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Island of the Lost: An Extraordinary Story of Survival at the Edg...
by Joan Druett

Language

English

Pages

299

Publication Date

June 08, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Auckland Island is a godforsaken place in the middle of the Southern Ocean, 285 miles south of New Zealand. With year-round freezing rain and howling winds, it is one of the most forbidding places in the world. To be shipwrecked there means almost certain death.<br /> <br /> In 1864 Captain Thomas Musgrave and his crew of four aboard the schooner <em>Grafton</em> wreck on the southern end of the island. Utterly alone in a dense coastal forest, plagued by stinging blowflies and relentless rain, Captain Musgrave—rather than succumb to this dismal fate—inspires his men to take action. With barely more than their bare hands, they build a cabin and, remarkably, a forge, where they manufacture their tools. Under Musgrave's leadership, they band together and remain civilized through even the darkest and most terrifying days.<br /> <br /> Incredibly, at the same time on the opposite end of the island—twenty miles of impassable cliffs and chasms away—the <em>Invercauld</em> wrecks during a horrible storm. Nineteen men stagger ashore. Unlike Captain Musgrave, the captain of the <em>Invercauld</em> falls apart given the same dismal circumstances. His men fight and split up; some die of starvation, others turn to cannibalism. Only three survive. Musgrave and all of his men not only endure for nearly two years, they also plan their own astonishing escape, setting off on one of the most courageous sea voyages in history.<br /> <br /> Using the survivors' journals and historical records, award-winning maritime historian Joan Druett brings this extraordinary untold story to life, a story about leadership and the fine line between order and chaos.
Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia
by Christina Thompson

Language

English

Pages

376

Publication Date

March 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A blend of Jared Diamond’s <em>Guns, Germs, and Steel</em> and Simon Winchester’s <em>Pacific</em>, a thrilling intellectual detective story that looks deep into the past to uncover who first settled the islands of the remote Pacific, where they came from, how they got there, and how we know. <br /><br />For more than a millennium, Polynesians have occupied the remotest islands in the Pacific Ocean, a vast triangle stretching from Hawaii to New Zealand to Easter Island. Until the arrival of European explorers they were the only people to have ever lived there. Both the most closely related and the most widely dispersed people in the world before the era of mass migration, Polynesians can trace their roots to a group of epic voyagers who ventured out into the unknown in one of the greatest adventures in human history. </p><p>How did the earliest Polynesians find and colonize these far-flung islands? How did a people without writing or metal tools conquer the largest ocean in the world? This conundrum, which came to be known as the Problem of Polynesian Origins, emerged in the eighteenth century as one of the great geographical mysteries of mankind.</p><p>For Christina Thompson, this mystery is personal: her Maori husband and their sons descend directly from these ancient navigators. In <em>Sea People</em>, Thompson explores the fascinating story of these ancestors, as well as those of the many sailors, linguists, archaeologists, folklorists, biologists, and geographers who have puzzled over this history for three hundred years. A masterful mix of history, geography, anthropology, and the science of navigation, Sea People combines the thrill of exploration with the drama of discovery in a vivid tour of one of the most captivating regions in the world.</p><p><em>Sea People</em> includes an 8-page photo insert, illustrations throughout, and 2 endpaper maps.</p>
Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before
by Tony Horwitz

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

August 01, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>In an exhilarating tale of historic adventure, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of <i>Confederates in the Attic</i> retraces the voyages of Captain James Cook, the Yorkshire farm boy who drew the map of the modern world</b></p><p> Captain James Cook's three epic journeys in the 18th century were the last great voyages of discovery. His ships sailed 150,000 miles, from the Artic to the Antarctic, from Tasmania to Oregon, from Easter Island to Siberia. When Cook set off for the Pacific in 1768, a third of the globe remained blank. By the time he died in Hawaii in 1779, the map of the world was substantially complete. </p><p>Tony Horwitz vividly recounts Cook's voyages and the exotic scenes the captain encountered: tropical orgies, taboo rituals, cannibal feasts, human sacrifice. He also relives Cook's adventures by following in the captain's wake to places such as Tahiti, Savage Island, and the Great Barrier Reef to discover Cook's embattled legacy in the present day. Signing on as a working crewman aboard a replica of Cook's vessel, Horwitz experiences the thrill and terror of sailing a tall ship. He also explores Cook the man: an impoverished farmboy who broke through the barriers of his class and time to become the greatest navigator in British history.</p><p>By turns harrowing and hilarious, insightful and entertaining, BLUE LATITUDES brings to life a man whose voyages helped create the 'global village' we know today.</p>
Destroyer Squadron 23: Combat Exploits of Arleigh Burke's Gallant...
by Ken Jones

Language

English

Pages

387

Publication Date

February 25, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><em>“The brilliant and heroic record achieved by Destroyer Squadron Twenty-Three is a distinctive tribute to the valiant fighting spirit of the individual units in this indomitable combat group and of each skilled and courageous ship’s company.”</em> — Presidential Unit Citation</b><br /><br />Captain Arleigh Burke assumed control over Destroyer Squadron 23 on 23 October 1943.<br /><br />Just over a month later they engaged five enemy destroyers and sunk three of them and received no damage themselves in what has been described by tacticians as “near perfect surface actions”.<br /><br />Over the course of the next four months Destroyer Squadron 23, which was nicknamed “The Little Beavers, would continue in the same vein and engage with enemy ships a further twenty-two times, destroying one Japanese cruiser, nine destroyers, one submarine, several smaller ships, and approximately 30 aircraft.<br /><br /><em>“The Captains of Squadron 23 went out looking for trouble; they found it; they sank it; and then they looked for more. When a ship became lost, as some did, she simply headed for the enemy and continued to fight by herself. It is impossible for me to express the proud, paternal feeling I felt for you all during the heat of battle. There are many officers in the United States Navy who probably would have done as well had the opportunity been granted them. There are NO officers in the United States Navy who could have done better.”</em> — Captain Arleigh Burke<br /><br />Ken Jones’ account of this brilliant squadron takes the reader to the heart of the action as he uncovers Arleigh’s tactics and the strategies that were deployed to defeat Japanese ships. He also uncovers what life was like for the men in the squadron as they powered across Pacific Ocean. <br /><br />“While the period covered by this book is relatively short, it was a crucial period in the Pacific War, and the vital part played by Destroyer Squadron 23 under the inspiring leadership of Arleigh Burke was, in a sense, only a beginning, but the vital beginning, of a steady drive forward which gained momentum and power until United States naval forces steamed victoriously into Tokyo Bay.” — Fleet Admiral William Halsey<br /><br />Ken Jones wrote a number of works on World War Two, including the biography <em>Admiral Arleigh</em>. His book <em>Destroyer Squadron 23</em> was first published in 1959.<br />
The Immortal Irishman: The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an Amer...
by Timothy Egan

Language

English

Pages

389

Publication Date

March 01, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>"An old-fashioned tale of tall talk, high ideals,and irresistible appeal . . . You will not read a historical thriller like this all year . . . [Egan] is a master storyteller." <I>—Boston Globe</I><BR /><BR /> “Egan has a gift for sweeping narrative . . . and he has a journalist’s eye for the telltale detail . . . This is masterly work.” — <I>New York Times Book Review</I></B><BR />  <BR /> In this exciting and illuminating work, National Book Award winner Timothy Egan delivers a story, both rollicking and haunting, of one of the most famous Irish Americans of all time. A dashing young orator during the Great Hunger of the 1840s, Thomas Francis Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, for which he was banished to a Tasmanian prison colony for life. But two years later he was “back from the dead” and in New York, instantly the most famous Irishman in America. Meagher’s rebirth included his leading the newly formed Irish Brigade in many of the fiercest battles of the Civil War. Afterward, he tried to build a new Ireland in the wild west of Montana—a quixotic adventure that ended in the  great mystery of his disappearance, which Egan resolves convincingly at last.<BR />  <BR /><B>“This is marvelous stuff. Thomas F. Meagher strides onto Egan's beautifully wrought pages just as he lived—powerfully larger than life. A fascinating account of an extraordinary life.” — Daniel James Brown, author of <I>The Boys in the Boat</I><BR />  <BR /> “Thomas Meagher’s is an irresistible story, irresistibly retold by the virtuosic Timothy Egan . . . A gripping, novelistic page-turner.” — <I>Wall Street Journal</I></B><BR />  </DIV>
Man-Eater: The Terrifying True Story of Cannibal Killer Katherine...
by Ryan Green

Language

English

Pages

160

Publication Date

January 21, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
On 29th February 2000, John Price took out a restraining order against his girlfriend, Katherine Knight. Later that day, he told his co-workers that she had stabbed him and if he were ever to go missing, it was because Knight had killed him. <br /><br />The next day, Price didn’t show up for work.<br /><br />A co-worker was sent to check on him. They found a bloody handprint by the front door and they immediately contacted the police. The local police force was not prepared for the chilling scene they were about to encounter.<br /><br />Price’s body was found in a chair, legs crossed, with a bottle of lemonade under his arm. He’d been decapitated and skinned. The “skin-suit” was hanging from a meat hook in the living room and his head was found in the kitchen, in a pot of vegetables that was still warm. There were two plates on the dining table, each had the name of one of Price's children on it. <br /><br />She was attempting to serve his body parts to his children.<br /><br /><i>Man-Eater</i> is a dramatic and gripping account of the first women in Australia to be given a life sentence without parole and a special addendum ‘never to be released’. Ryan Green’s riveting narrative draws the reader into the real-live horror experienced by the victim and has all the elements of a classic thriller.<br /><br /><h6>CAUTION: This book contains descriptive accounts of abuse and violence. If you are especially sensitive to this material, it might be advisable not to read any further</h6>
On Valor's Side: A Marine's Own Story of Parris Island and Guadal...
by T. Grady Gallant

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

July 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>On August 7, 1942, the First Marine Division launched the first successful American land assault in World War Two.</h2><br /><br /><b>The invasion of Guadalcanal was a long, cruel holding operation fought with too little equipment and support, not enough food and ammunition, and too few men.</b><br /><br />The marines on the island were subjected to bombing raids and strafing by Japanese aircraft, bombardment by battleships, cruisers, destroyers, submarines, and land artillery, as well as being continually attacked by Japanese tanks and infantry.<br /><br />For five long months they were attacked day and night before being eventually relieved by Army units.<br /><br />Who were these men who faced overwhelming odds?<br /><br />And how did they survive?<br /><br />T. Grady Gallant, who fought at Guadalcanal himself, answers these questions in his brilliant book <em>On Valor’s Side</em><br /><br />Gallant’s account begins with an account of the grueling training that he and his fellow marines received in places such as Parris Island, before they undertook last minute preparations in New Zealand and made the journey towards Guadalcanal.<br /><br />It is a fascinating work that gives an eyewitness view of one of the most ferocious encounters that the United States Marines had to face through the course of the Second World War.<br /><br />“recreates the real-life training, fighting and comradeship of men at arms, from North Carolina to Guadalcanal.” — <em>Kirkus Review</em><br /><br />“A great book” — Leon Uris<br /><br />T. Grady Gallant was a journalist, editor, columnist, author and editor. He served as a Sergeant of Special Weapons in the U.S. 1st marine Division, Fleet Marine Force 1941-1945, in the assault at Guadalcanal, and served a second tour with the 4th marine Division, Fleet Marine Force and was in the assault and Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II. His book <em>On Valor’s Side</em> was first published in 1963 and he passed away in 2009.<br />
JAMES COOK: An Outstanding Explorer and Cartographer. The Entire ...
by The History Hour

Language

English

Pages

85

Publication Date

August 06, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free Bonus Inside!</b><br /><b>Read on your Computer, Mac, Smart phone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet.</b><br />Did James Cook achieve fame by mapping the known world? Were his maps so accurate that many were used right into the 20th Century? Cook, an 18th Century explorer, lived during a time when humankind was yet naïve and inexperienced in terms of understanding their environment. His legacy is quite astounding, given the fact that mankind had only begun to develop instrumentation. The people from Europe had never before seen Hawaii, Tahiti, Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica, nor crossed the Antarctic circle.<br /><br /><h3>Inside you’ll read about</h3><br /><ul><li>James Cook, Master’s Mate</li><li>Australia and New Zealand</li><li>Antarctica and the Search for the South Pole</li><li>The Fateful Third Voyage</li></ul><br /><b>And much more!</b><br />Cook met and mingled with many different cultures, most of which were those of the South Pacific Ocean. He and his men even witnessed a human sacrifice. There were three voyages in all. The first one ran from 1768 to 1771 and included Tahiti, Australia, and New Zealand. The second voyage went from 1772 to 1775 and was mostly spent around the coast of Antarctica. Cook’s third and final voyage went from 1776-1779. It entailed the western coast of North America and Alaska where Cook fruitless sought for the fabled Northwest Passage. Was James Cook murdered by the Hawaiians? Was that a tragic incident that should have never happened?
At the Margin of Empire: John Webster and Hokianga, 1841-1900
by Jennifer Ashton

Language

English

Pages

276

Publication Date

February 20, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>In telling the story of John Webster's long and colorful life for the first time, this biography also explores the wider transformation of relationships between Maori and Pakeha during the 19th century. In this remarkable biography, Jennifer Ashton uses the life of one man as a unique lens through which to view the early history of New Zealand.</DIV>
God Is Samoan: Dialogues between Culture and Theology in the Paci...
by Matt Tomlinson

Language

English

Pages

216

Publication Date

March 31, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Christian theologians in the Pacific Islands see culture as the grounds on which one understands God. In this pathbreaking book, Matt Tomlinson engages in an anthropological conversation with the work of “contextual theologians,” exploring how the combination of Pacific Islands’ culture and Christianity shapes theological dialogues. Employing both scholarly research and ethnographic fieldwork, the author addresses a range of topics: from radical criticisms of biblical stories as inappropriate for Pacific audiences to celebrations of traditional gods such as Tagaloa as inherently Christian figures. This book presents a symphony of voices—engaged, critical, prophetic—from the contemporary Pacific’s leading religious thinkers and suggests how their work articulates with broad social transformations in the region. </p><p>Each chapter in this book focuses on a distinct type of culturally driven theological dialogue. One type is between readers and texts, in which biblical scholars suggest new ways of reading, and even rewriting, the Bible so it becomes more meaningful in local terms. A second kind concerns the state of the church and society. For example, feminist theologians and those calling for “prophetic” action on social problems propose new conversations about how people in Oceania should navigate difficult times. A third kind of discussion revolves around identity, emphasizing what makes Oceania unique and culturally coherent. A fourth addresses the problems of climate change and environmental degradation to sacred lands by encouraging “eco-theological” awareness and interconnection. Finally, many contextual theologians engage with the work of other disciplines— prominently, anthropology—as they develop new discourse on God, people, and the future of Oceania.</p><p>Contextual theology allows people in Oceania to speak with God and fellow humans through the idiom of culture in a distinctly Pacific way. However, Tomlinson concludes, the most fruitful topic of dialogue might not be culture, but rather the nature of dialogue itself. Written in an accessible, engaging style and presenting innovative findings, this book will interest students and scholars of anthropology, world religion, theology, globalization, and Pacific studies.</p>

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