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Ice Ghosts: The Epic Hunt for the Lost Franklin Expedition
by Paul Watson

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

March 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The spellbinding true story of the greatest cold case in Arctic history—and how the rare mix of marine science and Inuit knowledge finally led to the recent discovery of the shipwrecks.</p><br /><p>Spanning nearly 200 years, <em>Ice Ghosts</em> is a fast-paced detective story about Western science, indigenous beliefs, and the irrepressible spirit of exploration and discovery. It weaves together an epic account of the legendary Franklin Expedition of 1845—whose two ships, the HMS <em>Erebus</em> and the HMS <em>Terror</em>, and their crew of 129 were lost to the Arctic ice—with the modern tale of the scientists, researchers, divers, and local Inuit behind the recent discoveries of the two ships, which made news around the world.</p><br /><p>The journalist Paul Watson was on the icebreaker that led the expedition that discovered the HMS <em>Erebus</em> in 2014, and he broke the news of the discovery of the HMS <em>Terror</em> in 2016. In a masterful work of history and contemporary reporting, he tells the full story of the Franklin Expedition: Sir John Franklin and his crew setting off from England in search of the fabled Northwest Passage; the hazards they encountered and the reasons they were forced to abandon ship after getting stuck in the ice hundreds of miles from the nearest outpost of Western civilization; and the dozens of search expeditions over more than 160 years, which collectively have been called “the most extensive, expensive, perverse, and ill-starred . . . manhunt in history.”</p><br /><p>All that searching turned up a legendary trail of sailors’ relics, a fabled note, a lifeboat with skeletons lying next to loaded rifles, and rumors of cannibalism . . . but no sign of the ships until, finally, the discoveries in our own time. As Watson reveals, the epic hunt for the lost Franklin Expedition found success only when searchers combined the latest marine science with faith in Inuit lore that had been passed down orally for generations.</p><br /><p><em>Ice Ghosts</em> is narrative nonfiction of the highest order, full of drama and rich in characters: Lady Jane Franklin, who almost single-handedly kept the search alive for decades; an Inuit historian who worked for decades gathering elders’ accounts; an American software billionaire who launched his own hunt; and underwater archaeologists honing their skills to help find the ships. Watson also shows how the hunt for the Franklin Expedition was connected to such technological advances as SCUBA gear and sonar technology, and how it ignited debates over how to preserve the relics discovered with the ships.</p><br /><p>A modern adventure story that arcs back through history, <em>Ice Ghosts</em> tells the complete and incredible story of the Franklin Expedition—the greatest of Arctic mysteries—for the ages.</p>
The Man Who Ate His Boots: The Tragic History of the Search for t...
by Anthony Brandt

Language

English

Pages

464

Publication Date

February 24, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>After the triumphant end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, the British took it upon themselves to complete something they had been trying to do since the sixteenth century: find the fabled Northwest Passage. For the next thirty-five years the British Admiralty sent out expedition after expedition to probe the ice-bound waters of the Canadian Arctic in search of a route, and then, after 1845, to find Sir John Franklin, the Royal Navy hero who led the last of these Admiralty expeditions. Enthralling and often harrowing, <i>The Man Who Ate His Boots </i>captures the glory and the folly of this ultimately tragic enterprise.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
by Alfred Lansing

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 29, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>Bound for Antarctica, where polar explorer Ernest Shackleton planned to cross on foot the last uncharted continent, the <I>Endurance</I> set sail from England in August 1914. In January 1915, after battling its way for six weeks through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day's sail short of its destination, the <I>Endurance</I> became locked in an island of ice. For ten months the ice-moored <I>Endurance</I> drifted northwest before it was finally crushed. But for Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men, the ordeal had barely begun. It would end only after a miraculous journey through more than 850 miles of the South Atlantic's heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization.<BR><br />In <I>Endurance</I>, the definitive account of Shackleton's fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing voyage that has defined heroism for the last century.<BR><BR></div>
In the Land of White Death: An Epic Story of Survival in the Sibe...
by , Linda Dubosson

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

February 01, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In 1912, six months after Robert Falcon Scott and four of his men came to grief in Antarctica, a thirty-two-year-old Russian navigator named Valerian Albanov embarked on an expedition that would prove even more disastrous. In search of new Arctic hunting grounds, Albanov's ship, the Saint Anna, was frozen fast in the pack ice of the treacherous Kara Sea-a misfortune grievously compounded by an incompetent commander, the absence of crucial nautical charts, insufficient fuel, and inadequate provisions that left the crew weak and debilitated by scurvy.<br /><br />For nearly a year and a half, the twenty-five men and one woman aboard the Saint Anna endured terrible hardships and danger as the icebound ship drifted helplessly north. Convinced that the Saint Anna would never free herself from the ice, Albanov and thirteen crewmen left the ship in January 1914, hauling makeshift sledges and kayaks behind them across the frozen sea, hoping to reach the distant coast of Franz Josef Land. With only a shockingly inaccurate map to guide him, Albanov led his men on a 235-mile journey of continuous peril, enduring blizzards, disintegrating ice floes, attacks by polar bears and walrus, starvation, sickness, snowblindness, and mutiny. That any of the team survived is a wonder. That Albanov kept a diary of his ninety-day ordeal-a story that Jon Krakauer calls an "astounding, utterly compelling book," and David Roberts calls "as lean and taut as a good thriller"-is nearly miraculous.<br /><br />First published in Russia in 1917, Albanov's narrative is here translated into English for the first time. Haunting, suspenseful, and told with gripping detail, <b>In the Land of White Death</b> can now rightfully take its place among the classic writings of Nansen, Scott, Cherry-Garrard, and Shackleton.
Sir John Franklin's Erebus and Terror Expedition: Lost and Found
by Gillian Hutchinson

Language

English

Pages

192

Publication Date

July 13, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In 1845, British explorer Sir John Franklin set out on a voyage to find the North-West Passage – the sea route linking the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific. The expedition was expected to complete its mission within three years and return home in triumph but the two ships, HMS <i>Erebus</i> and HMS <i>Terror</i>, and the 129 men aboard them disappeared in the Arctic. The last Europeans to see them alive were the crews of two whaling ships in Baffin Bay in July 1845, just before they entered the labyrinth of the Arctic Archipelago.<br /> <br />The loss of this British hero and his crew, and the many rescue expeditions and searches that followed, captured the public imagination, but the mystery surrounding the expedition's fate only deepened as more clues were found. How did Franklin's final expedition end in tragedy? What happened to the crew? <br /> <br />The thrilling discoveries in the Arctic of the wrecks of <i>Erebus</i> in 2014 and <i>Terror</i> in 2016 have brought the events of 170 years ago into sharp focus and excited new interest in the Franklin expedition. This richly illustrated book is an essential guide to this story of heroism, endurance, tragedy and dark desperation.<br /><i></i>
Rescue in the Arctic
by A. L. Todd

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 20, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
As the debate droned on in Congress about whether to spend money on a rescue team for Lieutenant Adolphus W. Greely and the other men of the Lady Franklin Bay Expedition to the Arctic, the explorers were dying one by one from the cold and lack of supplies. Henrietta Greely was determined that if the U.S. government would not act, she would find a way to rescue her husband. Here, in this essay by A. L. Todd, is their dramatic story.
Ada Blackjack: A True Story of Survival in the Arctic
by Jennifer Niven

Language

English

Pages

448

Publication Date

February 21, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From the author of <em>The Ice Master</em> comes the remarkable true story of a young Inuit woman who survived six months alone on a desolate, uninhabited Arctic island<br /><br />In September 1921, four young men and Ada Blackjack, a diminutive 25-year-old Eskimo woman, ventured deep into the Arctic in a secret attempt to colonize desolate Wrangel Island for Great Britain. Two years later, Ada Blackjack emerged as the sole survivor of this ambitious polar expedition. This young, unskilled woman--who had headed to the Arctic in search of money and a husband--conquered the seemingly unconquerable north and survived all alone after her male companions had perished.<br /><br />Following her triumphant return to civilization, the international press proclaimed her the female Robinson Crusoe. But whatever stories the press turned out came from the imaginations of reporters: Ada Blackjack refused to speak to anyone about her horrific two years in the Arctic. Only on one occasion--after charges were published falsely accusing her of causing the death of one her companions--did she speak up for herself.<br /><br />Jennifer Niven has created an absorbing, compelling history of this remarkable woman, taking full advantage of the wealth of first-hand resources about Ada that exist, including her never-before-seen diaries, the unpublished diaries from other primary characters, and interviews with Ada's surviving son. <em>Ada Blackjack</em> is more than a rugged tale of a woman battling the elements to survive in the frozen north--it is the story of a hero.
The Cruise of the Corwin: Journal of the Arctic Expedition of 188...
by John Muir

Language

English

Pages

189

Publication Date

December 19, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>On July 8, 1879, the USS Jeanette departed San Francisco for the Bering Strait with the intention of finding a route to the North Pole.<br /><br />With the ship crushed by the pressure of the ice, its captain, George W. De Long, and twenty of its crew never made it back to America.</b><br /><br />The federal government called upon her captain, Calvin L. Hooper, to venture northwards and find out what happened to the USS Jeanette and the missing men. <br /><br />Built out of the finest Oregon fir, fastened with copper, galvanized iron, and locust-tree nails, the Corwin was the perfect ship for Arctic exploration where her sturdy sailing qualities were to prove of the utmost importance. <br /><br />John Muir, Scottish naturalist and explorer, sensing the possibilities of science and adventure in the exploration of this unknown Arctic land, immediately made himself available for the Corwin’s expedition. <br /><br />During the cruise Muir kept a daily record of his experiences and observations, these along with the numerous letters he wrote form the basis of this fascinating account.<br /><br />As well as describing the day by day events of the Corwin in its search for any survivors of the Jeanette, Muir also recorded his encounters with Alaskan natives, describing how they survived this brutal environment. He drew upon his experience as a naturalist to beautifully capture the flora and fauna of this landscape.<br /><br /><em>The Cruise of the Corwin: Journal of the Arctic Expedition of 1881 in search of De Long and the Jeannette</em> remains a fascinating read for anyone interested in late nineteenth century exploration, or for anyone wishing to find out more about the world of the Arctic circle. <br /><br />John Muir’s work is particularly relevant to modern times as it depicts a world that is coming increasingly under threat as the effects of global warming threaten the lands through which he traveled. During his lifetime he was particularly passionate in advocating preservation of wilderness in the United States, and he was instrumental in protecting Yosemite Valley, Sequoia National Park and other wilderness areas. This book was published in 1917, three years after Muir had died in 1914.
Sagas of the Icelanders (Illustrated): * (Penguin Classics Deluxe...
by Various

Language

English

Pages

848

Publication Date

April 07, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
THE SAGAS OF ICELANDERS are amongst the crowning achievements of medieval literature. In their narrative artistry and characterisation, the Sagas rank with the world's greatest literary treasures - as epic as Homer, as deep in tragedy as Sophocles, as engagingly human as Shakespeare. They form a unique literary genre and have inspired writers as diverse as Walter Scott, Jorge Luis Borges and W H Auden.
The Worst Journey in the World (Penguin Classics)
by , Apsley Cherry-Garrard

Language

English

Pages

640

Publication Date

February 28, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A firsthand account of Scott's disastrous Antarctic expedition</b><br /><br /><i>The Worst Journey in the World</i> recounts Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated expedition to the South Pole. Apsley Cherry-Garrard—the youngest member of Scott’s team and one of three men to make and survive the notorious Winter Journey—draws on his firsthand experiences as well as the diaries of his compatriots to create a stirring and detailed account of Scott’s legendary expedition. Cherry himself would be among the search party that discovered the corpses of Scott and his men, who had long since perished from starvation and brutal cold. It is through Cherry’s insightful narrative and keen descriptions that Scott and the other members of the expedition are fully memorialized.<br /><br />For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>

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