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A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, ...
by , Jeni Mitchell

Language

English

Pages

351

Publication Date

July 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A “delicious” (Dorie Greenspan), “genial” (<em>Kirkus Reviews</em>), “very cool book about the intersections of food and history” (Michael Pollan)—as featured in the <em>New York Times</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>"</em>The complex political, historical, religious and social factors that shaped some of [France's] . . . most iconic dishes and culinary products are explored in a way that will make you rethink every sprinkling of fleur de sel."<br /></strong><strong><em>—The New York Times Book Review</em></strong></p> <p>Acclaimed upon its hardcover publication as a “culinary treat for Francophiles” (<em>Publishers Weekly</em>), <em>A Bite-Sized History of France</em> is a thoroughly original book that explores the facts and legends of the most popular French foods and wines. Traversing the cuisines of France’s most famous cities as well as its underexplored regions, the book is enriched by the “authors’ friendly accessibility that makes these stories so memorable” (<em>The New York Times Book Review</em>). This innovative social history also explores the impact of war and imperialism, the age-old tension between tradition and innovation, and the enduring use of food to prop up social and political identities.</p> <p>The origins of the most legendary French foods and wines—from Roquefort and cognac to croissants and Calvados, from absinthe and oysters to Camembert and champagne—also reveal the social and political trends that propelled France’s rise upon the world stage. As told by a Franco-American couple (Stéphane is a cheesemonger, Jeni is an academic) this is an “impressive book that intertwines stories of gastronomy, culture, war, and revolution. . . . It’s a roller coaster ride, and when you’re done you’ll wish you could come back for more” (<em>The Christian Science Monitor</em>).</p>
The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary His...
by Michael W. Twitty

Language

English

Pages

477

Publication Date

August 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>2018 James Beard Foundation Book of the Year | 2018 James Beard Foundation Book Award Winner inWriting | Nominee for the 2018 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Nonfiction | #75 on The Root100 2018</strong></p><p>A renowned culinary historian offers a fresh perspective on our most divisive cultural issue, race, in this illuminating memoir of Southern cuisine and food culture that traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food, from Africa to America and slavery to freedom.</p><p>Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who "owns" it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes readers to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine. </p><p>From the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields, Twitty tells his family story through the foods that enabled his ancestors’ survival across three centuries. He sifts through stories, recipes, genetic tests, and historical documents, and travels from Civil War battlefields in Virginia to synagogues in Alabama to Black-owned organic farms in Georgia. </p><p>As he takes us through his ancestral culinary history, Twitty suggests that healing may come from embracing the discomfort of the Southern past. Along the way, he reveals a truth that is more than skin deep—the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table, where they can discover the real America together.</p><p>Illustrations by Stephen Crotts</p>
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p>
Barrel-Aged Stout and Selling Out: Goose Island, Anheuser-Busch, ...
by Josh Noel

Language

English

Pages

387

Publication Date

June 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>Goose Island opened as a family-owned Chicago brewpub in the late 1980s, and it soon became one of the most inventive breweries in the world. In the golden age of light, bland and cheap beers, John Hall and his son Greg brought European flavors to America. With distribution in two dozen states, two brewpubs and status as one of the 20 biggest breweries in the United States, Goose Island became an American success story and was a champion of craft beer. Then, on March 28, 2011, the Halls sold the brewery to Anheuser-Busch InBev, maker of Budweiser, the least craft-like beer imaginable. The sale forced the industry to reckon with craft beer's mainstream appeal and a popularity few envisioned. Josh Noel broke the news of the sale in the <I>Chicago Tribune</I>, and he covered the resulting backlash from Chicagoans and beer fanatics across the country as the discussion escalated into an intellectual craft beer war. Anheuser-Busch has since bought nine other craft breweries, and from among the outcry rises a question that Noel addresses through personal anecdotes from industry leaders: how should a brewery grow?</DIV>
A History of the World in 6 Glasses
by Tom Standage

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

May 26, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times </i>Bestseller</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>From beer to Coca-Cola, the six drinks that have helped shape human history. </b><br /><br /><br />Written with authority and charm by journalist Tom Standage, <i>A History of the World in 6 Glasses</i> tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of six beverages that have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of human events: beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. <br /><br />First made in the Fertile Crescent, beer became so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that by 3000 B.C.E. it was being used as currency. The main export of Ancient Greece's vast seaborne trade, wine helped spread its culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying men on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Originating in the Arab world, coffee stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. Hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it had far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Carbonated drinks, invented in 18th-century Europe and popularized in the 20th-century, are now a leading symbol of globalization, particularly Coca-Cola.<br /><br />"Incisive, illuminating, and swift," (<i>New York Times</i>), <i>A History of the World in 6 Glasses</i> shows the intricate interplay of different civilizations in a fascinating new light. For Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.
The Truffle Underground: A Tale of Mystery, Mayhem, and Manipulat...
by Ryan Jacobs

Language

English

Pages

277

Publication Date

June 04, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“The ultimate truffle true crime tale”*: A thrilling journey through the hidden underworld of the world's most prized luxury ingredient.</b><br /><br /><b>*Bianca Bosker, <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Cork Dork</i></b><br /><br /> Beneath the gloss of star chefs and crystal-laden tables, the truffle supply chain is touched by theft, secrecy, sabotage, and fraud. Farmers patrol their fields with rifles and fear losing trade secrets to spies. Hunters plant poisoned meatballs to eliminate rival truffle-hunting dogs. Naive buyers and even knowledgeable experts are duped by liars and counterfeits. <br /><br /> Deeply reported and elegantly written, this page-turning exposé documents the dark, sometimes deadly crimes at each level of the truffle’s path from ground to plate, making sense of an industry that traffics in scarcity, seduction, and cash. Through it all, a question lingers: What, other than money, draws people to these dirt-covered jewels?<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for <i>The Truffle Underground</i></b><br /><br />“In elegant, mesmerizing prose, Ryan Jacobs has delivered a forest-to-table page-turner from the outer limits of our foodie culture, a place where colorful farmers, serial dog murderers and famous chefs grapple over a crudely foraged fungus that's traded in parking lots and bars, like heroin. <i>The Truffle Underground</i> is an eye-opener for anyone who's picked up a fork.”<b><i>—</i>Steve Fainaru, <i><i>New York Times</i> </i>bestselling author of <i><i>League of Denial </i>and Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter</i></b><br /><br /><i>"The Truffle Underground</i> is a fascinating, genre-blending romp. It's a business book, a mystery, a science lesson, and a love story that's as seductive as the buttery fungus at the heart of it all."<b>—Derek Thompson, national bestselling author of <i>Hit Makers </i>and<i> </i>staff writer at <i>The Atlantic</i></b><br /><br />“Investigative journalist and first-time author Jacobs does a remarkable job reporting from the front lines of the truffle industry, bringing to vivid life French black-truffle farmers, Italian white-truffle foragers, and their marvelously well-trained dogs.”<b>—<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><br /><br />"[A] fascinating work . . . This deeply researched and eye-opening account of the lengths people will go for wealth, gratification, and a taste of the prized fungus will captivate readers."<b><i>—<i>Publishers Weekly </i></i></b>
What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained
by Robert L. Wolke

Language

English

Pages

369

Publication Date

June 21, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Finalist for the James Beard Foundation Book Award and the IACP Cookbook Award<br /><br /><br /><br />"[A]s good a read on the science of cooking as there is." —Mark Bittman, author of <em>How to Cook Everything</em></strong></p><br /><p>“Wolke, longtime professor of chemistry and author of the <em>Washington Post</em> column Food 101, turns his hand to a Cecil Adams style compendium of questions and answers on food chemistry. Is there really a difference between supermarket and sea salt? How is sugar made? Should cooks avoid aluminum pans? Interspersed throughout Wolke’s accessible and humorous answers to these and other mysteries are recipes demonstrating scientific principles. There is gravy that avoids lumps and grease; Portuguese Poached Meringue that demonstrates cream of tartar at work; and juicy Salt-Seared Burgers…With its zest for the truth, this book will help cooks learn how to make more intelligent choices.” —<em>Publishers Weekly</em></p>
The Way We Eat Now: How the Food Revolution Has Transformed Our L...
by Bee Wilson

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>An award-winning food writer takes us on a global tour of what the world eats--and shows us how we can change it for the better</b></div><div><div><br /></div><div>Food is one of life's great joys. So why has eating become such a source of anxiety and confusion?</div><div><br /></div><div>Bee Wilson shows that in two generations the world has undergone a massive shift from traditional, limited diets to more globalized ways of eating, from bubble tea to quinoa, from Soylent to meal kits. </div><div><br /></div><div>Paradoxically, our diets are getting healthier and less healthy at the same time. For some, there has never been a happier food era than today: a time of unusual herbs, farmers' markets, and internet recipe swaps. Yet modern food also kills--diabetes and heart disease are on the rise everywhere on earth.</div><div><br /></div><div>This is a book about the good, the terrible, and the avocado toast. A riveting exploration of the hidden forces behind what we eat, <i>The Way We Eat Now </i>explains how this food revolution has transformed our bodies, our social lives, and the world we live in.</div></div>
The Vintage Baker: More Than 50 Recipes from Butterscotch Pecan C...
by Jessie Sheehan

Language

English

Pages

160

Publication Date

May 15, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
This cookbook features fetching retro patterns and illustrations, alongside luscious photography, and an e-booklet at the end rendered in a vintage-style. Blue-ribbon recipes inspired by baking pamphlets from the 1920s to the 1960s are rendered with irresistible charm for modern tastes in this ebook. Here are more than 50 cookies, pies, cakes, bars, and more, plus informative headnotes detailing the origins of each recipe and how they were tweaked into deliciousness. For home bakers, collectors of vintage cookbooks or kitchenware, this is a gem.
On Spice: Advice, Wisdom, and History with a Grain of Saltiness
by Caitlin PenzeyMoog

Language

English

Pages

264

Publication Date

January 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<B>A revealing look at the history and production of spices, with modern, no-nonsense advice on using them at home.</B><BR><BR> Every home cook has thoughts on the right and wrong ways to use spices. These beliefs are passed down in family recipes and pronounced by television chefs, but where do such ideas come from? Many are little better than superstition, and most serve only to reinforce a cook’s sense of superiority or cover for their insecurities. It doesn’t have to be this way. <BR><BR> These notes <I>On Spice</I> come from three generations of a family in the spice trade, and dozens upon dozens of their collected spice guides and stories. Inside, you’ll learn where spices come from: historically, geographically, botanically, and in the modern market. You’ll see snapshots of life in a spice shop, how the flavors and stories can infuse not just meals but life and relationships. And you’ll get straightforward advice delivered with wry wit. <BR><BR> Discover why:<BR><li>Salt grinders are useless <li>Saffron is worth its weight in gold (as long as it’s pure) <li>That jar of cinnamon almost certainly isn’t <li>Vanilla is far more risqué than you think <BR><BR> Learn to stop worrying and love your spice rack.

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