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Killing the SS: The Hunt for the Worst War Criminals in History (...
by , Martin Dugard

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

October 09, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Confronting Nazi evil is the subject of the latest installment in the mega-bestselling <i>Killing</i> series</b></p><p>As the true horrors of the Third Reich began to be exposed immediately after World War II, the Nazi war criminals who committed genocide went on the run. A few were swiftly caught, including the notorious SS leader, Heinrich Himmler. Others, however, evaded capture through a sophisticated Nazi organization designed to hide them. Among those war criminals were Josef Mengele, the “Angel of Death” who performed hideous medical experiments at Auschwitz; Martin Bormann, Hitler’s brutal personal secretary; Klaus Barbie, the cruel "Butcher of Lyon"; and perhaps the most awful Nazi of all: Adolf Eichmann.</p><p><i>Killing the SS</i> is the epic saga of the espionage and daring waged by self-styled "Nazi hunters." This determined and disparate group included a French husband and wife team, an American lawyer who served in the army on D-Day, a German prosecutor who had signed an oath to the Nazi Party, Israeli Mossad agents, and a death camp survivor. Over decades, these men and women scoured the world, tracking down the SS fugitives and bringing them to justice, which often meant death.</p><p>Written in the fast-paced style of the <i>Killing</i> series, <i>Killing the SS</i> will educate and stun the reader. </p><p>The final chapter is truly shocking.</p>
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of th...
by David Grann

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

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Customer Reviews
<b>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   -  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST <br /><br />"Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." <b>—</b>Dave Eggers, <i>New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017<br /><br />Named a best book of the year by <i>Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, </i>NPR's Maureen Corrigan<i>, </i>NPR's "On Point,"<i> Vogue</i>, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, <i>Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's </i>"Ultimate Best Books<i>," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus,</i> Slate.com<i> </i>and</b><i><b> Book Browse</b><br /></i><b><i><br /></i>From <i>New Yorker</i> staff writer David Grann, #1 <i>New York Times</i> best-selling author of <i>The Lost City of Z,</i> a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history</b><br />        <br />In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.<br />       Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. <br />       In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. <br />       In <i>Killers of the Flower Moon, </i>David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i> is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger
by Rebecca Traister

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>***<i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER***</b><BR> <BR><b>“In a year when issues of gender and sexuality dominated the national conversation, no one shaped that exchange more than Rebecca Traister. Her wise and provocative columns helped make sense of a cultural transformation.”—National Magazine Award Citation, 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“The most brilliant voice on feminism in this country.”—Anne Lamott, author of <i>Bird by Bird</i></b><BR> <BR><b>From Rebecca Traister, the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>All the Single Ladies </i>comes a vital, incisive exploration into the transformative power of female anger and its ability to transcend into a political movement. </b><BR><BR>In the year 2018, it seems as if women’s anger has suddenly erupted into the public conversation. But long before Pantsuit Nation, before the Women’s March, and before the #MeToo movement, women’s anger was not only politically catalytic—but politically problematic. The story of female fury and its cultural significance demonstrates the long history of bitter resentment that has enshrouded women’s slow rise to political power in America, as well as the ways that anger is received when it comes from women as opposed to when it comes from men.<BR> <BR> With eloquence and fervor, Rebecca tracks the history of female anger as political fuel—from suffragettes marching on the White House to office workers vacating their buildings after Clarence Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court. Here Traister explores women’s anger at both men and other women; anger between ideological allies and foes; the varied ways anger is perceived based on its owner; as well as the history of caricaturing and delegitimizing female anger; and the way women’s collective fury has become transformative political fuel—as is most certainly occurring today. She deconstructs society’s (and the media’s) condemnation of female emotion (notably, rage) and the impact of their resulting repercussions.<BR> <BR> Highlighting a double standard perpetuated against women by all sexes, and its disastrous, stultifying effect, Traister’s latest is timely and crucial. It offers a glimpse into the galvanizing force of women’s collective anger, which, when harnessed, can change history.
The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels
by Jon Meacham

Language

English

Pages

372

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jon Meacham helps us understand the present moment in American politics and life by looking back at critical times in our history when hope overcame division and fear.</b><br /><br /> Our current climate of partisan fury is not new, and in <i>The Soul of America</i> Meacham shows us how what Abraham Lincoln called the “better angels of our nature” have repeatedly won the day. Painting surprising portraits of Lincoln and other presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, and Lyndon B. Johnson, and illuminating the courage of such influential citizen activists as Martin Luther King, Jr., early suffragettes Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt, civil rights pioneers Rosa Parks and John Lewis, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Army-McCarthy hearings lawyer Joseph N. Welch, Meacham brings vividly to life turning points in American history. He writes about the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the birth of the Lost Cause; the backlash against immigrants in the First World War and the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s; the fight for women’s rights; the demagoguery of Huey Long and Father Coughlin and the isolationist work of America First in the years before World War II; the anti-Communist witch-hunts led by Senator Joseph McCarthy; and Lyndon Johnson’s crusade against Jim Crow. Each of these dramatic hours in our national life have been shaped by the contest to lead the country to look forward rather than back, to assert hope over fear—a struggle that continues even now.<br /><br />While the American story has not always—or even often—been heroic, we have been sustained by a belief in progress even in the gloomiest of times. In this inspiring book, Meacham reassures us, “The good news is that we have come through such darkness before”—as, time and again, Lincoln’s better angels have found a way to prevail.<br /><b><br />Praise for <i>The Soul of America</i></b><br /><br />“Appalled by the ascendancy of Donald J. Trump, and shaken by the deadly white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville in 2017, Meacham returns to other moments in our history when fear and division seemed rampant. He wants to remind us that the current political turmoil is not unprecedented, that as a nation we have survived times worse than this. . . . Meacham tries to summon the better angels by looking back at when America truly has been great. He is effective as ever at writing history for a broad readership.”<b>—<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /><br />“This is a brilliant, fascinating, timely, and above all profoundly important book.”<b>—Walter Isaacson</b>
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American ...
by Dee Brown

Language

English

Pages

482

Publication Date

October 23, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The “fascinating” #1 <I>New York Times</I> bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (<I>The Wall Street Journal</I>).</B></DIV><DIV><BR /> First published in 1970, <I>Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee</I> generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture.</DIV><DIV> </DIV><DIV>Forcefully written and meticulously researched, <I>Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee</I> inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won.</DIV><DIV> </DIV><DIV>This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.</DIV>
The Secrets of the Notebook: A Woman's Quest to Uncover Her Royal...
by Eve Haas

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

October 01, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>“The beautiful owner of this book is dearer to me than my life – August your protector.” This one sentence was the key to a mystery involving some of the greatest and most infamous figures in European history, from Frederick the Great to Napoleon and Hitler—and solved by the author of this book.<BR><p>Eve Haas is the daughter of a German Jewish family that took refuge in London after Hitler came to power. Following a terrifying air raid in the blitz, her father revealed the family secret, that her great-great grandmother Emilie was married to a Prussian prince. He then showed her the treasured leather-bound notebook inscribed to Emilie by the prince. Her parents were reluctant to learn more, but later in life, when Eve was married and inherited the diary, she became obsessed with proving this birthright. <I>The Secrets of the Notebook</I> tells how she follows the clues, from experts on European royalty in London to archives in West Germany and then, under threat of being arrested as a spy by the Communist regime, to an archive in East Germany that had never before opened its doors to the West. What she unearths is a love story set against the upheaval of the Napoleonic wars and the antiSemitism of the Prussian court, and a ruse that both protected Emilie’s daughter and probably condemned her granddaughter—Eve’s beloved grandmother, Anna—to death in the Nazi camps.</p><p>When first published in the UK, <I>The Secrets of the Notebook</I> was an <I>Irish Times </I>bestseller. A movie based on the book is in production. </p></div>
White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America
by Nancy Isenberg

Language

English

Pages

476

Publication Date

June 21, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>The New York Times</i> bestseller <br /><b>A <i>New York Times </i>Notable and Critics’ Top Book of 2016<br />Longlisted for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction<br />One of NPR's 10 Best Books Of 2016 Faced Tough Topics Head On<br />NPR's Book Concierge Guide To 2016’s Great Reads<br />San Francisco Chronicle's Best of 2016: 100 recommended books<br />A <i>Washington Post</i> Notable Nonfiction Book of 2016<br />Globe & Mail 100 Best of 2016<br /></b><br /><b>“</b>Formidable and truth-dealing . . . necessary.<b>”</b> <b>—</b><i>The New York Times<br /><br /></i>“This eye-opening investigation into our country’s entrenched social hierarchy is acutely relevant.”<b> <b>—<i>O Magazine</i></b></b><i><br /></i> <br /><b>In her groundbreaking  bestselling history of the class system in America, Nancy Isenberg </b>upends history as we know it by taking on our comforting myths about equality and uncovering the crucial legacy of the ever-present, always embarrassing—if occasionally entertaining—poor white trash.</b><br />  <br /> “When you turn an election into a three-ring circus, there’s always a chance that the dancing bear will win,” says Isenberg of the political climate surrounding Sarah Palin. And we recognize how right she is today. Yet the voters who boosted Trump all the way to the White House have been a permanent part of our American fabric, argues Isenberg.<br /><br /> The wretched and landless poor have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement to today's hillbillies. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds.<br />  <br /> Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over four hundred years, Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. Reconstruction pitted poor white trash against newly freed slaves, which factored in the rise of eugenics–-a widely popular movement embraced by Theodore Roosevelt that targeted poor whites for sterilization. These poor were at the heart of New Deal reforms and LBJ’s Great Society; they haunt us in reality TV shows like <i>Here Comes Honey Boo Boo </i>and <i>Duck Dynasty. </i>Marginalized as a class, white trash have always been at or near the center of major political debates over the character of the American identity.<br /> <i> </i><br /> We acknowledge racial injustice as an ugly stain on our nation’s history. With Isenberg’s landmark book, we will have to face the truth about the enduring, malevolent nature of class as well.
A Treasury of Royal Scandals: The Shocking True Stories History's...
by Michael Farquhar

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

May 01, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From Nero's nagging mother (whom he found especially annoying after taking her as his lover) to Catherine's stable of studs (not of the equine variety), here is a wickedly delightful look at the most scandalous royal doings you never learned about in history class.<br /><br /> Gleeful, naughty, sometimes perverted-like so many of the crowned heads themselves-<b>A Treasury of Royal Scandals</b> presents the best (the worst?) of royal misbehavior through the ages. From ancient Rome to Edwardian England, from the lavish rooms of Versailles to the dankest corners of the Bastille, the great royals of Europe have excelled at savage parenting, deadly rivalry, pathological lust, and meeting death with the utmost indignity-or just very bad luck.
Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill
by Sonia Purnell

Language

English

Pages

436

Publication Date

October 27, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>A long over-due tribute to the extraordinary woman who was Winston Churchill’s closest confidante, fiercest critic and shrewdest advisor that captures the intimate dynamic of one of history’s most fateful marriages, as seen on <i>The Crown</i> and <i>Darkest Hour</i>—“Engrossing…the first formal biography of a woman who has heretofore been relegated to the sidelines.”</b> <b><i>–The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> Late in life, Winston Churchill claimed that victory in the Second World War would have been “impossible” without the woman who stood by his side for fifty-seven turbulent years. Why, then, do we know so little about her? In this landmark biography, a finalist for the Plutarch prize, Sonia Purnell finally gives Clementine Churchill her due. <br /><br />Born into impecunious aristocracy, the young Clementine Hozier was the target of cruel snobbery. Many wondered why Winston married her, when the prime minister’s daughter was desperate for his attention. Yet their marriage proved to be an exceptional partnership. "You know,"Winston confided to FDR, "I tell Clemmie everything." <br />  <br /> Through the ups and downs of his tumultuous career, in the tense days when he stood against Chamberlain and the many months when he helped inspire his fellow countrymen and women to keep strong and carry on, Clementine made her husband’s career her mission, at the expense of her family, her health and, fatefully, of her children. Any real consideration of Winston Churchill is incomplete without an understanding of their relationship. <i>Clementine</i> is both the first real biography of this remarkable woman and a fascinating look inside their private world.<br />  <br /> <b>"Sonia Purnell has at long last given Clementine Churchill the biography she deserves. Sensitive yet clear-eyed, <i>Clementine</i> tells the fascinating story of a complex woman struggling to maintain her own identity while serving as the conscience and principal adviser to one of the most important figures in history. I was enthralled all the way through." –Lynn Olson, bestselling author of <i>Citizens of London</i> </b><br /><br /></p>
Man's Search for Meaning
by Viktor E. Frankl

Language

English

Pages

188

Publication Date

June 01, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.<br /><br />At the time of Frankl's death in 1997, <i>Man's Search for Meaning</i> had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a "book that made a difference in your life" found <i>Man's Search for Meaning</i> among the ten most influential books in America.

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