Supreme Court sitting as a permanent constitutional convention, conjuring up laws out of smoke and mirrors and justifying them as expressions of the spirit of the age. <br /><br /><br /><br />But Thomas, who joined the Court after eight years running one of the myriad administrative agencies that the Great Society had piled on top of FDR’s batch, had deep misgivings about the new governmental order. He shared the framers’ vision of free, self-governing citizens forging their own fate. And from his own experience growing up in segregated Savannah, flirting with and rejecting black radicalism at college, and running an agency that supposedly advanced equality, he doubted that unelected experts and justices really did understand the moral arc of the universe better than the people themselves, or that the rules and rulings they issued made lives better rather than worse. So in the hundreds of opinions he has written in more than a quarter century on the Court—the most important of them explained in these pages in clear, non-lawyerly language—he has questioned the constitutional underpinnings of the new order and tried to restore the limited, self-governing original one, as more legitimate, more just, and more free than the one that grew up in its stead. The Court now seems set to move down the trail he blazed. <br /><br /> <br /><br />A free, self-governing nation needs independent-minded, self-reliant citizens, and Thomas’s biography, vividly recounted here, produced just the kind of character that the founders assumed would always mark Americans. America’s future depends on the power of its culture and institutions to form ever more citizens of this stamp.</div>
The Pox of Liberty: How the Constitution Left Americans Rich, Fre...
by Werner Troesken

Language

English

Pages

248

Publication Date

June 29, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world. But that wealth hasn't translated to a higher life expectancy, an area where the United States still ranks thirty-eighth—behind Cuba, Chile, Costa Rica, and Greece, among many others. Some fault the absence of universal health care or the persistence of social inequalities. Others blame unhealthy lifestyles. But these emphases on present-day behaviors and policies miss a much more fundamental determinant of societal health: the state.<br /><br /><br /><br />Werner Troesken looks at the history of the United States with a focus on three diseases—smallpox, typhoid fever, and yellow fever—to show how constitutional rules and provisions that promoted individual liberty and economic prosperity also influenced, for good and for bad, the country’s ability to eradicate infectious disease. Ranging from federalism under the Commerce Clause to the Contract Clause and the Fourteenth Amendment, Troesken argues persuasively that many institutions intended to promote desirable political or economic outcomes also hindered the provision of public health. We are unhealthy, in other words, at least in part because our political and legal institutions function well. Offering a compelling new perspective, <i>The Pox of Liberty</i> challenges many traditional claims that infectious diseases are inexorable forces in human history, beyond the control of individual actors or the state, revealing them instead to be the result of public and private choices.</div>
To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment
by , Joshua Matz

Language

English

Pages

305

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><div><b>The history and future of our democracy's ultimate sanction, presidential impeachment, and a guide to how it should be used now</b></div><div> </div><div><i><br /></i></div><div><i>To End a Presidency</i> addresses one of today's most urgent questions: when and whether to impeach a president. Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz provide an authoritative guide to impeachment's past and a bold argument about its proper role today. In an era of expansive presidential power and intense partisanship, we must rethink impeachment for the twenty-first century.</div><div> </div><div><br /></div><div>Of impeachments, one Constitutional Convention delegate declared, "A good magistrate will not fear them. A bad one will be kept in fear of them." <i >To End a Presidency</i> is an essential book for all Americans seeking to understand how this crucial but fearsome power should be exercised.</div></div>
Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey ...
by Steve Luxenberg

Language

English

Pages

622

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A <em>New York Times</em> Editors' Choice<br /><br /><br /><br />A myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced "separation" and its pernicious consequences.</strong></p><br /><p><em>Plessy v. Ferguson</em>, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first.</p><br /><p><em>Separate</em> spans a striking range of characters and landscapes, bound together by the defining issue of their time and ours—race and equality. Wending its way through a half-century of American history, the narrative begins at the dawn of the railroad age, in the North, home to the nation’s first separate railroad car, then moves briskly through slavery and the Civil War to Reconstruction and its aftermath, as separation took root in nearly every aspect of American life.</p><br /><p>Award-winning author Steve Luxenberg draws from letters, diaries, and archival collections to tell the story of <em>Plessy v. Ferguson</em> through the eyes of the people caught up in the case. <em>Separate</em> depicts indelible figures such as the resisters from the mixed-race community of French New Orleans, led by Louis Martinet, a lawyer and crusading newspaper editor; Homer Plessy’s lawyer, Albion Tourgée, a best-selling author and the country’s best-known white advocate for civil rights; Justice Henry Billings Brown, from antislavery New England, whose majority ruling endorsed separation; and Justice John Harlan, the Southerner from a slaveholding family whose singular dissent cemented his reputation as a steadfast voice for justice.</p><br /><p>Sweeping, swiftly paced, and richly detailed, <em>Separate</em> provides a fresh and urgently-needed exploration of our nation’s most devastating divide.</p>
Saving the Constitution from Lawyers: How Legal Training and Law ...
by Robert J. Spitzer

Language

English

Pages

206

Publication Date

April 07, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This book is a sweeping indictment of the legal profession in the realm of constitutional interpretation. The adversarial, advocacy-based American legal system is well suited to American justice, in which one-sided arguments collide to produce a just outcome. But when applied to constitutional theorizing, the result is selective analysis, overheated rhetoric, distorted facts, and overstated conclusions. Such wayward theorizing finds its way into print in the nation's over 600 law journals – professional publications run by law students, not faculty or other professionals – and peer review is almost never used to evaluate worthiness. The consequences of this system are examined through three timely cases: the presidential veto, the 'unitary theory' of the president's commander-in-chief power, and the Second Amendment's 'right to bear arms'. In each case, law reviews were the breeding ground for defective theories that won false legitimacy and political currency. This book concludes with recommendations for reform.

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