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Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p>
A History of the World in 6 Glasses
by Tom Standage

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

May 26, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times </i>Bestseller</b><br /><b><br /></b><b>From beer to Coca-Cola, the six drinks that have helped shape human history. </b><br /><br /><br />Written with authority and charm by journalist Tom Standage, <i>A History of the World in 6 Glasses</i> tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of six beverages that have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of human events: beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. <br /><br />First made in the Fertile Crescent, beer became so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that by 3000 B.C.E. it was being used as currency. The main export of Ancient Greece's vast seaborne trade, wine helped spread its culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying men on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Originating in the Arab world, coffee stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. Hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it had far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Carbonated drinks, invented in 18th-century Europe and popularized in the 20th-century, are now a leading symbol of globalization, particularly Coca-Cola.<br /><br />"Incisive, illuminating, and swift," (<i>New York Times</i>), <i>A History of the World in 6 Glasses</i> shows the intricate interplay of different civilizations in a fascinating new light. For Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.
Retro Recipes from the '50s and '60s: 103 Vintage Appetizers, Din...
by Addie Gundry

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

January 09, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In <i>Retro Recipes from the ‘50s and ‘60s</i>, Cutthroat Kitchen star Addie Gundry serves up nostalgic recipes from the Mad Men era, like Beef Wellington and Grasshopper Pie. Post-war rationing became a distant memory, and the rise of home entertainment culture made for prettier, more complex food. With French influence from Julia Child, and elegant aspirational figures like Jacqueline Kennedy, suburban dinner parties went glam. Backyard barbecues, fondues gathering everyone around a table, and not to mention cocktail parties were booming. From 1950's casseroles and hors d'oevres to more modern, adventurous dishes, there's plenty to celebrate and embrace! Each recipe is paired with a full-color, full-bleed finished dish photo.
Amish Pie Recipes
by Mary Jameson

Language

English

Pages

26

Publication Date

December 03, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
When the Amish settled in Pennsylvania, they brought their love of pastries with them. Pies quickly became a mainstay of their diet which included the famous “shoofly” pie. <br />“The desserts became part of our sustenance,” Amish historian Abigail Marks said. “The women made pies for men when they went to work in the fields and pies when they came home.”<br />The pies were not limited to just an after dinner dessert. They became a convenient way to feed a lot of hungry mouths. <br />“We used to eat pies at almost every meal,” Marks said. “But that was back in the 1940s. I'm sure it goes way beyond that. There are numerous pies on the Amish menu, many of which have been forgotten.”<br />What is presented here is the “old-school” way of doing things in the Amish country. Not all recipes come from the modern health-conscious mindset. But if certain ingredients are replaced than something would be lost in the translation. What was important here is the creation of a good pie not a low fat dessert.
The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary His...
by Michael W. Twitty

Language

English

Pages

477

Publication Date

August 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>2018 James Beard Foundation Book of the Year | 2018 James Beard Foundation Book Award Winner inWriting | Nominee for the 2018 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Nonfiction | #75 on The Root100 2018</strong></p><p>A renowned culinary historian offers a fresh perspective on our most divisive cultural issue, race, in this illuminating memoir of Southern cuisine and food culture that traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food, from Africa to America and slavery to freedom.</p><p>Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who "owns" it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes readers to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine. </p><p>From the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields, Twitty tells his family story through the foods that enabled his ancestors’ survival across three centuries. He sifts through stories, recipes, genetic tests, and historical documents, and travels from Civil War battlefields in Virginia to synagogues in Alabama to Black-owned organic farms in Georgia. </p><p>As he takes us through his ancestral culinary history, Twitty suggests that healing may come from embracing the discomfort of the Southern past. Along the way, he reveals a truth that is more than skin deep—the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table, where they can discover the real America together.</p><p>Illustrations by Stephen Crotts</p>
Burn the Ice: The American Culinary Revolution and Its End
by Kevin Alexander

Language

English

Pages

382

Publication Date

July 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>"Inspiring"—Danny Meyer, CEO, Union Square Hospitality Group; Founder, Shake Shack; and author, <i>Setting the Table</i></b><br /><br /><b>James Beard Award-winning food journalist Kevin Alexander traces an exhilarating golden age in American dining</b></b><br /><br />Over the past decade, Kevin Alexander saw American dining turned on its head. Starting in 2006, the food world underwent a transformation as the established gatekeepers of American culinary creativity in New York City and the Bay Area were forced to contend with Portland, Oregon. Its new, no-holds-barred, casual fine-dining style became a template for other cities, and a culinary revolution swept across America. Traditional ramen shops opened in Oklahoma City. Craft cocktail speakeasies appeared in Boise. Poke bowls sprung up in Omaha. Entire neighborhoods, like Williamsburg in Brooklyn, and cities like Austin, were suddenly unrecognizable to long-term residents, their names becoming shorthand for the so-called hipster movement. At the same time, new media companies such as Eater and Serious Eats launched to chronicle and cater to this developing scene, transforming nascent star chefs into proper celebrities. Emerging culinary television hosts like Anthony Bourdain inspired a generation to use food as the lens for different cultures. It seemed, for a moment, like a glorious belle epoque of eating and drinking in America. And then it was over.<br /><br />To tell this story, Alexander journeys through the travails and triumphs of a number of key chefs, bartenders, and activists, as well as restaurants and neighborhoods whose fortunes were made during this veritable gold rush--including Gabriel Rucker, an originator of the 2006 Portland restaurant scene; Tom Colicchio of Gramercy Tavern and <i>Top Chef </i>fame; as well as hugely influential figures, such as André Prince Jeffries of Prince's Hot Chicken Shack in Nashville; and Carolina barbecue pitmaster Rodney Scott.<br /><br />He writes with rare energy, telling a distinctly American story, at once timeless and cutting-edge, about unbridled creativity and ravenous ambition. To "burn the ice" means to melt down whatever remains in a kitchen's ice machine at the end of the night. Or, at the bar, to melt the ice if someone has broken a glass in the well. It is both an end and a beginning. It is the firsthand story of a revolution in how Americans eat and drink.
97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One N...
by Jane Ziegelman

Language

English

Pages

253

Publication Date

May 14, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>“Social history is, most elementally, food history. Jane Ziegelman had the great idea to zero in on one Lower East Side tenement building, and through it she has crafted a unique and aromatic narrative of New York’s immigrant culture: with bread in the oven, steam rising from pots, and the family gathering round.” — Russell Shorto, author of <em>The Island at the Center of the World </em></p><p><em>97 Orchard</em> is a richly detailed investigation of the lives and culinary habits—shopping, cooking, and eating—of five families of various ethnicities living at the turn of the twentieth century in one tenement on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. With 40 recipes included, <em>97 Orchard</em> is perfect for fans of Rachel Ray’s <em>Hometown Eats</em>; anyone interested in the history of how immigrant food became American food; and “foodies” of every stripe.</p>
The Truffle Underground: A Tale of Mystery, Mayhem, and Manipulat...
by Ryan Jacobs

Language

English

Pages

277

Publication Date

June 04, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“The ultimate truffle true crime tale”*: A thrilling journey through the hidden underworld of the world's most prized luxury ingredient.</b><br /><br /><b>*Bianca Bosker, <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>Cork Dork</i></b><br /><br /> Beneath the gloss of star chefs and crystal-laden tables, the truffle supply chain is touched by theft, secrecy, sabotage, and fraud. Farmers patrol their fields with rifles and fear losing trade secrets to spies. Hunters plant poisoned meatballs to eliminate rival truffle-hunting dogs. Naive buyers and even knowledgeable experts are duped by liars and counterfeits. <br /><br /> Deeply reported and elegantly written, this page-turning exposé documents the dark, sometimes deadly crimes at each level of the truffle’s path from ground to plate, making sense of an industry that traffics in scarcity, seduction, and cash. Through it all, a question lingers: What, other than money, draws people to these dirt-covered jewels?<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>The Truffle Underground</i></b><br /><br />“Investigative journalist and first-time author Jacobs does a remarkable job reporting from the front lines of the truffle industry, bringing to vivid life French black-truffle farmers, Italian white-truffle foragers, and their marvelously well-trained dogs.”<b>—<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><br /><br />“In <i>The Truffle Underground,</i> Ryan Jacobs presents a lively exposé of the truffle industry, reporting on the crimes that ‘haunt the whole supply chain.’ . . . Even if truffles are beyond your pay grade, there is plenty of enjoyment to be had in the sheer devilment portrayed in this informative and appetizing book.”<b>—<i>The Wall Street Journal</i><br /><br /></b>“You’ll never look at truffle fries the same way after reading this book. . . .  You can practically smell the soil as you follow truffle farmers and bandits through the groves and fields of France and Italy where the fungi are harvested and stolen.”<b>—<i>Outside</i>, “Five Favorite Summer Reads”</b><br /><br />“[The] book is a rigorously reported, carefully written, endlessly interesting immersion in a high-stakes subculture.”<b>—<i>San Francisco Chronicle</i></b><br /><br />“Jacobs takes us on an eye-opening journey through the prized mushroom’s supply chain and the global black market for these tubers in this tale of theft, deceit, and high-stakes secrets.”<b>—<i>Real Simple</i></b>
Typhoid Mary: An Urban Historical
by Anthony Bourdain

Language

English

Pages

161

Publication Date

October 17, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the host of <i>Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown</i> and bestselling author of <i>Kitchen Confidential</i> comes the true, thrilling story of Mary Mallon, otherwise known as the infamous Typhoid Mary.</b><br /><br />This is a tale of pursuit through the kitchens of New York City at the turn of the century. By the late nineteenth century, it seemed that New York City had put an end to the outbreaks of typhoid fever that had so frequently decimated the city's population. That is until 1904, when the disease broke out in a household in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Authorities suspected the family cook, Mary Mallon, of being a carrier. But before she could be tested, the woman, soon to be known as Typhoid Mary, had disappeared. Over the course of the next three years, Mary worked at several residences, spreading her pestilence as she went. In 1907, she was traced to a home on Park Avenue, and taken into custody. <br /><br />Institutionalized at Riverside Hospital for three years, she was released only when she promised never to work as a cook again. She promptly disappeared. For the next five years Mary worked in homes and institutions in and around New York, often under assumed names. In February 1915, a devastating outbreak of typhoid at the Sloane Hospital for Women was traced to her. She was finally apprehended and reinstitutionalized at Riverside Hospital, where she would remain for the rest of her life. <i>Typhoid Mary</i> is the story of her infamous life. <br /><br />Anthony Bourdain reveals the seedier side of the early 1900s, and writes with his renowned panache about life in the kitchen, uncovering the horrifying conditions that allowed the deadly spread of typhoid over a decade. <i>Typhoid Mary</i> is a true feast for history lovers and Bourdain lovers alike.
My Life in France
by , Alex Prud'homme

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

April 04, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The bestselling story of Julia’s years in France—and the basis for <i>Julie & Julia</i>, starring Meryl Streep and Amy Adams—in her own words.<br /> Although she would later singlehandedly create a new approach to American cuisine with her cookbook <i>Mastering the Art of French Cooking</i> and her television show <i>The French Chef</i>, Julia Child was not always a master chef. Indeed, when she first arrived in France in 1948 with her husband, Paul, who was to work for the USIS, she spoke no French and knew nothing about the country itself. But as she dove into French culture, buying food at local markets and taking classes at the Cordon Bleu, her life changed forever with her newfound passion for cooking and teaching. Julia’s unforgettable story—struggles with the head of the Cordon Bleu, rejections from publishers to whom she sent her now-famous cookbook, a wonderful, nearly fifty-year long marriage that took the Childs across the globe—unfolds with the spirit so key to Julia’s success as a chef and a writer, brilliantly capturing one of America’s most endearing personalities.

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