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Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Irelan...
by Patrick Radden Keefe

Language

English

Pages

455

Publication Date

February 26, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>"A masterful history of the Troubles. . . extraordinary. . .[Keefe] captures the complexities of a historical moment by digging deep into the lives of people on all sides of the conflict. . .As powerful as Keefe's account of the Troubles is, it's the aftermath that makes for a truly agonizing story. . . panoramic. . .as in the most ingenious crime stories, Keefe unveils a revelation — lying, so to speak, in plain sight — that only further complicates the moral dimensions of his tale."<br /><b><b><b>—</b></b></b>Maureen Corrigan, NPR<br /><br />From award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions</b></b><br /><br />In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, she had always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes.<br /><br />Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace but betrayed his hardcore comrades by denying his I.R.A. past--<i>Say Nothing</i> conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish.
Code Name: Lise: The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII's Mo...
by Larry Loftis

Language

English

Pages

385

Publication Date

January 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Best Nonfiction Books to Read in 2019—<i>Woman’s Day</i></b><BR> <b>The Best Nonfiction Books Coming Out This Year—<i>BookBub</i></b><BR> <b>“A nonfiction thriller.”—<i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><BR> <BR> <b>From internationally bestselling author of the “gripping” (Michael Connelly, #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author) <i>Into the Lion’s Mouth </i>comes the extraordinary true story of Odette Sansom, the British spy who operated in occupied France and fell in love with her commanding officer during World War II—perfect for fans of <i>Unbroken</i>, <i>The Nightingale</i>, and <i>Code Girls</i>. </b><BR><BR>The year is 1942, and World War II is in full swing. Odette Sansom decides to follow in her war hero father’s footsteps by becoming an SOE agent to aid Britain and her beloved homeland, France. Five failed attempts and one plane crash later, she finally lands in occupied France to begin her mission. It is here that she meets her commanding officer Captain Peter Churchill.<BR> <BR> As they successfully complete mission after mission, Peter and Odette fall in love. All the while, they are being hunted by the cunning German secret police sergeant, Hugo Bleicher, who finally succeeds in capturing them. They are sent to Paris’s Fresnes prison, and from there to concentration camps in Germany where they are starved, beaten, and tortured. But in the face of despair, they never give up hope, their love for each other, or the whereabouts of their colleagues.<BR> <BR> In<i> </i><i>Code Name: Lise</i><i>, </i>Larry Loftis paints a portrait of true courage, patriotism, and love—of two incredibly heroic people who endured unimaginable horrors and degradations. He seamlessly weaves together the touching romance between Odette and Peter and the thrilling cat and mouse game between them and Sergeant Bleicher. With this amazing testament to the human spirit, Loftis proves once again that he is adept at writing “nonfiction that reads like a page-turning novel” (<i>Parade</i>).
Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest N...
by Adam Higginbotham

Language

English

Pages

561

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><BR> <BR><b>Journalist Adam Higginbotham’s definitive, years-in-the-making account of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster—and a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters.</b><BR><BR>Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute.<BR> <BR>Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.<BR> <BR><i>Midnight in Chernobyl </i>is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will—lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
Ten Caesars: Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine
by Barry Strauss

Language

English

Pages

432

Publication Date

March 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“An exceptionally accessible history of the Roman Empire...Much of <i>Ten Caesars</i> reads like a script for <i>Game of Thrones...</i>This superb summation of four centuries of Roman history, a masterpiece of compression, confirms Barry Strauss as the foremost academic classicist writing for the general reader today.” —Andrew Roberts, <i>The Wall Street Journal</i></b><BR> <BR><b>Bestselling classical historian Barry Strauss tells the story of three and a half centuries of the Roman Empire through the lives of ten of the most important emperors, from Augustus to Constantine.</b><BR><BR>Barry Strauss’s <i>Ten Caesars </i>is the story of the Roman Empire from rise to reinvention, from Augustus, who founded the empire, to Constantine, who made it Christian and moved the capital east to Constantinople.<BR> <BR>During these centuries Rome gained in splendor and territory, then lost both. The empire reached from modern-day Britain to Iraq, and gradually emperors came not from the old families of the first century but from men born in the provinces, some of whom had never even seen Rome. By the fourth century, the time of Constantine, the Roman Empire had changed so dramatically in geography, ethnicity, religion, and culture that it would have been virtually unrecognizable to Augustus.<BR> <BR>In the imperial era Roman women—mothers, wives, mistresses—had substantial influence over the emperors, and Strauss also profiles the most important among them, from Livia, Augustus’s wife, to Helena, Constantine’s mother. But even women in the imperial family faced limits and the emperors often forced them to marry or divorce for purely political reasons.<BR> <BR>Rome’s legacy remains today in so many ways, from language, law, and architecture to the seat of the Roman Catholic Church. Strauss examines this enduring heritage through the lives of the men who shaped it: Augustus, Tiberius, Nero, Vespasian, Trajan, Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, Septimius Severus, Diocletian and Constantine. Over the ages, they learned to maintain the family business—the government of an empire—by adapting when necessary and always persevering no matter the cost. <i>Ten Caesars</i> is essential history as well as fascinating biography.
Churchill: Walking with Destiny
by Andrew Roberts

Language

English

Pages

1151

Publication Date

November 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER<br /><br />One of <i>The Wall Street Journal</i><b>’s </b>Ten Best Books of 2018<br />One of <i>The Economist</i>’s Best Books of 2018<br />One of <i>The New York Times</i><b>’</b>s Notable Books of 2018<br /><br />“Unarguably the best single-volume biography of Churchill . . . A brilliant feat of storytelling, monumental in scope, yet put together with tenderness for a man who had always believed that he would be Britain’s savior.” —<i>Wall Street Journal</i><br /><br />In this landmark biography of Winston Churchill based on extensive new material, the true genius of the man, statesman and leader can finally be fully seen and understood--by the bestselling, award-winning author of <i>Napoleon</i> and <i>The Storm of War. </i></b><br /><br />When we seek an example of great leaders with unalloyed courage, the person who comes to mind is Winston Churchill: the iconic, visionary war leader immune from the consensus of the day, who stood firmly for his beliefs when everyone doubted him. But how did young Winston become Churchill? What gave him the strength to take on the superior force of Nazi Germany when bombs rained on London and so many others had caved? In <i>Churchill,</i> Andrew Roberts gives readers the full and definitive Winston Churchill, from birth to lasting legacy, as personally revealing as it is compulsively readable.<br /><br />Roberts gained exclusive access to extensive new material: transcripts of War Cabinet meetings, diaries, letters and unpublished memoirs from Churchill's contemporaries. The Royal Family permitted Roberts--in a first for a Churchill biographer--to read the detailed notes taken by King George VI in his diary after his weekly meetings with Churchill during World War II. This treasure trove of access allows Roberts to understand the man in revelatory new ways, and to identify the hidden forces fueling Churchill's legendary drive.<br /><br />We think of Churchill as a hero who saved civilization from the evils of Nazism and warned of the grave crimes of Soviet communism, but Roberts's masterwork reveals that he has as much to teach us about the challenges leaders face today--and the fundamental values of courage, tenacity, leadership and moral conviction.
Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man's F...
by Bill Browder

Language

English

Pages

417

Publication Date

February 03, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> bestseller</b><BR> <BR><b>THE BOOK THAT EXPLAINS WHY RUSSIANS WANTED TO MEET WITH THE TRUMP CAMPAIGN</b><BR> <BR><b>“Part John Grisham-like thriller, part business and political memoir.” —<i>The New York Times</i></b><BR> <BR>“[<i>Red Notice</i>] does for investing in Russia and the former Soviet Union what <i>Liar’s Poker</i> did for our understanding of Salomon Brothers, Wall Street, and the mortgage-backed securities business in the 1980s. Browder’s business saga meshes well with the story of corruption and murder in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, making <i>Red Notice</i> an early candidate for any list of the year’s best books” (<i>Fortune</i>).<BR><BR>This is a story about an accidental activist. Bill Browder started out his adult life as the Wall Street maverick whose instincts led him to Russia just after the breakup of the Soviet Union, where he made his fortune.<BR> <BR> Along the way he exposed corruption, and when he did, he barely escaped with his life. His Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky wasn’t so lucky: he ended up in jail, where he was tortured to death. That changed Browder forever. He saw the murderous heart of the Putin regime and has spent the last half decade on a campaign to expose it. Because of that, he became Putin’s number one enemy, especially after Browder succeeded in having a law passed in the United States—The Magnitsky Act—that punishes a list of Russians implicated in the lawyer’s murder. Putin famously retaliated with a law that bans Americans from adopting Russian orphans.<BR> <BR>A financial caper, a crime thriller, and a political crusade, <i>Red Notice</i> is the story of one man taking on overpowering odds to change the world, and also the story of how, without intending to, he found meaning in his life.
Queen Anne: The Politics of Passion
by Anne Somerset

Language

English

Pages

649

Publication Date

October 15, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>She ascended the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland in 1702, at age thirty-seven, Britain’s last Stuart monarch, and five years later united two of her realms, England and Scotland, as a sovereign state, creating the Kingdom of Great Britain. She had a history of personal misfortune, overcoming ill health (she suffered from crippling arthritis; by the time she became Queen she was a virtual invalid) and living through seventeen miscarriages, stillbirths, and premature births in seventeen years. By the end of her comparatively short twelve-year reign, Britain had emerged as a great power; the succession of outstanding victories won by her general, John Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough, had humbled France and laid the foundations for Britain’s future naval and colonial supremacy.<br /><br /> While the Queen’s military was performing dazzling exploits on the continent, her own attention—indeed her realm—rested on a more intimate conflict: the female friendship on which her happiness had for decades depended and which became for her a source of utter torment.<br /><br /> At the core of Anne Somerset’s riveting new biography, published to great acclaim in England (“Definitive”—<i>London Evening Standard;</i> “Wonderfully pacy and absorbing”—<i>Daily Mail</i>), is a portrait of this deeply emotional, complex bond between two very different women: Queen Anne—reserved, stolid, shrewd; and Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, wife of the Queen’s great general—beautiful, willful, outspoken, whose acerbic wit was equally matched by her fearsome temper.<br />            <br /> Against a fraught background—the revolution that deposed Anne’s father, James II, and brought her to power . . . religious differences (she was born Protestant—her parents’ conversion to Catholicism had grave implications—and she grew up so suspicious of the Roman church that she considered its doctrines “wicked and dangerous”) . . . violently partisan politics (Whigs versus Tories) . . . a war with France that lasted for almost her entire reign . . . the constant threat of foreign invasion and civil war—the  much-admired historian, author of <i>Elizabeth I </i>(“Exhilarating”—<i>The Spectator; </i>“Ample, stylish, eloquent”—<i>The Washington Post Book World), </i>tells the extraordinary story of how Sarah goaded and provoked the Queen beyond endurance, and, after the withdrawal of Anne’s favor, how her replacement, Sarah’s cousin, the feline Abigail Masham, became the ubiquitous royal confidante and, so Sarah whispered to growing scandal, the object of the Queen's sexual infatuation.<br /><br />To write this remarkably rich and passionate biography, Somerset, winner of the Elizabeth Longford Prize for Historical Biography, has made use of royal archives, parliamentary records, personal correspondence and previously unpublished material. <br /><br /> <i>Queen Anne</i> is history on a large scale—a revelation of a centuries-overlooked monarch.<br /></p>
Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege: 1942-1943
by Antony Beevor

Language

English

Pages

530

Publication Date

May 01, 1999

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The Battle of Stalingrad was not only the psychological turning point of World War II: it also changed the face of modern warfare. From Antony Beevor, the internationally bestselling author of <i>D-Day</i> and <i>The Battle of Arnhem.</i></b><br /><br />In August 1942, Hitler's huge Sixth Army reached the city that bore Stalin's name. In the five-month siege that followed, the Russians fought to hold Stalingrad at any cost; then, in an astonishing reversal, encircled and trapped their Nazi enemy. This battle for the ruins of a city cost more than a million lives. Stalingrad conveys the experience of soldiers on both sides, fighting in inhuman conditions, and of civilians trapped on an urban battlefield. Antony Beevor has itnerviewed survivors and discovered completely new material in a wide range of German and Soviet archives, including prisoner interrogations and reports of desertions and executions. As a story of cruelty, courage, and human suffering, <i>Stalingrad</i> is unprecedented and unforgettable.<br /><br />Historians and reviewers worldwide have hailed Antony Beevor's magisterial<i> Stalingrad</i> as the definitive account of World War II's most harrowing battle.
The Forgotten 500: The Untold Story of the Men Who Risked All for...
by Gregory A. Freeman

Language

English

Pages

333

Publication Date

September 02, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The <b><b>astonishing, never before told story of the greatest rescue mission of World War II—when the OSS set out to recover more than 500 airmen trapped behind enemy lines in Yugoslavia...</b><br /></b></b><br />During a bombing campaign over Romanian oil fields, hundreds of American airmen were shot down in Nazi-occupied Yugoslavia. Local Serbian farmers and peasants risked their own lives to give refuge to the soldiers while they waited for rescue, and in 1944, Operation Halyard was born. The risks were incredible. The starving Americans in Yugoslavia had to construct a landing strip large enough for C-47 cargo planes—without tools, without alerting the Germans, and without endangering the villagers. And the cargo planes had to make it through enemy airspace and back—without getting shot down themselves.<br />  <br /> Classified for over half a century for political reasons, the full account of this unforgettable story of loyalty, self-sacrifice, and bravery is now being told for the first time ever. <i>The Forgotten 500 </i>is the gripping, behind-the-scenes look at the greatest escape of World War II.<br /><br /><b>“Amazing [and] riveting.”—James Bradley, <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author of <i>Flags of Our Fathers</i></b>
The Tigress of Forli: Renaissance Italy's Most Courageous and Not...
by Elizabeth Lev

Language

English

Pages

349

Publication Date

October 18, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>“In this insightful, fascinating portrayal, Elizabeth Lev brings Caterina Sforza and her times very much to life.”—Kathleen Turner, actress and author of <I>Send Yourself Roses</I><BR /><BR /> A strategist to match Machiavelli; a warrior who stood toe to toe with the Borgias; a wife whose three marriages would end in bloodshed and heartbreak; and a mother determined to maintain her family’s honor, Caterina Riario Sforza de’ Medici was a true Renaissance celebrity, beloved and vilified in equal measure. In this dazzling biography, Elizabeth Lev illuminates her extraordinary life and accomplishments.<BR /><BR /> Raised in the court of Milan and wed at age ten to the pope’s corrupt nephew, Caterina was ensnared in Italy’s political intrigues early in life. After turbulent years in Rome’s papal court, she moved to the Romagnol province of Forlì. Following her husband’s assassination, she ruled Italy’s crossroads with iron will, martial strength, political savvy, and an icon’s fashion sense. In finally losing her lands to the Borgia family, she put up a resistance that inspired all of Europe and set the stage for her progeny—including Cosimo de’ Medici—to follow her example to greatness.<BR /><BR /> A rich evocation of Renaissance life, <I>The Tigress of Forlì</I> reveals Caterina Riario Sforza as a brilliant and fearless ruler, and a tragic but unbowed figure.<BR /><BR /> “A rich, nuanced portrait of a highly controversial beauty and military leader, and her violent, albeit glittering, Italian Renaissance milieu.”—<I>Publishers Weekly</I><BR /><BR /> “Well-written and meticulously researched, The Tigress of Forlì recreates the world of Renaissance Italy in all its grandeur and violence. At the center stands a remarkable woman, Caterina Riario Sforza. Mother, warrior, and icon, Caterina is unforgettable, and so is the exciting story that Elizabeth Lev tells here.”—Barry Strauss, author of <I>Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership</I></DIV>

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