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Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
by Mark Bowden

Language

English

Pages

608

Publication Date

June 06, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><p><br /><b>A <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Book Prize Finalist in History</b><p><br /><b> Winner of the 2018 Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Greene Award for a distinguished work of nonfiction </b> <p><br /><br /><br /><b>"An extraordinary feat of journalism . . . full of emotion and color."—Karl Marlantes, <i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><p><br /><br />The first battle book from Mark Bowden since his #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>Black Hawk Down</i>, <i>Hue 1968</i> is the story of the centerpiece of the Tet Offensive and a turning point in the American War in Vietnam.<br /><br /><br /><br />In the early hours of January 31, 1968, the North Vietnamese launched over one hundred attacks across South Vietnam in what would become known as the Tet Offensive. The lynchpin of Tet was the capture of Hue, Vietnam?s intellectual and cultural capital, by 10,000 National Liberation Front troops who descended from hidden camps and surged across the city of 140,000. Within hours the entire city was in their hands save for two small military outposts. American commanders refused to believe the size and scope of the Front?s presence, ordering small companies of marines against thousands of entrenched enemy troops. After several futile and deadly days, Lieutenant Colonel Ernie Cheatham would finally come up with a strategy to retake the city, block by block and building by building, in some of the most intense urban combat since World War II.<p><br /><br /><br /><br />With unprecedented access to war archives in the U.S. and Vietnam and interviews with participants from both sides, Bowden narrates each stage of this crucial battle through multiple viewpoints. Played out over 24 days and ultimately costing 10,000 lives, the Battle of Hue was by far the bloodiest of the entire war. When it ended, the American debate was never again about winning, only about how to leave. <i>Hue 1968</i> is a gripping and moving account of this pivotal moment.
Last Boat Out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled...
by Helen Zia

Language

English

Pages

493

Publication Date

January 22, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The dramatic real life stories of four young people caught up in the mass exodus of Shanghai in the wake of China’s 1949 Communist revolution—a <b>heartrending </b>precursor to the struggles faced by emigrants today. </b><br /><br /><b>“A true page-turner . . . [Helen] Zia has proven once again that history is something that happens to real people.”—<i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Lisa See</b><br /><br /> Shanghai has historically been China’s jewel, its richest, most modern and westernized city. The bustling metropolis was home to sophisticated intellectuals, entrepreneurs, and a thriving middle class when Mao’s proletarian revolution emerged victorious from the long civil war. Terrified of the horrors the Communists would wreak upon their lives, citizens of Shanghai who could afford to fled in every direction. Seventy years later, members of the last generation to fully recall this massive exodus have revealed their stories to Chinese American journalist Helen Zia, who interviewed hundreds of exiles about their journey through one of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth century. From these moving accounts, Zia weaves together the stories of four young Shanghai residents who wrestled with the decision to abandon everything for an uncertain life as refugees in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the United States.<br /><br /> Benny, who as a teenager became the unwilling heir to his father’s dark wartime legacy, must decide either to escape to Hong Kong or navigate the intricacies of a newly Communist China. The resolute Annuo, forced to flee her home with her father, a defeated Nationalist official, becomes an unwelcome exile in Taiwan. The financially strapped Ho fights deportation from the U.S. in order to continue his studies while his family struggles at home. And Bing, given away by her poor parents, faces the prospect of a new life among strangers in America. The lives of these men and women are marvelously portrayed, revealing the dignity and triumph of personal survival.<br /><br /> Herself the daughter of immigrants from China, Zia is uniquely equipped to explain how crises like the Shanghai transition affect children and their families, students and their futures, and, ultimately, the way we see ourselves and those around us. <i>Last Boat Out of Shanghai </i>brings a poignant personal angle to the experiences of refugees then and, by extension, today.<br /><br /> <b>“Zia’s portraits are compassionate and heartbreaking, and they are, ultimately, the universal story of many families who leave their homeland as refugees and find less-than-welcoming circumstances on the other side.”—Amy Tan, author of <i>The Joy Luck Club</i></b>
Catfish and Mandala: A Two-Wheeled Voyage Through the Landscape a...
by Andrew X. Pham

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

April 01, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A Vietnamese Bicycle Days by a stunning new voice in American letters.</p><p>Andrew X. Pham dreamed of becoming a writer. Born in Vietnam and raised in California, he held technical jobs at United Airlines-and always carried a letter of resignation in his briefcase. His father had been a POW of the Vietcong; his family came to America as "boat people." His sister committed suicide, prompting Andrew to quit his job. He sold all of his possessions and embarked on a year-long bicycle journey that took him through the Mexican desert, where he was treated as a bueno hermano, a "good brother"; around a thousand-mile loop from Narita to Kyoto in Japan; and, after five months and 2,357 miles, to Saigon, where he finds "nothing familiar in the bombed-out darkness." In Mexico he's treated kindly as a Vietnamito, though he shouts, "I'm American, Vietnamese American!" In Vietnam, he's taken for Japanese or Korean by his countrymen, except, of course, by his relatives, who doubt that as a Vietnamese he has the stamina to complete his journey ("Only Westerners can do it"); and in the United States he's considered anything but American. A vibrant, picaresque memoir written with narrative flair and a wonderful, eye-opening sense of adventure, <i>Catfish and Mandala </i>is an unforgettable search for cultural identity.</p>
No Beast So Fierce: The Terrifying True Story of the Champawat Ti...
by Dane Huckelbridge

Language

English

Pages

299

Publication Date

February 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A gripping, </strong><strong>multifaceted</strong><strong> true account of the deadliest animal of all time and the hunter on its trail, equally comparable to <em>Jaws</em> as to Matthiessen's <em>The Snow Leopard</em>. </strong></p><p><strong>"RIVETING. A HAUNTING TALE." —<em>Scientific American</em> • "THRILLING." —<em>Wall Street Journal</em> • "GRIPPING. COMPELLING. DIGS DEEP INTO CAUSATION." —<em>Nature </em>•<em> </em>"A SUPERB WORK." —<em>Booklist,</em> starred</strong> <strong>• "VIVID. A GRIPPING TALE OF LIFE AND DEATH." —Minneapolis <em>Star Tribune</em></strong></p><p>Nepal, c. 1900: The single deadliest animal in recorded history began stalking humans, moving like a phantom through the lush foothills of the Himalayas.</p><p>As the death toll reached an astonishing 436 lives, a young local hunter was dispatched to stop the now-legendary man-eater before it struck again. </p><p>One part pulse-pounding thriller, one part soulful natural history of the endangered Royal Bengal tiger, acclaimed writer Dane Huckelbridge’s <em>No Beast So Fierce</em> is the gripping, true account of the Champawat Tiger, which terrified northern India and Nepal from 1900 to 1907, and Jim Corbett, the legendary hunter who pursued it. Huckelbridge’s masterful telling also reveals that the tiger, Corbett, and the forces that brought them together are far more complex and fascinating than a simple man-versus-beast tale. </p><p>At the turn of the twentieth century as British rule of India tightened and bounties were placed on tiger’s heads, a tigress was shot in the mouth by a poacher. Injured but alive, it turned from its usual hunting habits to easier prey—humans. For the next seven years, this man-made killer terrified locals, growing bolder with every kill. Colonial authorities, desperate for help, finally called upon Jim Corbett, a then-unknown railroad employee of humble origins who had grown up hunting game through the hills of Kumaon. </p><p>Like a detective on the trail of a serial killer, Corbett tracked the tiger’s movements in the dense, hilly woodlands—meanwhile the animal shadowed Corbett in return. Then, after a heartbreaking new kill of a young woman whom he was unable to protect, Corbett followed the gruesome blood trail deep into the forest where hunter and tiger would meet at last.</p><p>Drawing upon on-the-ground research in the Indian Himalayan region where he retraced Corbett’s footsteps, Huckelbridge brings to life one of the great adventure stories of the twentieth century. And yet Huckelbridge brings a deeper, more complex story into focus, placing the episode into its full context for the first time: that of colonialism’s disturbing impact on the ancient balance between man and tiger; and that of Corbett’s own evolution from a celebrated hunter to a  principled conservationist who in time would earn fame for his devotion to saving the Bengal tiger and its habitat. Today the Corbett Tiger Reserve preserves 1,200 km of wilderness; within its borders is Jim Corbett National Park, India’s oldest and most prestigious national park and a vital haven for the very animals Corbett once hunted.</p><p>An unforgettable tale, magnificently told, <em>No Beast So Fierce </em>is an epic of beauty, terror, survival, and redemption for the ages.</p>
The Hundred-Year Marathon: China's Secret Strategy to Replace Ame...
by Michael Pillsbury

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 03, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>One of the U.S. government's leading China experts reveals the hidden strategy fueling that country's rise – and how Americans have been seduced into helping China overtake us as the world's leading superpower.</b></p><p>For more than forty years, the United States has played an indispensable role helping the Chinese government build a booming economy, develop its scientific and military capabilities, and take its place on the world stage, in the belief that China's rise will bring us cooperation, diplomacy, and free trade. But what if the "China Dream" is to replace us, just as America replaced the British Empire, without firing a shot?</p><p>Based on interviews with Chinese defectors and newly declassified, previously undisclosed national security documents, <i>The Hundred-Year Marathon</i> reveals China's secret strategy to supplant the United States as the world's dominant power, and to do so by 2049, the one-hundredth anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic. Michael Pillsbury, a fluent Mandarin speaker who has served in senior national security positions in the U.S. government since the days of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, draws on his decades of contact with the "hawks" in China's military and intelligence agencies and translates their documents, speeches, and books to show how the teachings of traditional Chinese statecraft underpin their actions. He offers an inside look at how the Chinese really view America and its leaders – as barbarians who will be the architects of their own demise.<br />Pillsbury also explains how the U.S. government has helped – sometimes unwittingly and sometimes deliberately – to make this "China Dream" come true, and he calls for the United States to implement a new, more competitive strategy toward China as it really is, and not as we might wish it to be. <i>The Hundred-Year Marathon</i> is a wake-up call as we face the greatest national security challenge of the twenty-first century.</p>
Samurai!
by Martin Caidin

Language

English

Pages

348

Publication Date

December 07, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2><b>Saburo Sakai became a living legend in Japan during World War II. </h2><br /><br />Pilots everywhere spoke in awe of his incredible exploits in the air.</b><br /><br />Of all Japan’s aces, Saburo Sakai is the only pilot who never lost a wingman in combat.<br /><br />For a man who engaged in more than two hundred aerial combats, this was an incredible achievement.<br /><br />His remarkable book <em>Samurai!</em> written by Martin Caiden but with the assistance of Sakai and Fred Saito is a brilliant account of life as a Japanese pilot in the Second World War.<br /><br /><em>Samurai!</em> charts Sakai’s remarkable life from his lowly, poor origins, to signing up with the military at the age of sixteen, to his conflicts with American aircraft over Guadalcanal where he had the heavy fragments of two 50-caliber machine gun bullets imbedded in his skull, through to the moment when Japan eventually surrendered.<br /><br />For many readers <em>Samurai!</em> will do much to bring the Pacific air war into new perspective. The story of Saburo Sakai provides for the first time an intimate look into the “other side.”<br /><br />Martin Caidin was an American author and an authority on aeronautics and aviation. Caidin was an airplane pilot as well, and bought and restored a 1936 Junkers Ju 52 airplane. <em>Samurai!</em> was first published in 1957 and Caidin passed away in 1997. Saburo Sakai was a Japanese naval aviator and flying ace who had 64 aerial victories. He passed away in 2000.<br />
Secret Commandos: Behind Enemy Lines with the Elite Warriors of S...
by John L. Plaster

Language

English

Pages

433

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Major John L. Plaster recalls his remarkable covert activities </b><b>as a member of a special operations team during the Vietnam War in a “comprehensive, informative, and often exciting…account of an important part of the overall Vietnam tragedy” (<i>The New York Times</i>).</b><BR><BR>Before there were Navy SEALs, there was SOG. Short for “Studies and Operations Group,” it was a secret operations force in Vietnam, the most highly decorated unit in the war. Although their chief mission was disrupting the main North Vietnamese supply route into South Vietnam, SOG commandos also rescued downed helicopter pilots and fellow soldiers, and infiltrated deep into Laos and Cambodia to identify bombing targets, conduct ambushes, mine roads, and capture North Vietnamese soldiers for intelligence purposes.<BR> <BR>Always outnumbered, they matched wits in the most dangerous environments with an unrelenting foe that hunted them with trackers and dogs. Ten entire teams disappeared and another fourteen were annihilated. This is the dramatic, page-turning true story of that team’s dedication, sacrifice, and constant fight for survival. In the “gripping” (<i>Publishers Weekly</i>) <i>Secret Commandos</i>, John Plaster vividly describes these unique warriors who gave everything fighting for their country—and for each other.
Quartered Safe Out Here: A Harrowing Tale of World War II
by George MacDonald Fraser

Language

English

Pages

265

Publication Date

October 17, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
George MacDonald Fraser—beloved for his series of <I>Flashman</I> historical novels—offers an action-packed memoir of his experiences in Burma during World War II. Fraser was only 19 when he arrived there in the war's final year, and he offers a first-hand glimpse at the camaraderie, danger, and satisfactions of service. A substantial Epilogue, occasioned by the 50th anniversary of VJ-Day in 1995, adds poignancy to a volume that eminent military historian John Keegan described as "one of the great personal memoirs of the Second World War."
Vietnam: An Epic Tragedy, 1945-1975
by Sir Max Hastings

Language

English

Pages

895

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>An absorbing and definitive modern history of the Vietnam War from the acclaimed <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author of <em>The Secret War.</em></p><p>Vietnam became the Western world’s most divisive modern conflict, precipitating a battlefield humiliation for France in 1954, then a vastly greater one for the United States in 1975. Max Hastings has spent the past three years interviewing scores of participants on both sides, as well as researching a multitude of American and Vietnamese documents and memoirs, to create an epic narrative of an epic struggle. He portrays the set pieces of Dienbienphu, the 1968 Tet offensive, the air blitz of North Vietnam, and also much less familiar miniatures such as the bloodbath at Daido, where a US Marine battalion was almost wiped out, together with extraordinary recollections of Ho Chi Minh’s warriors. Here are the vivid realities of strife amid jungle and paddies that killed two million people.</p><p>Many writers treat the war as a US tragedy, yet Hastings sees it as overwhelmingly that of the Vietnamese people, of whom forty died for every American. US blunders and atrocities were matched by those committed by their enemies. While all the world has seen the image of a screaming, naked girl seared by napalm, it forgets countless eviscerations, beheadings, and murders carried out by the communists. The people of both former Vietnams paid a bitter price for the Northerners’ victory in privation and oppression. Here is testimony from Vietcong guerrillas, Southern paratroopers, Saigon bargirls, and Hanoi students alongside that of infantrymen from South Dakota, Marines from North Carolina, and Huey pilots from Arkansas.</p><p>No past volume has blended a political and military narrative of the entire conflict with heart-stopping personal experiences, in the fashion that Max Hastings’ readers know so well. The author suggests that neither side deserved to win this struggle with so many lessons for the twenty-first century about the misuse of military might to confront intractable political and cultural challenges. He marshals testimony from warlords and peasants, statesmen and soldiers, to create an extraordinary record.</p>
One Damned Island After Another: The Saga of the Seventh
by , Joe Whitley

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

September 23, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>On 19th October 1940, the Hawaiian Air Force, later known as the Seventh Air Force, was established to provide air defense of the Hawaiian Island and to engage with threats in the Pacific.</b><br /><br />Just over a year later the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor devastated this force. Out of a total of 231 aircraft of the Hawaiian Air Force, 64 were destroyed and not more than 79 were left usable. <br /><br />Out of the inferno emerged the newly reformed Seventh Air Force.<br /><br />It faced, in the central Pacific, the largest water theater in the world — sixteen million square miles, five times the size of the United States. <br /><br />The Americans patched up their planes as best they could and began to fly the "Atoll Circuit," the low-lying, white sand atolls and the first stepping stones on the long road to Tokyo. <br /><br />In this huge area and against a fearsome opponent, the men of the Seventh were forced to fly the longest missions in any theater of war, entirely over water and, at first, without fighter escort. <br /><br />They fought at Midway, Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Truk, Saipan, Palau, the Philippines, Iwo Jima, and finally Tokyo.<br /><br />Clive Howard and Joe Whitley’s history of this remarkable air force covers from the events at Pearl Harbor through to V-J Day, covering every single island that the force landed on in between.<br /><br />They listened to demand of Corporal Earl Nelson’s article “Heroes Don’t Win Wars”, that criticised the press and radio that only recorded the fantastic achievements of men who wore medals; “Why don’t they talk about the guy who is just a soldier?” <br /><br />So with humor and insight Howard and Whitley have provided us with a history of the Seventh Air Force that doesn’t focus on only the glorious achievements of some men, nor does it simply record the accounts of the “brass hats”, but instead gets to the heart of what the men of this extraordinary force did and thought.<br /><br />Clive Howard and Joe Whitley were both sergeants and served as correspondents for the Seventh Air Force. They were there; they saw it happen. Their book <em> One Damned Island After Another</em> was first published in 1946.<br />

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