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Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Min...
by Michael Massing

Language

English

Pages

1008

Publication Date

February 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A deeply textured dual biography and fascinating intellectual history that examines two of the greatest minds of European history—Desiderius Erasmus and Martin Luther—whose heated rivalry gave rise to two enduring, fundamental, and often colliding traditions of philosophical and religious thought.</strong></p><p>Erasmus of Rotterdam was the leading figure of the Northern Renaissance. At a time when Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael were revolutionizing Western art and culture, Erasmus was helping to transform Europe’s intellectual and religious life, developing a new design for living for a continent rebelling against the hierarchical constraints of the Roman Church. When in 1516 he came out with a revised edition of the New Testament based on the original Greek, he was hailed as the prophet of a new enlightened age. Today, however, Erasmus is largely forgotten, and the reason can be summed up in two words: Martin Luther. As a young friar in remote Wittenberg, Luther was initially a great admirer of Erasmus and his critique of the Catholic Church, but while Erasmus sought to reform that institution from within, Luther wanted a more radical transformation. Eventually, the differences between them flared into a bitter rivalry, with each trying to win over Europe to his vision.</p><p>In <em>Fatal Discord</em>, Michael Massing seeks to restore Erasmus to his proper place in the Western tradition. The conflict between him and Luther, he argues, forms a fault line in Western thinking—the moment when two enduring schools of thought, Christian humanism and evangelical Christianity, took shape. A seasoned journalist who has reported from many countries, Massing here travels back to the early sixteenth century to recover a long-neglected chapter of Western intellectual life, in which the introduction of new ways of reading the Bible set loose social and cultural forces that helped shatter the millennial unity of Christendom and whose echoes can still be heard today. Massing concludes that Europe has adopted a form of Erasmian humanism while America has been shaped by Luther-inspired individualism.</p>
Rome: A History in Seven Sackings
by Matthew Kneale

Language

English

Pages

432

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"Kneale's account is a masterpiece of pacing and suspense. Characters from the city's history spring to life in his hands." —<i>The Sunday Times</i> (London)<BR> <BR>Novelist and historian Matthew Kneale, a longtime resident of Rome, tells the story of the Eternal City—from the early Roman Republic through the Renaissance and the Reformation to Mussolini and the German occupation in World War Two—through pivotal moments that defined its history.<BR><BR>Rome, the Eternal City. It is a hugely popular tourist destination with a rich history, famed for such sites as the Colosseum, the Forum, the Pantheon, St. Peter’s, and the Vatican. In no other city is history as present as it is in Rome. Today visitors can stand on bridges that Julius Caesar and Cicero crossed; walk around temples in the footsteps of emperors; visit churches from the earliest days of Christianity.<BR> <BR> This is all the more remarkable considering what the city has endured over the centuries. It has been ravaged by fires, floods, earthquakes, and—most of all—by roving armies. These have invaded repeatedly, from ancient times to as recently as 1943. Many times Romans have shrugged off catastrophe and remade their city anew.<BR> <BR> Matthew Kneale uses seven of these crisis moments to create a powerful and captivating account of Rome’s extraordinary history. He paints portraits of the city before each assault, describing what it looked like, felt like, smelled like and how Romans, both rich and poor, lived their everyday lives. He shows how the attacks transformed Rome—sometimes for the better. With drama and humor he brings to life the city of Augustus, of Michelangelo and Bernini, of Garibaldi and Mussolini, and of popes both saintly and very worldly. He shows how Rome became the chaotic and wondrous place it is today. <i>Rome: A History in Seven Sackings</i> offers a unique look at a truly remarkable city.
Francis I: The Maker of Modern France
by Leonie Frieda

Language

English

Pages

381

Publication Date

April 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The bestselling author of <em>Catherine de Medici</em> returns to sixteenth-century Europe in this evocative and entertaining biography that recreates a remarkable era of French history and brings to life a great monarch—Francis I—who turned France into a great nation.</p><p>Catherine de Medici’s father-in-law, King Francis of France, was the perfect Renaissance knight, the movement’s exemplar and its Gallic interpreter. An aesthete, diplomat par excellence, and contemporary of Machiavelli, Francis was the founder of modern France, whose sheer force of will and personality molded his kingdom into the first European superpower. Arguably the man who introduced the Renaissance to France, Francis was also the prototype Frenchman—a national identity was modeled on his character. So great was his stamp, that few countries even now are quite so robustly patriotic as is France. Yet as Leonie Frieda reveals, Francis did not always live up to his ideal; a man of grand passions and vision, he was also a flawed husband, father, lover, and king.</p><p>With access to private archives that have never been used in a study of Francis I, Frieda explores the life of a man who was the most human of the monarchs of the period—and yet, remains the most elusive.</p>
The Painter's Apprentice: A Novel of 16th-Century Venice (Venetia...
by Laura Morelli

Language

English

Pages

408

Publication Date

November 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>Would you rather sacrifice your livelihood, your lover, or your life? When the Black Death comes knocking on your door, you'd better decide quickly. </h2><br /><p><br /><i>Venice, 1510.</i> Maria Bartolini wants nothing more than to carry on her father’s legacy as a master gilder. Instead, her father has sent her away from the only home she’s ever known to train as an apprentice to Master Trevisan, a renowned painter. <br />Maria arranges to leave the painter’s workshop to return to her family workshop and to a secret lover waiting for her. But the encroaching Black Death foils her plans…<br /></p><p><br />When the painter’s servants uncover the real reason why Maria has been sent away to train with Master Trevisan, they threaten to reveal a secret that could tear down her family and the future of their trade. She is forced to buy the servants’ silence, but as their greed steadily grows, Maria resorts to more desperate measures. She questions whether her heart’s desire is worth risking her family, her trade, and her future, but Maria’s sacrifices may amount to nothing if the plague steals away everything she’s ever loved…<br /></p><p><br />From the author of the award-winning <i>The Gondola Maker</i> comes a rich tale of Renaissance Venice, a heroine with a lust for life, and love against all odds. <br /></p><p><br /></p><h2><i>Buy <i>The Painter’s Apprentice</i> today to transport yourself to the vibrant and dangerous world of 16th-century Venice…</i></h2><i><br /></i><br />
A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance -...
by William Manchester

Language

English

Pages

316

Publication Date

September 09, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
William Manchester's A World Lit Only by Fire is the preeminent popular history of civilization's rebirth after the Dark Ages.
The Medici: Power, Money, and Ambition in the Italian Renaissance
by Paul Strathern

Language

English

Pages

430

Publication Date

March 15, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A vivid, dramatic, and authoritative account of perhaps the most influential family in Italian history: the Medici.</p><br />A dazzling history of the modest family that rose to become one of the most powerful in Europe, <em>The Medici</em> is a remarkably modern story of power, money, and ambition. Against the background of an age that saw the rebirth of ancient and classical learning Paul Strathern explores the intensely dramatic rise and fall of the Medici family in Florence, as well as the Italian Renaissance which they did so much to sponsor and encourage.<br /><br /><br /><br />Strathern also follows the lives of many of the great Renaissance artists with whom the Medici had dealings, including Leonardo, Michelangelo and Donatello; as well as scientists like Galileo and Pico della Mirandola; and the fortunes of those members of the Medici family who achieved success away from Florence, including the two Medici popes and Catherine de' Médicis, who became Queen of France and played a major role in that country through three turbulent reigns.
Tudors: The History of England from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I
by Peter Ackroyd

Language

English

Pages

517

Publication Date

October 08, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Peter Ackroyd, one of Britain's most acclaimed writers, brings the age of the Tudors to vivid life in this monumental book in his The History of England series, charting the course of English history from Henry VIII's cataclysmic break with Rome to the epic rule of Elizabeth I.</p><p>Rich in detail and atmosphere, Peter Ackroyd's <i>Tudors</i> is the story of Henry VIII's relentless pursuit of both the perfect wife and the perfect heir; of how the brief reign of the teenage king, Edward VI, gave way to the violent reimposition of Catholicism and the stench of bonfires under "Bloody Mary." It tells, too, of the long reign of Elizabeth I, which, though marked by civil strife, plots against the queen and even an invasion force, finally brought stability. </p><p>Above all, however, it is the story of the English Reformation and the making of the Anglican Church. At the beginning of the sixteenth century, England was still largely feudal and looked to Rome for direction; at its end, it was a country where good governance was the duty of the state, not the church, and where men and women began to look to themselves for answers rather than to those who ruled them.</p>
City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas
by Roger Crowley

Language

English

Pages

464

Publication Date

January 24, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“The rise and fall of Venice’s empire is an irresistible story and [Roger] Crowley, with his rousing descriptive gifts and scholarly attention to detail, is its perfect chronicler.”—<i>The Financial Times</i></b><br /> <i> </i><br /> The <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Empires of the Sea</i> charts Venice’s astounding five-hundred-year voyage to the pinnacle of power in an epic story that stands unrivaled for drama, intrigue, and sheer opulent majesty. <i>City of Fortune </i>traces the full arc of the Venetian imperial saga, from the ill-fated Fourth Crusade, which culminates in the sacking of Constantinople in 1204, to the Ottoman-Venetian War of 1499–1503, which sees the Ottoman Turks supplant the Venetians as the preeminent naval power in the Mediterranean. In between are three centuries of Venetian maritime dominance, during which a tiny city of “lagoon dwellers” grow into the richest place on earth. Drawing on firsthand accounts of pitched sea battles, skillful negotiations, and diplomatic maneuvers, Crowley paints a vivid picture of this avaricious, enterprising people and the bountiful lands that came under their dominion. From the opening of the spice routes to the clash between Christianity and Islam, Venice played a leading role in the defining conflicts of its time—the reverberations of which are still being felt today.<br />  <br /> <b>“[Crowley] writes with a racy briskness that lifts sea battles and sieges off the page.”—<i>The New York Times</i></b><br /> <b> </b><br /> <b>“Crowley chronicles the peak of Venice’s past glory with Wordsworthian sympathy, supplemented by impressive learning and infectious enthusiasm.”<i>—The Wall Street Journal</i></b>
The Gondola Maker: A Novel of 16th-Century Venice (Venetian Artis...
by Laura Morelli

Language

English

Pages

300

Publication Date

March 03, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>Award-winning historical fiction set in 16th-century Venice</h2><br /><li>Benjamin Franklin Digital Award<br /></li><li>IPPY Award for Best Adult Fiction E-book<br /></li><li>National Indie Excellence Award Finalist<br /></li><li>Eric Hoffer Award Finalist<br /></li><li>Shortlisted for the da Vinci Eye Prize<br /><br />From the author of <i>Made in Italy</i> comes a tale of artisanal tradition and family bonds set in one of the world's most magnificent settings: Renaissance Venice.<br /><br /><b>Venetian gondola-maker Luca Vianello considers his whole life arranged. His father charted a course for his eldest son from the day he was born, and Luca is positioned to inherit one of the city's most esteemed boatyards. But when Luca experiences an unexpected tragedy in the boatyard, he believes that his destiny lies elsewhere. Soon he finds himself drawn to restore an antique gondola with the dream of taking a girl for a ride. <br /><br /><i>The Gondola Maker</i> brings the centuries-old art of gondola-making to life in the tale of a young man's complicated relationship with his master-craftsman father. Lovers of historical fiction will appreciate the authentic details of gondola craftsmanship, along with an intimate first-person narrative set against the richly textured backdrop of 16th-century Venice.<br /><br /><h4>A Venetian page-turner</h4><br /><br />"I'm a big fan of Venice, so I appreciate Laura Morelli's special knowledge of the city, the period, and the process of gondola-making. An especially compelling story." --Frances Mayes, author of <i>Under the Tuscan Sun</i><br /><br />"Laura Morelli has done her research, or perhaps she was an Italian carpenter in another life. One can literally smell and feel the grain of finely turned wood in her hands." --Pamela Sheldon Johns, author of <i>Italian Food Artisans</i><br /><br />"Romance, intrigue, family loyalty, pride, and redemption set against the backdrop of Renaissance Italy." --Library of Clean Reads<br /><br />"Beautiful, powerful evocation of the characters, the place, and the time. An elegant and thoroughly engaging narrative voice." --Mark Spencer, author of <i>Fiction Club: A Concise Guide to Writing Good Fiction</i><br /><br /><h2>Scroll up and get your copy today!</h2></b></li>
Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith and Lov...
by Dava Sobel

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

May 26, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<FONT face="Times New Roman"><br /><DIV>Inspired by a long fascination with Galileo, and by the remarkable surviving letters of Galileo's daughter, a cloistered nun, Dava Sobel has written a biography unlike any other of the man Albert Einstein called "the father of modern physics- indeed of modern science altogether." <I>Galileo's Daughter</I> also presents a stunning portrait of a person hitherto lost to history, described by her father as "a woman of exquisite mind, singular goodness, and most tenderly attached to me." </DIV><br /><DIV> </DIV><br /><DIV><I>Galileo's Daughter</I> dramatically recolors the personality and accomplishment of a mythic figure whose seventeenth-century clash with Catholic doctrine continues to define the schism between science and religion. Moving between Galileo's grand public life and Maria Celeste's sequestered world, Sobel illuminates the Florence of the Medicis and the papal court in Rome during the pivotal era when humanity's perception of its place in the cosmos was about to be overturned. In that same time, while the bubonic plague wreaked its terrible devastation and the Thirty Years' War tipped fortunes across Europe, one man sought to reconcile the Heaven he revered as a good Catholic with the heavens he revealed through his telescope. </DIV><br /><DIV> </DIV><br /><DIV>With all the human drama and scientific adventure that distinguished Dava Sobel's previous book <I>Longitude,</I> <I>Galileo's Daughter</I> is an unforgettable story</DIV></FONT>

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