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Shortest Way Home: One Mayor's Challenge and a Model for America'...
by Pete Buttigieg

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>NEW YORK TIMES</em> BESTSELLER<br /><br />A mayor’s inspirational story of a Midwest city that has become nothing less than a blueprint for the future of American renewal.</strong></p><br /><p>Once described by the <em>Washington Post</em> as “the most interesting mayor you’ve never heard of,” Pete Buttigieg, the thirty-seven-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has now emerged as one of the nation’s most visionary politicians. With soaring prose that celebrates a resurgent American Midwest, <em>Shortest Way Home</em> narrates the heroic transformation of a “dying city” (<em>Newsweek</em>) into nothing less than a shining model of urban reinvention.</p><br /><p>Interweaving two narratives—that of a young man coming of age and a town regaining its economic vitality—Buttigieg recounts growing up in a Rust Belt city, amid decayed factory buildings and the steady soundtrack of rumbling freight trains passing through on their long journey to Chicagoland. Inspired by John F. Kennedy’s legacy, Buttigieg first left northern Indiana for red-bricked Harvard and then studied at Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, before joining McKinsey, where he trained as a consultant—becoming, of all things, an expert in grocery pricing. Then, Buttigieg defied the expectations that came with his pedigree, choosing to return home to Indiana and responding to the ultimate challenge of how to revive a once-great industrial city and help steer its future in the twenty-first century.</p><br /><p>Elected at twenty-nine as the nation’s youngest mayor, Pete Buttigieg immediately recognized that “great cities, and even great nations, are built though attention to the everyday.” As <em>Shortest Way Home</em> recalls, the challenges were daunting—whether confronting gun violence, renaming a street in honor of Martin Luther King Jr., or attracting tech companies to a city that had appealed more to junk bond scavengers than serious investors. None of this is underscored more than Buttigieg’s audacious campaign to reclaim 1,000 houses, many of them abandoned, in 1,000 days and then, even as a sitting mayor, deploying to serve in Afghanistan as a Navy officer. Yet the most personal challenge still awaited Buttigieg, who came out in a South Bend Tribune editorial, just before being reelected with 78 percent of the vote, and then finding Chasten Glezman, a middle-school teacher, who would become his partner for life.</p><br /><p>While Washington reels with scandal, <em>Shortest Way Home</em>, with its graceful, often humorous, language, challenges our perception of the typical American politician. In chronicling two once-unthinkable stories—that of an Afghanistan veteran who came out and found love and acceptance, all while in office, and that of a revitalized Rust Belt city no longer regarded as “flyover country”—Buttigieg provides a new vision for America’s shortest way home.</p>
The Library Book
by Susan Orlean

Language

English

Pages

310

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK</b><BR> <BR><b>A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR </b> * <b>A</b> <b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER and <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“A constant pleasure to read…Everybody who loves books should check out <i>The Library Book</i>.” —<i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR><b>“CAPTIVATING…DELIGHTFUL.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i> * “EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING.” —<i>The New York Times</i> * “MESMERIZING…RIVETING.” —<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><BR> <BR><b>A dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries—from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by <i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>.</b><BR><BR>On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?<BR> <BR> Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>reporter and <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Library Book</i>, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.<BR> <BR> Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.<BR> <BR> Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, <i>The Library Book </i>is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Bl...
by Margot Lee Shetterly

Language

English

Pages

370

Publication Date

September 06, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>The #1 New York Times bestseller</em></strong></p><p><em>The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring </em><em>Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. </em></p><p>Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. </p><p>Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. </p><p>Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. </p><p>Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, <em>Hidden Figures</em> follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.</p><p> </p>
A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Wh...
by Sonia Purnell

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

April 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"An incredible story of under-appreciated heroism." - <b><i>USA Today</i></b><br /><br />"A compelling biography of a masterful spy, and a reminder of what can be done with a few brave people -- and a little resistance." - <b>NPR</b><br /><br /><b>The never-before-told story of Virginia Hall, the American spy who changed the course of World War II, from the author of </b><b><i>Clementine</i></b></b><br /><br />In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." <br /><br />The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare." She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and--despite her prosthetic leg--helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. <br /><br />Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day.<br /><br />Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall--an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spycraft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. <i>A Woman of No Importance</i> is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of th...
by David Grann

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   -  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST <br /><br />"Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." <b>—</b>Dave Eggers, <i>New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017<br /><br />Named a best book of the year by <i>Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, </i>NPR's Maureen Corrigan<i>, </i>NPR's "On Point,"<i> Vogue</i>, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, <i>Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's </i>"Ultimate Best Books<i>," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus,</i> Slate.com<i> </i>and</b><i><b> Book Browse</b><br /></i><b><i><br /></i>From <i>New Yorker</i> staff writer David Grann, #1 <i>New York Times</i> best-selling author of <i>The Lost City of Z,</i> a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history</b><br />        <br />In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.<br />       Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. <br />       In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. <br />       In <i>Killers of the Flower Moon, </i>David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i> is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
First: Sandra Day O'Connor
by Evan Thomas

Language

English

Pages

455

Publication Date

March 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • The intimate, inspiring, and authoritative biography of Sandra Day O’Connor, America’s first female Supreme Court justice, drawing on exclusive interviews and first-time access to Justice O’Connor’s archives—by the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Evan Thomas.</b><br /><br /><b>“She’s a hero for our time, and this is the biography for our time.”—Walter Isaacson</b><br /><br /> She was born in 1930 in El Paso and grew up on a cattle ranch in Arizona. At a time when women were expected to be homemakers, she set her sights on Stanford University. When she graduated near the top of her law school class in 1952, no firm would even interview her. But Sandra Day O’Connor’s story is that of a woman who repeatedly shattered glass ceilings—doing so with a blend of grace, wisdom, humor, understatement, and cowgirl toughness.<br /><br /> She became the first ever female majority leader of a state senate. As a judge on the Arizona Court of Appeals, she stood up to corrupt lawyers and humanized the law. When she arrived at the United States Supreme Court, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1981, she began a quarter-century tenure on the Court, hearing cases that ultimately shaped American law. Diagnosed with cancer at fifty-eight, and caring for a husband with Alzheimer’s, O’Connor endured every difficulty with grit and poise.<br /><br /> Women and men who want to be leaders and be first in their own lives—who want to learn when to walk away and when to stand their ground—will be inspired by O’Connor’s example. This is a remarkably vivid and personal portrait of a woman who loved her family, who believed in serving her country, and who, when she became the most powerful woman in America, built a bridge forward for all women.<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for </b><i><b>First</b></i><br /><br />“A great storyteller has found his greatest subject in trailblazer Sandra Day O’Connor. Evan Thomas has written one of the most insightful and thoroughly captivating biographies I have ever read: A clear and compelling illumination of Sandra Day O’Connor’s unique voice and place in American history is told through her remarkable life’s journey from a rancher’s daughter to the first woman appointed to the highest court in the land.”<b>—Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of <i>Leadership:</i></b><i> <b>In Turbulent Times</b></i><br />   <br /> “A vivid, humane, and inspiring portrait of an extraordinary woman and how she both reflected and shaped an era.”<b>—Drew Faust, president emerita, Harvard University</b>
The Art of Seduction
by Robert Greene

Language

English

Pages

467

Publication Date

October 07, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the author of the multi-million copy bestseller <i>The 48 Laws of Power </i>and <i>The Laws of Human Nature, </i>a mesmerizing handbook on seduction: the most subtle and effective form of power</b><br />  <br /> When raised to the level of art, seduction, an indirect and subtle form of power, has toppled empires, won elections and enslaved great minds. Immerse yourself in the twenty-four maneuvers and strategies of the seductive process, the ritual by which a seducer gains mastery over his target. Understand how to "Poeticize Your Presence," “Keep them in Suspense – What Comes Next” and “Master the Art of the Bold Move”. Every bit as essential as <i>The 48 Laws of Power</i>, <i>The Art of Seduction</i> is an indispensable primer of persuasion that reveals one of history's greatest weapons and the ultimate form of power.
Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of ...
by Henry Louis Gates

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

April 02, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A profound new rendering of the struggle by African-Americans for equality after the Civil War and the violent counter-revolution that resubjugated them, as seen through the prism of the war of images and ideas that have left an enduring racist stain on the American mind.</b><br /><br />The abolition of slavery in the aftermath of the Civil War is a familiar story, as is the civil rights revolution that transformed the nation after World War II. But the century in between remains a mystery: if emancipation sparked "a new birth of freedom" in Lincoln's America, why was it necessary to march in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s America? In this new book, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., one of our leading chroniclers of the African-American experience, seeks to answer that question in a history that moves from the Reconstruction Era to the "nadir" of the African-American experience under Jim Crow, through to World War I and the Harlem Renaissance. <br /><br />Through his close reading of the visual culture of this tragic era, Gates reveals the many faces of Jim Crow and how, together, they reinforced a stark color line between white and black Americans. Bringing a lifetime of wisdom to bear as a scholar, filmmaker, and public intellectual, Gates uncovers the roots of structural racism in our own time, while showing how African Americans after slavery combatted it by articulating a vision of a "New Negro" to force the nation to recognize their humanity and unique contributions to America as it hurtled toward the modern age.<br /><br />The story Gates tells begins with great hope, with the Emancipation Proclamation, Union victory, and the liberation of nearly 4 million enslaved African-Americans. Until 1877, the federal government, goaded by the activism of Frederick Douglass and many others, tried at various turns to sustain their new rights. But the terror unleashed by white paramilitary groups in the former Confederacy, combined with deteriorating economic conditions and a loss of Northern will, restored "home rule" to the South. The retreat from Reconstruction was followed by one of the most violent periods in our history, with thousands of black people murdered or lynched and many more afflicted by the degrading impositions of Jim Crow segregation. <br /><br />An essential tour through one of America's fundamental historical tragedies, <i>Stony the Road</i> is also a story of heroic resistance, as figures such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells fought to create a counter-narrative, and culture, inside the lion's mouth. As sobering as this tale is, it also has within it the inspiration that comes with encountering the hopes our ancestors advanced against the longest odds.
Man's Search for Meaning
by Viktor E. Frankl

Language

English

Pages

188

Publication Date

June 01, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl's theory-known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos ("meaning")-holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.<br /><br />At the time of Frankl's death in 1997, <i>Man's Search for Meaning</i> had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a "book that made a difference in your life" found <i>Man's Search for Meaning</i> among the ten most influential books in America.
The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps
by Edward Brooke-Hitching

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

April 03, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h3><strong>Discover the mysteries within ancient maps — Where exploration and mythology meet</strong></h3><p>This richly illustrated book collects and explores the colorful histories behind a striking range of real antique maps that are all in some way a little too good to be true.</p><p><strong>Mysteries within ancient maps:</strong> The Phantom Atlas is a guide to the world not as it is, but as it was imagined to be. It's a world of ghost islands, invisible mountain ranges, mythical civilizations, ship-wrecking beasts, and other fictitious features introduced on maps and atlases through mistakes, misunderstanding, fantasies, and outright lies.</p><p><strong>Where exploration and mythology meet:</strong> Author Edward Brooke-Hitching is a map collector, author, writer for the popular BBC Television program QI and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. He lives in a dusty heap of old maps and books in London investigating the places where exploration and mythology meet.</p><p><strong>Cartography’s greatest phantoms: </strong><em>The Phantom Atlas</em> uses gorgeous atlas images as springboards for tales of deranged buccaneers, seafaring monks, heroes, swindlers, and other amazing stories behind cartography's greatest phantoms.</p><p><strong>If you are a fan of this popular genre and a reader of books such as <em>Prisoners of Geography, Atlas of Ancient Rome, Atlas Obscura, What If, Book of General Ignorance, or Thing Explainer,</em> your will love <em>The Phantom Atlas</em></strong></p>

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