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Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
by Alfred Lansing

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 29, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>The harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to reach the South Pole, one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age.</b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div>In August 1914, polar explorer Ernest Shackleton boarded the Endurance and set sail for Antarctica, where he planned to cross the last uncharted continent on foot. In January 1915, after battling its way through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day's sail short of its destination, the Endurance became locked in an island of ice. Thus began the legendary ordeal of Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men.</div><div><br /></div><div>For ten months the ice-moored Endurance drifted northwest before it was finally crushed between two ice floes. With no options left, Shackleton and a skeleton crew attempted a near-impossible journey over 850 miles of the South Atlantic's heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization. Their survival, and the survival of the men they left behind, depended on their small lifeboat successfully finding the island of South Georgia--a tiny dot of land in a vast and hostile ocean.</div><div><br /></div><div>In <i>Endurance</i>, the definitive account of Ernest Shackleton's fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing and miraculous voyage that has defined heroism for the modern age.</div>
The Stowaway: A Young Man's Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica
by Laurie Gwen Shapiro

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

January 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The spectacular, true story of a scrappy teenager from New York’s Lower East Side who stowed away on the most remarkable feat of science and daring of the Jazz Age, <i>The Stowaway</i> is “a thrilling adventure that captures not only the making of a man but of a nation” (David Grann, bestselling author of <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i>).</b><BR><BR>It was 1928: a time of illicit booze, of Gatsby and Babe Ruth, of freewheeling fun. The Great War was over and American optimism was higher than the stock market. What better moment to launch an expedition to Antarctica, the planet’s final frontier?<BR> <BR> Everyone wanted in on the adventure. Rockefellers and Vanderbilts begged to be taken along as mess boys, and newspapers across the globe covered the planning’s every stage. And then, the night before the expedition’s flagship set off, Billy Gawronski—a mischievous, first-generation New York City high schooler, desperate to escape a dreary future in the family upholstery business—jumped into the Hudson River and snuck aboard.<BR> <BR> Could he get away with it?<BR> <BR> From the soda shops of New York’s Lower East Side to the dance halls of sultry Francophone Tahiti, all the way to Antarctica’s blinding white and deadly freeze, author Laurie Gwen Shapiro “narrates this period piece with gusto” (<i>Los Angeles Times</i>), taking readers on the “novelistic” (<i>The New Yorker</i>) and unforgettable voyage of a plucky young stowaway who became a Roaring Twenties celebrity, a mascot for an up-by-your bootstraps era.
In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the...
by Hampton Sides

Language

English

Pages

489

Publication Date

August 05, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i></b> <b>bestselling author Hampton Sides returns with a white-knuckle tale of polar exploration and survival in the Gilded Age<br /></b><br />In the late nineteenth century, people were obsessed by one of the last unmapped areas of the globe: the North Pole. No one knew what existed beyond the fortress of ice rimming the northern oceans, although theories abounded. The foremost cartographer in the world, a German named August Petermann, believed that warm currents sustained a verdant island at the top of the world. National glory would fall to whoever could plant his flag upon its shores. <br /><br />James Gordon Bennett, the eccentric and stupendously wealthy owner of <i>The New York Herald</i>, had recently captured the world's attention by dispatching Stanley to Africa to find Dr. Livingstone. Now he was keen to re-create that sensation on an even more epic scale. So he funded an official U.S. naval expedition to reach the Pole, choosing as its captain a young officer named George Washington De Long, who had gained fame for a rescue operation off the coast of Greenland. De Long led a team of 32 men deep into uncharted Arctic waters, carrying the aspirations of a young country burning to become a world power. On July 8, 1879, the USS <i>Jeannette</i> set sail from San Francisco to cheering crowds in the grip of "Arctic Fever." <br /><br />The ship sailed into uncharted seas, but soon was trapped in pack ice. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the hull was breached. Amid the rush of water and the shrieks of breaking wooden boards, the crew abandoned the ship. Less than an hour later, the <i>Jeannette </i>sank to the bottom,and the men found themselves marooned a thousand miles north of Siberia with only the barest supplies. Thus began their long march across the endless ice—a frozen hell in the most lonesome corner of the world. Facing everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and frosty labyrinths, the expedition battled madness and starvation as they desperately strove for survival. <br /><br />With twists and turns worthy of a thriller, <i>In The Kingdom of Ice</i> is a spellbinding tale of heroism and determination in the most unforgiving territory on Earth.<br /><br /><b>Ebook edition includes over a dozen extra images<br /></b>
Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of E...
by David Roberts

Language

English

Pages

393

Publication Date

January 28, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"Gripping and superb. This book will steal the night from you." —Laurence Gonzales, author of <em>Deep Survival</em></strong></p><br /><p>On January 17, 1913, alone and near starvation, Douglas Mawson, leader of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, was hauling a sledge to get back to base camp. The dogs were gone. Now Mawson himself plunged through a snow bridge, dangling over an abyss by the sledge harness. A line of poetry gave him the will to haul himself back to the surface.</p><br /><p>Mawson was sometimes reduced to crawling, and one night he discovered that the soles of his feet had completely detached from the flesh beneath. On February 8, when he staggered back to base, his features unrecognizably skeletal, the first teammate to reach him blurted out, "Which one are you?"</p><br /><p>This thrilling and almost unbelievable account establishes Mawson in his rightful place as one of the greatest polar explorers and expedition leaders. It is illustrated by a trove of Frank Hurley’s famous Antarctic photographs, many never before published in the United States.</p>
The Last Gentleman Adventurer: Coming of Age in the Arctic
by Edward Beauclerk Maurice

Language

English

Pages

428

Publication Date

November 01, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>"This is a great book about life at remote bases in Canada's far north as seen by a young English boy who went there by himself to see the world and got more than he could have bargained for. Beautifully written." --Sir Ranulph Fiennes<br /><br />"As spare, gleaming, and exhilarating as the Arctic wastes and the gentle, stoic Eskimos who had mastery of this realm . . . The book evokes the frozen seas, whale hunts, snow plains and storms that intimidated those rash enough to brave this world, and the traditions, myths, and hunting skills that contoured a bygone way of life . . . His translucent prose is a sparkling and moving record." -- Times (London)<br /><br />At sixteen, Edward Beauclerk Maurice impulsively signed up with the Hudson's Bay Company -- the Company of Gentleman Adventurers -- and was sent to an isolated trading post in the Canadian Arctic, where there was no telephone or radio and only one ship arrived each year. But the Inuit people who traded there taught him how to track polar bears, build igloos, and survive expeditions in ferocious winter storms. He learned their language and became so immersed in their culture and way of life that children thought he was Inuit himself. When an epidemic struck, Maurice treated the sick using a simple first aid kit, and after a number of the hunters died, he had to start hunting himself, often with women, who soon began to compete for his affections. The young man who in England had never been alone with a woman other than his mother and sisters had come of age in the Arctic.<br /><br />In The Last Gentleman Adventurer Edward Beauclerk Maurice transports the reader to a time and a way of life now lost forever.<br /><br />After serving in the New Zealand navy during World War II, Edward Beauclerk Maurice became a bookseller in an English village and rarely traveled again. He died in 2003 as this, his only book, was being readied for publication.<br /><br /> "If you like reality, The Last Gentleman Adventurer will be your cup of tea: a delicious quaff of it. Savor it!" -- Edward Hoagland<br /><br />"Maurice's memoir supplies a fascinating elegy to a vanishing world." -- Telegraph<br /><br />"One of those rare writers who will be remembered for turning out one great memoir/travel book . . . He relates these events in a beautiful prose that is quaintly elegant in tone but never archly so . . . Not only a gentleman but a wonderful writer who limited his output to one book, and perhaps that is why it reads so beautifully." -- Sunday Tribune (Dublin)<br /><br />"Maybe he was exceptional, but the charm of his book lies in its modesty; he makes no claims for himself. His concern was to make a record of some amazing adventures and a vanishing way of life; these are woven into an eye-opening narrative that is suffused with kindliness and an attitude to growing up more restrained but more humane than that prevailing today. A gentleman adventurer indeed." -- Times Educational Supplement<br /><br />"A deceptively simple account of how he grew to manhood, shaped on one hand by the brutal elements of the Arctic, on the other by the compassionate communities of Inuit who understood them . . . This is a beautifully unadorned, homespun tale with a lack of self-consciousness rare in travel literature . . . I was charmed." -- Benedict Allen, Independent on Sunday</div>
The Capture of Attu (Annotated): A World War II Battle as Told by...
by , Nelson L. Drummond

Language

English

Pages

228

Publication Date

October 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In May 1943 US forces clashed with Japanese invaders in an epic battle on the Alaskan island of Attu. Fighting through the fog and icy rain, avoiding pot-shots from snipers in mountain crevices, lugging heavy machine guns up slippery inclines, and ultimately scaling a 250-foot cliff, the 17th Infantry willed its way to a crucial victory in what the author calls, ‘The Queen of Infantry Battles.’<br /><br /><br />*Annotated edition with original footnotes.<br />*Includes photographs from the Aleutian Islands Campaign.
The White Darkness
by David Grann

Language

English

Pages

142

Publication Date

October 30, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>By the #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i>, a powerful true story of adventure and obsession in the Antarctic, lavishly illustrated with color photographs</b></b><br /><br />Henry Worsley was a devoted husband and father and a decorated British special forces officer who believed in honor and sacrifice. He was also a man obsessed. He spent his life idolizing Ernest Shackleton, the nineteenth-century polar explorer, who tried to become the first person to reach the South Pole, and later sought to cross Antarctica on foot. Shackleton never completed his journeys, but he repeatedly rescued his men from certain death, and emerged as one of the greatest leaders in history.<br /><br />Worsley felt an overpowering connection to those expeditions. He was related to one of Shackleton's men, Frank Worsley, and spent a fortune collecting artifacts from their epic treks across the continent. He modeled his military command on Shackleton's legendary skills and was determined to measure his own powers of endurance against them. He would succeed where Shackleton had failed, in the most brutal landscape in the world. <br /><br />In 2008, Worsley set out across Antarctica with two other descendants of Shackleton's crew, battling the freezing, desolate landscape, life-threatening physical exhaustion, and hidden crevasses. Yet when he returned home he felt compelled to go back. On November 13, 2015, at age 55, Worsley bid farewell to his family and embarked on his most perilous quest: to walk across Antarctica alone.<br /><br />David Grann tells Worsley's remarkable story with the intensity and power that have led him to be called "simply the best narrative nonfiction writer working today." Illustrated with more than fifty stunning photographs from Worsley's and Shackleton's journeys, <i>The White Darkness</i> is both a gorgeous keepsake volume and a spellbinding story of courage, love, and a man pushing himself to the extremes of human capacity.
Shackleton's Way: Leadership Lessons from the Great Antarctic Exp...
by , Stephanie Capparell

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

January 08, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Lead your business to survival and success by following the example of legendary explorer Ernest Shackleton</b><br /><br />Sir Ernest Shackleton has been called "the greatest leader that ever came on God's earth, bar none" for saving the lives of the twenty-seven men stranded with him in the Antarctic for almost two years. Because of his courageous actions, he remains to this day a model for great leadership and masterful crisis management. Now, through anecdotes, the diaries of the men in his crew, and Shackleton's own writing, Shackleton's leadership style and time-honored principles are translated for the modern business world. Written by two veteran business observers and illustrated with ship photographer Frank Hurley's masterpieces and other rarely seen photos, this practical book helps today's leaders follow Shackleton's triumphant example.<br /><br />"An important addition to any leader's library." -<i>Seattle Times</i>
Erebus: One Ship, Two Epic Voyages, and the Greatest Naval Myster...
by Michael Palin

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

September 25, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><em>Driven by a passion for travel and history and a love of ships and the sea, former Monty Python stalwart and beloved television globe-trotter Michael Palin explores the world of HMS </em>Erebus, <em>last seen on an ill-fated voyage to chart the Northwest Passage.</em></p><p>Michael Palin brings the fascinating story of the <em>Erebus</em> and its occupants to life, from its construction as a bomb vessel in 1826 through the flagship years of James Clark Ross’s Antarctic expedition and finally to Sir John Franklin’s quest for the holy grail of navigation—a route through the Northwest Passage, where the ship disappeared into the depths of the sea for more than 150 years. It was rediscovered under the arctic waters in 2014.</p><p>Palin travels across the world—from Tasmania to the Falkland Islands and the Canadian Arctic—to offer a firsthand account of the terrain and conditions that would have confronted the <em>Erebus</em> and her doomed final crew. Delving into the research, he describes the intertwined careers of the two men who shared the ship’s journeys: Ross, the organizational genius who mapped much of the Antarctic coastline and oversaw some of the earliest scientific experiments to be conducted there; and Franklin, who, at the age of sixty and after a checkered career, commanded the ship on its last disastrous venture. Expertly researched and illustrated with maps, photographs, paintings, and engravings, <em>Erebus</em> is an evocative account of two journeys: one successful and forgotten, the other tragic yet unforgettable.</p>
Sea of Glory: America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring E...
by Nathaniel Philbrick

Language

English

Pages

481

Publication Date

October 26, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"A treasure of a book."—David McCullough<br /><br />The harrowing story of a pathbreaking naval expedition that set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean, dwarfing Lewis and Clark with its discoveries, from the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Valiant Ambition</i> and <i>In the Hurricane's Eye</i>.<br /></b><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book</b><br /><br />America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling <i>In the Heart of the Sea</i> Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory.<br /><br /><b>Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize</b>

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