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JELL-O Girls: A Family History
by Allie Rowbottom

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

July 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A "gorgeous" (<i>New York Times</i>) memoir that braids the evolution of one of America's most iconic branding campaigns with the stirring tales of the women who lived behind its facade - told by the inheritor of their stories.<br /></b><br /><b><i>A New York Times Editors' Choice<br />One of People Magazine's Best Books of Summer <br />An Amazon Best Book of the Month<br />An Indie Next Pick<br />A Real Simple Best Book of 2018<br /></i></b><br />In 1899, Allie Rowbottom's great-great-great-uncle bought the patent to Jell-O from its inventor for $450. The sale would turn out to be one of the most profitable business deals in American history, and the generations that followed enjoyed immense privilege - but they were also haunted by suicides, cancer, alcoholism, and mysterious ailments.<br /><br /> More than 100 years after that deal was struck, Allie's mother Mary was diagnosed with the same incurable cancer, a disease that had also claimed her own mother's life. Determined to combat what she had come to consider the "Jell-O curse" and her looming mortality, Mary began obsessively researching her family's past, determined to understand the origins of her illness and the impact on her life of Jell-O and the traditional American values the company championed. Before she died in 2015, Mary began to send Allie boxes of her research and notes, in the hope that her daughter might write what she could not. JELL-O GIRLS is the liberation of that story.<br /><br />A gripping examination of the dark side of an iconic American product and a moving portrait of the women who lived in the shadow of its fractured fortune, JELL-O GIRLS is a family history, a feminist history, and a story of motherhood, love and loss. In crystalline prose Rowbottom considers the roots of trauma not only in her own family, but in the American psyche as well, ultimately weaving a story that is deeply personal, as well as deeply connected to the collective female experience.<br /><br />
Coffee: The Epic of a Commodity
by H.E. Jacob

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

March 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>“A cup of coffee is a miracle, a wonderful assemblage of relationships”. This classic follows coffee's journey around the world, from London to Brazil, telling in fascinating detail and amusing anecdote the singular history of the legendary commodity, from its discovery that chewing on the beans were keeping goats awake in Yemen to the author’s own experiences with the bean in 1935.<br /><BR>Referred to as a “documentary novel” back during its inception, H.E. Jacobs pioneered the concept of creative nonfiction, combining the reality of nonfiction with the epic presentation and prose of fiction. This genre exploded into popularity and remains so today. <I>Coffee</I> tells the story of this popular beverage in short, fun to read essays that will entertain anyone that enjoys a good, strong cup of coffee.<br /></div>
Milk!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

390

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestselling <i>Cod</i> and<i> Salt</i>; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. </b><br /><b> </b><br />According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. <br /> <br />Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanization made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurization slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurization.<br /> <br />Profoundly intertwined with human civilization, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid's diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.
A History of the World in 6 Glasses
by Tom Standage

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

May 26, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times </i>Bestseller</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>From beer to Coca-Cola, the six drinks that have helped shape human history. </b><br /><b><br /></b>Throughout human history, certain drinks have done much more than just quench thirst. As Tom Standage relates with authority and charm, six of them have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of history, becoming the defining drink during a pivotal historical period. <br /><br /><i>A History of the World in 6 Glasses</i> tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. Beer was first made in the Fertile Crescent and by 3000 B.C.E. was so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that it was used to pay wages. In ancient Greece wine became the main export of her vast seaborne trade, helping spread Greek culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying seamen on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. And hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it became especially popular in Britain, with far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading symbol of globalization.<br /><br />For Tom Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture by which he demonstrates the intricate interplay of different civilizations. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.
The Chinese Kitchen Garden: Growing Techniques and Family Recipes...
by Wendy Kiang-Spray

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

February 08, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><P><B>Winner of the Garden Writers Association 2018 Silver Medal of Achievement </B><BR />  <BR /> Wendy Kiang-Spray’s family has a strong culinary and gardening tradition. In <I>The Chinese Kitchen Garden, </I>she beautifully blends the story of her family’s cultural heritage with growing information for 38 Chinese vegetables—like lotus root, garlic, chives, and eggplant—and 25 traditional recipes, like congee, dumplings, and bok choy stir-fry. Organized by season, you’ll learn what to grow in spring and what to cook in winter. </P></DIV>
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Martha's American Food: A Celebration of Our Nation's Most Treasu...
by Martha Stewart

Language

English

Pages

432

Publication Date

April 24, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Martha Stewart, who has so significantly influenced the American table, collects her favorite national dishes--as well as the stories and traditions behind them--in this love letter to American food featuring 200 recipes. </b><br /><br />These are recipes that will delight you with nostalgia, inspire you, and teach you about our nation by way of its regions and their distinctive flavors. Above all, these are time-honored recipes that you will turn to again and again. <br /><br />Organized geographically, the 200 recipes in <i>Martha’s American Food</i> include main dishes such as comforting Chicken Pot Pies, easy Grilled Fish Tacos, irresistible Barbecued Ribs, and hearty New England Clam Chowder. Here, too, are thoroughly modern starters, sides, and one-dish meals that harness the bounty of each region’s seasons and landscape: Hot Crab Dip, Tequila-Grilled Shrimp, Indiana Succotash, Chicken and Andouille Gumbo, Grilled Bacon-Wrapped Whitefish, and Whole-Wheat Spaghetti with Meyer Lemon, Arugula, and Pistachios. And you will want to leave room for dessert, with dozens of treats such as Chocolate-Bourbon Pecan Pie, New York Cheesecake, and Peach and Berry Cobbler. <br /><br />Through sidebars about the flavors that define each region and stunning photography that brings the foods—and the places with which we identify them—to life, Martha celebrates the unique character of each part of the country. With all the dishes that inspire pride in our national cuisine, <i>Martha’s American Food </i>gathers, in one place, the recipes that will surely please your family and friends for generations to come. 
Feeding Nelson's Navy: The True Story of Food at Sea in the Georg...
by Janet Macdonald

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

April 30, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<SPAN STYLE= "" >This celebration of the Georgian sailor's diet reveals how the navy's administrators fed a fleet of more than 150,000 men, in ships that were often at sea for months on end and that had no recourse to either refrigeration or canning. Contrary to the prevailing image of rotten meat and weevily biscuits their diet was a surprisingly hearty mixture of beer, brandy, salt beef and pork, pease, butter, cheese, hard biscuit and the exotic sounding lobscouse, not to mention the Malaga raisins, oranges, lemons, figs, dates and pumpkins which were available to ships on far-distant stations. In fact, by 1800 the British fleet had largely eradicated scurvy and other dietary disorders. 

While this scholarly work contains much of value to the historian, the author's popular touch makes this an enthralling story for anyone with an interest in life at sea in the age of sail.</SPAN>
A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, ...
by , Jeni Mitchell

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

July 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>One of <i>The Christian Science Monitor</i>’s “Ten Best Books of July”<br /><br />One of <i>Time</i> magazine’s “22 Books to Read this Summer”<br /><br /> ★ “A genial journey through history that will leave readers both satiated and ravenous.”<BR>—<strong><em>Kirkus Reviews</em></strong><BR><BR>“Savor this book in bite-sized morsels, the better to enjoy every bit.”<BR>—<strong>Dorie Greenspan, “On Dessert” columnist for <em>The New York Times Magazine, New York Times</em> bestselling and award-winning author of <em>Around My French Table</em> and <em>Dorie’s Cookies</em></strong><br /></b><BR>A French cheesemonger and an American academic and ex-pat join forces to serve up a sumptuous history of France and its food, in the delicious tradition of Anthony Bourdain, Peter Mayle, and Pamela Druckerman</b> <p>From the cassoulet that won a war to the crêpe that doomed Napoleon, from the rebellions sparked by bread and salt to the new cuisines forged by empire, the history of France is intimately entwined with its gastronomic pursuits. A witty exploration of the facts and legends surrounding some of the most popular French foods and wines by a French cheesemonger and an American academic, <em>A Bite-Sized History of France</em> tells the compelling and often surprising story of France from the Roman era to modern times. Traversing the cuisines of France’s most famous cities as well as its underexplored regions, this innovative social history explores the impact of war and imperialism, the age-old tension between tradition and innovation, and the enduring use of food to prop up social and political identities.</p> <p>The origins of the most legendary French foods and wines—from Roquefort and cognac to croissants and Calvados, from absinthe and oysters to Camembert and champagne—also reveal the social and political trends that propelled France’s rise upon the world stage. They help explain France’s dark history of war and conquest, as well as its most enlightened cultural achievements and the political and scientific innovations that transformed human history. These gastronomic tales will edify even the most seasoned lovers of food, history and all things French.</p>
Sugar: The World Corrupted: From Slavery to Obesity
by James Walvin

Language

English

Pages

348

Publication Date

April 03, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>The modern successor to <em>Sweetness and Power</em>, James Walvin’s <em>Sugar</em> is a rich and engaging work on a topic that continues to change our world.</strong></p><br /><p>How did a simple commodity, once the prized monopoly of kings and princes, become an essential ingredient in the lives of millions, before mutating yet again into the cause of a global health epidemic?</p><br /><p>Prior to 1600, sugar was a costly luxury, the domain of the rich. But with the rise of the sugar colonies in the New World over the following century, sugar became cheap, ubiquitous and an everyday necessity. Less than fifty years ago, few people suggested that sugar posed a global health problem.  And yet today, sugar is regularly denounced as a dangerous addiction, on a par with tobacco. While sugar consumption remains higher than ever—in some countries as high as 100lbs per head per year—some advertisements even proudly proclaim that their product contains no sugar.</p><br /><p>How did sugar grow from prize to pariah? Acclaimed historian James Walvin looks at the history of our collective sweet tooth, beginning with the sugar grown by enslaved people who had been uprooted and shipped vast distances to undertake the grueling labor on plantations.  The combination of sugar and slavery would transform the tastes of the Western world.</p><br /><p>Masterfully insightful and probing, James Walvin reveals the relationship between society and sweetness over the past two centuries—and how it explains our conflicted relationship with sugar today.  </p>

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