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The Boy Between Worlds: A Biography
by Annejet van der Zijl

Language

English

Pages

218

Publication Date

August 01, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>From the Amazon Charts bestselling author of <i>An American Princess</i> comes the true story of an unconventional family divided by war and prejudice during WWII.</b></p><p>When they fell in love in 1928, Rika and Waldemar could not have been more different. She was a thirty-seven-year-old Dutch-born mother, estranged from her husband. He was her immigrant boarder, not yet twenty, and a wealthy Surinamese descendant of slaves. The child they have together, brown skinned and blue eyed, brings the couple great joy yet raises some eyebrows. Until the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands explodes their promising life.</p><p>What unfolds is more than the astonishing story of a love that prevailed over convention. It’s also the quest of a young boy. Through the cruelty of World War II, he will fight for a connection between his father’s South American birthplace and his mother’s European traditions. Lost and displaced for much of his life, but with a legacy of resilience in his blood, he will struggle to find his place in the world.</p><p>Moving deftly between personal experience and the devastating machinations of war, <i>The Boy Between Worlds</i> is an unforgettable journey of hope, love, and courage in the face of humanity’s darkest hour.</p>
Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest N...
by Adam Higginbotham

Language

English

Pages

561

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><BR> <BR><b>Journalist Adam Higginbotham’s definitive, years-in-the-making account of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster—and a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters.</b><BR><BR>Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute.<BR> <BR>Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.<BR> <BR><i>Midnight in Chernobyl </i>is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will—lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Wh...
by Sonia Purnell

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

April 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b> <b>A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><br /><br />“E<b>xcellent…This book is as riveting as any thriller, and as hard to put down</b>.” -- <i>The New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />"A compelling biography of a masterful spy, and a reminder of what can be done with a few brave people -- and a little resistance." - <b>NPR</b><br /><br /><b>The never-before-told story of Virginia Hall, the American spy who changed the course of World War II, from the author of <i>Clementine</i></b></b><br /><br />In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." <br /><br />The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare." She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and--despite her prosthetic leg--helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. <br /><br />Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day.<br /><br />Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall--an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spycraft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. <i>A Woman of No Importance</i> is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.
The Mueller Report
by The Washington Post

Language

English

Pages

737

Publication Date

April 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The Crucial #1 <i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><BR> <BR><b>“The Mueller report is that rare Washington tell-all that surpasses its pre-publication hype…the best book by far on the workings of the Trump presidency.” —Carlos Lozada, <i>The Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR> <b>The only book with exclusive analysis by the Pulitzer Prize–winning staff of <i>The Washington Post</i>, and the most complete and authoritative available.</b><BR><BR>Read the findings of the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, complete with accompanying analysis by the <i>Post</i> reporters who’ve covered the story from the beginning.<BR> <BR> This edition from <i>The Washington Post</i>/Scribner contains:<BR> <BR>—A fully-searchable live-text version of the long-awaited <b>Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election. </b>Readers can take notes and highlight. Footnotes are linked for easy navigation. Redactions are distinctively formatted and clear.<BR> <BR>—<b>An introduction</b> by <i>The Washington Post</i> titled “A President, a Prosecutor, and the Protection of American Democracy”<BR> <BR> —<b>A timeline</b> of the major events of the Special Counsel’s investigation from May 2017, when Robert Mueller was appointed, to the report's delivery<BR> <BR> —<b>A guide to individuals</b> involved, including in the Special Counsel’s Office, the Department of Justice, the FBI, the Trump Campaign, the White House, the Trump legal defense team, and the Russians<BR> <BR> —<b>Key documents</b> in the Special Counsel’s investigation, including filings pertaining to General Michael T. Flynn, Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen, Roger Stone, and the Russian internet operation in St. Petersburg. Each document is introduced and explained by <i>Washington Post</i> reporters.<BR> <BR> One of the most urgent and important investigations ever conducted, the Mueller inquiry focuses on Donald Trump, his presidential campaign, and Russian interference in the 2016 election, and draws on the testimony of dozens of witnesses and the work of some of the country’s most seasoned prosecutors.<BR> <BR> The special counsel’s investigation looms as a turning point in American history. <i>The Mueller Report </i>is essential reading for all citizens concerned about the fate of the presidency and the future of our democracy.
Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Irelan...
by Patrick Radden Keefe

Language

English

Pages

455

Publication Date

February 26, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER<br /><br />Winner of the Orwell Prize<br /><br />"A masterful history of the Troubles. . . Extraordinary. . .As in the most ingenious crime stories, Keefe unveils a revelation — lying, so to speak, in plain sight."<b><b><b>—</b></b></b>Maureen Corrigan, NPR<br /><br />From award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions</b></b><br /><br />In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, she had always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes.<br /><br />Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace but betrayed his hardcore comrades by denying his I.R.A. past--<i>Say Nothing</i> conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish.
Winston Churchill: The Era and The Man
by Virginia Cowles

Language

English

Pages

404

Publication Date

March 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>'Splendidly readable.' Sunday Times</b><br /><br /><p><b>Winston Churchill had to fight for everything he got.</b><br /><br /></p><p>No man has aroused more heated opposition, or been more bitterly hated in his time, whilst also becoming a patriotic symbol of Britain’s wartime steadfastness.<br /><br /></p><p>A descendant of the first Duke of Marlborough, Winston Churchill was not only an icon of British political history but a man of great contradictions:<br /><br /></p><p>One of the great orators of the era, he actually lost more elections than any other politician …<br /><br /></p><p>Having spent most of his life fighting its leaders, he went on to lead the Conservative party himself.<br /><br /></p><p>And even having gone through periods of distrust with each party in turn, they still entrusted him with all their hopes in 1940.<br /><br /></p><p>Yet behind this exterior lay another man that the public never knew existed.<br /><br /></p><p>Churchill, ever knowledgeable of the moment, nevertheless liked to escape: he enjoyed painting, and delighted in animals and his children.<br /><br /></p><p>Despite Churchill’s confidence that there was nothing left to plough in this field, Virginia Cowles cast an unwavering eye over the most colourful of lives.<br /><br /></p><p>Through his many incarnations as a soldier, correspondent, author, politician and Prime Minister, Cowles illustrates just what impact the man and the era had on one another.<br /><br /></p><p>Praise for Virginia Cowles<br /><br /></p><p>’The history of the Rothschilds is every bit as rich and remarkable as their wealth.’ — <b>The Times</b><br /><br /></p><p>’Splendidly readable.’ — <em>Sunday Times<br /><br /></em></p><p><em>‘One of the most delightful books I have read. Miss Cowles has given us a tour-de-force, well researched, comprehensive, frank … [it] abounds in amazing stories of extraordinary personalities.’ — <b>Books & Bookmen</b><br /><br /></em></p><p><em>‘Recounted at great speed, and with splendid life, vigour and readability’ – <b>Evening Standard</b><br /><br /></em></p><p><em><b>Virginia Cowles</b> (1910-1983) was an author and journalist. Born in Vermont, USA she became a well-known journalist in the 1930s with her columns appearing on both sides of the Atlantic. During the Second World War she covered the Italian campaign, the liberation of Paris, and the Allied invasion of Germany. In 1945 she married the politician and writer Aidan Crawley. She wrote many biographies including <i>The Rothchilds.</i><br /></em></p>
The Volunteer: One Man, an Underground Army, and the Secret Missi...
by Jack Fairweather

Language

English

Pages

528

Publication Date

June 25, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>“Superbly written and breathtakingly researched, <em>The Volunteer</em> smuggles us into Auschwitz and shows us—as if watching a movie—the story of a Polish agent who infiltrated the infamous camp, organized a rebellion, and then snuck back out. We are squarely confronted with the <em>other</em> human truth: ordinary people will happily risk their lives to help others. Fairweather has dug up a story of incalculable value and delivered it to us in the most compelling prose I have read in a long time.” —Sebastian Junger, bestselling author of <em>The Perfect Storm</em> and <em>Tribe</em></strong></p><p>The incredible true story of a Polish resistance fighter’s infiltration of Auschwitz to sabotage the camp from within, and his death-defying attempt to warn the Allies about the Nazis’ plans for a “Final Solution” before it was too late.</p><p>To uncover the fate of the thousands being interred at a mysterious Nazi camp on the border of the Reich, a thirty-nine-year-old Polish resistance fighter named Witold Pilecki volunteered for an audacious mission: assume a fake identity, intentionally get captured and sent to the new camp, and then report back to the underground on what had happened to his compatriots there. But gathering information was not his only task: he was to execute an attack from inside—where the Germans would least expect it. </p><p>The name of the camp was Auschwitz.</p><p>Over the next two and half years, Pilecki forged an underground army within Auschwitz that sabotaged facilities, assassinated Nazi informants and officers, and gathered evidence of terrifying abuse and mass murder. But as he pieced together the horrifying truth that the camp was to become the epicenter of Nazi plans to exterminate Europe’s Jews, Pilecki realized he would have to risk his men, his life, and his family to warn the West before all was lost. To do so, meant attempting the impossible—an escape from Auschwitz itself.</p><p>Completely erased from the historical record by Poland’s post-war Communist government, Pilecki remains almost unknown to the world. Now, with exclusive access to previously hidden diaries, family and camp survivor accounts, and recently declassified files, Jack Fairweather offers an unflinching portrayal of survival, revenge and betrayal in mankind’s darkest hour. And in uncovering the tragic outcome of Pilecki’s mission, he reveals that its ultimate defeat originated not in Auschwitz or Berlin, but in London and Washington.</p>
The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper
by Hallie Rubenhold

Language

English

Pages

359

Publication Date

April 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>Five devastating human stories and a dark and moving portrait of Victorian London—the untold lives of the women killed by Jack the Ripper.</B><BR /><BR /> Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden, and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffee houses, lived on country estates, they breathed ink-dust from printing presses and escaped people-traffickers.<BR /><BR /> What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888. The person responsible was never identified, but the character created by the press to fill that gap has become far more famous than any of these five women.<BR /><BR /> For more than a century, newspapers have been keen to tell us that "the Ripper" preyed on prostitutes. Not only is this untrue, as historian Hallie Rubenhold has discovered, it has prevented the real stories of these fascinating women from being told. Now, in this devastating narrative of five lives, Rubenhold finally sets the record straight, revealing a world not just of Dickens and Queen Victoria, but of poverty, homelessness and rampant misogyny. They died because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time—but their greatest misfortune was to be born a woman.<BR />  </DIV>
Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life Book 1)
by , Joseph Gies

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

July 18, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>From acclaimed historians Frances and Joseph Gies comes the reissue of their classic book on day-to-day life in medieval cities, which was a source for George R.R. Martin’s <em>Game of Thrones</em> series.</p><p>Evoking every aspect of city life in the Middle Ages, <em>Life in a Medieval City</em> depicts in detail what it was like to live in a prosperous city of Northwest Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The year is 1250 CE and the city is Troyes, capital of the county of Champagne and site of two of the cycle Champagne Fairs—the “Hot Fair” in August and the “Cold Fair” in December. European civilization has emerged from the Dark Ages and is in the midst of a commercial revolution. Merchants and money men from all over Europe gather at Troyes to buy, sell, borrow, and lend, creating a bustling market center typical of the feudal era. As the Gieses take us through the day-to-day life of burghers, we learn the customs and habits of lords and serfs, how financial transactions were conducted, how medieval cities were governed, and what life was really like for a wide range of people.</p><p>For serious students of the medieval era and anyone wishing to learn more about this fascinating period, <em>Life in a Medieval City</em> remains a timeless work of popular medieval scholarship.</p>
Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man's F...
by Bill Browder

Language

English

Pages

417

Publication Date

February 03, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> bestseller</b><BR> <BR><b>THE BOOK THAT EXPLAINS WHY RUSSIANS WANTED TO MEET WITH THE TRUMP CAMPAIGN</b><BR> <BR><b>“Part John Grisham-like thriller, part business and political memoir.” —<i>The New York Times</i></b><BR> <BR>“[<i>Red Notice</i>] does for investing in Russia and the former Soviet Union what <i>Liar’s Poker</i> did for our understanding of Salomon Brothers, Wall Street, and the mortgage-backed securities business in the 1980s. Browder’s business saga meshes well with the story of corruption and murder in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, making <i>Red Notice</i> an early candidate for any list of the year’s best books” (<i>Fortune</i>).<BR><BR>This is a story about an accidental activist. Bill Browder started out his adult life as the Wall Street maverick whose instincts led him to Russia just after the breakup of the Soviet Union, where he made his fortune.<BR> <BR> Along the way he exposed corruption, and when he did, he barely escaped with his life. His Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky wasn’t so lucky: he ended up in jail, where he was tortured to death. That changed Browder forever. He saw the murderous heart of the Putin regime and has spent the last half decade on a campaign to expose it. Because of that, he became Putin’s number one enemy, especially after Browder succeeded in having a law passed in the United States—The Magnitsky Act—that punishes a list of Russians implicated in the lawyer’s murder. Putin famously retaliated with a law that bans Americans from adopting Russian orphans.<BR> <BR>A financial caper, a crime thriller, and a political crusade, <i>Red Notice</i> is the story of one man taking on overpowering odds to change the world, and also the story of how, without intending to, he found meaning in his life.

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