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Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
by Alfred Lansing

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

April 29, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>The harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to reach the South Pole, one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age.</b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div>In August 1914, polar explorer Ernest Shackleton boarded the Endurance and set sail for Antarctica, where he planned to cross the last uncharted continent on foot. In January 1915, after battling its way through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day's sail short of its destination, the Endurance became locked in an island of ice. Thus began the legendary ordeal of Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men.</div><div><br /></div><div>For ten months the ice-moored Endurance drifted northwest before it was finally crushed between two ice floes. With no options left, Shackleton and a skeleton crew attempted a near-impossible journey over 850 miles of the South Atlantic's heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization. Their survival, and the survival of the men they left behind, depended on their small lifeboat successfully finding the island of South Georgia--a tiny dot of land in a vast and hostile ocean.</div><div><br /></div><div>In <i>Endurance</i>, the definitive account of Ernest Shackleton's fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing and miraculous voyage that has defined heroism for the modern age.</div>
My Life with the Eskimo
by Vilhjalmur Stefansson

Language

English

Pages

478

Publication Date

May 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>Who are the Eskimo peoples?<br /><br />And how do they survive in the freezing conditions of the far north?</h2><br /><br />Vilhjálmur Stefánsson left New York in April 1908 to begin his journey northwards and into the Arctic Circle. <br /><br />For the next two years he made his way northwards to Victoria Island to study an isolated group of Inuit who still used primitive tools and had strong Caucasian features, and whom some believed were descended from Vikings.<br /><br />The journey into these remote areas was incredibly tough and being delayed by blizzards Stefánsson, along with his companions, were forced to eat the tongue of a beached whale that had been dead for at least four years. <br /><br />Stefánsson, who learnt how to communicate with the Inuit, provides fascinating insight into the beliefs and every day life of these people.<br /><br />“the book is full of psychologic and human interest, and of clear-cut observation of many different kinds.” <em>The North American Review</em><br /><br />“This book contains a wealth of ethnological and biological information … this is a valuable contribution to the scientific study of the Eskimos, by one who knows them thoroughly.” <em>The Literary Digest</em><br /><br />“It is impossible to analyze with certainty the amalgam of motives underlying the ceaseless movement of northern exploration, but the lure of the difficult and the dangerous can hardly be less active than the desire to enlarge bounds of human knowledge.” <em>The Nation</em><br /><br />This book is essential reading for anyone interested in this remarkable expedition and for people who want to find out more about life of people in the far north prior to the advent of modern technology.<br /><br />Vilhjálmur Stefánsson was a Canadian Artic explorer and ethnologist. Under the auspices of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, he and Dr. R. M. Anderson undertook the ethnological survey of the Central Arctic coasts of the shores of North America from 1908 to 1912. The results of this expedition were <em>My Life with the Eskimo</em> first published in 1913. Stefánsson passed away in 1962.<br />
Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of E...
by David Roberts

Language

English

Pages

393

Publication Date

January 28, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"Gripping and superb. This book will steal the night from you." —Laurence Gonzales, author of <em>Deep Survival</em></strong></p><br /><p>On January 17, 1913, alone and near starvation, Douglas Mawson, leader of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, was hauling a sledge to get back to base camp. The dogs were gone. Now Mawson himself plunged through a snow bridge, dangling over an abyss by the sledge harness. A line of poetry gave him the will to haul himself back to the surface.</p><br /><p>Mawson was sometimes reduced to crawling, and one night he discovered that the soles of his feet had completely detached from the flesh beneath. On February 8, when he staggered back to base, his features unrecognizably skeletal, the first teammate to reach him blurted out, "Which one are you?"</p><br /><p>This thrilling and almost unbelievable account establishes Mawson in his rightful place as one of the greatest polar explorers and expedition leaders. It is illustrated by a trove of Frank Hurley’s famous Antarctic photographs, many never before published in the United States.</p>
In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the...
by Hampton Sides

Language

English

Pages

489

Publication Date

August 05, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i></b> <b>bestselling author Hampton Sides returns with a white-knuckle tale of polar exploration and survival in the Gilded Age<br /></b><br />In the late nineteenth century, people were obsessed by one of the last unmapped areas of the globe: the North Pole. No one knew what existed beyond the fortress of ice rimming the northern oceans, although theories abounded. The foremost cartographer in the world, a German named August Petermann, believed that warm currents sustained a verdant island at the top of the world. National glory would fall to whoever could plant his flag upon its shores. <br /><br />James Gordon Bennett, the eccentric and stupendously wealthy owner of <i>The New York Herald</i>, had recently captured the world's attention by dispatching Stanley to Africa to find Dr. Livingstone. Now he was keen to re-create that sensation on an even more epic scale. So he funded an official U.S. naval expedition to reach the Pole, choosing as its captain a young officer named George Washington De Long, who had gained fame for a rescue operation off the coast of Greenland. De Long led a team of 32 men deep into uncharted Arctic waters, carrying the aspirations of a young country burning to become a world power. On July 8, 1879, the USS <i>Jeannette</i> set sail from San Francisco to cheering crowds in the grip of "Arctic Fever." <br /><br />The ship sailed into uncharted seas, but soon was trapped in pack ice. Two years into the harrowing voyage, the hull was breached. Amid the rush of water and the shrieks of breaking wooden boards, the crew abandoned the ship. Less than an hour later, the <i>Jeannette </i>sank to the bottom,and the men found themselves marooned a thousand miles north of Siberia with only the barest supplies. Thus began their long march across the endless ice—a frozen hell in the most lonesome corner of the world. Facing everything from snow blindness and polar bears to ferocious storms and frosty labyrinths, the expedition battled madness and starvation as they desperately strove for survival. <br /><br />With twists and turns worthy of a thriller, <i>In The Kingdom of Ice</i> is a spellbinding tale of heroism and determination in the most unforgiving territory on Earth.<br /><br /><b>Ebook edition includes over a dozen extra images<br /></b>
The Ice Diaries: The True Story of One of Mankind's Greatest Adve...
by Captain William R. Anders...

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

July 29, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<P><B>The greatest undersea adventure of the 20th century.</B></P> <P><I>The Ice Diaries</I> tells the incredible true story of Captain William R. Anderson and his crew's harrowing top-secret mission aboard the USS <I>Nautilus</I>, the world's first nuclear-powered submarine. Bristling with newly classified, never-before-published information and photos from the captain's personal collection, <I>The Ice Diaries</I> takes readers on a dangerous journey beneath the vast, unexplored Arctic ice cap during the height of the Cold War.</P> <P>"Captain Anderson and the crew of the <I>USS Nautilus</I> exemplified daring and boldness in taking their boat beneath the Arctic ice to the North Pole. This expertly told story captures the drama, danger, and importance of that monumental achievement." ?Capt. Stanley D. M. Carpenter, Professor of Strategy and Policy, United States Naval War College</P> <P>"Few maritime exploits in history have so startled the world as the silent, secret transpolar voyage of the U.S. Navy's nuclear submarine <I>Nautilus</I>, and none since the age of Columbus and Vasco da Gama has opened, in one bold stroke, so vast and forbidding an area of the seas." ?Paul O'Neil, <I>Life</I> magazine</P> <P><BR> </P>
To the Edges of the Earth: 1909, the Race for the Three Poles, an...
by Edward J. Larson

Language

English

Pages

373

Publication Date

March 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>From the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, a breathtaking entwined narrative of the most adventurous year of all time: in 1909 three daring expeditions–led by Ernest Shackleton, Robert Peary, and the dashing Duke of the Abruzzi–simultaneously raced to the top, bottom, and heights of the world.</strong></p><p><strong>"Suspenseful. ... Larson does full justice to his three protagonists’ remarkable bravery." —<em>Wall Street Journal</em></strong></p><p>As 1909 dawned, the greatest jewels of exploration—set at the world’s frozen extremes—lay unclaimed: the North and South Poles and the so-called “Third Pole,” the pole of altitude, located in unexplored heights of the Himalaya. Before the calendar turned, three expeditions had faced death, mutiny, and the harshest conditions on the planet to plant flags at the furthest edges of the Earth.</p><p>In the course of one extraordinary year, Americans Robert Peary and Matthew Henson were hailed worldwide at the discovers of the North Pole; Britain’s Ernest Shackleton had set a new geographic “Furthest South” record, while his expedition mate, Australian Douglas Mawson, had reached the Magnetic South Pole; and at the roof of the world, Italy’s Duke of the Abruzzi had attained an altitude record that would stand for a generation, the result of the first major mountaineering expedition to the Himalaya's eastern Karakoram, where the daring aristocrat attempted K2 and established the standard route up the most notorious mountain on the planet.  </p><p>Based on extensive archival and on-the-ground research, Edward J. Larson weaves these narratives into one thrilling adventure story<strong>.</strong> Larson, author of the acclaimed polar history <em>Empire of Ice</em>, draws on his own voyages to the Himalaya, the arctic, and the ice sheets of the Antarctic, where he himself reached the South Pole and lived in Shackleton’s Cape Royds hut as a fellow in the National Science Foundations’ Antarctic Artists and Writers Program.  </p><p>These three legendary expeditions, overlapping in time, danger, and stakes, were glorified upon their return, their leaders celebrated as the preeminent heroes of their day. Stripping away the myth, Larson, a master historian, illuminates one of the great, overlooked tales of exploration, revealing the extraordinary human achievement at the heart of these journeys.</p><p> </p>
Sea of Glory: America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring E...
by Nathaniel Philbrick

Language

English

Pages

481

Publication Date

October 26, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"A treasure of a book."—David McCullough<br /><br />The harrowing story of a pathbreaking naval expedition that set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean, dwarfing Lewis and Clark with its discoveries, from the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Valiant Ambition</i> and <i>In the Hurricane's Eye</i>.<br /></b><br /><b>A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book</b><br /><br />America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling <i>In the Heart of the Sea</i> Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory.<br /><br /><b>Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize</b>
White Horizon: The Arctic in the Nineteenth-Century British Imagi...
by Jen Hill

Language

English

Pages

246

Publication Date

January 08, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<i>From explorers’ accounts to boys’ adventure fiction, how Arctic exploration served as a metaphor for nation-building and empire in nineteenth-century Britain.</i><br /><br />Bridging historical and literary studies, White Horizon explores the importance of the Arctic to British understandings of masculine identity, the nation, and the rapidly expanding British Empire in the nineteenth century. Well before Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, polar space had come to represent the limit of both empire and human experience. Using a variety of texts, from explorers’ accounts to boys’ adventure fiction, as well as provocative and fresh readings of the works of Mary Shelley, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, and Wilkie Collins, Jen H ill illustrates the function of Arctic space in the nineteenth-century British social imagination, arguing that the desolate north was imagined as a “pure” space, a conveniently blank page on which to write narratives of Arctic exploration that both furthered and critiqued British imperialism.<br /><br />Jen Hill is Associate Professor of English at the University of Nevada at Reno and editor of An Exhilaration of Wings: The Literature of Birdwatching.<br /><br />
The Stowaway: A Young Man's Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica
by Laurie Gwen Shapiro

Language

English

Pages

256

Publication Date

January 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The spectacular, true story of a scrappy teenager from New York’s Lower East Side who stowed away on the Roaring Twenties’ most remarkable feat of science and daring: an expedition to Antarctica.<BR><BR>It was 1928: a time of illicit booze, of Gatsby and Babe Ruth, of freewheeling fun. The Great War was over and American optimism was higher than the stock market. What better moment to launch an expedition to Antarctica, the planet’s final frontier? There wouldn’t be another encounter with an unknown this magnificent until Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon.<BR> <BR>Everyone wanted in on the adventure. Rockefellers and Vanderbilts begged to be taken along as mess boys, and newspapers across the globe covered the planning’s every stage. And then, the night before the expedition’s flagship set off, Billy Gawronski—a mischievous, first-generation New York City high schooler desperate to escape a dreary future in the family upholstery business—jumped into the Hudson River and snuck aboard.<BR> <BR>Could he get away with it?<BR> <BR>From the soda shops of New York’s Lower East Side to the dance halls of sultry Francophone Tahiti, all the way to Antarctica’s blinding white and deadly freeze, Laurie Gwen Shapiro’s <i>The Stowaway</i> takes you on the unforgettable voyage of a plucky young stowaway who became a Jazz Age celebrity, a mascot for an up-by-your bootstraps era.
Captain Francis Crozier: Last Man Standing?
by Michael Smith

Language

English

Pages

264

Publication Date

June 12, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Irishman Francis Crozier was a major figure in nineteenth-century polar exploration. His voyages with Parry, Ross and Franklin lifted the veil from the frozen wastes of the Arctic and Antarctic, paving the way for Amundsen, Scott and Shackleton. The Antarctic cape named after him was immortalised in Apsley Cherry-Garrard's The Worst Journey in the World. A failed romance drove him back to the ice one fatal last time with Franklin's North West Passage expedition in 1845. All 129 men perished. Crozier took command after Franklin's death and led the courageous battle to survive in the Arctic wilderness. In the bitter life-or-death struggle, which lasted for years, some even resorted to cannibalism. But, according to legend, Crozier was the last to die – the last man standing. • Also available: An Unsung Hero: Tom Crean</p>

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