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The Case Against Impeaching Trump
by Alan Dershowitz

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

July 09, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The <i>New York Times</i> bestseller</b><br /><BR><BR><br /><B>“This brand new book by Professor Dershowitz is absolutely amazing….If you care about justice and the President with the witch hunt, you’re going to want to read this book.”—Sean Hannity</B><br /><BR><BR><br />“Maybe the question isn’t what happened to Alan Dershowitz. Maybe it’s what happened to everyone else.”—<i>Politico</i><br /><br /><b>Alan Dershowitz</b> has been called “one of the most prominent and consistent defenders of civil liberties in America” by <i>Politico</i> and “the nation’s most peripatetic civil liberties lawyer and one of its most distinguished defenders of individual rights” by <i>Newsweek</i>. Yet he has come under partisan fire for applying those same principles to Donald Trump during the course of his many appearances in national media outlets as an expert resource on civil and constitutional law.<br /><br /><i><b>The Case Against Impeaching Trump</b></i> seeks to reorient the debate over impeachment to the same standard that Dershowitz has continued to uphold for decades: the law of the United States of America, as established by the Constitution. In the author’s own words:<br /><br />“In the fervor to impeach President Trump, his political enemies have ignored the text of the Constitution. As a civil libertarian who voted against Trump, I remind those who would impeach him not to run roughshod over a document that has protected us all for two and a quarter centuries. In this case against impeachment, I make arguments similar to those I made against the impeachment of President Bill Clinton (and that I would be making had Hillary Clinton been elected and Republicans were seeking to impeach her). Impeachment and removal of a president are not entirely political decisions by Congress. Every member takes an oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution sets out specific substantive criteria that MUST be met.<br /><br />I am thrilled to contribute to this important debate and especially that my book will be so quickly available to readers so they can make up their own minds.”
Anatomy of Injustice: A Murder Case Gone Wrong
by Raymond Bonner

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

February 21, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The book that helped free an innocent man who had spent twenty-seven years on death row.<br /> <br />In January 1982, an elderly white widow was found brutally murdered in the small town of Greenwood, South Carolina. Police immediately arrested Edward Lee Elmore, a semiliterate, mentally retarded black man with no previous felony record. His only connection to the victim was having cleaned her gutters and windows, but barely ninety days after the victim’s body was found, he was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death.<br /> <br />Elmore had been on death row for eleven years when a young attorney named Diana Holt first learned of his case. After attending the University of Texas School of Law, Holt was eager to help the disenfranchised and voiceless; she herself had been a childhood victim of abuse. It required little scrutiny for Holt to discern that Elmore’s case—plagued by incompetent court-appointed defense attorneys, a virulent prosecution, and both misplaced and contaminated evidence—reeked of injustice. It was the cause of a lifetime for the spirited, hardworking lawyer. Holt would spend more than a decade fighting on Elmore’s behalf.<br /> <br />With the exemplary moral commitment and tenacious investigation that have distinguished his reporting career, Bonner follows Holt’s battle to save Elmore’s life and shows us how his case is a textbook example of what can go wrong in the American justice system. He reviews police work, evidence gathering, jury selection, work of court-appointed lawyers, latitude of judges, iniquities in the law, prison informants, and the appeals process. Throughout, the actions and motivations of both unlikely heroes and shameful villains in our justice system are vividly revealed.            <br /> <br />Moving, suspenseful, and enlightening, <i>Anatomy of Injustice</i> is a vital contribution to our nation’s ongoing, increasingly important debate about inequality and the death penalty.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
by Carol Anderson Ph.D.

Language

English

Pages

248

Publication Date

May 31, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>National Book Critics Circle Award Winner</b><br /><b><i>New York Times</i><i> </i>Bestseller</b><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i><i> </i>Notable Book of the Year</b><br /><b>A <i>Washington Post</i> Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year</b><br /><b>A <i>Boston Globe</i> Best Book of 2016</b><br /><b>A <i>Chicago Review of Books</i> Best Nonfiction Book of 2016</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America.</b><br /><br />As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in <i>The Washington Post</i> suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling."<br /> <br /> Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 <i>Brown v. Board of Education</i> decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. <br /> <br /> Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, <i>White Rage</i> will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment
by , Joshua Matz

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><div><b>The history and future of our democracy's ultimate sanction, presidential impeachment, and a guide to how it should be used now</b></div><div> </div><div><i><br /></i></div><div><i>To End a Presidency</i> addresses one of today's most urgent questions: when and whether to impeach a president. Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz provide an authoritative guide to impeachment's past and a bold argument about its proper role today. In an era of expansive presidential power and intense partisanship, we must rethink impeachment for the twenty-first century.</div><div> </div><div><br /></div><div>Of impeachments, one Constitutional Convention delegate declared, "A good magistrate will not fear them. A bad one will be kept in fear of them." <i >To End a Presidency</i> is an essential book for all Americans seeking to understand how this crucial but fearsome power should be exercised.</div></div>
Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Bl...
by Richard Kluger

Language

English

Pages

882

Publication Date

August 24, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<i>Simple Justice</i> is generally regarded as the classic account of the U.S. Supreme Court's epochal decision outlawing racial segregation and the centerpiece of African-Americans' ongoing crusade for equal justice under law.<br /><br />The 1954 Supreme Court ruling in the case of Brown v. Board of Education brought centuries of legal segregation in this country to an end. It was and remains, beyond question, one of the truly significant events in American history, "probably the most important American government act of any kind since the Emancipation Proclamation," in the view of constitutional scholar Louis H. Pollak. The Brown decision climaxed along, torturous battle for black equality in education, making hard law out of vague principles and opening the way for the broad civil rights upheavals of the 1960s and beyond.<br /><i></i><br /><i>Simple Justice</i> is the story of that battle. Richard Kluger traces the background of the epochal decision,from its remote legal and cultural roots to the complex personalities of those who brought about its realization. The result is a landmark work of popular history, graceful and fascinatingly detailed, the panoramic account of a struggle for human dignity in process since the birth of the nation.<br /><br />Here is the human drama, told in all its dimensions, of the many plaintiffs, men, women, and children,variously scared or defiant but always determined, who made the hard decision to proceed - bucking the white power structure in Topeka,Kansas; braving night riders in rural South Carolina; rallying fellow high school students in strictly segregated Prince Edward County,Virginia - and at a dozen other times and places showing their refusal to accept defeat.<br /><br />Here, too, is the extraordinary tale,told for the first time, of the black legal establishment, forced literally to invent itself before it could join the fight, then patiently assembling, in courtroom after courtroom, a body of law that would serve to free its people from thralldom to unjust laws. Heroes abound, some obscure, like Charles Houston (who built Howard Law School into a rigorous academy for black lawyers) and the Reverend J.A. DeLaine (the minister-teacher who, despite bitter opposition, organized and led the first crucial fight for educational equality in the Jim Crow South), others like Thurgood Marshall, justly famous - but all of whose passionate devotion proved intense enough to match their mission.<br /><br />Reading <i>Simple Justice</i>, we see how black Americans' groundswell urge for fair treatment collides with the intransigence of white supremacists in a grinding legal campaign that inevitably found its way to the halls and chambers of the Supreme Court for a final showdown.  Kluger searches out and analyzes what went on there during the months of hearings and deliberations, often behind closed doors, laying bare the doubts,disagreements, and often deeply held convictions of the nine Justices. He shows above all how Chief Justice Earl Warren, new to the Court but old in the ways of politics, achieved the impossible - a unanimous decision to reverse the 58-year-old false doctrine of "separate but equal" education for blacks. Impeccably researched and elegantly written, this may be the most revealing report ever published of America's highest court at work.<br />Based on extensive interviews and both published and unpublished documentary sources, <i>Simple Justice</i> has the lineaments of an epic. It will stand as the classic study of a turning point in our history.
American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and...
by Sebastian Edwards

Language

English

Pages

278

Publication Date

May 29, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>The untold story of how FDR did the unthinkable to save the American economy</b></p><p>The American economy is strong in large part because nobody believes that America would ever default on its debt. Yet in 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt did just that, when in a bid to pull the country out of depression, he depreciated the U.S. dollar in relation to gold, effectively annulling all debt contracts. <i>American Default</i> is the story of this forgotten chapter in America's history.</p><p>Sebastian Edwards provides a compelling account of the economic and legal drama that embroiled a nation already reeling from global financial collapse. It began on April 5, 1933, when FDR ordered Americans to sell all their gold holdings to the government. This was followed by the abandonment of the gold standard, the unilateral and retroactive rewriting of contracts, and the devaluation of the dollar. Anyone who held public and private debt suddenly saw its value reduced by nearly half, and debtors--including the U.S. government—suddenly owed their creditors far less. Revaluing the dollar imposed a hefty loss on investors and savers, many of them middle-class American families. The banks fought back, and a bitter battle for gold ensued. In early 1935, the case went to the Supreme Court. Edwards describes FDR's rancorous clashes with conservative Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, a confrontation that threatened to finish the New Deal for good—and that led to FDR's attempt to pack the court in 1937.</p><p>At a time when several major economies never approached the brink of default or devaluing or recalling currencies, <i>American Default</i> is a timely account of a little-known yet drastic experiment with these policies, the inevitable backlash, and the ultimate result.</p>
Constitutional Violence
by Antoni Abat i Ninet

Language

English

Pages

192

Publication Date

August 20, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>If constitutional legitimacy is based on violence, what does this mean for democracy?</strong><br /><br />Almost every state in the world has a written constitution and, for the great majority, the constitution is the law that controls the organs of the state. But is a constitution the best device to rule a country?<br /><br />Western political systems tend to be 'constitutional democracies', dividing the system into a domain of politics, where the people rule, and a domain of law, set aside for a trained elite. Legal, political and constitutional practices demonstrate that constitutionalism and democracy seem to be irreconcilable. <br /><br />Antoni Abat i Ninet strives to resolve these apparently exclusive public and legal sovereignties, using their various avatars across the globe as case studies. He challenges the American constitutional experience that has dominated western constitutional thought as a quasi-religious doctrine. And he argues that human rights and democracy must strive to deactivate the 'invisible' but very real violence embedded in our seemingly sacrosanct constitutions.<br />
Französisches und Deutsches Verfassungsrecht: Ein Rechtsvergleic...
by Springer

Language

German

Pages

460

Publication Date

May 08, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Der Band entfaltet die Grundzüge des Verfassungsrechts in Deutschland und Frankreich im Wege des Rechtsvergleichs. Systematisch wird das institutionelle und materielle Verfassungsrecht beider Länder einschließlich der jeweiligen Kontextbedingungen erschlossen. Der fortlaufende Perspektivwechsel zwischen dem Recht diesseits und jenseits des Rheins lässt übergeordnete Problemlagen des modernen Verfassungsstaates erkennen und ermöglicht es zugleich, die verfassungsrechtlichen Lösungsstrategien kritisch zu hinterfragen. Das Buch wendet sich an alle, die sich im Zuge von Studium, Forschung, fachspezifischer Fremdsprachenausbildung oder Rechtspraxis in beiden Verfassungsordnungen reflektiert bewegen möchten und hierzu einen integrierten rechtsvergleichenden Zugang suchen, der mehr sein soll als eine separierte Darstellung der Rechtslage in beiden Staaten.<b> </b></p><p>Mit Beiträgen von:</p><p>Aurore Gaillet</p><p>Thomas Hochmann</p><p>Nikolaus Marsch</p><p>Yoan Vilain</p><p>Mattias Wendel </p><p></p>
Verfassungsrecht II - Grundrechte (Springer-Lehrbuch) (German Edi...
by Michael Sachs

Language

German

Pages

731

Publication Date

November 22, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>Dieses Buch gibt Studierenden, die sich erstmalig mit den Grundrechten befassen, ebenso wie solchen, die den Stoff für Übungen oder zum Examen wiederholen wollen, einen guten Überblick über die grundlegenden Strukturen der Materie „Grundrechte“. Neben den allgemeinen Lehren werden auch die einzelnen Grundrechte behandelt. Dem besseren Verständnis dienen vor allem der bundesverfassungsgerichtlichen Judikatur entnommene Beispiele und Hinweise auf besondere Gestaltungen. Zusammenhänge werden mit Hilfe von Querverweisen verdeutlicht, die rasches Nachlesen ermöglichen. Die wichtigsten Ergebnisse werden nach jedem Abschnitt zusammengestellt; sie dienen als Hilfe zur Selbstkontrolle des Lernerfolgs bzw. des Wissenstandes und geben einen raschen Überblick.<br /></div><div><br /></div>
We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Righ...
by Adam Winkler

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

February 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><em>We the Corporations</em> chronicles the revelatory story of one of the most successful, yet least known, “civil rights movements” in American history.</p><br /><p><em>We the Corporations</em> chronicles the astonishing story of one of the most successful yet least well-known “civil rights movements” in American history. Hardly oppressed like women and minorities, business corporations, too, have fought since the nation’s earliest days to gain equal rights under the Constitution—and today have nearly all the same rights as ordinary people.</p><br /><p>Exposing the historical origins of <em>Citizens United</em> and <em>Hobby Lobby</em>, Adam Winkler explains how those controversial Supreme Court decisions extending free speech and religious liberty to corporations were the capstone of a centuries-long struggle over corporate personhood and constitutional protections for business. Beginning his account in the colonial era, Winkler reveals the profound influence corporations had on the birth of democracy and on the shape of the Constitution itself. Once the Constitution was ratified, corporations quickly sought to gain the rights it guaranteed. The first Supreme Court case on the rights of corporations was decided in 1809, a half-century before the first comparable cases on the rights of African Americans or women. Ever since, corporations have waged a persistent and remarkably fruitful campaign to win an ever-greater share of individual rights.</p><br /><p>Although corporations never marched on Washington, they employed many of the same strategies of more familiar civil rights struggles: civil disobedience, test cases, and novel legal claims made in a purposeful effort to reshape the law. Indeed, corporations have often been unheralded innovators in constitutional law, and several of the individual rights Americans hold most dear were first secured in lawsuits brought by businesses.</p><br /><p>Winkler enlivens his narrative with a flair for storytelling and a colorful cast of characters: among others, Daniel Webster, America’s greatest advocate, who argued some of the earliest corporate rights cases on behalf of his business clients; Roger Taney, the reviled Chief Justice, who surprisingly fought to limit protections for corporations—in part to protect slavery; and Roscoe Conkling, a renowned politician who deceived the Supreme Court in a brazen effort to win for corporations the rights added to the Constitution for the freed slaves. Alexander Hamilton, Teddy Roosevelt, Huey Long, Ralph Nader, Louis Brandeis, and even Thurgood Marshall all played starring roles in the story of the corporate rights movement.</p><br /><p>In this heated political age, nothing can be timelier than Winkler’s <em>tour de force</em>, which shows how America’s most powerful corporations won our most fundamental rights and turned the Constitution into a weapon to impede the regulation of big business.</p>

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