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An Unsinkable Titanic: every ship its own lifeboat
by John Bernard Walker

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The history and story of the creation of the Titanic
In Memoriam: The Titanic Disaster
by Hannah Rea Woodman

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
A memorial for the survivors and lost of the disaster Titanic
Massacre: The Tragedy that befell the Yaburara of Murujuga
by Thom Ardun

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This short story features a dramatisation of events that took place in February 1868 on Murujuga, an island in the Dampier Archipeligo of Western Australia, now known as the Burrup Peninsula. An example of the extreme violence with which the Aborigines were routinely 'pacified' by the British invaders.
The Marriage Crucible: Still the Lonely Heart, A Western Australi...
by William Streat

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Harassed by a lifetime of guilt over youthful indiscretions and traumatised by her life’s choices, Ros Hamill returns to her Irish homeland forty-five years after her exile to the wilds of Western Australia where she became a farming pioneer. The redemption she seeks reveals a different interpretation of the myth she has created about her life and motives.<br /><br />‘Silently, she was shocked by each new revelation and the crudity that appeared to accompany it. Was this the netherworld of her vision in Southampton, the hell to be visited upon her for her indiscretion?’<br /><br />‘She was dismayed that she had embellished the future beyond reason, the common failure of dreams. Was it to be her destiny, her road to fulfilment, to follow his prolonged male path?’<br /><br />‘It was a surprising revelation - to find she had been hardened by the torture of her other life.’
Not Your Usual Australian Tales: a social history, from Invasion ...
by Peter Macinnis

Language

English

Pages

1022

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Australians: this book fleshes out the bald, dead-white-male hero story you learned at school. It introduces new characters (not all of them white, or male, or heroes); provides contexts; and encourages you to ask your own questions.<br /><br />Non-Australians: Mark Twain explains why you should read this book:<br /><br />“Australian history … does not read like history, but like the most beautiful lies. And all of a fresh new sort, no mouldy old stale ones. It is full of surprises, and adventures, and incongruities, and contradictions, and incredibilities; but they are all true, they all happened.”<br /><br />Here, you will meet reformed would-be assassins who fought bushrangers; the first cases of redbacks on the dunny seat; the truth about bunyips and the crocodile in Sydney’s Rocks; methods for getting rid of fleas; how horse thieves worked; what had to be done before paddle steamers could run on the Murray River; the Russian invasion ‘scare’ in Melbourne; duels fought by foolish men; a scandal over a dead horse; cruel treatment dished out to coolies; wrecks, floods, bushfires, droughts and plague; booms and busts; early schools and early poets: some sublime and some awful.<br /><br />The real history of Australia, the untold stuff, has many diversions, like the case of the society ladies who stood on their chairs, waving their handkerchiefs: their action was one of the starting points for the book, and in chapter 48, you will learn why they did it.<br /><br />The real Australian history is very different from the packaged stuff that you get from written and dramatic fiction in books. The judges weren’t all monsters, screaming “Hang Them!”. Judges often worked very hard to save prisoners from the gallows (even Samuel Burt, who really wanted to hang!). That said, quite a few of the convicts were serious villains, who did far more than “steal a loaf of bread to feed their hungry children”.<br /><br />Then again, some of the other convicts were political prisoners, and at least one was falsely convicted: you’ll find all of those here, and you’ll also learn that transported convicts weren’t kept below decks, in chains, the whole voyage — and Norfolk Island wasn’t always the hell-hole it was in later years. <br /><br />Then again, squatters weren’t always rich, the first bushrangers weren’t thieves, and Edward Hammond Hargraves wasn’t the first to discover gold — in fact, he never did discover gold, but he conspired to make Australia’s gold rush happen. Oh, yes, and if you learned about explorers at school, they weren’t all heroes, some were villains, and some of them were fools.<br /><br />The surprises didn’t stop there: specialist pedants will tell you that Matthew Flinders was the first to use the name ‘Australia’, but this book offers two earlier sources for that name. Then again, pop history has swimming only starting with ‘neck-to-knee’ costumes in the 1890s: sorry, but your ancestors, if you are Australian, probably skinny-dipped. Certainly, the nation’s first swimming races came off with it all off, so to speak.<br /><br />In short, this book tells it like it was, but more importantly, in the age of Fake News and Alternative Facts, this book gives you the sources, so you can ask the important questions:<br />* what happened before that?<br />* do you really expect us to believe that? And<br />* what happened next?<br /><br />Peter Macinnis is an award-winning Australian writer for both adults and children, and his awards come from the Children's Book Council of Australia, the West Australian Premier’s Literary Awards, the Wilderness Society, and the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, among others.<br /><br />Trained as a biologist, he cares about the stories behind things, and so he has become well-regarded as an historian. He also talks on ABC Radio National from time to time, sometimes teaches adults how to do extreme research and data handling, and thoroughly enjoys being the visiting scientist at his local K-6 school.<br />
Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism, and Michael Roc...
by Carl Hoffman

Language

English

Pages

339

Publication Date

March 18, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The mysterious disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in New Guinea in 1961 has kept the world and his powerful, influential family guessing for years. Now, Carl Hoffman uncovers startling new evidence that finally tells the full, astonishing story.</p><p>Despite exhaustive searches, no trace of Rockefeller was ever found. Soon after his disappearance, rumors surfaced that he'd been killed and ceremonially eaten by the local Asmat—a native tribe of warriors whose complex culture was built around sacred, reciprocal violence, head hunting, and ritual cannibalism. The Dutch government and the Rockefeller family denied the story, and Michael's death was officially ruled a drowning. Yet doubts lingered. Sensational rumors and stories circulated, fueling speculation and intrigue for decades. The real story has long waited to be told—until now.</p><p>Retracing Rockefeller's steps, award-winning journalist Carl Hoffman traveled to the jungles of New Guinea, immersing himself in a world of headhunters and cannibals, secret spirits and customs, and getting to know generations of Asmat. Through exhaustive archival research, he uncovered never-before-seen original documents and located witnesses willing to speak publically after fifty years.</p><p>In <em>Savage Harvest</em> he finally solves this decades-old mystery and illuminates a culture transformed by years of colonial rule, whose people continue to be shaped by ancient customs and lore. Combining history, art, colonialism, adventure, and ethnography, <em>Savage Harvest</em> is a mesmerizing whodunit, and a fascinating portrait of the clash between two civilizations that resulted in the death of one of America's richest and most powerful scions.</p>
Pacific: Silicon Chips and Surfboards, Coral Reefs and Atom Bombs...
by Simon Winchester

Language

English

Pages

512

Publication Date

October 27, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>One of <em>Library Journal</em>’s 10 Best Books of 2015</strong></p><p>Following his acclaimed <em>Atlantic</em> and <em>The Men Who United the States,</em> <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author Simon Winchester offers an enthralling biography of the Pacific Ocean and its role in the modern world, exploring our relationship with this imposing force of nature.</p><p>As the Mediterranean shaped the classical world, and the Atlantic connected Europe to the New World, the Pacific Ocean defines our tomorrow. With China on the rise, so, too, are the American cities of the West coast, including Seattle, San Francisco, and the long cluster of towns down the Silicon Valley.</p><p>Today, the Pacific is ascendant. Its geological history has long transformed us—tremendous earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis—but its human history, from a Western perspective, is quite young, beginning with Magellan’s sixteenth-century circumnavigation. It is a natural wonder whose most fascinating history is currently being made.</p><p>In telling the story of the Pacific, Simon Winchester takes us from the Bering Strait to Cape Horn, the Yangtze River to the Panama Canal, and to the many small islands and archipelagos that lie in between. He observes the fall of a dictator in Manila, visits aboriginals in northern Queensland, and is jailed in Tierra del Fuego, the land at the end of the world. His journey encompasses a trip down the Alaska Highway, a stop at the isolated Pitcairn Islands, a trek across South Korea and a glimpse of its mysterious northern neighbor.</p><p>Winchester’s personal experience is vast and his storytelling second to none. And his historical understanding of the region is formidable, making <em>Pacific</em> a paean to this magnificent sea of beauty, myth, and imagination that is transforming our lives.</p>
The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an Amer...
by Timothy Egan

Language

English

Pages

389

Publication Date

March 01, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>"An old-fashioned tale of tall talk, high ideals,and irresistible appeal . . . You will not read a historical thriller like this all year . . . [Egan] is a master storyteller." <I>—Boston Globe</I><BR /><BR /> “Egan has a gift for sweeping narrative . . . and he has a journalist’s eye for the telltale detail . . . This is masterly work.” — <I>New York Times Book Review</I></B><BR />  <BR /> In this exciting and illuminating work, National Book Award winner Timothy Egan delivers a story, both rollicking and haunting, of one of the most famous Irish Americans of all time. A dashing young orator during the Great Hunger of the 1840s, Thomas Francis Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, for which he was banished to a Tasmanian prison colony for life. But two years later he was “back from the dead” and in New York, instantly the most famous Irishman in America. Meagher’s rebirth included his leading the newly formed Irish Brigade in many of the fiercest battles of the Civil War. Afterward, he tried to build a new Ireland in the wild west of Montana—a quixotic adventure that ended in the  great mystery of his disappearance, which Egan resolves convincingly at last.<BR />  <BR /><B>“This is marvelous stuff. Thomas F. Meagher strides onto Egan's beautifully wrought pages just as he lived—powerfully larger than life. A fascinating account of an extraordinary life.” — Daniel James Brown, author of <I>The Boys in the Boat</I><BR />  <BR /> “Thomas Meagher’s is an irresistible story, irresistibly retold by the virtuosic Timothy Egan . . . A gripping, novelistic page-turner.” — <I>Wall Street Journal</I></B><BR />  </DIV>
Mother of Ten (Whisper My Secret Book 2)
by JB Rowley

Language

English

Pages

236

Publication Date

April 21, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b> #1 BEST SELLER IN ‘AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND’! </b><br /><p><strong> What happens to children who are robbed of family?</strong></p><p>Myrtle’s first three children grew up without any knowledge of their mother after Myrtle was forced to give them up when they were still toddlers. Not only were the children deprived of contact with their mother, they also grew up devoid of any knowledge of each other after being placed in separate facilities.</p><p>In this sequel to Whisper My Secret, JB Rowley explores what happened to the three half-siblings she never knew. As one of the children of Myrtle’s second family, JB also offers a personal view of a mother making a new life without her first family.</p><p>Although the devastating loss of her first three children remained with her, Myrtle became a caring and committed mother of seven more children living in near isolation in the Australian bush. This mother’s strength of character is matched in her first three children who survived and thrived despite being cheated of the nurturing that should have been their birthright.</p> <p>Their stories are sad, sometimes heartbreaking but ultimately courageous and inspiring.</p>
Indigenous Crime and Settler Law: White Sovereignty after Empire ...
by , M. Finnane

Language

English

Pages

280

Publication Date

August 21, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In a break from the contemporary focus on the law's response to inter-racial crime, the authors examine the law's approach to the victimization of one Indigenous person by another. Drawing on a wealth of archival material relating to homicides in Australia, they conclude that settlers and Indigenous peoples still live in the shadow of empire.

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