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Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World
by Jack Weatherford

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

March 22, 2005

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<b><i>New York Times </i>Bestseller • The startling true history of how one extraordinary man from a remote cornerof the world created an empire that led the world into the modern age.<br /><br /></b>The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in twenty-five years than the Romans did in four hundred. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization. Vastly more progressive than his European or Asian counterparts, Genghis Khan abolished torture, granted universal religious freedom, and smashed feudal systems of aristocratic privilege. <br /><br />From the story of his rise through the tribal culture to the explosion of civilization that the Mongol Empire unleashed, this brilliant work of revisionist history is nothing less than the epic story of how the modern world was made.
Alone at Dawn: Medal of Honor Recipient John Chapman and the Unto...
by , Lori Longfritz

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

June 25, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The <i>New York Times</i> bestselling true account of John Chapman, Medal of Honor recipient and Special Ops Combat Controller, and his heroic one-man stand during the Afghan War, as he sacrificed his life to save the lives of 23 comrades-in-arms.</b><br />In the predawn hours of March 4, 2002, just below the 10,469-foot peak of a mountain in eastern Afghanistan, a fierce battle raged. Outnumbered by Al Qaeda fighters, Air Force Combat Controller John Chapman and a handful of Navy SEALs struggled to take the summit in a desperate bid to find a lost teammate. <br />Chapman, leading the charge, was gravely wounded in the initial assault. Believing he was dead, his SEAL leader ordered a retreat. Chapman regained consciousness alone, with the enemy closing in on three sides.<br /><br />John Chapman's subsequent display of incredible valor -- first saving the lives of his SEAL teammates and then, knowing he was mortally wounded, single-handedly engaging two dozen hardened fighters to save the lives of an incoming rescue squad -- posthumously earned him the Medal of Honor. Chapman is the first airman in nearly fifty years to be given the distinction reserved for America's greatest heroes.<br /><br /><i>Alone at Dawn</i> is also a behind-the-scenes look at the Air Force Combat Controllers: the world's deadliest and most versatile special operations force, whose members must not only exceed the qualifications of Navy SEAL and Army Delta Force teams but also act with sharp decisiveness and deft precision -- even in the face of life-threatening danger.<br /><br />Drawing from firsthand accounts, classified documents, dramatic video footage, and extensive interviews with leaders and survivors of the operation, <i>Alone at Dawn</i> is the story of an extraordinary man's brave last stand and the brotherhood that forged him.<br /><br />
Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America's Secret Wars in Afghanista...
by Steve Coll

Language

English

Pages

779

Publication Date

February 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Winner of the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction</b><br /><br />Longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award for Nonfiction<br /><br />From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of <i>Ghost Wars,</i> the epic and enthralling story of America's intelligence, military, and diplomatic efforts to defeat Al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan since 9/11</b></b><br /><br />Prior to 9/11, the United States had been carrying out small-scale covert operations in Afghanistan, ostensibly in cooperation, although often in direct opposition, with I.S.I., the Pakistani intelligence agency. While the US was trying to quell extremists, a highly secretive and compartmentalized wing of I.S.I., known as "Directorate S," was covertly training, arming, and seeking to legitimize the Taliban, in order to enlarge Pakistan's sphere of influence. After 9/11, when fifty-nine countries, led by the U. S., deployed troops or provided aid to Afghanistan in an effort to flush out the Taliban and Al Qaeda, the U.S. was set on an invisible slow-motion collision course with Pakistan.<br /><br />Today we know that the war in Afghanistan would falter badly because of military hubris at the highest levels of the Pentagon, the drain on resources and provocation in the Muslim world caused by the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, and corruption. But more than anything, as Coll makes painfully clear, the war in Afghanistan was doomed because of the failure of the United States to apprehend the motivations and intentions of I.S.I.'s "Directorate S". This was a swirling and shadowy struggle of historic proportions, which endured over a decade and across both the Bush and Obama administrations, involving multiple secret intelligence agencies, a litany of incongruous strategies and tactics, and dozens of players, including some of the most prominent military and political figures. A sprawling American tragedy, the war was an open clash of arms but also a covert melee of ideas, secrets, and subterranean violence. <br /><br />Coll excavates this grand battle, which took place away from the gaze of the American public. With unsurpassed expertise, original research, and attention to detail, he brings to life a narrative at once vast and intricate, local and global, propulsive and painstaking. <br /><br />This is the definitive explanation of how America came to be so badly ensnared in an elaborate, factional, and seemingly interminable conflict in South Asia. Nothing less than a forensic examination of the personal and political forces that shape world history, <i>Directorate S</i> is a complete masterpiece of both investigative and narrative journalism.
Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary Ame...
by Kathleen Belew

Language

English

Pages

339

Publication Date

April 13, 2018

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Customer Reviews
The white power movement in America wants a revolution. It has declared all-out war against the federal government and its agents, and has carried out—with military precision—an escalating campaign of terror against the American public. Its soldiers are not lone wolves but are highly organized cadres motivated by a coherent and deeply troubling worldview of white supremacy, anticommunism, and apocalypse. In<i> Bring the War Home, </i>Kathleen Belew gives us the first full history of the movement that consolidated in the 1970s and 1980s around a potent sense of betrayal in the Vietnam War and made tragic headlines in the 1995 bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building.<br /><br />Returning to an America ripped apart by a war that, in their view, they were not allowed to win, a small but driven group of veterans, active-duty personnel, and civilian supporters concluded that waging war on their own country was justified. They unified people from a variety of militant groups, including Klansmen, neo-Nazis, skinheads, radical tax protestors, and white separatists. The white power movement operated with discipline and clarity, undertaking assassinations, mercenary soldiering, armed robbery, counterfeiting, and weapons trafficking. Its command structure gave women a prominent place in brokering intergroup alliances and giving birth to future recruits.<br /><br />Belew’s disturbing history reveals how war cannot be contained in time and space. In its wake, grievances intensify and violence becomes a logical course of action for some. <i>Bring the War Home</i> argues for awareness of the heightened potential for paramilitarism in a present defined by ongoing war.
Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
by Mark Bowden

Language

English

Pages

608

Publication Date

June 06, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><p><br /><b>A <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Book Prize Finalist in History</b><p><br /><b> Winner of the 2018 Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Greene Award for a distinguished work of nonfiction </b> <p><br /><br /><br /><b>"An extraordinary feat of journalism . . . full of emotion and color."—Karl Marlantes, <i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><p><br /><br />The first battle book from Mark Bowden since his #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>Black Hawk Down</i>, <i>Hue 1968</i> is the story of the centerpiece of the Tet Offensive and a turning point in the American War in Vietnam.<br /><br /><br /><br />In the early hours of January 31, 1968, the North Vietnamese launched over one hundred attacks across South Vietnam in what would become known as the Tet Offensive. The lynchpin of Tet was the capture of Hue, Vietnam?s intellectual and cultural capital, by 10,000 National Liberation Front troops who descended from hidden camps and surged across the city of 140,000. Within hours the entire city was in their hands save for two small military outposts. American commanders refused to believe the size and scope of the Front?s presence, ordering small companies of marines against thousands of entrenched enemy troops. After several futile and deadly days, Lieutenant Colonel Ernie Cheatham would finally come up with a strategy to retake the city, block by block and building by building, in some of the most intense urban combat since World War II.<p><br /><br /><br /><br />With unprecedented access to war archives in the U.S. and Vietnam and interviews with participants from both sides, Bowden narrates each stage of this crucial battle through multiple viewpoints. Played out over 24 days and ultimately costing 10,000 lives, the Battle of Hue was by far the bloodiest of the entire war. When it ended, the American debate was never again about winning, only about how to leave. <i>Hue 1968</i> is a gripping and moving account of this pivotal moment.
Witness to the Revolution: Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, an...
by Clara Bingham

Language

English

Pages

582

Publication Date

May 31, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The electrifying story of the turbulent year when the sixties ended and America teetered on the edge of revolution</b><br /><br /><b>NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE <i>ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH</i></b><br /><br />As the 1960s drew to a close, the United States was coming apart at the seams. From August 1969 to August 1970, the nation witnessed nine thousand protests and eighty-four acts of arson or bombings at schools across the country. It was the year of the My Lai massacre investigation, the Cambodia invasion, Woodstock, and the Moratorium to End the War. The American death toll in Vietnam was approaching fifty thousand, and the ascendant counterculture was challenging nearly every aspect of American society. <i>Witness to the Revolution</i>, Clara Bingham’s unique oral history of that tumultuous time, unveils anew that moment when America careened to the brink of a civil war at home, as it fought a long, futile war abroad.<br /><br /> Woven together from one hundred original interviews, <i>Witness to the Revolution </i>provides a firsthand narrative of that period of upheaval in the words of those closest to the action—the activists, organizers, radicals, and resisters who manned the barricades of what Students for a Democratic Society leader Tom Hayden called “the Great Refusal.”<br /><br /> We meet Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn of the Weather Underground; Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department employee who released the Pentagon Papers; feminist theorist Robin Morgan; actor and activist Jane Fonda; and many others whose powerful personal stories capture the essence of an era. We witness how the killing of four students at Kent State turned a straitlaced social worker into a hippie, how the civil rights movement gave birth to the women’s movement, and how opposition to the war in Vietnam turned college students into prisoners, veterans into peace marchers, and intellectuals into bombers.<br /><br /> With lessons that can be applied to our time, <i>Witness to the Revolution</i> is more than just a record of the death throes of the Age of Aquarius. Today, when America is once again enmeshed in racial turmoil, extended wars overseas, and distrust of the government, the insights contained in this book are more relevant than ever.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Witness to the Revolution</i></b><br /><br />“Especially for younger generations who didn’t live through it, <i>Witness to the Revolution</i> is a valuable and entertaining primer on a moment in American history the likes of which we may never see again.”<b>—Bryan Burrough, <i>The Wall Street Journal</i></b><br /><br />“A rich tapestry of a volatile period in American history.”<b>—<i>Time</i></b><br /><br />“A gripping oral history of the centrifugal social forces tearing America apart at the end of the ’60s . . . This is rousing reportage from the front lines of US history.”<b>—<i>O: The Oprah Magazine</i></b><br /><br />“The familiar voices and the unfamiliar ones are woven together with documents to make this a surprisingly powerful and moving book.”<b>—<i>New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /><br />“[An] Enthralling and brilliant chronology of the period between August 1969 and September 1970.”<b>—<i>Buffalo News</i></b><br /><br />“[Bingham] captures the essence of these fourteen months through the words of movement organizers, vets, students, draft resisters, journalists, musicians, government agents, writers, and others. . . . This oral history will enable readers to see that era in a new light and with fresh sympathy for the motivations of those involved. While Bingham’s is one of many retrospective looks at that period, it is one of the most immediate and personal.”<b>—<i>Booklist</i></b>
China's Vision of Victory
by Jonathan D. T. Ward

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

May 11, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Someday we may say that we never saw it coming. After seventy-five years of peace in the Pacific, a new challenger to American power has emerged, on a scale not seen in generations. Working from a deep sense of national destiny, the Chinese Communist Party is guiding a country of 1.4 billion people towards what it calls “the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation,” and, with it, the end of an American-led world. Will this generation witness the final act for America as a superpower? Can American ingenuity, confidence, and will power outcompete the long-term strategic thinking and planning of China’s Communist Party? These are the challenges that will shape the next decade and more. China’s Vision of Victory brings the reader to a new understanding of China’s planning, strategy, and ambitions. From seabed to space, from Africa to the Arctic, from subsurface warfare to the rise of China’s global corporations, this book will illuminate for the reader the new great game of our lifetimes, and how our adversary sees it all.</p>
If I Die in a Combat Zone: Box Me Up and Ship Me Home
by Tim O'Brien

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

August 24, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A classic from the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>The Things They Carried <br /><br /></i>"One of the best, most disturbing, and most powerful books about the shame that was / is Vietnam."<i><br /><i><b><i>—</i>Minneapolis Star and Tribune</b></i><br /></i></b><br />Before writing his award-winning <i>Going After Cacciato</i>, Tim O'Brien gave us this intensely personal account of his year as a foot soldier in Vietnam. The author takes us with him to experience combat from behind an infantryman's rifle, to walk the minefields of My Lai, to crawl into the ghostly tunnels, and to explore the ambiguities of manhood and morality in a war gone terribly wrong. Beautifully written and searingly heartfelt, <i>If I Die in a Combat Zone</i> is a masterwork of its genre.<br /><br />Now with Extra Libris material, including a reader’s guide and bonus content.
Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War
by Karl Marlantes

Language

English

Pages

617

Publication Date

April 01, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Intense, powerful, and compelling, <i>Matterhorn</i> is an epic war novel in the tradition of Norman Mailer’s <i>The Naked and the Dead</i> and James Jones’s <i>The Thin Red Line</i>. It is the timeless story of a young Marine lieutenant, Waino Mellas, and his comrades in Bravo Company, who are dropped into the mountain jungle of Vietnam as boys and forced to fight their way into manhood. Standing in their way are not merely the North Vietnamese but also monsoon rain and mud, leeches and tigers, disease and malnutrition. Almost as daunting, it turns out, are the obstacles they discover between each other: racial tension, competing ambitions, and duplicitous superior officers. But when the company finds itself surrounded and outnumbered by a massive enemy regiment, the Marines are thrust into the raw and all-consuming terror of combat. The experience will change them forever. <br /><br />Written by a highly decorated Marine veteran over the course of thirty years, <i>Matterhorn</i> is a spellbinding and unforgettable novel that brings to life an entire world—both its horrors and its thrills—and seems destined to become a classic of combat literature.
A Rumor of War: The Classic Vietnam Memoir (40th Anniversary Edit...
by Philip Caputo

Language

English

Pages

378

Publication Date

May 13, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>The 40th anniversary edition of the classic Vietnam memoir—featured in the PBS documentary series <i>The Vietnam Wa</i>r by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick—with a new foreword by Kevin Powers </b></p><p>In March of 1965, Lieutenant Philip J. Caputo landed at Danang with the first ground combat unit deployed to Vietnam. Sixteen months later, having served on the line in one of modern history’s ugliest wars, he returned home—physically whole but emotionally wasted, his youthful idealism forever gone.</p><p><i>A Rumor of War</i> is far more than one soldier’s story. Upon its publication in 1977, it shattered America’s indifference to the fate of the men sent to fight in the jungles of Vietnam. In the years since then, it has become not only a basic text on the Vietnam War but also a renowned classic in the literature of wars throughout history and, as the author writes, of "the things men do in war and the things war does to them."</p><p><b>"Heartbreaking, terrifying, and enraging. It belongs to the literature of men at war." —<i>Los Angeles Times Book Review</i></b></p>

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