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Island of the Lost: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World
by Joan Druett

Language

English

Pages

299

Publication Date

June 08, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Auckland Island is a godforsaken place in the middle of the Southern Ocean, 285 miles south of New Zealand. With year-round freezing rain and howling winds, it is one of the most forbidding places in the world. To be shipwrecked there means almost certain death.<br /> <br /> In 1864 Captain Thomas Musgrave and his crew of four aboard the schooner <em>Grafton</em> wreck on the southern end of the island. Utterly alone in a dense coastal forest, plagued by stinging blowflies and relentless rain, Captain Musgrave—rather than succumb to this dismal fate—inspires his men to take action. With barely more than their bare hands, they build a cabin and, remarkably, a forge, where they manufacture their tools. Under Musgrave's leadership, they band together and remain civilized through even the darkest and most terrifying days.<br /> <br /> Incredibly, at the same time on the opposite end of the island—twenty miles of impassable cliffs and chasms away—the <em>Invercauld</em> wrecks during a horrible storm. Nineteen men stagger ashore. Unlike Captain Musgrave, the captain of the <em>Invercauld</em> falls apart given the same dismal circumstances. His men fight and split up; some die of starvation, others turn to cannibalism. Only three survive. Musgrave and all of his men not only endure for nearly two years, they also plan their own astonishing escape, setting off on one of the most courageous sea voyages in history.<br /> <br /> Using the survivors' journals and historical records, award-winning maritime historian Joan Druett brings this extraordinary untold story to life, a story about leadership and the fine line between order and chaos.
South From Corregidor
by , Pete Martin

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

September 17, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>“This is not only one of the best of the war books, it is a record of cooperative courage achieved by a group of men in a manner wholly American.” <em>The New York Times</em></h2><br /><br />At the outbreak of the Second World War U.S.S. Quail was in the Philippines sweeping mines to provide access for American shipping to South Harbor, Corregidor. <br /><br />Damaged by enemy bombs and guns during the Japanese invasion of the island John Morrill and his fellow men decided to make the decision to scuttle their ship rather than allow it to be captured.<br /><br />This led them to begin one of the most daring escapes of the Second World War.<br /><br />Lieutenant Commander John Morrill and sixteen fellow sailors took a thirty-six-foot diesel boat nearly two thousand miles through Japanese controlled waters.<br /><br />They moved mostly at night, with a homemade sextant, some salvaged charts, with little fresh water and food, but even despite these difficulties they eventually made their way to Darwin, Australia.<br /><br />“nonfiction account of his breathtaking escape in 1942 from the Japanese at Corregidor, the beleaguered U.S. fortress commanding Manila Bay in the Philippines.” <em>The Washington Post</em><br /><br />“The enthralling story of how a handful of Navy men escaped from falling Corregidor southward to Australia in a leaky 36-foot landing boat.” <em>Foreign Affairs</em><br /><br />“A matter of fact, modest and inherently dramatic account of an isolated incident in the pacific war” <em>Kirkus Reviews</em><br /><br />John Morrill was a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Navy. In June 1939 he became commanding officer of the minesweeper U.S.S. Quail. Pete Martin was a journalist and author. Their book <em>South from Corregidor</em> was first published in 1943. Pete Martin passed away in 1980 and John Morrill passed away in 1997.<br />
Road Through the Rain Forest: Living Anthropology in Highland Pap...
by David M. Hayano

Language

English

Pages

164

Publication Date

January 01, 1990

Product Description
Customer Reviews
On the remote slopes of the grassland and rain forests of Highland Papua New Guinea, live the Awa, subsiding on root crops and raising domestic pigs. Like many cultures, the Awa must deal with and find solutions to the problems of human social existence: inevitable and rapid culture change, interpersonal squabbles, lying and deceit, adultery, sorcery, and unexpected death. They wait ambivalently for the building of a road that would put them in direct contact with the encroaching world of trade stores, outdoor markets, schools, and the government station. In the middle of this walks an anthropologist who learns that fieldwork is first and foremost about understanding lives, both his and theirs. This book is a personal narrative that provides an intimate glimpse of the actual conduct of fieldwork among diverse individuals with remarkably distinct views of their own culture. It is an account of intertwined lives—of living anthropology—and a road of hope and promise, despair and tragedy.
Victory in Papua
by Samuel Milner

Language

English

Pages

476

Publication Date

December 17, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<em><h2></b>Costly in casualties and suffering, [this campaign] taught lessons that the Army had to learn if it was to cope with the Japanese under conditions of tropical warfare.</h2></em></b><br /><br />By mid-1942 the Japanese forces were threatening to take the colonial capital of Port Moresby and therefore gain a base to launch their proposed invasion of Australia.<br /><br />The allied forces needed to blunt the Japanese thrust toward Australia and thus protect the transpacific line of communications, as well as to secure a favorable position to take the offensive to the Japanese.<br /><br />Yet this was easier planned than executed; the Australians had been battered through two years of combat with their enemies and although the Americans were bringing large numbers of reinforcements, they were living under intolerable conditions, plagued by disease, short of equipment, ill-prepared for jungle fighting, and pitted against a skilled and resolute foe.<br /><br />According to Australian military historian, John Laffin, the campaign "was arguably the most arduous fought by any Allied troops during World War II".<br /><br />Milner uncovers every aspect of the campaign in 1942 from its early planning stages through to the many conflicts with Japanese troops that culminated in the brutal Battle of Buna-Gona in early 1943. However, rather than simply giving an overview of these turbulent months Milner focuses particularly on the actions of the 32nd Infantry Division who were at the frontline of the offensive to give the reader a direct view of what life was like during the campaign.<br /><br />To develop a picture of this dramatic campaign Milner drew from not only the official records but also spoke to men who were there and saw it, including Robert L. Eichelberger, as well as drawing from many Australian sources and historians.<br /><br />“Samuel Milner’s <em>Victory in Papua</em>, the official U.S. Army history, provides a thorough narrative of the Papua New Guinea campaign and is an excellent starting point.” Major Matthew H. Fath, <em> Intrepidity, Iron Will, and Intellect: General Robert L. Eichelberger and Military Genius</em><br /><br />“a solid and valued work.” James Jay Carafano, www.heritage.org <br /><br />“a thorough account of the actions of the 32nd Division in the Papuan campaign of 1942.” Henry L. Roberts, <em>Foreign Affairs</em><br /><br />“In telling the story of a comparatively limited number of troops, the author has been able to present the combat experience of small units in sharper focus than has been possible in most of the other full-scale campaign volumes.” Maj. Gen. A. C. Smith, Chief of Military History<br /><br />Samuel Milner was a historian who held a graduate degree in history from the University of Alberta and had done further graduate work in political science at the University of Minnesota. He had served during the war as a historian with the Army Air Transport Command in Australia and New Guinea, and worked for the Army office of the chief of military history after the war. After this he worked as government historian for many years before passing away in 2000. His book <em> Victory in Papua</em> was first published in 1957.<br />
Tears in the Darkness: The Story of the Bataan Death March and It...
by , Elizabeth M. Norman

Language

English

Pages

479

Publication Date

June 09, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><i>Tears in the Darkness</i> is an altogether new look at World War II that exposes the myths of war and shows the extent of suffering and loss on both sides. </p><p>For the first four months of 1942, U.S., Filipino, and Japanese soldiers fought what was America's first major land battle of World War II, the battle for the tiny Philippine peninsula of Bataan. It ended with the surrender of 76,000 Filipinos and Americans, the single largest defeat in American military history.</p><p>The defeat, though, was only the beginning, as Michael and Elizabeth M. Norman make dramatically clear in this powerfully original book. From then until the Japanese surrendered in August 1945, the prisoners of war suffered an ordeal of unparalleled cruelty and savagery: forty-one months of captivity, starvation rations, dehydration, hard labor, deadly disease, and torture—far from the machinations of General Douglas MacArthur.</p><p>The Normans bring to the story remarkable feats of reportage and literary empathy. Their protagonist, Ben Steele, is a figure out of Hemingway: a young cowboy turned sketch artist from Montana who joined the army to see the world. Juxtaposed against Steele's story and the sobering tale of the Death March and its aftermath is the story of a number of Japanese soldiers.</p>
The Land Before Avocado
by Richard Glover

Language

English

Pages

206

Publication Date

November 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>The new book from the bestselling author of <em>Flesh Wounds.</em> A funny and frank look at the way Australia used to be - and just how far we have come.</strong> <p>'It was simpler time'. We had more fun back then'. 'Everyone could afford a house'.</p><p>There's plenty of nostalgia right now for the Australia of the past, but what was it really like?</p><p>In <em>The </em><em>Land Before Avocado</em>, Richard Glover takes a journey to an almost unrecognisable Australia. It's a vivid portrait of a quite peculiar land: a place that is scary and weird, dangerous and incomprehensible, and, now and then, surprisingly appealing.</p><p>It's the Australia of his childhood. The Australia of the late '60s and early '70s.</p><p>Let's break the news now: they didn't have avocado.</p><p>It's a place of funny clothing and food that was appalling, but amusingly so. It is also the land of staggeringly awful attitudes - often enshrined in law - towards anybody who didn't fit in.</p><p><em>The Land Before Avocado</em> will make you laugh and cry, feel angry and inspired. And leave you wondering how bizarre things were, not so long ago.</p><p>Most of all, it will make you realise how far we've come - and how much further we can go.</p><p>PRAISE</p><p>Richard Glover's just-published <em>The Land Before </em><em>Avocado</em> is a wonderful and witty journey back in time to life in the early 1970s. For a start, he deftly reclaims the book's title fruit from those who have positioned it as a proxy for all that is wrong with today's supposedly feckless and spendthrift young adults. Rather than maligning the avocado (and young people), he cleverly appropriates the fruit as an exemplar of how far we have come since the 1970s' Richard Wakelin, <em>Australian Financial Review</em></p><p>'This is vintage Glover - warm, wise and very, very funny. Brimming with excruciating insights into life in the late sixties and early seventies, The Land Before Avocado explains why this was the cultural revolution we had to have' Hugh Mackay</p><p> </p><p>'Hilarious and horrifying, this is the ultimate intergenerational conversation starter' Annabel Crabb</p><p> </p><p>PRAISE FOR FLESH WOUNDS</p><p>'A funny, moving, very entertaining memoir' Bill Bryson, New York Times</p><p> </p><p>'The best Australian memoir I've read is Richard Glover's Flesh Wounds' Greg Sheridan, The</p><p>Australian</p><p> </p>
The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an Amer...
by Timothy Egan

Language

English

Pages

389

Publication Date

March 01, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>"An old-fashioned tale of tall talk, high ideals,and irresistible appeal . . . You will not read a historical thriller like this all year . . . [Egan] is a master storyteller." <I>—Boston Globe</I><BR /><BR /> “Egan has a gift for sweeping narrative . . . and he has a journalist’s eye for the telltale detail . . . This is masterly work.” — <I>New York Times Book Review</I></B><BR />  <BR /> In this exciting and illuminating work, National Book Award winner Timothy Egan delivers a story, both rollicking and haunting, of one of the most famous Irish Americans of all time. A dashing young orator during the Great Hunger of the 1840s, Thomas Francis Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, for which he was banished to a Tasmanian prison colony for life. But two years later he was “back from the dead” and in New York, instantly the most famous Irishman in America. Meagher’s rebirth included his leading the newly formed Irish Brigade in many of the fiercest battles of the Civil War. Afterward, he tried to build a new Ireland in the wild west of Montana—a quixotic adventure that ended in the  great mystery of his disappearance, which Egan resolves convincingly at last.<BR />  <BR /><B>“This is marvelous stuff. Thomas F. Meagher strides onto Egan's beautifully wrought pages just as he lived—powerfully larger than life. A fascinating account of an extraordinary life.” — Daniel James Brown, author of <I>The Boys in the Boat</I><BR />  <BR /> “Thomas Meagher’s is an irresistible story, irresistibly retold by the virtuosic Timothy Egan . . . A gripping, novelistic page-turner.” — <I>Wall Street Journal</I></B><BR />  </DIV>
Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific
by Robert Leckie

Language

English

Pages

252

Publication Date

January 28, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“One hell of a book! The real stuff that proves the U.S. Marines are the greatest fighting men on earth!” Leon Uris</b><br /><br />Robert Leckie signed up for service with the United States Marines on January 5, 1942.<br /><br />Wake Island had fallen and America was still reeling from the tragedy of Pearl Harbor.<br /><br />This vivid and personal account of one marine’s journey through the course of the war in the Pacific in World War Two.<br /><br />Leckie provides vivid, and at times humorous, details of his training in South Carolina, through to being assigned to first terrifying duties as a fighting marine.<br /><br />He was thrust into the heat of battle at Guadalcanal before seeing action across many islands of the Pacific until he was eventually wounded and evacuated from the island of Peleliu.<br /><br />Yet this fascinating autobiography is not simply about Leckie’s fighting life over the duration of the war as it also records the camaraderie of his fellow soldiers, the adventures that he enjoyed during his time off service in Melbourne, Australia, along with the day to day life of a normal marine.<br /><br />“Helmet for My Pillow is a grand and epic prose poem. Robert Leckie’s theme is the purely human experience of war in the Pacific, written in the graceful imagery of a human being who — somehow — survived.” Tom Hanks<br /><br />This work is essential reading for anyone interested in uncovering the voice of a true marine who saw some of the bloodiest battles of World War Two.<br /><br />Along with E. B. Sledge’s <em>With the Old Breed: At Peleiu and Okinawa</em> this book formed the basis for the HBO miniseries <em>The Pacific</em>.<br /><br />Robert Leckie was an American author and historian. His service with the 1st Marine Division in World War Two as a machine gunner and a scout greatly influenced his later work. <em>Helmet for my Pillow</em> was first published in 1957 and Leckie passed away in 2001.<br />
Textiles in the Pacific, 1500–1900 (The Pacific World: Lands, P...
by Debin Ma

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

March 02, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Textiles in the Pacific, 1500-1900 brings together 13 articles which include both classics and lesser-known but important works related to the trade and production of textiles in the Pacific region, extending from the tip of Northeast Asia to the other end of South America and Australia. Collectively these articles bring out two central themes, as highlighted in the introduction. First, there is the leading role of textiles in linking up the economies across the Pacific in the era before the 19th-century rise of steam-engine-powered global integration. Second is the crucial role of textile manufacturing and trade in the early stage of industrialization for most of the developing Pacific economies after the 19th century. The volume also reflects both revolutionary shifts in paradigms and revisions of traditional consensus, and seeks to present a more balanced account of global trade and market integration in the early modern period.
The Saga of Pappy Gunn
by George C. Kenney

Language

English

Pages

105

Publication Date

May 06, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2><b> “This is the story of an extraordinary character. He was one of the great heroes of the Southwest Pacific in World War II, a mechanical genius, and one of the finest storytellers I have ever known.”</b></h2><br /><br />Four-star General Kenney pays tribute to a remarkable man in this biography. <br /><br />Colonel Paul Irvin (“Pappy”) Gunn was a fearless fighter who demonstrated his qualities of leadership. <br /><br />To the youngsters fresh from the training fields and untried in air combat he was an example, an inspiration, a confidence builder, and an invaluable man to have around.<br /><br />As well as a brilliant pilot, Pappy was also a formidable aviation engineer. If any piece of equipment from the airplane itself to any of its hundreds of accessories failed to work, the universal answer was “Pappy can fix it,” and Pappy could and did. <br /><br />Kenney's book uncovers the remarkable life of Pappy Gunn and his exploits through the Second World War, explaining why many generals, admirals and soldiers acknowledged that he was one of aviation's great pioneers.<br /><br />‘Pappy Gunn is a loving tribute by the youngest son of one of the United States’ greatest heroes, one that highlights the humanity of a man who was a legend in his own time.’ — <em>HistoryNet</em><br /><br />‘An affectionate biography of an almost legendary Air Force hero’ — <em>Kirkus Reviews</em><br /><br />George Churchill Kenney (1889 –1977) was a United States Army Air Forces general during World War II. He is best known as the commander of the Allied Air Forces in the Southwest Pacific Area (SWPA), a position he held from August 1942 until 1945. Kenney wrote three books about the SWPA air campaigns he led during World War II. His major work was <em>General Kenney Reports</em> (1949), a personal history of the air war he led from 1942 to 1945. He also wrote <em>The Saga of Pappy Gunn</em> (1959) and <em>Dick Bong: Ace of Aces</em> (1960), which described the careers of Paul Gunn and Richard Bong, two of the most prominent airmen under his command.

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