Categories

 > History > World

29,936 results were found

Sort by:

Famous Affinities of History
by Lyndon Orr

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Lyndon Orr was an English writer best known for his book Famous Affinities of History which provides great detail on many of the most famous romances in history including Antony and Cleopatra, Marie Antoinette and Count Fersen, and many others. A table of contents is included.
The Royal Oak
by K A Rathburn

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
3rd September 1651<br /><br />Charles II is in a fight for his life. How will he evade Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England who most burning desire is to see the young King dead?<br /><br />This is a narrative of the brutal battle waged at Worcester which heralded the last battle of the English Civil War and the incredible fortitude of the twenty-one year old King. The story will transport you hour by hour and day by day through vicious fighting, impromptu planning, astonishing providence and the heart-wrenching stories of humble people who risked life and limb to spare the monarch from execution by conducting him through an unplanned underground railroad to Fécamp France.<br /><br />You will travel the journey from Worcester to Shoreham with Charles II, Lord Wilmot, The Penderells, Jane Lane, The Whitgreaves, Juliana Coningsby, The Hydes of Heale House, Colonel Gounter and the many other loyal people who had everything to lose by aiding the fugitive Stuart, but did it anyway.<br /><br />You will experience the Kings unfailing fortitude and humour in a true tale where plan after plan fails, where the King eludes near capture, more than once, and betrayal is on the lips of anyone who was tempted by £1000. <br /><br />The grueling journey tested his spirit and made him into the King that he eventually became. A loved and merry Monarch.<br />
Convair Class VF Convoy Fighter: The Original Proposal for the XF...
by Jared Zichek

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This book presents the original proposal for the Convair Class VF Convoy Fighter of 1950, which led to the XFY-1 Pogo turboprop tailsitter naval aircraft. It was one of five submissions to the US Navy's Convoy Fighter competition, which called for a single-seat high performance fighter designed to protect convoy vessels from attack by enemy aircraft, and for vertical unassisted takeoff from, and landings on, small platform areas afloat or ashore. Every detail of the proposal is covered, including armament variations, landing gear alternatives, and an unbuilt small scale technology demonstrator. While the XFY-1 retained the original configuration of the proposal, nearly every contour was subtly changed during the type's evolution. As a bonus, a pair of Convair design studies for a vertical takeoff observation and reconnaissance tailsitter aircraft submitted to the US Army in 1955 are also included. This book features 43 images, including rare photos, detailed blueprints, contemporary illustrations, and beautiful color profiles. This is the fourth in a series of monographs covering the Navy's Convoy Fighter competition of 1950; previous volumes on the Goodyear, Martin and Northrop designs are still available from booksellers worldwide.
The Jewish Problem and its Final Solution: Modernity and Destiny
by K. David Turner

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In his 1990 book, Israeli Holocaust historian Alex Bein wrote perhaps the most succinct and profound description of Jewish victimhood, a warning ignored at our peril. <br /><br />“[A]lmost all periods of great violence, at least since the Middle Ages, have caught the Jews by surprise and found them unprepared… the persecutions began with particular severity and intensity especially when the Jews position was so secure and their relationship to their environment well ordered that there was no thought of attacks and major violence—at least not in their country, their house.”<br /><br />The Jewish Problem and its Final Solution traces two-thousand years of the history of the West’s Jewish Problem from its emergence with the birth of Christianity in the first century to its adaptation by secularism beginning in the eighteenth century as the Jewish Question. The book describes Jewish disappointment at their promised emancipation, and the backlash of western society to accepting Jewish equality; the rise of antisemitic political parties in the nineteenth century and, in the 20th century, National Socialism with its intention to achieve the final solution to the West’s millennial Jewish Problem. <br /><br />And finally, the book discusses the role of the United States in Germany’s emerging and nearly successful state program intended to achieve the final solution to the West’s Jewish Program. The book addresses troubling issues about the level and implications of popular antisemitism in the United States over those years; of Congress and administration actions resulting in the closing of America as refuge for Europe’s condemned. In 1944 three Christian senior aides to Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau, Jr. drafted an official protest to President Roosevelt regarding his discriminatory refugee policy, “The Acquiescence of this Government in the Murder of the Jews.” <br /><br />It is consoling to believe that the Holocaust is, as many scholars prefer, an event unique in History. This book describes a pathology and prejudice born of religion, a superstition which inspired centuries of anti-Jewish persecution that survives today: a two-thousand-year history that is barely concealed in the bowels of Western culture as antisemitic stereotypes. As these stereotypes were used as propaganda to enlist support for Germany’s Final Solution, they remain today in forms most of us recognize but dismiss. <br /><br />At his 2014 Rosh Hashana dinner hosted for mostly Jewish congressmen, administration officials and members of the media Vice President Biden reminded his audience, “Folks, there is no place else to go, and you understand that in your bones… There is really only one absolute guarantee, and that’s the state of Israel.” <br /><br />The threat of the Jewish Problem remains but with one difference: the Holocaust is now precedent for today. And for tomorrow.
Infiltration (Phantom Air Combat Book 6)
by David Gledhill

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The year is 1985 and the Cold War threatens to turn hot. An agent is sent to join a carrier battle group in the North Atlantic, his covert mission to help the Soviet Union to track British nuclear powered submarines as they set off to patrol the oceans. To mask his bold assignment a complex diversionary operation is launched from the decks of the aircraft carrier “Kiev”, the pride of the Red Banner Northern Fleet. The target; British military radar installations on the Scottish coastline. <br />Commanders respond by deploying Phantom fighters to a remote base in western Scotland to assist Quick Reaction Alert forces where a tense stand-off develops before unexpected events bring the two sides to the brink. Could these be the opening moves of World War 3 or will the intrepid fighter crews foil the Soviet efforts?<br />As with all his books David Gledhill takes you into the cockpit with unparalleled realism for another high octane adventure in the skies.<br />
In Russian and French Prisons (Annotated)
by P. Kropotkin

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
most of them. The arbitrary despotism of the directors of prisons had no limits, and the dreadful tales which circulated in Transbaikalia about one of them--Razghildeeff--were fully confirmed. Terrible epidemics of scurvy swept away the prisoners by hundreds each year, that a more active extraction of gold was ordered from St. Petersburg, and the underfed convicts were compelled to overwork. As to the buildings and their rotten condition, the overcrowding therein, and the filth accumulated by generations of overcrowded prisoners, the reports were really heartbreaking. No repairs would do, the whole had to undergo a thorough reform. I visited a few prisons, and could but confirm the reports. The Transbaikalian authorities insisted, therefore, on limiting the number of convicts sent to the province; they pointed out the material impossibility of providing them not only with work, but even with shelter.<br /><br />Things were no better with regard to the transport of exiles. This service was in the most deplorable c......
In The Boyhood of Lincoln (Annotated): In The Boyhood of Lincoln ...
by Hezekiah Butterworth

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
CONTENTS<br />CHAPTER PAGE<br />I.--INTRODUCED 1<br />II.--THOMAS LINCOLN'S FAMILY STORIES 17<br />III.--THE OLD BLACKSMITH'S SHOP AND THE MERRY STORY-TELLERS 33<br />IV.--A BOY WITH A HEART 55<br />V.--JASPER COBBLES FOR AUNT OLIVE.--HER QUEER STORIES 62<br />VI.--JASPER GIVES AN ACCOUNT OF HIS VISIT TO BLACK HAWK.--AUNT INDIANA'S WIG 75<br />VII.--THE EXAMINATION AT CRAWFORD'S SCHOOL 87<br />VIII.--THE PARABLE PREACHES IN THE WILDERNESS 100<br />IX.--AUNT INDIANA'S PROPHECIES 108<br />X.--THE INDIAN RUNNER 115<br />XI.--THE CABIN NEAR CHICAGO 122<br />XII.--THE WHITE INDIAN OF CHICAGO 133<br />XIII.--LAFAYETTE AT KASKASKIA.--THE STATELY MINUET 140<br />XIV.--WAUBENO AND YOUNG LINCOLN 156<br />XV.--THE DEBATING SCHOOL 166<br />XVI.--THE SCHOOL THAT MADE LINCOLN PRESIDENT 177<br />XVII.--THOMAS LINCOLN MOVES 184<br />XVIII.--MAIN-POGUE 196<br />XIX.--THE FOREST COLLEGE 202<br />XX.--MAKING LINCOLN A "SON OF MALTA" 214<br />XXI.--PRAIRIE ISLAND 218<br />XXII.--THE INDIAN PLOT 229<br />XXIII.--FOR LINCOLN'S SAKE 236<br />XXIV.--"OUR LINCOLN IS THE MAN" 251<br />XXV.--AT THE LAST 265<br /><br />LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS<br />FACING PAGE<br />The rescue Frontispiece<br />The Tunker school-master's class in manners 14<br />Lines written by Lincoln on the leaf of his school-book 22<br />Story-telling at the smithy 35<br />The home of Abraham Lincoln when in his tenth year 55<br />Aunt Olive's wedding 68<br />Abraham as a peace-maker 90<br />Black Hawk tells the story of Waubeno 118<br />A queer place to write poetry 160<br />Sarah Bush Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln's step-mother 217<br />The approach of the mysterious Indian 240<br />The Lincoln family record 250<br />Abraham Lincoln, the man 262<br /><br />IN THE BOYHOOD OF LINCOLN.(Annotated)<br />CHAPTER I.<br />INTRODUCED.<br />"Boy, are there any schools in these parts?"<br />"Crawford's."<br />"And who, my boy, is Crawford?"<br />"The schoolmaster, don't yer know? He's great on thrashing--on thrashing--and--and he knows everything. Everybody in these parts has heard of Crawford. He's great."<br />"That is all very extraordinary. 'Great on thrashing, and knows everything.' Very extraordinary! Do you raise much wheat in these parts?"<br />"He don't thrash wheat, mister. Old Dennis and young Dennis do that with their thrashing-flails."<br />"But what does he thrash, my boy--what does he thrash?"<br />"He just thrashes boys, don't you know."<br />"Extraordinary--very extraordinary. He thrashes boys."<br />"And teaches 'em their manners. He teaches manners, Crawford does. Didn't you never hear of Crawford? You must be a stranger in these parts."<br />"Yes, I am a stranger in Indiana. I have been following the timber along the creek, and looking out on the prairie islands. This is a beautiful country. Nature has covered it with grasses and flowers, and the bees will swarm here some day; I see them now; the air is all bright with them, my boy."<br />"I don't see any bees; it isn't the time of year for 'em. Do you cobble?"<br />"You don't quite understand me. I was speaking spiritually. Yes, I cobble to pay my way. Yes, my boy."<br />"Do you preach?"<br />"Yes, and teach the higher branches--like Crawford. He teaches the higher branches, does he not?"<br />"Don't make any odds where he gets 'em. I didn't know that he used the higher branches. He just cuts a stick anywhere, and goes at 'em, he does."<br />"You do not comprehend me, my boy. I teach the higher branches in new schools--Latin and singing. I do not use the higher branches of the trees."<br />"Latin! Then you must be a wizard."<br />"No, no, my boy. I am one of the Brethren--called. My new name is Jasper. I chose that name because I needed polishing. Do you see? Well, the Lord is doing his work, polishing me, and I shall shine by and by. 'They that turn many to righteousness shall shine like the stars of heaven.' They call me the Parable."<br />"Then you be a Tunker?"<br />"I am one of the wandering Brethren that they call 'Tunkers.'"<br />"You preach for nothin'? They do."<br />"Yes, my boy; the Word is free."<br />"Then who pays you?"<br />"My soul."<br />"And you teach for nothin', too, do ye?"<br />"Yes, my boy. Knowledge is free."<br />"Then who pays you?"<br />"It all comes back to me. He that teaches is taught."<br />.....
The Huguenots in France (Annotated)
by Samuel Smiles

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
CONTENTS.<br />THE HUGUENOTS IN FRANCE AFTER THE REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF NANTES.<br />CHAPTER PAGE<br />I. REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF NANTES........................... 1<br />II. EFFECTS OF THE REVOCATION--CHURCH IN THE DESERT............ 12<br />III. CLAUDE BROUSSON, THE HUGUENOT ADVOCATE..................... 30<br />IV. CLAUDE BROUSSON, PASTOR AND MARTYR......................... 50<br />V. OUTBREAK IN LANGUEDOC...................................... 75<br />VI. INSURRECTION OF THE CAMISARDS.............................. 99<br />VII. EXPLOITS OF CAVALIER...................................... 130<br />VIII. END OF THE CAMISARD INSURRECTION.......................... 166<br />IX. GALLEY-SLAVES FOR THE FAITH............................... 190<br />X. ANTOINE COURT............................................. 205<br />XI. REORGANIZATION OF THE CHURCH IN THE DESERT................ 218<br />XII. THE CHURCH IN THE DESERT--PAUL RABAUT..................... 235<br />XIII. END OF THE PERSECUTIONS--THE FRENCH REVOLUTION............ 253<br />MEMOIRS OF DISTINGUISHED HUGUENOT REFUGEES.<br />I. STORY OF SAMUEL DE PÉCHELS................................ 285<br />II. CAPTAIN RAPIN, AUTHOR OF THE "HISTORY OF ENGLAND"......... 316<br />III. CAPTAIN RIOU, R.N......................................... 368<br />A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY OF THE VAUDOIS.<br />I. INTRODUCTORY--EARLY PERSECUTIONS OF THE VAUDOIS........... 383<br />II. THE VALLEY OF THE ROMANCHE--BRIANÇON...................... 401<br />III. VAL LOUISE--HISTORY OF FELIX NEFF......................... 420<br />IV. THE VAUDOIS MOUNTAIN-REFUGE OF DORMILHOUSE................ 437<br />V. GUILLESTRE AND THE VALLEY OF QUEYRAS...................... 455<br />VI. THE VALLEY OF THE PELICE -- LA TOUR -- ANGROGNA -- THE PRA DE TOUR............................................... 472<br />VII. THE GLORIOUS RETURN: AN EPISODE IN THE HISTORY OF THE ITALIAN VAUDOIS........................................... 493<br />MAPS.<br />PAGE<br />THE COUNTRY OF THE CEVENNES...................................... 98<br />"THE COUNTRY OF FELIX NEFF" (Dauphiny).......................... 382<br />THE VALLEY OF LUSERNE........................................... 472<br /><br />PREFACE.<br />In preparing this edition for the press, I have ventured to add three short memoirs of distinguished Huguenot Refugees and their descendants.<br />Though the greatest number of Huguenots banished from France at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes were merchants and manufacturers, who transferred their skill and arts to England, which was not then a manufacturing country; a large number of nobles and gentry emigrated to this and other countries, leaving their possessions to be confiscated by the French king.<br />The greater number of the nobles entered the armies of the countries in which they took refuge. In Holland, they joined the army of the Prince of Orange, afterwards William III., King of England. After driving the armies of Louis XIV. out of Ireland, they met the French at Ramilies, Blenheim, and Malplacquet, and other battles in the Low Countries. A Huguenot engineer directed the operations at the siege of Namur, which ended in its capture. Another conducted the siege of Lille, which was also taken.<br />But perhaps the greatest number of Huguenot nobles entered the Prussian service. Their descendants revisited France on more than one occasion. They overran the northern and eastern parts of France in 1814 and 1815; and last of all they vanquished the descendants of their former persecutors at Sedan in 1870. Sedan was, prior to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, the renowned seat of Protestant learning; while now it is known as the scene of the greatest military catastrophe which has occurred in modern history.<br />The Prime Minister of France, M. Jules Simon, not long ago recorded the fateful effects of Louis XIV.'s religious intolerance. In discussing the perpetual ecclesiastical questions which still disturb France, he recalled the fact that not less than eighty of the ....
The Unblazed Trail: How Holocaust Survivors and Perpetrators Esca...
by David Weiss

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This is the ideal Holocaust Education book for high school students and adult learners. It comes with comprehension questions that are split into various categories. Some of the questions simply need to be searched for and found while others require that the reader make connections to other world events. Another set of questions require 'on your own' thinking. The author is a teacher, the grandson of four Holocaust Survivors and has written five previous Holocaust books. "The Unblazed Trail" is sure to educate and enlighten readers and inspire further thinking about these topics.<br /><br /> Europe was, without question, the epicenter of world events and politics in the 1930's and 1940's. As tensions began to build to a scary, fevered pitch, most Jews would have loved to leave Europe for safer surroundings. Unfortunately leaving Europe was very, very difficult and finding a place to take them in was nearly impossible. Nations required Jews to give up everything they had, making leaving impossible. How could they afford to leave if they had nothing? Then there was the challenge of finding a safe-haven. Almost nobody wanted to accept Europe's Jews. Most nations weren't eager to welcome any immigrants, but especially Jews. Anti-Semitic sentiment was a worldwide phenomenon (and still is). People in various parts of the world believed that Jews were greedy and had diseases. Even the Allied nations, the United States, Canada and England had strong prejudices and were not open to the idea of accepting Jewish refugees. There was, however, an understanding that the world's nations should accept a token number of Jewish refugees. Grudgingly many nations did agree to accept small numbers of Jews. Only the Dominican Republic wanted a very large number of refugees. They felt that this was a good way to turn people's attention away from their own misbehavior. Unfortunately the world's oceans became very dangerous and an incredibly small percentage of European Jews were able to reach other continents. For this reason, even the small quotas established by countries like Haiti and Jamaica could not be met. Every rescue, however, is important. These countries played a small but important role. For some individual Jews, they played a huge, life-saving role. This section of the book also educates the reader about the history of Judaism in each country and the state of present-day Jewish life in that country. Having strong Jewish communities worldwide is extremely beneficial and important. It is also important that we "Never Forget" the entire history of the Holocaust including what happened in these remote Holocaust safe-havens.<br /><br />The second part of this book details how Nazi War Criminals escaped Europe after the war. Some of these killers ended up being caught and brought to justice and some of them did not. The readers learns about the role that a Vatican Bishop played in helping Nazis escape and why so many Nazis ended up in Argentina. Many Nazis used aliases throughout their post-war life but some did not. One thing that they all did have in common is the lack of any feeling of remorse. Some of the names in this book are familiar and some are lesser known. Many were actually in the custody of the United States, England or France, only to be let free or escape. All of these Nazi War Criminals, however, have a maddening, destructive legacy. This book is sure to get the reader thinking and enrich their knowledge of some lesser known aspects of the Holocaust.
The History of the Telephone (Annotated)
by Herbert N. Casson

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
CONTENTS<br /><br />CHAPTER I<br />THE BIRTH OF THE TELEPHONE<br />II THE BUILDING OF THE BUSINESS<br />III THE HOLDING OF THE BUSINESS<br />IV THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ART<br />V THE EXPANSION OF THE BUSINESS<br />VI NOTABLE USERS OF THE TELEPHONE<br />VII THE TELEPHONE AND NATIONAL EFFICIENCY<br />VIII THE TELEPHONE IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES<br />IX THE FUTURE OF THE TELEPHONE<br /><br />THE HISTORY OF THE TELEPHONE<br /><br />CHAPTER I<br />THE BIRTH OF THE TELEPHONE<br />In that somewhat distant year 1875, when the telegraph and the Atlantic cable were the most wonderful things in the world, a tall young professor of elocution was desperately busy in a noisy machine-shop that stood in one of the narrow streets of Boston, not far from Scollay Square. It was a very hot afternoon in June, but the young professor had forgotten the heat and the grime of the workshop. He was wholly absorbed in the making of a nondescript machine, a sort of crude harmonica with a clock-spring reed, a magnet, and a wire. It was a most absurd toy in appearance. It was unlike any other thing that had ever been made in any country. The young professor had been toiling over it for three years and it had constantly baffled him, until, on this hot afternoon in June, 1875, he heard an almost inaudible sound--a faint TWANG--come from the machine itself.<br />For an instant he was stunned. He had been expecting just such a sound for several months, but it came so suddenly as to give him the sensation of surprise. His eyes blazed with delight, and he sprang in a passion of eagerness to an adjoining room in which stood a young mechanic who was assisting him.<br />"Snap that reed again, Watson," cried the apparently irrational young professor. There was one of the odd-looking machines in each room, so it appears, and the two were connected by an electric wire. Watson had snapped the reed on one of the machines and the professor had heard from the other machine exactly the same sound. It was no more than the gentle TWANG of a clock-spring; but it was the first time in the history of the world that a complete sound had been carried along a wire, reproduced perfectly at the other end, and heard by an expert in acoustics.<br />That twang of the clock-spring was the first tiny cry of the newborn telephone, uttered in the clanging din of a machine-shop and happily heard by a man whose ear had been trained to recognize the strange voice of the little newcomer. There, amidst flying belts and jarring wheels, the baby telephone was born, as feeble and helpless as any other baby, and "with no language but a cry."<br />The professor-inventor, who had thus rescued the tiny foundling of science, was a young Scottish American. His name, now known as widely as the telephone itself, was Alexander Graham Bell. He was a teacher of acoustics and a student of electricity, possibly the only man in his generation who was able to focus a knowledge of both subjects upon the problem of the telephone. To other men that exceedingly faint sound would have been as inaudible as silence itself; but to Bell it was a thunder-clap. It was a dream come true. It was an impossible thing which had in a flash become so easy that he could scarcely believe it. Here, without the use of a battery, with no more electric current than that made by a couple of magnets, all the waves of a sound had been carried along a wire and changed back to sound at the farther end. It was absurd. It was incredible. It was something which neither wire nor electricity had been known to do before. But it was true.<br />No discovery has ever been less accidental. It was the last link of a long chain of discoveries. It was the result of a persistent and deliberate search. Already, for half a year or longer, Bell had known the correct theory of the telephone; but he had not realized that the feeble undulatory current generated by a magnet was strong enough for the transmission of speech. He had been taught <br />.....

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

Kind Reader Monthly Drawing (March 2017)

Congratulations to February 2017's winner Henry H. of New York, USA.