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Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

580

Publication Date

February 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg </strong></p><p>From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”</p><p>One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?</p><p>Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, <em>Sapiens</em> integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.</p><p>Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?</p><p>Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.</p>
Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny
by Edward Jay Watts

Language

English

Pages

298

Publication Date

November 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>A new history of the Roman Republic and its collapse</b><br /> </div><div> In <i>Mortal Republic</i>, prize-winning historian Edward J. Watts offers a new history of the fall of the Roman Republic that explains why Rome exchanged freedom for autocracy. For centuries, even as Rome grew into the Mediterranean's premier military and political power, its governing institutions, parliamentary rules, and political customs successfully fostered negotiation and compromise. By the 130s BC, however, Rome's leaders increasingly used these same tools to cynically pursue individual gain and obstruct their opponents. As the center decayed and dysfunction grew, arguments between politicians gave way to political violence in the streets. The stage was set for destructive civil wars--and ultimately the imperial reign of Augustus.</div><div> <br /> The death of Rome's Republic was not inevitable. In <i>Mortal Republic</i>, Watts shows it died because it was allowed to, from thousands of small wounds inflicted by Romans who assumed that it would last forever. <br /><br /></div>
Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings t...
by Peter Ackroyd

Language

English

Pages

520

Publication Date

October 16, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The first book in Peter Ackroyd's history of England series, which has since been followed up with two more installments, <i>Tudors </i>and <i>Rebellion</i>.</p><p>In <i>Foundation, </i>the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past--a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house--and describes in rich prose the successive waves of invaders who made England English, despite being themselves Roman, Viking, Saxon, or Norman French.</p><p>With his extraordinary skill for evoking time and place and his acute eye for the telling detail, Ackroyd recounts the story of warring kings, of civil strife, and foreign wars. But he also gives us a vivid sense of how England's early people lived: the homes they built, the clothes the wore, the food they ate, even the jokes they told. All are brought vividly to life in this history of England through the narrative mastery of one of Britain's finest writers.</p>
The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story
by Douglas Preston

Language

English

Pages

326

Publication Date

January 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>NAMED A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> NOTABLE BOOK OF 2017</strong><div><strong>#1 <em>New York Times </em>and #1 <em>Wall Street Journal </em>bestseller! </strong></div><div><strong><br /></strong></div><div><b>A Best Book of 2017 from the <i>Boston Globe</i></b></div><div><b>One of the 12 Best Books of the Year from<i> National Geographic</i></b></div><div><b>Included in <i>Lithub</i>'s Ultimate Best Books of 2017 List</b></div><div><b>A Favorite Science Book of 2017 from <i>Science News</i></b></div><div><br /></div><div><strong>A five-hundred-year-old legend. An ancient curse. A stunning medical mystery. And a pioneering journey into the unknown heart of the world's densest jungle.</strong></div><div><br />Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and they warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die. In 1940, swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artifacts and an electrifying story of having found the Lost City of the Monkey God-but then committed suicide without revealing its location.<br /><br /><br />Three quarters of a century later, bestselling author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest. In 2012 he climbed aboard a rickety, single-engine plane carrying the machine that would change everything: lidar, a highly advanced, classified technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy. In an unexplored valley ringed by steep mountains, that flight revealed the unmistakable image of a sprawling metropolis, tantalizing evidence of not just an undiscovered city but an enigmatic, lost civilization.<br /><br />Venturing into this raw, treacherous, but breathtakingly beautiful wilderness to confirm the discovery, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, disease-carrying insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. But it wasn't until they returned that tragedy struck: Preston and others found they had contracted in the ruins a horrifying, sometimes lethal-and incurable-disease.<br /><br />Suspenseful and shocking, filled with colorful history, hair-raising adventure, and dramatic twists of fortune, THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD is the absolutely true, eyewitness account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century.<br /> </div> <style type="text/css"> p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 11.0px Helvetica} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} </style>
Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides's Trap?
by Graham Allison

Language

English

Pages

389

Publication Date

May 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>SHORT-LISTED FOR THE 2018 LIONEL GELBER PRIZE<BR /><BR /> A <I>NEW YORK TIMES</I> NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR<BR />  <BR /> NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY: <I>FINANCIAL TIMES * THE TIMES</I> (LONDON) * AMAZON<BR />  <BR /> “Allison is one of the keenest observers of international affairs around.”— JOE BIDEN, former vice president of the United States<BR />  <BR /> China and the United States are heading toward a war neither wants. The reason is Thucydides’s Trap: when a rising power threatens to displace a ruling one, violence is the likeliest result. Over the past five hundred years, these conditions have occurred sixteen times; war broke out in twelve. Today, as an unstoppable China approaches an immovable America, and both Xi Jinping and Donald Trump promise to make their countries “great again,” the seventeenth case looks grim. A trade conflict, cyberattack, Korean crisis, or accident at sea could easily spark a major war.<BR />       In <I>Destined for War</I>, eminent Harvard scholar Graham Allison masterfully blends history and current events to explain the timeless machinery of Thucydides’s Trap—and to explore the painful steps that might prevent disaster today.<BR />  <BR /> “[A] must-read book in both Washington and Beijing.”— NIALL FERGUSON, <I>BOSTON GLOBE</I><BR />  <BR /> “[Allison is] a first-class academic with the instincts of a first-rate politician.”— <I>BLOOMBERG NEWS</I><BR />  <BR /> “[Full of] wide-ranging, erudite case studies that span human history . . . [A] fine book.”— <I>NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW</I></DIV>
The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean: The Ancient World Economy ...
by Raoul McLaughlin

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

September 11, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<SPAN STYLE= "" >The ancient evidence suggests that international commerce supplied Roman government with up to a third of the revenues that sustained their empire. In ancient times large fleets of Roman merchant ships set sail from Egypt on voyages across the Indian Ocean. They sailed from Roman ports on the Red Sea to distant kingdoms on the east coast of Africa and the seaboard off southern Arabia. Many continued their voyages across the ocean to trade with the rich kingdoms of ancient India. Freighters from the Roman Empire left with bullion and returned with cargo holds filled with valuable trade goods, including exotic African products, Arabian incense and eastern spices. 

This book examines Roman commerce with Indian kingdoms from the Indus region to the Tamil lands. It investigates contacts between the Roman Empire and powerful African kingdoms, including the Nilotic regime that ruled Meroe and the rising Axumite Realm. Further chapters explore Roman dealings with the Arab kingdoms of south Arabia, including the Saba-Himyarites and the Hadramaut Regime, which sent caravans along the incense trail to the ancient rock-carved city of Petra.

The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean is the first book to bring these subjects together in a single comprehensive study that reveals Rome's impact on the ancient world and explains how international trade funded the Legions that maintained imperial rule. It offers a new international perspective on the Roman Empire and its legacy for modern society.</SPAN>
The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman...
by Mike Duncan

Language

English

Pages

308

Publication Date

October 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b></div> <b><div><b><br /></b></div>The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic.</b><div><b><br /></b></div><div>The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world.</div><div><br /></div><div>In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic.</div><div><br /></div><div>Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.</div><div><br /></div>
SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome
by Mary Beard

Language

English

Pages

607

Publication Date

November 09, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller • National Book Critics Circle Finalist • <em>Wall Street Journal</em> Best Books of 2015 • <em>Kirkus Reviews</em> Best Books of 2015 • <em>Economist</em> Books of the Year 2015 • <em>New York Times Book Review</em> 100 Notable Books of 2015<br /><br /><br /><br />A sweeping, "magisterial" history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists shows why Rome remains "relevant to people many centuries later" (<em>Atlantic</em>).</strong></p><br /><p>In <em>SPQR</em>, an instant classic, Mary Beard narrates the history of Rome "with passion and without technical jargon" and demonstrates how "a slightly shabby Iron Age village" rose to become the "undisputed hegemon of the Mediterranean" (<em>Wall Street Journal</em>). Hailed by critics as animating "the grand sweep and the intimate details that bring the distant past vividly to life" (<em>Economist</em>) in a way that makes "your hair stand on end" (<em>Christian Science Monitor</em>) and spanning nearly a thousand years of history, this "highly informative, highly readable" (<em>Dallas Morning News</em>) work examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries. With its nuanced attention to class, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, <em>SPQR</em> will to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.</p>
The Triumph of Christianity: How a Forbidden Religion Swept the W...
by Bart D. Ehrman

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

February 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The “marvelous” (Reza Aslan, bestselling author of <i>Zealot</i>), <i>New York Times</i> bestselling story of how Christianity became the dominant religion in the West.</b><BR><BR>How did a religion whose first believers were twenty or so illiterate day laborers in a remote part of the empire became the official religion of Rome, converting some thirty million people in just four centuries? In <i>The Triumph of Christianity</i>, early Christian historian Bart D. Ehrman weaves the rigorously-researched answer to this question “into a vivid, nuanced, and enormously readable narrative” (Elaine Pagels, National Book Award-winning author of <i>The Gnostic Gospels</i>), showing how a handful of charismatic characters used a brilliant social strategy and an irresistible message to win over hearts and minds one at a time.<BR> <BR>This “humane, thoughtful and intelligent” book (<i>The </i><i>New York Times Book Review</i>) upends the way we think about the single most important cultural transformation our world has ever seen—one that revolutionized art, music, literature, philosophy, ethics, economics, and law.
The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought a...
by Victor Davis Hanson

Language

English

Pages

720

Publication Date

October 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><br />A definitive account of World War II by America's preeminent military historian</b><br /><br />World War II was the most lethal conflict in human history. Never before had a war been fought on so many diverse landscapes and in so many different ways, from rocket attacks in London to jungle fighting in Burma to armor strikes in Libya.<br /><br /><i>The Second World Wars </i>examines how combat unfolded in the air, at sea, and on land to show how distinct conflicts among disparate combatants coalesced into one interconnected global war. Drawing on 3,000 years of military history, Victor Davis Hanson argues that despite its novel industrial barbarity, neither the war's origins nor its geography were unusual. Nor was its ultimate outcome surprising. The Axis powers were well prepared to win limited border conflicts, but once they blundered into global war, they had no hope of victory.<br /><br />An authoritative new history of astonishing breadth, <i>The Second World Wars</i> offers a stunning reinterpretation of history's deadliest conflict.<br /><br /><br />

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