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Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

469

Publication Date

February 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg </strong></p><p>From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”</p><p>One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?</p><p>Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, <em>Sapiens</em> integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.</p><p>Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?</p><p>Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.</p>
The Triumph of Christianity: How a Forbidden Religion Swept the W...
by Bart D. Ehrman

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

February 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling authority on early Christianity, the story of how Christianity grew from a religion of twenty or so peasants in rural Galilee to the dominant religion in the West in less than four hundred years.<BR><BR>Christianity didn’t <i>have</i> to become the dominant religion in the West. It easily could have remained a sect of Judaism fated to have the historical importance of the Sadducees or the Essenes. In <i>The Triumph of Christianity</i>, Bart Ehrman, a master explainer of Christian history, texts, and traditions, shows how a religion whose first believers were twenty or so illiterate day laborers in a remote part of the empire became the official religion of Rome, converting some thirty million people in just four centuries. <i>The Triumph of Christianity</i> combines deep knowledge and meticulous research in an eye-opening, immensely readable narrative that upends the way we think about the single most important cultural transformation our world has ever seen—one that revolutionized art, music, literature, philosophy, ethics, economics, and law.
SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome
by Mary Beard

Language

English

Pages

607

Publication Date

November 09, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller • National Book Critics Circle Finalist • <em>Wall Street Journal</em> Best Books of 2015 • <em>Kirkus Reviews</em> Best Books of 2015 • <em>Economist</em> Books of the Year 2015 • <em>New York Times Book Review</em> 100 Notable Books of 2015<br /><br /><br /><br />A sweeping, "magisterial" history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists shows why Rome remains "relevant to people many centuries later" (<em>Atlantic</em>).</p><br /><p>In <em>SPQR</em>, an instant classic, Mary Beard narrates the history of Rome "with passion and without technical jargon" and demonstrates how "a slightly shabby Iron Age village" rose to become the "undisputed hegemon of the Mediterranean" (<em>Wall Street Journal</em>). Hailed by critics as animating "the grand sweep and the intimate details that bring the distant past vividly to life" (<em>Economist</em>) in a way that makes "your hair stand on end" (<em>Christian Science Monitor</em>) and spanning nearly a thousand years of history, this "highly informative, highly readable" (<em>Dallas Morning News</em>) work examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries. With its nuanced attention to class, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, <em>SPQR</em> will to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.</p>
A History of Ancient Egypt’s Most Famous Sites
by Charles River Editors

Language

English

Pages

402

Publication Date

January 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
*Includes pictures<br />*Profiles sites like the pyramids, Sphinx, Luxor, Alexandria, and more<br />*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading<br />*Includes a table of contents<br /><br /> “Egypt is not a country we live in but a country that lives within us.” – Pope Shenouda III<br /><br />Africa may have given rise to the first humans, and Egypt probably gave rise to the first great civilizations, which continue to fascinate modern societies across the globe nearly 5,000 years later. From the Library and Lighthouse of Alexandria to the Great Pyramid at Giza, the Ancient Egyptians produced several wonders of the world, revolutionized architecture and construction, created some of the world’s first systems of mathematics and medicine, and established language and art that spread across the known world. With world-famous leaders like King Tut and Cleopatra, it’s no wonder that today’s world has so many Egyptologists.<br /><br />For almost four millennia, the Great Pyramids of Ancient Egypt have been widely hailed as the single greatest archeological feat man has ever accomplished. The Great Pyramid at Giza is the only one of the seven wonders of the ancient world to have survived into the modern age. Unlike so many pieces of the historical record which have been “re-discovered,” relatively recently (in the grand scheme of things,” in their four thousand years of existence, the Great Pyramids have never allowed themselves to be truly forgotten by the human civilization which has never ceased to regard them with wonder and awe. <br /><br />Egypt also impressed its contemporaries. The 5th century B.C. Greek historian Herodotus wrote that Egypt was “the gift of the Nile” because the river made its soil so fertile and thus helped create one of the first great civilizations. Indeed, the land of Egypt so impressed the Greeks that when Alexander the Great conquered the Nile Valley in the 4th century B.C., he decided that he would build a new city on its soil and name it Alexandria. After Alexander, the city of Alexandria grew and became the most important city in the world for centuries as it watched and played a role in the rise and fall of numerous dynasties. The city also became home to one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World – the Lighthouse of Alexandria – and a center of culture and learning, which was exemplified by the Library of Alexandria. <br /><br />A History of Ancient Egypt’s Most Famous Sites profiles the places that made Ancient Egypt so legendary. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Egyptians’ most famous sites like never before.
Marching With Caesar: Revolt of the Legions
by R.W. Peake

Language

English

Pages

540

Publication Date

January 05, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Within the span of five years, Rome is shaken to its foundations, first with the slaughter of three Legions under the command of Publius Quinctilius Varus in the Teutoberg Forest, betrayed by the German prince Arminius, then with the death of Augustus coming five years later. Within this time period, the Legions on the Rhine are rocked, first with the turmoil created by this unprecedented disaster, which is exacerbated with Augustus' decision to rid Rome of troublemakers when he forces them to enlist in the Legions in response to the crisis posed by the German victory, then followed with the uncertainty caused by the death of Augustus, a man who has controlled Rome for four decades. <br /><br />Titus Porcinianus Pullus, like his fellow Centurions, must cope with the difficulties presented by the uncertainty created by the cunning leadership of Arminius, and the agitation of men who had been forced into the ranks, but it is the addition of a haughty young equestrian who has purchased a posting in Titus' Century who presents the most personally vexing and disturbing challenge. Young Gnaeus Volusenus is one of the only men in the Legions whose size and strength rivals that of Titus, but there are other similarities between the two men that guarantee they will clash. Their personal differences, however, must be subordinated when the Legions in Germania and Pannonia revolt, sending Titus on a journey that will prove to be one of the most important and troubling of his life. Nevertheless, Titus has a duty to perform, not only to Rome, but to the spirit of his grandfather, the first and greatest Titus Pullus; both the outcome of the revolt of the Legions and the honor of the Pullus name depend on him. <br />
Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States
by James C. Scott

Language

English

Pages

335

Publication Date

August 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative</B><BR /><BR /> Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family—all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction.<BR /><BR /> Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the “barbarians” who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.</DIV>
The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman...
by Mike Duncan

Language

English

Pages

308

Publication Date

October 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b></div> <b><div><b><br /></b></div>The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic.</b><div><b><br /></b></div><div>The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world.</div><div><br /></div><div>In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic.</div><div><br /></div><div>Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.</div><div><br /></div>
Cræft: An Inquiry Into the Origins and True Meaning of Tradition...
by Alexander Langlands

Language

English

Pages

330

Publication Date

January 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>An archaeologist takes us into the ancient world of traditional crafts to uncover their deep, original histories.</p><br /><p>An archaeologist takes us into the ancient world of traditional crafts to uncover their deep, original histories.</p><br /><p>In the midst of a seemingly endless supply of mass-manufactured products, we find ourselves nostalgic for products bearing the mark of authenticity—hand-made furniture, artisan breads, craft beers, and other goods produced by human hands. What often goes unnoticed is the transformation of our understanding of craft—or rather, <em>craeft</em>—in the wake of industrialization.</p><br /><p>In <em>Craeft</em>, archaeologist and medieval historian Alexander Langlands argues that our modern understanding of craft only skims the surface. His journeys from his home in Wales have taken him along the Atlantic seaboard of Europe, from Spain through France and England to Scotland and Iceland in search of the lost meaning of craft. Reaching as far back as the Neolithic period, he combines deep history with scientific analyses and personal anecdotes. We follow the author as he herds sheep, keeps bees, tans hides, spins wool, and thatches roofs. We learn that scythes work much better on tall grass than the latest model of weed trimmers, that you can spin wool using a large wooden spoon, and that it was once considered criminal to work on animal hides before a requisite twelve-month soak.</p><br /><p>When it first appeared in Old English, the word <em>craeft</em> signified an indefinable sense of knowledge, wisdom, and resourcefulness. Rediscovering craft will connect us with our human past, our sense of place, and our remarkable capacity to survive in the harshest of landscapes. <em>Craeft</em> helps us more fully appreciate human ingenuity and the passing on of traditions from generation to generation.</p>
Die by the Blade
by James Mace

Language

English

Pages

251

Publication Date

November 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
*Thus Valour and Skill Have Their Reward*<br /><br />The year is 77 A.D. On the frontier of the Roman Empire, a Dacian man named Verus is captured and enslaved during an imperial raid north of the Danube. He is sent to a rock quarry known as The Pit, as one among thousands of fresh slaves needed to mine marble for Emperor Vespasian’s new amphitheatre. Funded by spoils taken during the Siege of Jerusalem, the Emperor promises it will be the largest gladiatorial arena ever; his personal gift to the people of Rome. Requiring years of herculean labour and millions of cubic feet in stone, Vespasian’s son, Titus, worries whether his father will live to see its completion.<br /><br />After months of back-breaking suffering and toil, Verus is taken from The Pit to become a gladiator. Whether by chance or fate, he knows that only by making a pact with death will he have a chance at life. In a savage world of blood, sweat, sand, and steel, his very soul is forged, until he no longer remembers the man he once was. As the Flavian Amphitheatre nears completion, with the possibility of fighting before the Emperor himself, Verus swears to either win his cherished freedom, or ignominiously die by the blade.<br />
Killing Jesus: A History (Bill O'Reilly's Killing Series)
by , Martin Dugard

Language

English

Pages

302

Publication Date

September 24, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Millions of readers have thrilled to bestselling authors Bill O'Reilly and historian Martin Dugard's <i>Killing Kennedy</i> and <i>Killing Lincoln</i>, page-turning works of nonfiction that have changed the way we read history.</b></p><p>Now the iconic anchor of <i>The O'Reilly Factor</i> details the events leading up to the murder of the most influential man in history: Jesus of Nazareth. Nearly two thousand years after this beloved and controversial young revolutionary was brutally killed by Roman soldiers, more than 2.2 billion human beings attempt to follow his teachings and believe he is God. <i>Killing Jesus</i> will take readers inside Jesus's life, recounting the seismic political and historical events that made his death inevitable - and changed the world forever.</p>

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