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The Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I: The History and ...
by Charles River Editors

Language

English

Pages

71

Publication Date

April 25, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
*Includes pictures<br />*Includes accounts of the fighting <br />*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading<br />*Includes a table of contents<br /><br />Most books and documentaries about the First World War focus on the carnage of the Western Front, where Germany faced off against France, the British Empire, and their allies in a grueling slugfest that wasted millions of lives. The shattered landscape of the trenches has become symbolic of the war as a whole, and it is this experience that everyone associates with World War I, but that front was not the only experience. There was the more mobile Eastern Front, as well as mountain warfare in the Alps and scattered fighting in Africa and the Far East. <br /><br />There was also the Middle Eastern Front, in both the Levant and Mesopotamia, which captured the imagination of the European public. There, the British and their allies fought the Ottoman Turkish Empire under harsh desert conditions hundreds of miles from home, struggling for possession of places most people only knew from the Bible and the Koran.<br /><br />The campaign to protect British Egypt from Turkish invasion was especially important to the Allied war effort. The Turks sought to cut the Suez Canal, a vital supply route connecting the Mediterranean with British colonies in East Africa and India and Britain’s allies in Australia and New Zealand. Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany quipped that the canal was the “jugular vein of the British Empire.”<br /><br />Egypt at the outbreak of war was still nominally part of the Ottoman Empire, though British troops had been there since 1882, and the British ruled in all but name, with an Egyptian khedive as the supposed head of state. When the Ottoman Empire entered the war in late October of 1914, the British were quick to make Egypt a protectorate. With the Ottomans declaring jihad, or “holy war,” against the Allies and calling for all Muslims to rise up, the British quickly removed Khedive Abbas Il Helmi, who was pro-German, and replaced him with the more tractable Hussein Kamel.<br /><br />It wasn’t long into the campaign before the men had to march in that heat, pushing the Turks out of the Sinai and continuing into Palestine. The Turks suffered greatly in their marches as they prepared to attack Egypt, and the British would soon learn to appreciate what their enemies had been through. Massey noted, “There was a time when six miles a day in marching order was considered the utmost limit for infantry in the eastern desert. One day, when travelling light, during the battle of Romani, I tramped twelve miles and could get nobody to believe me. At the end of it I chanced upon the East Lancashire troops at Canterbury Siding, and could not move for two hours. Yet I have been a walker and runner from my youth up. I was fresher after a London to Brighton walk [about 50 miles], untrained, than at the finish of that desert twelve miles. And I was not carrying a sixth of the weight of the foot-sloggers. The fatigue of marching with the sun overhead was no light trial.” For the men of the Allied and Ottoman armies, the land was as fearsome of an enemy as the men opposing them.<br /><br />The Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I: The History and Legacy of the British Empire’s Victory Over the Ottoman Empire in the Middle East examines the history of this crucial but often overlooked campaign. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the campaign like never before.
An Unexpected War (Tales of an Inconvenient War Book 2)
by Emery Buxton

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

April 25, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In 1949, First Lieutenant Everett Klehn arrives in San Francisco on his way to Tokyo to take up a position as Intelligence analyst at SCAP (Supreme Commander Allied Powers) Headquarters. But his orders are altered so that he leads a raucous group of Airborne trainees to their new post on Okinawa and ends up on temporary duty as a platoon leader for eight weeks, where he forms a bond with Sergeant Witherspoon, known as ‘Spoon’.<br />SCAP ultimately calls for him to head to Tokyo where he is put in an Intelligence unit headed by Captain Barrows, an overbearing and arrogant leader, who takes the work of his analysts and passes it off as his own. Through translating duties and Intelligence work Everett watches the drama of two antagonistic Koreas head inexorably toward war.
Notorious Nazi Women (The Eclectic Collection Book 1)
by Stewart Andel

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Some things in life go unnoticed. The fact that there were ruthless, vicious and vindictive female Nazi guards is one of them. This new title from author Stewart Andel hopes to address that issue and open up the stories behind the evil Nazi plague that were the "Notorious Nazi Women". Hear the stories of "The Bitch of Buchenwald", or the "Beautiful Beast" inside this first volume of The Eclectic Collection.
A Diary from Dixie: a Lady's Illustrated Account of the Confedera...
by Mary Boykin Chesnut

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 28, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A singular view from a remarkable woman<br />This is a famous book. Any source work is worthy and accounts of the American Civil War from the female perspective are not so numerous, so all of them should be valued. Nevertheless, there is an inevitable order to everything and Mary Chesnut's diary is of the highest rank. Undoubtedly Mary Chesnut viewed the events of her time from a position of privilege. She was, in many respects, the archetypal southern lady. She was born on a South Carolina plantation, the daughter of a U. S Senator. She was highly educated, spoke several languages and married a U. S. Senator who became a Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army. Her family connections meant she knew the principal characters of her time well. They included Jefferson Davis, John Bell Hood, Wade Hampton and many other important figures and their families in Confederate society, government and the military. She was in a position to travel to the field of engagement. Yet despite all these advantages, Mary Chesnut still exceptional and that was entirely due to her character and intellect. She was a strong minded, passionate woman in advance of her time and was disinclined to accept anything at face value—including the basic tenants upon which her new country was founded. She was an able authoress and has left posterity a vibrant, intimate, thoughtful, detailed, personable and entertaining chronicle of her life and times. This is essential Civil War reading and highly recommended.
Pens, Plows, & Gunpowder: The Collected Works of J.P. Irvine
by J.P. Irvine

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 28, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
An average government clerk presented a poem to President Ulysses S. Grant and a crowd of 10,000 people. Then J.P. Irvine and his words faded into history. Dustin Renwick sifted through more than 20,000 pages of microfilm to uncover this forgotten Civil War poet’s work that illuminates a changing country.<br /><br />From the construction of the transcontinental railroad to the streets of the nation’s capital, Irvine offers an eye-witness view of America in the late 1800s told through rhyme and sharp commentary. Pens, Plows, & Gunpowder gathers Irvine’s entire body of writing in one place for the first time ever, including the poems from his lone book, The Green Leaf and the Gray.
Free State of Jones: the True Story
by Kathleen Shelby Boyett

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 29, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"The man held his shotgun close to his body as he darted through the woods. Branches and vines slapped at his face and arms, leaving small cuts in their wake. His heart was pounding, and his breath came in short gasps, barely able to keep up with the pace of his legs, which churned at the top speed the dense woods would allow. He could hear the bloodhounds barking behind him. They seemed to be getting closer..."<br />For a number of years now, the hunt has been on to find out the real truth about Newt Knight and his compatriots, and about the Free State of Jones. Who was Newt Knight – a cowardly deserter and a murderer, or a hero who stood up for his beliefs? As with all long-told stories, the truth lies somewhere between these two extremes. Come discover the truth about Newt's story from all the available new evidence.
Tales from a Mountain City: A Vietnam War memoir
by Quynh Dao

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Tales from a Mountain City is a blend of history and memoir told by a young Vietnamese girl growing up during the last years of the war and the communist regime. This is a poignant account of the innocence of a child, the innocence of a people, shattered again and again by the cruel tides of power and dogma, clinging tenaciously to their traditions, their home provinces, their hometowns, until the sheer pervasiveness of a communist value system drives them to suicide or exile. Indirectly, this story raises many questions on nationalism and qualities of power, freedom and independence, human rights and human nature.</p>
Plotting Power: Strategy in the Eighteenth Century
by Jeremy Black

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

April 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<P>Military strategy takes place as much on broad national and international stages as on battlefields. In a brilliant reimagining of the impetus and scope of eighteenth-century warfare, historian Jeremy Black takes us far and wide, from the battlefields and global maneuvers in North America and Europe to the military machinations and plotting of such Asian powers as China, Japan, Burma, Vietnam, and Siam. Europeans coined the term "strategy" only two centuries ago, but strategy as a concept has been practiced globally throughout history. Taking issue with traditional military historians, Black argues persuasively that strategy was as much political as battlefield tactics and that plotting power did not always involve outright warfare but also global considerations of alliance building, trade agreements, and intimidation.</P>
The Dragonflies
by Robert Jackson

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>“The dream of flight is as old as the mind of man.”</h2><br /><br />So begins Robert Jackson’s incredible book on the history of helicopters.<br /><br />It is an epic tale that begins in the 4th Century B.C. and travels to ancient Greek physicists and great men like Da Vinci. Dreams of fantastical flying creations that either soared magnificently or crashed to the ground. Their designs evolved until, centuries later, the helicopter's potential was recognised by the military.<br /><br />In combat, the helicopter's story goes from the early dreams of flight to daring searches and rescue missions. <br /><br />Complex and compelling, <em>The Dragonflies</em> explores man’s relationship with flight in an extraordinary way.<br /><br /><b>Robert Jackson</b> was born in 1941 in the North Yorkshire village of Melsonby. A former pilot and navigation instructor, his active involvement with aviation lasted many years. Following his retirement from the RAFVR in 1977 as a squadron leader, he became a full-time aviation writer and aerospace correspondent and lectured extensively on strategic issues. He speaks five languages, including Russian, and has written more than forty nonfiction works on military affairs. He is also the author of the popular Yeoman and SAS fiction series.
The Limit: Ejection Over the Desert
by Robert Prest

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

May 04, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>‘A brilliantly written account of a fighter pilot’s brush with death.’ Rowland White, author of <i>Vulcan 607</i></b><p><br />Air Combat. To a fighter pilot it's the sport of kings. A jet-fuelled, high stakes game of three-dimensional chess that offers the ultimate test of man and machine. Skill, aggression, intelligence and lightning reflexes give you the edge. But it's easy to push too hard. The Limit is the gripping story of a single mission over the desert. For Jaguar pilot Robert Prest, this aerial duel very nearly proved to be his last…</p><p><br /><b>Note: this is not a full-length book. </b></p><p><br /><b>Robert Prest</b> was born in 1949 and educated at Downside School. He obtained a flying scholarship and joined the RAF in 1968. After basic training on Jet Provosts and advanced training on Gnats and Hunters, he graduated from the Phantom OCU (Operational Conversion Unit) in 1971. His first operational posting was to 43 Squadron at Leuchars. He returned to Coningsby for the QWI (Qualified Weapons Instructor) course, after which he completed 3 years on the OCU staff, where his speciality was teaching Air Combat Tactics. Following tours with 92 and 23 Squadrons, he left the RAF in 1980. The next five years were spent flying Jaguars in Oman with SOAF (Sultan of Oman’s Air Force) and Nigeria (with British Aerospace Jaguar Training team). That marked the end of his military flying. Since then, he has pursued a civil aviation career with various airlines in the Middle and Far East, flying a variety of Boeing and Airbus aircraft, from the B737 and B767 to the A330/340 and B747, finally retiring on the B777. In retirement, he still maintains a passion for aviation, albeit in the slightly slower form of floatplanes. He is the author of <i>F-4 Phantom</i>, a memoir of his career in the RAF.<br /></p>

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