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An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Volume One o...
by Rick Atkinson

Language

English

Pages

681

Publication Date

February 22, 2002

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE AND <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b></p><p><b>In the first volume of his monumental trilogy about the liberation of Europe in WW II, Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson tells the riveting story of the war in North Africa</b></p><p>The liberation of Europe and the destruction of the Third Reich is a story of courage and enduring triumph, of calamity and miscalculation. In this first volume of the Liberation Trilogy, Rick Atkinson shows why no modern reader can understand the ultimate victory of the Allied powers without a grasp of the great drama that unfolded in North Africa in 1942 and 1943. That first year of the Allied war was a pivotal point in American history, the moment when the United States began to act like a great power.</p><p>Beginning with the daring amphibious invasion in November 1942, An Army at Dawn follows the American and British armies as they fight the French in Morocco and Algeria, and then take on the Germans and Italians in Tunisia. Battle by battle, an inexperienced and sometimes poorly led army gradually becomes a superb fighting force. Central to the tale are the extraordinary but fallible commanders who come to dominate the battlefield: Eisenhower, Patton, Bradley, Montgomery, and Rommel.</p><p>Brilliantly researched, rich with new material and vivid insights, Atkinson's narrative provides the definitive history of the war in North Africa.</p>
Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates: The Forgotten War That ...
by , Don Yaeger

Language

English

Pages

251

Publication Date

November 03, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“Another blockbuster! <i>Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates</i> reads like an edge-of-your-seat, page-turning thriller. You will love this book and also wonder why so few people know this story. No one captures the danger, intrigue, and drama of the American Revolution and its aftermath like Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger.” —Brad Thor</b><br /><br />This is the little-known story of how a newly indepen­dent nation was challenged by four Muslim powers and what happened when America’s third president decided to stand up to intimidation.<br /> <br />When Thomas Jefferson became president in 1801, America faced a crisis. The new nation was deeply in debt and needed its economy to grow quickly, but its merchant ships were under attack. Pirates from North Africa’s Barbary coast routinely captured American sailors and held them as slaves, demanding ransom and tribute payments far beyond what the new coun­try could afford.<br /> <br />Over the previous fifteen years, as a diplomat and then as secretary of state, Jefferson had tried to work with the Barbary states (Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco). Unfortunately, he found it impossible to negotiate with people who believed their religion jus­tified the plunder and enslavement of non-Muslims. These rogue states would show no mercy—at least not while easy money could be made by extorting the Western powers. So President Jefferson decided to move beyond diplomacy. He sent the U.S. Navy’s new warships and a detachment of Marines to blockade Tripoli—launching the Barbary Wars and beginning America’s journey toward future superpower status.<br /> <br />As they did in their previous bestseller, <i>George Washington’s Secret Six</i>, Kilmeade and Yaeger have transformed a nearly forgotten slice of history into a dramatic story that will keep you turning the pages to find out what happens next. Among the many sus­penseful episodes: <br /> <br />·Lieutenant Andrew Sterett’s ferocious cannon battle on the high seas against the treacherous pirate ship <i>Tripoli</i>.<br /> <br />·Lieutenant Stephen Decatur’s daring night raid of an enemy harbor, with the aim of destroying an American ship that had fallen into the pirates’ hands.<br /><br />·General William Eaton’s unprecedented five-hundred-mile land march from Egypt to the port of Derne, where the Marines launched a surprise attack and an American flag was raised in victory on foreign soil for the first time.<br /> <br />Few today remember these men and other heroes who inspired the Marine Corps hymn: “From the Halls of Montezuma to the Shores of Tripoli, we fight our country’s battles in the air, on land and sea.” <i>Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates </i>recaptures this forgot­ten war that changed American history with a real-life drama of intrigue, bravery, and battle on the high seas.
Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela
by Nelson Mandela

Language

English

Pages

684

Publication Date

March 11, 2008

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The autobiography of global human rights icon Nelson Mandela is </b><b>"riveting...both a brilliant description of a diabolical system and a testament to the power of the spirit to transcend it" (<i>Washington Post</i>). </b> <b><br /><br /></b>Nelson Mandela was one of the great moral and political leaders of his time: an international hero whose lifelong dedication to the fight against racial oppression in South Africa won him the Nobel Peace Prize and the presidency of his country. After his triumphant release in 1990 from more than a quarter-century of imprisonment, Mandela was at the center of the most compelling and inspiring political drama in the world. As president of the African National Congress and head of South Africa's antiapartheid movement, he was instrumental in moving the nation toward multiracial government and majority rule. He is still revered everywhere as a vital force in the fight for human rights and racial equality.<br /><br /><i>Long Walk to Freedom</i> is his moving and exhilarating autobiography, destined to take its place among the finest memoirs of history's greatest figures. Here for the first time, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela told the extraordinary story of his life -- an epic of struggle, setback, renewed hope, and ultimate triumph. <br /><b>The book that inspired the major motion picture <i>Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.</i></b><br /><br /><br />
King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Co...
by Adam Hochschild

Language

English

Pages

318

Publication Date

September 03, 1999

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In the 1880s, as the European powers were carving up Africa, King Leopold II of Belgium seized for himself the vast and mostly unexplored territory surrounding the Congo River. Carrying out a genocidal plundering of the Congo, he looted its rubber, brutalized its people, and ultimately slashed its population by ten million—all the while shrewdly cultivating his reputation as a great humanitarian. Heroic efforts to expose these crimes eventually led to the first great human rights movement of the twentieth century, in which everyone from Mark Twain to the Archbishop of Canterbury participated. <i>King Leopold's Ghost</i> is the haunting account of a megalomaniac of monstrous proportions, a man as cunning, charming, and cruel as any of the great Shakespearean villains. It is also the deeply moving portrait of those who fought Leopold: a brave handful of missionaries, travelers, and young idealists who went to Africa for work or adventure and unexpectedly found themselves witnesses to a holocaust. Adam Hochschild brings this largely untold story alive with the wit and skill of a Barbara Tuchman. Like her, he knows that history often provides a far richer cast of characters than any novelist could invent. Chief among them is Edmund Morel, a young British shipping agent who went on to lead the international crusade against Leopold. Another hero of this tale, the Irish patriot Roger Casement, ended his life on a London gallows. Two courageous black Americans, George Washington Williams and William Sheppard, risked much to bring evidence of the Congo atrocities to the outside world. Sailing into the middle of the story was a young Congo River steamboat officer named Joseph Conrad. And looming above them all, the duplicitous billionaire King Leopold II. With great power and compassion, <i>King Leopold's Ghost</i> will brand the tragedy of the Congo—too long forgotten—onto the conscience of the West.
The Travels of Reverend Ólafur Egilsson: The Story of the Barbar...
by Ólafur Egilsson

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 11, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A seventeenth-century minister tells his story of abduction by pirates, and a solo journey from Algiers to Copenhagen, in this remarkable historical text.</b><br />  <br /> In summer 1627, Barbary corsairs raided Iceland, killing dozens and abducting almost four hundred people to sell into slavery in Algiers. Among those taken was Lutheran minister Olafur Egilsson.<br />  <br /> Reverend Olafur—born in the same year as William Shakespeare and Galileo Galilei—wrote <i>The Travels</i> to chronicle his experiences both as a captive and as a traveler across Europe as he journeyed alone from Algiers to Copenhagen in an attempt to raise funds to ransom the Icelandic captives that remained behind. He was a keen observer, and the narrative is filled with a wealth of detail―social, political, economic, religious―about both the Maghreb and Europe. It is also a moving story on the human level: We witness a man enduring great personal tragedy and struggling to reconcile such calamity with his understanding of God.<br />  <br /><i>The Travels</i> is the first-ever English translation of the Icelandic text. Until now, the corsair raid on Iceland has remained largely unknown in the English-speaking world. To give a clearer sense of the extraordinary events connected with that raid, this edition of <i>The Travels</i> includes not only Reverend Olafur’s first-person narrative but also a collection of contemporary letters describing both the events of the raid itself and the conditions under which the enslaved Icelanders lived. Also included are appendices containing background information on the cities of Algiers and Salé in the seventeenth century, on Iceland in the seventeenth century, on the manuscripts accessed for the translation, and on the book’s early modern European context.
The Great Siege, Malta 1565: Clash of Cultures: Christian Knights...
by Ernle Bradford

Language

English

Pages

262

Publication Date

April 01, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The indispensable account of the Ottoman Empire’s Siege of Malta from the author of <i>Hannibal</i> and <i>Gibraltar</i>.</b><br /><br /> In the first half of the sixteenth century, the Ottoman Empire was thought to be invincible. Suleiman the Magnificent, the Ottoman sultan, had expanded his empire from western Asia to southeastern Europe and North Africa. To secure control of the Mediterranean between these territories and launch an offensive into western Europe, Suleiman needed the small but strategically crucial island of Malta. But Suleiman’s attempt to take the island from the Holy Roman Empire’s Knights of St. John would emerge as one of the most famous and brutal military defeats in history.<br /><br /> Forty-two years earlier, Suleiman had been victorious against the Knights of St. John when he drove them out of their island fortress at Rhodes. Believing he would repeat this victory, the sultan sent an armada to Malta. When they captured Fort St. Elmo, the Ottoman forces ruthlessly took no prisoners. The Roman grand master La Vallette responded by having his Ottoman captives beheaded. Then the battle for Malta began in earnest: no quarter asked, none given.<br /><br /> Ernle Bradford’s compelling and thoroughly researched account of the Great Siege of Malta recalls not just an epic battle, but a clash of civilizations unlike anything since the time of Alexander the Great. It is “a superior, readable treatment of an important but little-discussed epic from the Renaissance past . . . An astonishing tale” (<i>Kirkus Reviews</i>).
The Boer War (Winston S. Churchill Early Works)
by Winston S. Churchill

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

July 23, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A fascinating piece of first-person reporting from the British statesman’s early years as a war correspondent in South Africa.</b><br />  <br /> As a young, ambitious soldier, Winston S. Churchill managed to get himself posted to the 21st Lancers in 1899 as a war correspondent for the <i>Morning Post</i>—and joined them in fighting the rebel Boer settlers in South Africa. In this conflict, rebel forces in the Transvaal and Orange Free State had proclaimed their own statehood, calling it the Boer Republic.<br />  <br /> This book consists of two separate works in one volume, “London to Ladysmith via Pretoria” and “Ian Hamilton’s March.” In the former, Churchill is captured in Pretoria not long after he arrives to join the British forces—and is frustrated not by the conditions in the prison, but by the fact that he was missing the action. Churchill tells the story of how he escaped and made a daring overland crossing, traveling only at night to avoid detection.<br />  <br /> Recounting Churchill’s own adventures and observations during the conflict, this book is fascinating for both its historical and personal perspective.<br />  <br /> “We never think of Churchill as a reporter. That is our loss . . . His dispatches from the 1899-1902 Boer War in South Africa to the London <i>Morning Post</i> . . . sizzle with energy and daring.” —<i>The Washington Times</i>
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier
by Ishmael Beah

Language

English

Pages

244

Publication Date

April 01, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><i>My new friends have begun to suspect I haven't told them the full story of my life.</i><br /><i>"Why did you leave Sierra Leone?"</i><br /><i>"Because there is a war."</i><br /><i>"You mean, you saw people running around with guns and shooting each other?"</i><br /><i>"Yes, all the time."</i><br /><i>"Cool."</i><br /><i>I smile a little.</i><br /><i>"You should tell us about it sometime."</i><br /><i>"Yes, sometime."</i><br /><i></i><br /><i></i><br />This is how wars are fought now: by children, hopped-up on drugs and wielding AK-47s. Children have become soldiers of choice. In the more than fifty conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers. Ishmael Beah used to be one of them.</p><p>What is war like through the eyes of a child soldier? How does one become a killer? How does one stop? Child soldiers have been profiled by journalists, and novelists have struggled to imagine their lives. But until now, there has not been a first-person account from someone who came through this hell and survived.</p><p>In <i>A Long Way Gone</i>, Beah, now twenty-five years old, tells a riveting story: how at the age of twelve, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence. By thirteen, he'd been picked up by the government army, and Beah, at heart a gentle boy, found that he was capable of truly terrible acts.</p><p>This is a rare and mesmerizing account, told with real literary force and heartbreaking honesty.</p>
Congo: The Epic History of a People
by David Van Reybrouck

Language

English

Pages

658

Publication Date

March 25, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Hailed as "a monumental history . . . more exciting than any novel" (NRC Handelsblad),David van Reybrouck’s rich and gripping epic, in the tradition of Robert Hughes' <em>The Fatal Shore</em>, tells the extraordinary story of one of the world's most devastated countries: the Democratic Republic of Congo.</p><p> Epic in scope yet eminently readable, penetrating and deeply moving, David van Reybrouck's <em>Congo: The Epic History of a People</em> traces the fate of one of the world's most critical, failed nation-states, second only to war-torn Somalia: the Democratic Republic of Congo.</p><p>Van Reybrouck takes us through several hundred years of history, bringing some of the most dramatic episodes in Congolese history. Here are the people and events that have impinged the Congo's development—from the slave trade to the ivory and rubber booms; from the arrival of Henry Morton Stanley to the tragic regime of King Leopold II; from global indignation to Belgian colonialism; from the struggle for independence to Mobutu's brutal rule; and from the world famous Rumble in the Jungle to the civil war over natural resources that began in 1996 and still rages today.</p><p>Van Reybrouck interweaves his own family's history with the voices of a diverse range of individuals—charismatic dictators, feuding warlords, child-soldiers, the elderly, female merchant smugglers, and many in the African diaspora of Europe and China—to offer a deeply humane approach to political history, focusing squarely on the Congolese perspective and returning a nation's history to its people.</p>
Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
by Alexandra Fuller

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

March 05, 2002

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • <b>A worthy heir to Isak Dinesen and Beryl Markham, Alexandra Fuller shares visceral memories of her childhood in Africa, and of her headstrong, unforgettable mother.</b> </b><br /><br /> <b>“This is not a book you read just once, but a tale of terrible beauty to get lost in over and over.”—<i>Newsweek</i></b><br /><br /> <b>“By turns mischievous and openhearted, earthy and soaring . . . hair-raising, horrific, and thrilling.”—<i>The New Yorker</i></b><br /><br /> Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, <i>Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight</i> is suffused with Fuller’s endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate. Fuller’s debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating. In wry and sometimes hilarious prose, she stares down disaster and looks back with rage and love at the life of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time.<br /><br /> From 1972 to 1990, Alexandra Fuller—known to friends and family as Bobo—grew up on several farms in southern and central Africa. Her father joined up on the side of the white government in the Rhodesian civil war, and was often away fighting against the powerful black guerilla factions. Her mother, in turn, flung herself at their African life and its rugged farm work with the same passion and maniacal energy she brought to everything else. Though she loved her children, she was no hand-holder and had little tolerance for neediness. She nurtured her daughters in other ways: She taught them, by example, to be resilient and self-sufficient, to have strong wills and strong opinions, and to embrace life wholeheartedly, despite and because of difficult circumstances. And she instilled in Bobo, particularly, a love of reading and of storytelling that proved to be her salvation.<br /><br /> Alexandra Fuller writes poignantly about a girl becoming a woman and a writer against a backdrop of unrest, not just in her country but in her home. But <i>Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight</i> is more than a survivor’s story. It is the story of one woman’s unbreakable bond with a continent and the people who inhabit it, a portrait lovingly realized and deeply felt.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight</i></b><br /><br />“Riveting . . . [full of] humor and compassion.”<b>—<i>O: The Oprah Magazine</i></b><br /> <br />“The incredible story of an incredible childhood.”<b>—<i>The Providence Journal</i></b>

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