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Queens of the Renaissance
by M. Beresford Ryley

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Queens of the Renaissance is a collection of short biographies of famous women of the Renaissance.
Ireland, France, and the Atlantic in a Time of War: Reflections o...
by Thomas M. Truxes

Language

English

Pages

254

Publication Date

April 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<P>In March 1757 – early in the Seven Years’ War – a British privateer intercepted an Irish ship, the <I>Two Sisters</I> of Dublin, as it returned home from Bordeaux with a cargo of wine and French luxury goods. Amongst the cargo seized were 125 letters from members of the Irish expatriate community, which were to lay undisturbed in the British archives for the next 250 years. </P><br /><P>Re-discovered in 2011 by Dr. Truxes, this cache of (mostly unopened) letters provides a colorful, intimate, and revealing glimpse into the lives of ordinary people caught up in momentous events. </P><br /><P>Taking this correspondence (published by the British Academy in 2013) as a shared starting point, the ten essays in this volume are not so much "about" the Bordeaux–Dublin letters themselves, but rather reflect upon themes, perspectives, and questions embedded within the mail of ordinary men, women, and children cut off from home by war. The volume’s introduction situates these essays within a broad Atlantic context, allowing the succeeding chapters to explore a range of topics at the cutting edge of early-modern British and Irish historical scholarship, including women in the early-modern world, the consequences of war across all classes in society, the eighteenth-century penal laws and their impact, and Irish expatriate communities on the European continent. Leavening these broad themes with the personal snapshots of life provided by the Bordeaux-Dublin letters, this edited collection enlarges, complicates, and challenges our understanding of the mid-eighteenth-century Atlantic world.</P>
Brian Fitz-Count: A Story of Wallingford Castle and Dorchester Ab...
by A. D. (Augustine David) C...

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This vintage book from 1888 has been digitally converted to downloadable format. A great classic for the home or classroom, an interesting old-fashioned reference book, and an outstanding find.
Great Ladies: The Forgotten Witnesses to the Lives of Tudor Queen...
by Sylvia Barbara Soberton

Language

English

Pages

296

Publication Date

February 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
There has been a great deal written about Tudor queens, but less so about those women who surrounded the throne, who may have held even more power and influence than those who actually wore the golden crown.<br /><br />Some ladies who served at the Tudor court are only faceless silhouettes lost to the sands of time, but there are those who dedicated their lives to please their royal mistresses and left documentation, allowing us to piece their life stories together and link them to the stories of Tudor queens. These female attendants saw their queens and princesses up close and often used their intimate bonds to their own benefit. Some were beloved, others hated. <br /><br />This is the story of the ladies of the Tudor court like you’ve never read it before.<br />
A Short Introduction to Galileo
by John Lord

Language

English

Pages

28

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Among the wonders of the sixteenth century was the appearance of a new star in the northern horizon, which, shining at first with a feeble light, gradually surpassed the brightness of the planet Jupiter; and then changing its color from white to yellow and from yellow to red, after seventeen months, faded away from the sight, and has not since appeared. This celebrated star, first seen by Tycho Brahe in the constellation Cassiopeia, never changed its position, or presented the slightest perceptible parallax. It could not therefore have been a meteor, nor a planet regularly revolving round the sun, nor a comet blazing with fiery nebulous light, nor a satellite of one of the planets, but a fixed star, far beyond our solar system. Such a phenomenon created an immense sensation, and has never since been satisfactorily explained by philosophers. In the infancy of astronomical science it was regarded by astrologers as a sign to portend the birth of an extraordinary individual.<br />Though the birth of some great political character was supposed to be heralded by this mysterious star, its prophetic meaning might with more propriety apply to the extraordinary man who astonished his contemporaries by discoveries in the heavens, and who forms the subject of this lecture; or it poetically might apply to the brilliancy of the century itself in which it appeared. The sixteenth century cannot be compared with the nineteenth century in the variety and scope of scientific discoveries; but, compared with the ages which had preceded it, it was a memorable epoch, marked by the simultaneous breaking up of the darkness of mediaeval Europe, and the bursting forth of new energies in all departments of human thought and action. In that century arose great artists, poets, philosophers, theologians, reformers, navigators, jurists, statesmen, whose genius has scarcely since been surpassed. In Italy it was marked by the triumphs of scholars and artists; in Germany and France, by reformers and warriors; in England, by that splendid constellation that shed glory on the reign of Elizabeth. Close upon the artists who followed Da Vinci, to Salvator Rosa, were those scholars of whom Emanuel Chrysoloras, Erasmus, and Scaliger were the representatives,—going back to the classic fountains of Greece and Rome, reviving a study for antiquity, breathing a new spirit into universities, enriching vernacular tongues, collecting and collating manuscripts, translating the Scriptures, and stimulating the learned to emancipate themselves from the trammels of the scholastic philosophers...
The Shepherdess of Siena: A Novel of Renaissance Tuscany
by Linda Lafferty

Language

English

Pages

578

Publication Date

March 31, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Raised by her aunt and uncle amidst the rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside, young orphan Virginia Tacci has always harbored a deep love for horses—though she knows she may never have the chance to ride. As a shepherdess in sixteenth-century Italy, Virginia’s possibilities are doubly limited by her peasant class and her gender. Yet while she tends her flock, Virginia is captivated by the daring equestrian feats of the high-spirited Isabella de’ Medici, who rides with the strength and courage of any man, much to the horror of her brother, the tyrannical Gran Duca Francesco de’ Medici.</p><p>Inspired, the young shepherdess keeps one dream close to her heart: to race in Siena’s Palio. Twenty-six years after Florence captured Siena, Virginia’s defiance will rally the broken spirit of the Senese people and threaten the pernicious reign of the Gran Duca. Bringing alive the rich history of one of Tuscany’s most famed cities, this lush, captivating saga draws an illuminating portrait of one girl with an unbreakable spirit.</p>
A Short Introduction to Dante
by John Lord

Language

English

Pages

26

Publication Date

April 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The first great genius who aroused his country from the torpor of the Middle Ages was a poet. Poetry, then, was the first influence which elevated the human mind amid the miseries of a gloomy period, if we may except the schools of philosophy which flourished in the rising universities. But poetry probably preceded all other forms of culture in Europe, even as it preceded philosophy and art in Greece. The gay Provencal singers were harbingers of Dante, even as unknown poets prepared the way for Homer. And as Homer was the creator of Grecian literature, so Dante, by his immortal comedy, gave the first great impulse to Italian thought. Hence poets are great benefactors, and we will not let them die in our memories or hearts. We crown them, when alive, with laurels and praises; and when they die, we erect monuments to their honor. They are dear to us, since their writings give perpetual pleasure, and appeal to our loftiest sentiments. They appeal not merely to consecrated ideas and feelings, but they strive to conform to the principles of immortal art. Every great poet is as much an artist as the sculptor or the painter; and art survives learning itself. Varro, the most learned of the Romans, is forgotten, when Virgil is familiar to every school-boy. Cicero himself would not have been immortal, if his essays and orations had not conformed to the principles of art. Even an historian who would live must be an artist, like Voltaire or Macaulay. A cumbrous, or heavy, or pedantic historian will never be read, even if his learning be praised by all the critics of Germany...
Strategy Six Pack - The Art of War, The Gallic Wars, Life of Char...
by , Ardant du Picq

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

March 29, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
**OUT NOW: <b>Strategy Six Pack 13</b> The Caesars, Patrick Henry, A Princess from Zanzibar and more.**<br /><br /><i>“War is merely the continuation of politics by other means.”</i> - Clausewitz.<br /><br /><b>Strategy Six Pack</b> brings together six essential texts for military theorists:<br /><br />Machiavelli’s <b>The Prince</b><br /><b>The Art of War</b> by Sun Tzu<br /><b>Battle Studies</b> by Ardant du Picq <br />Einhard’s <b>Life of Charlemagne</b><br />Julius Caesar’s <b>The Gallic Wars</b> <br /><b>On War</b> by Carl von Clausewitz <br /><br />In addition to these six master texts, there is also an image gallery and a link to a free audio recording of <b>The Art of War</b>. Each work has been newly revised and expertly edited with notes, images and a table of contents. Centuries of tactical wisdom distilled into one awesome e-book. Military Science has never been more thoroughly represented in one single volume. <br /><br /><i>“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”</i> - Sun Tzu.<br />
Leonardo da Vinci
by Jay Williams

Language

English

Pages

104

Publication Date

June 19, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In his youth, Leonardo da Vinci wrote confidently, "I wish to work miracles." By the time of his death in 1519, when he was sixty-seven and famed throughout Europe, it seemed that he had accomplished wonders aplenty as an artist, engineer, inventor, and scientist. Here, from author Jay Williams, is the moving story of the man behind the Renaissance myth.
The Sistine Secrets: Michelangelo's Forbidden Messages in the Hea...
by , Roy Doliner

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

October 13, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p> The Shocking Secrets of Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel Artwork </p><p>The recent cleaning of the Sistine Chapel frescoes removed layer after layer of centuries of accumulated tarnish and darkness. <em>The Sistine Secrets</em> endeavors to remove the centuries of prejudice, censorship, and ignorance that blind us to the truth about one of the world's most famous and beloved art treasures.</p><p>Some images that appeared in the print edition of this book are unavailable in the electronic edition due to rights reasons.</p>

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