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The Gourmands' Way: Six Americans in Paris and the Birth of a New...
by Justin Spring

Language

English

Pages

449

Publication Date

October 10, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>A biography of six writers on food and wine whose lives and careers intersected in mid-twentieth-century France </b></p><p>During <i>les trente glorieuses</i>—a thirty-year boom period in France between the end of World War II and the 1974 oil crisis—Paris was not only the world’s most delicious, stylish, and exciting tourist destination; it was also the world capital of gastronomic genius and innovation. <i>The Gourmands’ Way</i> explores the lives and writings of six Americans who chronicled the food and wine of “the glorious thirty,” paying particular attention to their individual struggles as writers, to their life circumstances, and, ultimately, to their particular genius at sharing awareness of French food with mainstream American readers. In doing so, this group biography also tells the story of an era when America adored all things French. The group is comprised of the war correspondent A. J. Liebling; Alice B. Toklas, Gertrude Stein’s life partner, who reinvented herself at seventy as a cookbook author; M.F.K. Fisher, a sensualist and fabulist storyteller; Julia Child, a television celebrity and cookbook author; Alexis Lichine, an ambitious wine merchant; and Richard Olney, a reclusive artist who reluctantly evolved into a brilliant writer on French food and wine.</p><p>Together, these writer-adventurers initiated an American cultural dialogue on food that has continued to this day. Justin Spring’s <i>The Gourmands’ Way</i> is the first book ever to look at them as a group and to specifically chronicle their Paris experiences.</p>
BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts
by Stella Parks

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

August 15, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A <em>New York Times</em> Bestseller<br /><br /><em>Wall Street Journal</em> Best Baking Book of the Year<br /><br /><br /><br />"The most groundbreaking book on baking in years. Full stop."—<em>Saveur</em></p><br /><p>From One-Bowl Devil’s Food Layer Cake to a flawless Cherry Pie that’s crisp even on the very bottom, <em>BraveTart</em> is a celebration of classic American desserts. Whether down-home delights like Blueberry Muffins and Glossy Fudge Brownies or supermarket mainstays such as Vanilla Wafers and Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream, your favorites are all here. These meticulously tested recipes bring an award-winning pastry chef’s expertise into your kitchen, along with advice on how to “mix it up” with over 200 customizable variations—in short, exactly what you’d expect from a cookbook penned by a senior editor at <em>Serious Eats</em>. Yet <em>BraveTart</em> is much more than a cookbook, as Stella Parks delves into the surprising stories of how our favorite desserts came to be, from chocolate chip cookies that predate the Tollhouse Inn to the prohibition-era origins of ice cream sodas and floats. With a foreword by <em>The Food Lab</em>’s J. Kenji López-Alt, vintage advertisements for these historical desserts, and breathtaking photography from Penny De Los Santos, <em>BraveTart</em> is sure to become an American classic.</p>
What She Ate: Six Remarkable Women and the Food That Tells Their ...
by Laura Shapiro

Language

English

Pages

318

Publication Date

July 25, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>“</b>How lucky for us readers that Shapiro has been listening so perceptively for decades to the language of food.” <i><b><i>—</i></b></i><b>Maureen Corrigan, NPR Fresh Air<br /><br />Six </b> “mouthwatering” (<b><i>Eater.com</i>) <i>s</i></b>hort takes on six famous women through the lens of food and cooking, probing how their attitudes toward food can offer surprising new insights into their lives, and our own.<br /><br /></b>Everyone eats, and food touches on every aspect of our lives—social and cultural, personal and political. Yet most biographers pay little attention to people’s attitudes toward food, as if the great and notable never bothered to think about what was on the plate in front of them. Once we ask how somebody relates to food, we find a whole world of different and provocative ways to understand her. Food stories can be as intimate and revealing as stories of love, work, or coming-of-age. Each of the six women in this entertaining group portrait was famous in her time, and most are still famous in ours; but until now, nobody has told their lives from the point of view of the kitchen and the table.  <br /><br /><i>What She Ate</i> is a lively and unpredictable array of women; what they have in common with one another (and us) is a powerful relationship with food. They include Dorothy Wordsworth, whose food story transforms our picture of the life she shared with her famous poet brother; Rosa Lewis, the Edwardian-era Cockney caterer who cooked her way up the social ladder; Eleanor Roosevelt,  First Lady and rigorous protector of the worst cook in White House history; Eva Braun, Hitler’s mistress, who challenges our warm associations of food, family, and table; Barbara Pym, whose witty books upend a host of stereotypes about postwar British cuisine; and Helen Gurley Brown, the editor of <i>Cosmopolitan</i>, whose commitment to “having it all” meant having almost nothing on the plate except a supersized portion of diet gelatin.
The Taste of Empire: How Britain's Quest for Food Shaped the Mode...
by Lizzie Collingham

Language

English

Pages

408

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><br />A history of the British Empire told through twenty meals eaten around the world</b><br /><br />In <i>The Taste of Empire</i>, acclaimed historian Lizzie Collingham tells the story of how the British Empire's quest for food shaped the modern world. Told through twenty meals over the course of 450 years, from the Far East to the New World, Collingham explains how Africans taught Americans how to grow rice, how the East India Company turned opium into tea, and how Americans became the best-fed people in the world. In <i>The Taste of Empire</i>, Collingham masterfully shows that only by examining the history of Great Britain's global food system, from sixteenth-century Newfoundland fisheries to our present-day eating habits, can we fully understand our capitalist economy and its role in making our modern diets.<br /><br />
A History of the World in 6 Glasses
by Tom Standage

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

May 26, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<B>From beer to Coca-Cola, the six drinks that have helped shape human history.</B><br />Throughout human history. certain drinks have done much more than just quench thirst. As Tom Standage relates with authority and charm, six of them have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of history, becoming the defining drink during a pivotal historical period.<br /><br /><I>A History of the World in 6 Glasses</I> tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. Beer was first made in the Fertile Crescent and by 3000 B.C.E. was so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that it was used to pay wages. In ancient Greece wine became the main export of her vast seaborne trade, helping spread Greek culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying seamen on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. And hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it became especially popular in Britain, with far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading symbol of globalization.<br />For Tom Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture by which he demonstrates the intricate interplay of different civilizations. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.
The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary His...
by Michael W. Twitty

Language

English

Pages

477

Publication Date

August 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A renowned culinary historian offers a fresh perspective on our most divisive cultural issue, race, in this illuminating memoir of Southern cuisine and food culture that traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food, from Africa to America and slavery to freedom.</p><p>Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who "owns" it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes readers to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine. </p><p>From the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields, Twitty tells his family story through the foods that enabled his ancestors’ survival across three centuries. He sifts through stories, recipes, genetic tests, and historical documents, and travels from Civil War battlefields in Virginia to synagogues in Alabama to Black-owned organic farms in Georgia. </p><p>As he takes us through his ancestral culinary history, Twitty suggests that healing may come from embracing the discomfort of the Southern past. Along the way, he reveals a truth that is more than skin deep—the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table, where they can discover the real America together.</p><p>Illustrations by Stephen Crotts</p>
Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation
by Michael Pollan

Language

English

Pages

4

Publication Date

April 23, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>**Now a docu-series streaming on Netflix, starring Pollan as he explores how cooking transforms food and shapes our world. Oscar-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney exectuve produces the four-part series based on Pollan's book, and each episode will focus on a different natural element: fire, water, air, and earth. **</b><br /><br />In <i>Cooked</i>, Michael Pollan explores the previously uncharted territory of his own kitchen. Here, he discovers the enduring power of the four classical elements—fire, water, air, and earth—to transform the stuff of nature into delicious things to eat and drink. Apprenticing himself to a succession of culinary masters, Pollan learns how to grill with fire, cook with liquid, bake bread, and ferment everything from cheese to beer.<br /><br /> Each section of <i>Cooked </i>tracks Pollan’s effort to master a single classic recipe using one of the four elements. A North Carolina barbecue pit master tutors him in the primal magic of fire; a Chez Panisse–trained cook schools him in the art of braising; a celebrated baker teaches him how air transforms grain and water into a fragrant loaf of bread; and finally, several mad-genius “fermentos” (a tribe that includes brewers, cheese makers, and all kinds of picklers) reveal how fungi and bacteria can perform the most amazing alchemies of all. The reader learns alongside Pollan, but the lessons move beyond the practical to become an investigation of how cooking involves us in a web of social and ecological relationships. Cooking, above all, connects us.<br /><br /> The effects of not cooking are similarly far reaching. Relying upon corporations to process our food means we consume large quantities of fat, sugar, and salt; disrupt an essential link to the natural world; and weaken our relationships with family and friends. In fact, <i>Cooked</i> argues, taking back control of cooking may be the single most important step anyone can take to help make the American food system healthier and more sustainable. Reclaiming cooking as an act of enjoyment and self-reliance, learning to perform the magic of these everyday transformations, opens the door to a more nourishing life.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Tasting Beer, 2nd Edition: An Insider's Guide to the World's Grea...
by Randy Mosher

Language

English

Pages

377

Publication Date

April 04, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>This completely updated second edition of the best-selling beer resource features the most current information on beer styles, flavor profiles, sensory evaluation guidelines, craft beer trends, food and beer pairings, and draft beer systems. You’ll learn to identify the scents, colors, flavors, mouth-feel, and vocabulary of the major beer styles — including ales, lagers, weissbeirs, and Belgian beers — and develop a more nuanced understanding of your favorite brews with in-depth sections on recent developments in the science of taste. Spirited drinkers will also enjoy the new section on beer cocktails that round out this comprehensive volume.</DIV>
Butter: A Rich History
by Elaine Khosrova

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

November 10, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>“Edifying from every point of view--historical, cultural, and culinary.” —David Tanis, author of </B><I><B>A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes</B></I><B><BR /><BR /> It’s a culinary catalyst, an agent of change, a gastronomic rock star. Ubiquitous in the world’s most fabulous cuisines, butter is boss. Here, it finally gets its due.</B><DIV><DIV><BR /> After traveling across three continents to stalk the modern story of butter, award-winning food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova serves up a story as rich, textured, and culturally relevant as butter itself.<BR /><BR /> From its humble agrarian origins to its present-day artisanal glory, butter has a fascinating story to tell, and Khosrova is the perfect person to tell it. With tales about the ancient butter bogs of Ireland, the pleasure dairies of France, and the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Khosrova details butter’s role in history, politics, economics, nutrition, and even spirituality and art. Readers will also find the essential collection of core butter recipes, including beurre manié, croissants, pâte brisée, and the only buttercream frosting anyone will ever need, as well as practical how-tos for making various types of butter at home--or shopping for the best.<BR /><BR /> “A fascinating, tasty read . . . And what a bonus to have a collection of essential classic butter recipes included.” <B>—David Tanis, author of <I>A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes</I></B><BR /><BR /> “Following the path blazed by Margaret Visser in <I>Much Depends on Dinner</I>, Elaine Khosrova makes much of butter and the ruminants whose milk man churns. You will revel in dairy physics. And you may never eat margarine again.” <B>—John T.  Edge, author of <I>The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South</I></B><BR /><BR /> “<I>Butter</I> proves that close study can reveal rich history, lore, and practical information. All that and charm too.” <B>—Mimi Sheraton, author of <I>1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die</I></B><BR /><BR /> “Irresistible and fascinating . . . This is one of those definitive books on a subject that every cook should have.” <B>—Elisabeth Prueitt, co-owner of Tartine Bakery</B><BR /><BR /> “The history of one of the most delectable ingredients throughout our many cultures and geography over time is wonderfully churned and emulsified in Khosrova’s <I>Butter</I> . . . Delightful storytelling.” <B>—Elizabeth Falkner, author of <I>Demolition Desserts: Recipes from Citizen Cake</I></B></DIV></DIV></DIV>

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