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The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the Am...
by David McCullough

Language

English

Pages

353

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Pulitzer Prize–winning historian David McCullough rediscovers an important and dramatic chapter in the American story—the settling of the Northwest Territory by dauntless pioneers who overcame incredible hardships to build a community based on ideals that would come to define our country.</b><BR><BR>As part of the Treaty of Paris, in which Great Britain recognized the new United States of America, Britain ceded the land that comprised the immense Northwest Territory, a wilderness empire northwest of the Ohio River containing the future states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. A Massachusetts minister named Manasseh Cutler was instrumental in opening this vast territory to veterans of the Revolutionary War and their families for settlement. Included in the Northwest Ordinance were three remarkable conditions: freedom of religion, free universal education, and most importantly, the prohibition of slavery. In 1788 the first band of pioneers set out from New England for the Northwest Territory under the leadership of Revolutionary War veteran General Rufus Putnam. They settled in what is now Marietta on the banks of the Ohio River.<BR> <BR>McCullough tells the story through five major characters: Cutler and Putnam; Cutler’s son Ephraim; and two other men, one a carpenter turned architect, and the other a physician who became a prominent pioneer in American science. They and their families created a town in a primeval wilderness, while coping with such frontier realities as floods, fires, wolves and bears, no roads or bridges, no guarantees of any sort, all the while negotiating a contentious and sometimes hostile relationship with the native people. Like so many of McCullough’s subjects, they let no obstacle deter or defeat them.<BR> <BR>Drawn in great part from a rare and all-but-unknown collection of diaries and letters by the key figures, <i>The Pioneers</i> is a uniquely American story of people whose ambition and courage led them to remarkable accomplishments. This is a revelatory and quintessentially American story, written with David McCullough’s signature narrative energy.
The Mueller Report
by The Washington Post

Language

English

Pages

736

Publication Date

April 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The Crucial #1 <i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><BR> <BR><b>“The Mueller report is that rare Washington tell-all that surpasses its pre-publication hype…the best book by far on the workings of the Trump presidency.” —Carlos Lozada, <i>The Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR> <b>The only book with exclusive analysis by the Pulitzer Prize–winning staff of <i>The Washington Post</i>, and the most complete and authoritative available.</b><BR><BR>Read the findings of the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, complete with accompanying analysis by the <i>Post</i> reporters who’ve covered the story from the beginning.<BR> <BR> This edition from <i>The Washington Post</i>/Scribner contains:<BR> <BR>—A fully-searchable live-text version of the long-awaited <b>Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election. </b>Readers can take notes and highlight. Footnotes are linked for easy navigation. Redactions are distinctively formatted and clear.<BR> <BR>—<b>An introduction</b> by <i>The Washington Post</i> titled “A President, a Prosecutor, and the Protection of American Democracy”<BR> <BR> —<b>A timeline</b> of the major events of the Special Counsel’s investigation from May 2017, when Robert Mueller was appointed, to the report's delivery<BR> <BR> —<b>A guide to individuals</b> involved, including in the Special Counsel’s Office, the Department of Justice, the FBI, the Trump Campaign, the White House, the Trump legal defense team, and the Russians<BR> <BR> —<b>Key documents</b> in the Special Counsel’s investigation, including filings pertaining to General Michael T. Flynn, Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen, Roger Stone, and the Russian internet operation in St. Petersburg. Each document is introduced and explained by <i>Washington Post</i> reporters.<BR> <BR> One of the most urgent and important investigations ever conducted, the Mueller inquiry focuses on Donald Trump, his presidential campaign, and Russian interference in the 2016 election, and draws on the testimony of dozens of witnesses and the work of some of the country’s most seasoned prosecutors.<BR> <BR> The special counsel’s investigation looms as a turning point in American history. <i>The Mueller Report </i>is essential reading for all citizens concerned about the fate of the presidency and the future of our democracy.
Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee
by Casey Cep

Language

English

Pages

308

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>In <i>Furious Hours</i>, Casey Cep unravels the mystery surrounding Harper Lee's first and only work of nonfiction, and the shocking true crimes at the center of it<br /><br />"A triumph on every level . . . Casey Cep has excavated this mesmerizing story and tells it with grace and insight and a fierce fidelity to the truth." --David Grann, best-selling author of <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i></b><br /><br />Reverend Willie Maxwell was a rural preacher accused of murdering five of his family members for insurance money in the 1970s. With the help of a savvy lawyer, he escaped justice for years until a relative shot him dead at the funeral of his last victim. Despite hundreds of witnesses, Maxwell's murderer was acquitted--thanks to the same attorney who had previously defended the Reverend.<br /><br />Sitting in the audience during the vigilante's trial was Harper Lee, who had traveled from New York City to her native Alabama with the idea of writing her own <i>In Cold Blood,</i> the true-crime classic she had helped her friend Truman Capote research seventeen years earlier. Lee spent a year in town reporting, and many more years working on her own version of the case.<br /><br />Now Casey Cep brings this story to life, from the shocking murders to the courtroom drama to the racial politics of the Deep South. At the same time, she offers a deeply moving portrait of one of the country's most beloved writers and her struggle with fame, success, and the mystery of artistic creativity.
The Fifth Risk
by Michael Lewis

Language

English

Pages

221

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller<br /><br /><br /><br />What are the consequences if the people given control over our government have no idea how it works?</strong></p><br /><p>"The election happened," remembers Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, then deputy secretary of the Department of Energy. "And then there was radio silence." Across all departments, similar stories were playing out: Trump appointees were few and far between; those that did show up were shockingly uninformed about the functions of their new workplace. Some even threw away the briefing books that had been prepared for them.</p><br /><p>Michael Lewis’s brilliant narrative takes us into the engine rooms of a government under attack by its own leaders. In Agriculture the funding of vital programs like food stamps and school lunches is being slashed. The Commerce Department may not have enough staff to conduct the 2020 Census properly. Over at Energy, where international nuclear risk is managed, it’s not clear there will be enough inspectors to track and locate black market uranium before terrorists do.</p><br /><p>Willful ignorance plays a role in these looming disasters. If your ambition is to maximize short-term gains without regard to the long-term cost, you are better off not knowing those costs. If you want to preserve your personal immunity to the hard problems, it’s better never to really understand those problems. There is upside to ignorance, and downside to knowledge. Knowledge makes life messier. It makes it a bit more difficult for a person who wishes to shrink the world to a worldview.</p><br /><p>If there are dangerous fools in this book, there are also heroes, unsung, of course. They are the linchpins of the system—those public servants whose knowledge, dedication, and proactivity keep the machinery running. Michael Lewis finds them, and he asks them what keeps them up at night.</p>
Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century
by George Packer

Language

English

Pages

608

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"Portrays Holbrooke in all of his endearing and exasperating self-willed glory...Both a sweeping diplomatic history and a Shakespearean tragicomedy... If you could read one book to comprehend American's foreign policy and its quixotic forays into quicksands over the past 50 years, this would be it."--Walter Isaacson, <i>The New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />"By the end of the second page, maybe the third, you will be hooked...There never was a diplomat-activist quite like [Holbrooke], and there seldom has been a book quite like this -- sweeping and sentimental, beguiling and brutal, catty and critical, much like the man himself."--David M. Shribman, <i>The Boston Globe</i></b><br /><br />Richard Holbrooke was brilliant, utterly self-absorbed, and possessed of almost inhuman energy and appetites. Admired and detested, he was the force behind the Dayton Accords that ended the Balkan wars, America's greatest diplomatic achievement in the post-Cold War era. His power lay in an utter belief in himself and his idea of a muscular, generous foreign policy. From his days as a young adviser in Vietnam to his last efforts to end the war in Afghanistan, Holbrooke embodied the postwar American impulse to take the lead on the global stage. But his sharp elbows and tireless self-promotion ensured that he never rose to the highest levels in government that he so desperately coveted. His story is thus the story of America during its era of supremacy: its strength, drive, and sense of possibility, as well as its penchant for overreach and heedless self-confidence. In <i>Our Man,</i> drawn from Holbrooke's diaries and papers, we are given a nonfiction narrative that is both intimate and epic in its revelatory portrait of this extraordinary and deeply flawed man and the elite spheres of society and government he inhabited.
Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11
by Mitchell Zuckoff

Language

English

Pages

625

Publication Date

April 30, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Years in the making, this spellbinding, heartbreaking, and ultimately uplifting narrative is an unforgettable portrait of 9/11.</strong></p><p>This is a 9/11 book like no other. Masterfully weaving together multiple strands of the events in New York, at the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, <em>Fall and Rise </em>is a mesmerizing, minute-by-minute account of that terrible day. </p><p>In the days and months after 9/11, Mitchell Zuckoff, then a reporter for the <em>Boston Globe</em>, wrote about the attacks, the victims, and their families. After further years of meticulous reporting, Zuckoff has filled <em>Fall and Rise</em> with voices of the lost and the saved. The result is an utterly gripping book, filled with intimate stories of people most affected by the events of that sunny Tuesday in September: an out-of-work actor stuck in an elevator in the North Tower of the World Trade Center; the heroes aboard Flight 93 deciding to take action; a veteran trapped in the inferno in the Pentagon; the fire chief among the first on the scene in sleepy Shanksville; a team of firefighters racing to save an injured woman and themselves; and the men, women, and children flying across country to see loved ones or for work who suddenly faced terrorists bent on murder.</p><p><em>Fall and Rise</em> will open new avenues of understanding for everyone who thinks they know the story of 9/11, bringing to life—and in some cases, bringing back to life—the extraordinary ordinary people who experienced the worst day in modern American history. </p><p>Destined to be a classic, <em>Fall and Rise</em> will move, shock, inspire, and fill hearts with love and admiration for the human spirit as it triumphs in the face of horrifying events.</p>
The Mueller Report: The Final Report of the Special Counsel into ...
by , Alan Dershowitz

Language

English

Pages

480

Publication Date

April 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<B>NOW A <I>NEW YORK TIMES</I> AND <I>USA TODAY</I> BESTSELLER.<BR><BR> There has never been a more important political investigation than Robert S. Mueller III's into President Donald Trump's possible collusion with Russia. His momentous findings can be found here, complete with:</B><BR><ul><li>The <B>300+ pages</B> of the <B>historic report, </B>as released by the Justice Department</li><li>An introduction by <B>constitutional scholar, eminent civil libertarian, and <I>New York Times </I>bestselling author Alan Dershowitz.</B></li><li>The relevant portions of <B>Title 28 of the Code of Federal Regulations,</B> the 1999 provisions written by former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal, which establish and regulate the powers of the special counsel.</li><li><B>Rod Rosenstein’s 2016 order</B> appointing Robert Mueller III as special counsel and outlining the scope of his investigation.</li><li>Attorney General <B>William Barr’s four-page summary </B>of the report, as sent to Congress.</li><li>Barr's explanation of the <B>four reasons for redacting the report, and a key </B>for identifying them in the color-coded report</li></ul><BR>The wait is over. Robert Mueller, a lifelong Republican, has concluded his investigation and submitted its findings to Attorney General William Barr. Barr has told Congress that Mueller found no proof of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, and did not come to a conclusion on obstruction of justice—neither concluding the president committed a crime nor exonerating him. But Mueller’s report was over 300 pages and Barr’s summary was only four pages, raising questions about the conclusions of a historic investigation.<BR><BR> Special Counsel Robert Mueller III’s probe into Russian influence on the 2016 election of Donald Trump—including links between the campaign and Russian interests, obstruction of justice by President Trump, and any other matters that may have arisen in the course of the investigation—has been the focal point of American politics since its inception in May 2017. <BR><BR> Democrats in the US House of Representatives hoped to use the report to begin impeachment proceedings, with the support of those critical of the president. Media tracked Mueller’s every move, and the investigation was subject to constant speculation by political pundits everywhere. It resulted in the indictments of Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, and many others. President Trump and his supporters affirmed that the investigation was a “witch hunt” and the product of a plot by the political establishment—the “deep state”—to delegitimize his presidency.<BR><BR> Mueller’s findings—at least according to Barr—allowed the latter to claim victory. But now, thanks to a subpoena from House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler for the full report, a resolution from the House of Representatives to release the full report to the public (though blocked in the Senate by Mitch McConnell), and popular demand, it’s time for public to judge if that is true.<BR><BR> The Mueller investigation will join Watergate, and the Mueller Report will join the 9/11 Commission Report, the Warren Report, and the Starr Report, as one of the most important in history. <I>The Mueller Report </I>is required reading for everyone with interest in American politics, for every 2016 and 2020 voter, and every American. It’s now available here as an affordable paperback, featuring an introduction from eminent civil libertarian, Harvard Law Professor Emeritus, and <I>New York Times </I>bestselling author Alan Dershowitz, who provides a constitutional, civil law-based commentary sorely needed in today’s media landscape.
The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princet...
by Rick Atkinson

Language

English

Pages

782

Publication Date

May 14, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>From the bestselling author of the Liberation Trilogy comes the extraordinary first volume of his new trilogy about the American Revolution</b><br /><b></b><br /><b></b>Rick Atkinson, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning <i>An Army at Dawn</i> and two other superb books about World War II, has long been admired for his deeply researched, stunningly vivid narrative histories. Now he turns his attention to a new war, and in the initial volume of the Revolution Trilogy he recounts the first twenty-one months of America’s violent war for independence. </p><p>From the battles at Lexington and Concord in spring 1775 to those at Trenton and Princeton in winter 1777, American militiamen and then the ragged Continental Army take on the world’s most formidable fighting force. It is a gripping saga alive with astonishing characters: Henry Knox, the former bookseller with an uncanny understanding of artillery; Nathanael Greene, the blue-eyed bumpkin who becomes a brilliant battle captain; Benjamin Franklin, the self-made man who proves to be the wiliest of diplomats; George Washington, the commander in chief who learns the difficult art of leadership when the war seems all but lost. The story is also told from the British perspective, making the mortal conflict between the redcoats and the rebels all the more compelling.</p><p>Full of riveting details and untold stories, <i>The British Are Coming</i> is a tale of heroes and knaves, of sacrifice and blunder, of redemption and profound suffering. Rick Atkinson has given stirring new life to the first act of our country’s creation drama.</p>
The Library Book
by Susan Orlean

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK</b><BR> <BR><b>A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR </b> * <b>A</b> <b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER and <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“A constant pleasure to read…Everybody who loves books should check out <i>The Library Book</i>.” —<i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR><b>“CAPTIVATING…DELIGHTFUL.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i> * “EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING.” —<i>The New York Times</i> * “MESMERIZING…RIVETING.” —<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><BR> <BR><b>A dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries—from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by <i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>.</b><BR><BR>On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?<BR> <BR> Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>reporter and <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Library Book</i>, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.<BR> <BR> Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.<BR> <BR> Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, <i>The Library Book </i>is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.
Shortest Way Home: One Mayor's Challenge and a Model for America'...
by Pete Buttigieg

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>NEW YORK TIMES</em> BESTSELLER<br /><br />"The best American political autobiography since Barack Obama’s <em>Dreams from My Father</em>." —Charles Kaiser, <em>The Guardian</em><br /><br /><br /><br />A mayor’s inspirational story of a Midwest city that has become nothing less than a blueprint for the future of American renewal.</strong></p><br /><p>Once described by the <em>Washington Post</em> as “the most interesting mayor you’ve never heard of,” Pete Buttigieg, the thirty-seven-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has now emerged as one of the nation’s most visionary politicians. With soaring prose that celebrates a resurgent American Midwest, <em>Shortest Way Home</em> narrates the heroic transformation of a “dying city” (<em>Newsweek</em>) into nothing less than a shining model of urban reinvention.</p><br /><p>Interweaving two narratives—that of a young man coming of age and a town regaining its economic vitality—Buttigieg recounts growing up in a Rust Belt city, amid decayed factory buildings and the steady soundtrack of rumbling freight trains passing through on their long journey to Chicagoland. Inspired by John F. Kennedy’s legacy, Buttigieg first left northern Indiana for red-bricked Harvard and then studied at Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, before joining McKinsey, where he trained as a consultant—becoming, of all things, an expert in grocery pricing. Then, Buttigieg defied the expectations that came with his pedigree, choosing to return home to Indiana and responding to the ultimate challenge of how to revive a once-great industrial city and help steer its future in the twenty-first century.</p><br /><p>Elected at twenty-nine as the nation’s youngest mayor, Pete Buttigieg immediately recognized that “great cities, and even great nations, are built through attention to the everyday.” As <em>Shortest Way Home</em> recalls, the challenges were daunting—whether confronting gun violence, renaming a street in honor of Martin Luther King Jr., or attracting tech companies to a city that had appealed more to junk bond scavengers than serious investors. None of this is underscored more than Buttigieg’s audacious campaign to reclaim 1,000 houses, many of them abandoned, in 1,000 days and then, even as a sitting mayor, deploying to serve in Afghanistan as a Navy officer. Yet the most personal challenge still awaited Buttigieg, who came out in a South Bend Tribune editorial, just before being reelected with 78 percent of the vote, and then finding Chasten Glezman, a middle-school teacher, who would become his partner for life.</p><br /><p>While Washington reels with scandal, <em>Shortest Way Home</em>, with its graceful, often humorous, language, challenges our perception of the typical American politician. In chronicling two once-unthinkable stories—that of an Afghanistan veteran who came out and found love and acceptance, all while in office, and that of a revitalized Rust Belt city no longer regarded as “flyover country”—Buttigieg provides a new vision for America’s shortest way home.</p>

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