Categories

 > History > Asia

21,030 results were found

Sort by:

Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific
by Robert Leckie

Language

English

Pages

252

Publication Date

January 28, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“One hell of a book! The real stuff that proves the U.S. Marines are the greatest fighting men on earth!” Leon Uris</b><br /><br />Robert Leckie signed up for service with the United States Marines on January 5, 1942.<br /><br />Wake Island had fallen and America was still reeling from the tragedy of Pearl Harbor.<br /><br />This vivid and personal account of one marine’s journey through the course of the war in the Pacific in World War Two.<br /><br />Leckie provides vivid, and at times humorous, details of his training in South Carolina, through to being assigned to first terrifying duties as a fighting marine.<br /><br />He was thrust into the heat of battle at Guadalcanal before seeing action across many islands of the Pacific until he was eventually wounded and evacuated from the island of Peleliu.<br /><br />Yet this fascinating autobiography is not simply about Leckie’s fighting life over the duration of the war as it also records the camaraderie of his fellow soldiers, the adventures that he enjoyed during his time off service in Melbourne, Australia, along with the day to day life of a normal marine.<br /><br />“Helmet for My Pillow is a grand and epic prose poem. Robert Leckie’s theme is the purely human experience of war in the Pacific, written in the graceful imagery of a human being who — somehow — survived.” Tom Hanks<br /><br />This work is essential reading for anyone interested in uncovering the voice of a true marine who saw some of the bloodiest battles of World War Two.<br /><br />Along with E. B. Sledge’s <em>With the Old Breed: At Peleiu and Okinawa</em> this book formed the basis for the HBO miniseries <em>The Pacific</em>.<br /><br />Robert Leckie was an American author and historian. His service with the 1st Marine Division in World War Two as a machine gunner and a scout greatly influenced his later work. <em>Helmet for my Pillow</em> was first published in 1957 and Leckie passed away in 2001.<br />
The Flying Tigers: The Untold Story of the American Pilots Who Wa...
by Sam Kleiner

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The thrilling story behind the American pilots who were secretly recruited to defend the nation’s desperate Chinese allies before Pearl Harbor and ended up on the front lines of the war against the Japanese in the Pacific</b><br /><br /> Sam Kleiner’s <i>The</i> <i>Flying Tigers</i> uncovers the hidden story of the group of young American men and women who crossed the Pacific before Pearl Harbor to risk their lives defending China. Led by legendary army pilot Claire Chennault, these men left behind an America still at peace in the summer of 1941 using false identities to travel across the Pacific to a run-down airbase in the jungles of Burma. In the wake of the disaster at Pearl Harbor this motley crew was the first group of Americans to take on the Japanese in combat, shooting down hundreds of Japanese aircraft in the skies over Burma, Thailand, and China. At a time when the Allies were being defeated across the globe, the Flying Tigers’ exploits gave hope to Americans and Chinese alike.<br />  <br /> Kleiner takes readers into the cockpits of their iconic shark-nosed P-40 planes—one of the most familiar images of the war—as the Tigers perform nail-biting missions against the Japanese. He profiles the outsize personalities involved in the operation, including Chennault, whose aggressive tactics went against the prevailing wisdom of military strategy; Greg “Pappy” Boyington, the man who would become the nation’s most beloved pilot until he was shot down and became a POW; Emma Foster, one of the nurses in the unit who had a passionate romance with a pilot named John Petach; and Madame Chiang Kai-shek herself, who first brought Chennault to China and who would come to visit these young Americans.<br /><br /> A dramatic story of a covert operation whose very existence would have scandalized an isolationist United States, <i>The</i> <i>Flying Tigers</i> is the unforgettable account of a group of Americans whose heroism changed the world, and who cemented an alliance between the United States and China as both nations fought against seemingly insurmountable odds.
Agent High Pockets
by Claire Phillips

Language

English

Pages

227

Publication Date

March 19, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><em>“To me Claire Phillips is four people:<br /><br />First she is a fellow soldier’s widow. <br /><br />Second, she is “High-Pockets,” the outstanding and resourceful spy operating in Jap-held Manila for over 2 years. <br /><br />Third, she is a guerrilla officer; determined and able leader and organizer of the Manila underground. <br /><br />Last, she is ‘Comadre,’ the intensely patriotic, and spiritually strong godmother of ragged, desperate men.”</em> Major John Peyton Boone </b><br /><br /><em>Agent High Pockets</em> is the remarkable story of a fascinating woman who under the pressures of war found any resourceful means to aid her friends against their common enemy, the Japanese, through the tumultuous years of World War Two.<br /><br />This memoir, written by Claire Phillips, shortly after World War Two provides brilliant detail into her life as she spied, smuggled information, and funneled aid to American guerilla fighters who were hidden in the jungles surrounding Manila.<br /><br />Shortly after arriving in the Philippines she fell in love with Sgt. John V. Phillips and became engaged to marry him. But before the ceremony could take place the Japanese Imperial Army invaded, forcing Phillips and her fiancé to retreat to the Bataan peninsula and conduct a quick ceremony in the jungle.<br /><br />Claire’s resourcefulness allowed her survive through these turbulent years and she opened a nightclub, Club Tsubaki, on the Manila waterfront. The Japanese officers who frequented it had little knowledge that they were paying for the contraband that Claire and her friends were smuggling to POW camps and their loud, drunken conversations were being quickly relayed to American guerillas in the surrounding jungles.<br /><br />She could not evade Japanese authorities forever, however, and in May 1944 she was arrested. While at the notorious Bilibid Prison she endured numerous forms of torture but refused to give any information away.<br /><br />This remarkable account should be essential reading for anyone interested in the war in the Pacific and how civilians who had been caught up in the conflict fought to survive and support their country.<br /><br />Claire was later given the Medal of Freedom for her activities through the course of the war. Her citation reads: “By direction of the President, under the provisions of Army Regulations 600-45, the Medal of Honor is awarded to you by the Commander-in-Chief, Far East, for the meritorious service which has aided the United States in the prosecution of the war against Japan in the Southwest Pacific Areas, from June 1942 to June 1944.” <br /><br />After she returned to the United States she wrote her account of this time which was published as <em>Manila Espionage</em> in 1947. Her book was the basis of a Hollywood feature film, <em>I Was an American Spy</em>, released in 1951 and starring Anne Dvorak as Phillips. She died of meningitis in 1960.<br />
The China Mission: George Marshall's Unfinished War, 1945-1947
by Daniel Kurtz-Phelan

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

April 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A spellbinding narrative of the high-stakes mission that changed the course of America, China, and global politics—and a rich portrait of the towering, complex figure who carried it out.</p><br /><p>As World War II came to an end, General George Marshall was renowned as the architect of Allied victory. Set to retire, he instead accepted what he thought was a final mission—this time not to win a war, but to stop one. Across the Pacific, conflict between Chinese Nationalists and Communists threatened to suck in the United States and escalate into revolution. His assignment was to broker a peace, build a Chinese democracy, and prevent a Communist takeover, all while staving off World War III.</p><br /><p>In his thirteen months in China, Marshall journeyed across battle-scarred landscapes, grappled with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, and plotted and argued with Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and his brilliant wife, often over card games or cocktails. The results at first seemed miraculous. But as they started to come apart, Marshall was faced with a wrenching choice. Its consequences would define the rest of his career, as the secretary of state who launched the Marshall Plan and set the standard for American leadership, and the shape of the Cold War and the US-China relationship for decades to come. It would also help spark one of the darkest turns in American civic life, as Marshall and the mission became a first prominent target of McCarthyism, and the question of “who lost China” roiled American politics.</p><br /><p><em>The China Mission</em> traces this neglected turning point and forgotten interlude in a heroic career—a story of not just diplomatic wrangling and guerrilla warfare, but also intricate spycraft and charismatic personalities. Drawing on eyewitness accounts both personal and official, it offers a richly detailed, gripping, close-up, and often surprising view of the central figures of the time—from Marshall, Mao, and Chiang to Eisenhower, Truman, and MacArthur—as they stood face-to-face and struggled to make history, with consequences and lessons that echo today.</p>
Dog Company: A True Story of American Soldiers Abandoned by Their...
by , Roger Hill

Language

English

Pages

424

Publication Date

April 11, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The Army does not want you to read this book. It does not want to advertise its detention system that coddles enemy fighters while putting American soldiers at risk. It does not want to reveal the new lawyered-up Pentagon war ethic that prosecutes U.S. soldiers and Marines while setting free spies who kill Americans.This very system ambushed Captain Roger Hill and his men.Hill, a West Point grad and decorated combat veteran, was a rising young officer who had always followed the letter of the military law. In 2007, Hill got his dream job: infantry commander in the storied 101st Airborne. His new unit, Dog Company, 1-506th, had just returned stateside from the hell of Ramadi. The men were brilliant in combat but unpolished at home, where paperwork and inspections filled their days.With tough love, Hill and his First Sergeant, an old-school former drill instructor named Tommy Scott, turned the company into the top performers in the battalion. Hill and Scott then led Dog Company into combat in Afghanistan, where a third of their men became battlefield casualties after just six months. Meanwhile, Hill found himself at war with his own battalion commander, a charismatic but difficult man who threatened to relieve Hill at every turn. After two of his men died on a routine patrol, Hill and a counterintelligence team busted a dozen enemy infiltrators on their base in the violent province of Wardak. Abandoned by his high command, Hill suddenly faced an excruciating choice: follow Army rules the way he always had, or damn the rules to his own destruction and protect the men he'd grown to love.
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea
by Barbara Demick

Language

English

Pages

338

Publication Date

December 01, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An eye-opening account of life inside North Korea—a closed world of increasing global importance—hailed as a “tour de force of meticulous reporting” (<i>The New York Review of Books</i>)</b><br />  <br /> <b>NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST • NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST</b><br /> <b> </b><br /> In this landmark addition to the literature of totalitarianism, award-winning journalist Barbara Demick follows the lives of six North Korean citizens over fifteen years—a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-sung, the rise to power of his son Kim Jong-il (the father of Kim Jong-un), and a devastating famine that killed one-fifth of the population.<br />  <br /> Demick brings to life what it means to be living under the most repressive regime today—an Orwellian world that is by choice not connected to the Internet, where displays of affection are punished, informants are rewarded, and an offhand remark can send a person to the gulag for life. She takes us deep inside the country, beyond the reach of government censors, and through meticulous and sensitive reporting we see her subjects fall in love, raise families, nurture ambitions, and struggle for survival. One by one, we witness their profound, life-altering disillusionment with the government and their realization that, rather than providing them with lives of abundance, their country has betrayed them.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Nothing to Envy</i></b><br /><br />“Provocative . . . offers extensive evidence of the author’s deep knowledge of this country while keeping its sights firmly on individual stories and human details.”<b>—<i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Deeply moving . . . The personal stories are related with novelistic detail.”<b>—<i>The Wall Street Journal</i></b><br /><br /> “A tour de force of meticulous reporting.”<b>—<i>The New York Review of Books</i></b><br /><br /> “Excellent . . . humanizes a downtrodden, long-suffering people whose individual lives, hopes and dreams are so little known abroad.”<b>—<i>San Francisco Chronicle</i></b><br /><br /> “The narrow boundaries of our knowledge have expanded radically with the publication of Nothing to Envy. . . . Elegantly structured and written, [it] is a groundbreaking work of literary nonfiction.”<b>—John Delury, <i>Slate</i></b><br /><br /> “At times a page-turner, at others an intimate study in totalitarian psychology.”<b>—<i>The Philadelphia Inquirer</i></b>
Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
by Mark Bowden

Language

English

Pages

608

Publication Date

June 06, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><p><br /><b>A <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Book Prize Finalist in History</b><p><br /><b> Winner of the 2018 Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Greene Award for a distinguished work of nonfiction </b> <p><br /><br /><br /><b>"An extraordinary feat of journalism . . . full of emotion and color."—Karl Marlantes, <i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><p><br /><br />The first battle book from Mark Bowden since his #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>Black Hawk Down</i>, <i>Hue 1968</i> is the story of the centerpiece of the Tet Offensive and a turning point in the American War in Vietnam.<br /><br /><br /><br />In the early hours of January 31, 1968, the North Vietnamese launched over one hundred attacks across South Vietnam in what would become known as the Tet Offensive. The lynchpin of Tet was the capture of Hue, Vietnam?s intellectual and cultural capital, by 10,000 National Liberation Front troops who descended from hidden camps and surged across the city of 140,000. Within hours the entire city was in their hands save for two small military outposts. American commanders refused to believe the size and scope of the Front?s presence, ordering small companies of marines against thousands of entrenched enemy troops. After several futile and deadly days, Lieutenant Colonel Ernie Cheatham would finally come up with a strategy to retake the city, block by block and building by building, in some of the most intense urban combat since World War II.<p><br /><br /><br /><br />With unprecedented access to war archives in the U.S. and Vietnam and interviews with participants from both sides, Bowden narrates each stage of this crucial battle through multiple viewpoints. Played out over 24 days and ultimately costing 10,000 lives, the Battle of Hue was by far the bloodiest of the entire war. When it ended, the American debate was never again about winning, only about how to leave. <i>Hue 1968</i> is a gripping and moving account of this pivotal moment.
The Hundred-Year Marathon: China's Secret Strategy to Replace Ame...
by Michael Pillsbury

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 03, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>One of the U.S. government's leading China experts reveals the hidden strategy fueling that country's rise – and how Americans have been seduced into helping China overtake us as the world's leading superpower.</b></p><p>For more than forty years, the United States has played an indispensable role helping the Chinese government build a booming economy, develop its scientific and military capabilities, and take its place on the world stage, in the belief that China's rise will bring us cooperation, diplomacy, and free trade. But what if the "China Dream" is to replace us, just as America replaced the British Empire, without firing a shot?</p><p>Based on interviews with Chinese defectors and newly declassified, previously undisclosed national security documents, <i>The Hundred-Year Marathon</i> reveals China's secret strategy to supplant the United States as the world's dominant power, and to do so by 2049, the one-hundredth anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic. Michael Pillsbury, a fluent Mandarin speaker who has served in senior national security positions in the U.S. government since the days of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, draws on his decades of contact with the "hawks" in China's military and intelligence agencies and translates their documents, speeches, and books to show how the teachings of traditional Chinese statecraft underpin their actions. He offers an inside look at how the Chinese really view America and its leaders – as barbarians who will be the architects of their own demise.<br />Pillsbury also explains how the U.S. government has helped – sometimes unwittingly and sometimes deliberately – to make this "China Dream" come true, and he calls for the United States to implement a new, more competitive strategy toward China as it really is, and not as we might wish it to be. <i>The Hundred-Year Marathon</i> is a wake-up call as we face the greatest national security challenge of the twenty-first century.</p>
Saipan: The Beginning of the End
by Carl W. Hoffman

Language

English

Pages

357

Publication Date

May 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“The conquest of Saipan was, among Pacific operations up to that time, the most clear-cut decisive triumph of combined arms of the United States over the Japanese.” C. B. Cates, General, U. S. Marine Corps.</b><br /><br />Saipan was the last barrier that the prevented the Allied forces from launching their entire military might against the Japanese homeland.<br /><br />Victory at Saipan was the key which opened the door to the soft underbelly of the Japanese Empire.<br /><br />Yet, because the Japanese were aware of this vulnerability, they were willing to throw everything they had against the ever-encroaching American forces and fight to the death to defend this island.<br /><br />Fifteen battleships began their bombardment of Japanese positions on 13 June 1944, they would fire over 165,000 shells onto the island.<br /><br />Then at 0700 on 15 June 8000 marines travelled in 300 LVTs to land on the west coast of Saipan to begin their assault.<br /><br />The Japanese high command realized that without resupply the island would be impossible to hold, but they and their soldiers were to fight until the last man. <br /><br />To make things as difficult as possible for the U. S. marines the Japanese used guerilla tactics to disrupt the offensive and dug themselves in in the mountainous terrain of central Saipan. <br /><br />Carl Hoffman’s brilliant account of this ferocious battle takes the reader through the course of its duration, from the initial discussion of plans and preparations right through to the eventual victory.<br /><br />This book is essential for anyone interested in the Pacific theater of war during World War Two and for the huge impact that the marine corps made in some of the bloodiest battles ever to have taken place.<br /><br />Carl W. Hoffman was a Major General in the United States Marines Corps. He served in World War Two, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. During World War Two he earned the Silver Star and two Purple Heart Medals while participating in operations on Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Saipan and Tinian. His book <em>Saipan: The Beginning of the End</em> was first published in 1950 and he passed away in 2016.<br />
Pearl Harbor and More: Stories of WWII - December 1941
by , Robert Kingsley

Language

English

Pages

356

Publication Date

November 01, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><span>When Pearl Harbor goes up in flames, eight lives will change forever</span></b><span>.</span><br /><span> </span><br /><span>A shock wave ripples across the world, setting off a chain of events in which no one is left untouched.</span><br /><span> </span><br /><span>From a con man in New York, to an Ulster Home Guard, to an American naval nurse, to a French Countess, and to a German Jew, each will bear the consequence of Japan's surprise attack on the American naval base.</span><br /><span> </span><br /><span>What challenges will they face? Will they find their ways and come through?</span><br /><span> </span><br /><span>Step into these tales of eight men and women spread across continents after the fateful day of December 7, 1941. See through their eyes how one event shook their lives and devastated the world.</span><br /> <br /><b><span>The Stories:</span></b><b><span><br /><br /><i><span></span></i></span></b><br /><b><i><span>Deadly Liberty</span></i></b><span> by R.V. Doon: Connie Collins, a navy nurse on the hospital ship, USS Solace, takes liberty the day before Pearl Harbor. Her budding romance wilts, an AWOL nurse insists she find a missing baby, and she's in the harbor when WWII erupts. Under fire, she boards the ship--and witnesses a murder during the red alert chaos. When liberty turns deadly, shipmates become suspects.</span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>The List</span></i></b><span> by Vanessa Couchman: A high-ranking German officer is assassinated in Western France and 50 hostages are shot. Fifty more will be executed if the killers are not handed over. Jewish communist Joseph Mazelier is on the list. Will Countess Ida agree to help him escape?</span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>Christmas Eve in the City of Dreams</span></i></b><span> by Alexa Kang: On his last night in New York, a young grifter sets out to turn the table on those who shorted him before he leaves for the draft. Will he win or lose?</span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>Allies After All</span></i></b><span> by Dianne Ascroft: Although their nations are allies, from their first meeting American civilian contractor Art Miller and Local Defence Volunteer, Robbie Hetherington loathe each other. But Northern Ireland is too small a place for such animosity. What will it take to make the two men put aside their enmity and work together? </span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>Time to Go</span></i></b><span> by Margaret Tanner: A young sailor, who died at Pearl Harbor, finally meets his soulmate on the 75th Anniversary of the battle. Will she be prepared to leave the 21st century with him? Or will they forever remain apart?</span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>Turning Point</span></i></b><span> by Marion Kummerow: Eighteen-year-old German Jew Margarete Rosenbaum is about to be sent to a labor camp, when a bomb hits the building she lives in. Emerging from the rubble she's presented with an unexpected opportunity. But how far is she willing to go to save her life?</span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>I am an American</span></i></b><span> by Robyn Hobusch Echols: Ellen Okita and Flo Kaufmann are high school seniors in Livingston, California. Ellen is a first generation American who lives in the Yamato Colony, composed of about 100 families of Japanese descent. Flo's father is a first generation American. After Pearl Harbor, the war hits home fast and brings unforeseen changes to them and their families.</span><span><br /><br /><b><i><span></span></i></b></span><br /><b><i><span>A Rude Awakening</span></i></b><span> by Robert A. Kingsley: Singapore, December1941; the fortress sleeps, believing its own tales of strength and invulnerability. A rigidly class based society throws garden parties and dines sedately, disregarding the slowly growing number of warning signals. Suddenly, the underestimated enemy ferociously attacks and the myth of invincibility is shattered forever. </span>

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldnt have due to the Kindle eliminating sp...

David Foster Wallace Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. Ive found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found adve...

Ernest Hemingway The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen Kings On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But Kings prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of Kings greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. Kings On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft that resu...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

Kind Reader Monthly Drawing (March 2017)

Congratulations to February 2017's winner Henry H. of New York, USA.

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com