Categories

 > History > Food & Cooking

2,485 results were found

Sort by:

Betty Crocker Lost Recipes: Beloved Vintage Recipes for Today's K...
by Betty Crocker

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

October 10, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>A captivating collection that celebrates the wonderful recipes from the Betty Crocker archives in a package that appeals to the modern cook​</B><BR /><BR /><I>Betty Crocker Lost Recipes</I> is the ultimate treasure for the most devoted Betty Crocker fans, as well as cooks who are interested in recipes with a retro/nostalgic twist. Eighty percent of the book includes tried-and-true recipes that simply aren’t in today’s cooking repertoire—mainly from-scratch recipes that are hard to find. Twenty percent is a fun look back at some of the cooking customs of the past that may not be worth repeating, but are worth remembering. Features include ideas like “How to Throw a Hawaiian Tiki Party,” and the robust introductory pages contain interesting stories, anecdotes, and artwork from Betty Crocker’s history. Recipes are carefully curated to ensure that they are still relevant, achievable, and made with available ingredients—think Beef Stroganoff, Chicken à la King, Waldorf Salad, and Chiffon Cake. These lost recipes are ready to grace the tables of a whole new generation of cooks.</DIV>
The Tex-Mex Cookbook: A History in Recipes and Photos
by Robb Walsh

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

August 19, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Join Texas food writer Robb Walsh on a grand tour complete with larger-than-life characters, colorful yarns, rare archival photographs, and a savory assortment of more than 100 recipes for crispy, crunchy Tex-Mex foods.</b><br /><br />From the Mexican pioneers of the sixteenth century, who first brought horses and cattle to Texas, to the Spanish mission era when cumin and garlic were introduced, to the 1890s when the Chile Queens of San Antonio sold their peppery stews to gringos like O. Henry and Ambrose Bierce, and through the chili gravy, combination plates, crispy tacos, and frozen margaritas of the twentieth century, all the way to the nuevo fried oyster nachos and vegetarian chorizo of today, here is the history of Tex-Mex in more than 100 recipes and 150 photos.<br /><br />Rolled, folded, and stacked enchiladas, old-fashioned puffy tacos, sizzling fajitas, truck-stop chili, frozen margaritas, Frito™ Pie, and much, much more, are all here in easy-to-follow recipes for home cooks.<br /><br />The Tex-Mex Cookbook will delight chile heads, food history buffs, Mexican food fans, and anybody who has ever woken up in the middle of the night craving cheese enchiladas.
Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

January 28, 2003

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unlikely world history from the bestselling author of <i>Cod </i> and <i>The Basque History of the World<br /><br /></i></b>In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.  Populated by colorful characters and filled with an unending series of fascinating details, <b><i>Salt</i> </b>is a supremely entertaining, multi-layered masterpiece.</p><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i>
Tasting the Past: The Science of Flavor and the Search for the Or...
by Kevin Begos

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

June 12, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>“A myth-busting, history-reclaiming, science-centric, skeptical—and yet loving and respectful—tour of the history, the present, and even the future of wine production.” </B><BR /> —<B>Cat Warren<I>, </I>author of <I>What the Dog Knows</I><BR /><BR /> “This is quite a book and I hope it is read widely throughout the wine world and that it has a huge impact. The fact that current practices have put a halt to evolution for wine grapes, that was news to me. <I>Tasting the Past</I> shocked the hell out of me.”   <BR /> —Kermit Lynch, wine merchant and author of <I>Adventures on the Wine Route</I></B><BR /><BR /> Discover the hidden life of wine.<BR /><BR /> After a chance encounter with an obscure Middle Eastern red, journalist Kevin Begos embarks on a ten-year journey to seek the origins of wine. What he unearths is a whole world of forgotten grapes, each with distinctive tastes and aromas, as well as the archaeologists, geneticists, chemists—even a paleobotanist—who are deciphering wine down to molecules of flavor. We meet a young scientist who sets out to decode the DNA of every single wine grape in the world; a researcher who seeks to discover the wines that Caesar and Cleopatra drank; and an academic who has spent decades analyzing wine remains to pinpoint ancient vineyards. Science illuminates wine in ways no critic can, and it has demolished some of the most sacred dogmas of the industry: for example, well-known French grapes aren’t especially noble.<BR /><BR /> We travel with Begos along the original wine routes—starting in the Caucasus Mountains, where wine grapes were first domesticated eight thousand years ago; then down to Israel and across the Mediterranean to Greece, Italy, and France; and finally to America where vintners are just now beginning to make distinctive wines from a new generation of local grapes. Imagine the wine grape version of heirloom vegetables or craft beer, or better yet, taste it: Begos offers readers drinking suggestions that go far beyond the endless bottles of Chardonnay and Merlot found in most stores and restaurants.<BR /><BR /> In this viticultural detective story wine geeks and history lovers alike will discover new tastes and flavors to savor.</DIV>
My Life in France
by , Alex Prud'homme

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

April 04, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The bestselling story of Julia’s years in France—and the basis for <i>Julie & Julia</i>, starring Meryl Streep and Amy Adams—in her own words.<br /> Although she would later singlehandedly create a new approach to American cuisine with her cookbook <i>Mastering the Art of French Cooking</i> and her television show <i>The French Chef</i>, Julia Child was not always a master chef. Indeed, when she first arrived in France in 1948 with her husband, Paul, who was to work for the USIS, she spoke no French and knew nothing about the country itself. But as she dove into French culture, buying food at local markets and taking classes at the Cordon Bleu, her life changed forever with her newfound passion for cooking and teaching. Julia’s unforgettable story—struggles with the head of the Cordon Bleu, rejections from publishers to whom she sent her now-famous cookbook, a wonderful, nearly fifty-year long marriage that took the Childs across the globe—unfolds with the spirit so key to Julia’s success as a chef and a writer, brilliantly capturing one of America’s most endearing personalities.
Bourbon
by Fred Minnick

Language

English

Pages

247

Publication Date

August 15, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Once and for all, America learns the likely inventor of its beloved bourbon.<br /><br />Bourbon is not just alcohol -- this amber-colored drink is deeply ingrained in American culture and tangled in American history. From the early days of raw corn liquor to the myriad distilleries that have proliferated around the country today, bourbon has come to symbolize America. In Bourbon: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of an American Whiskey, award-winning whiskey author Fred Minnick traces bourbon's entire history, from the 1700s with Irish, Scottish, and French settlers setting up stills and making distilled spirits in the New World through today's booming resurgence. He also lays out in expert detail the critical role this spirit has played throughout the cultural and even political history of the nation -- from Congress passing whiskey-protection laws to consumers standing in long lines just for a glimpse of a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle -- complemented by more than 100 illustrations and photos. And most importantly, Minnick explores the mystery of who most likely created the sweet corn liquor we now know as bourbon. He studies the men who've been championed as its inventors over time -- from Daniel Boone's cousin to Baptist minister Elijah Craig -- and, based on new research and never-before-seen documentation, answers the question of who deserves the credit.
Typhoid Mary: An Urban Historical
by Anthony Bourdain

Language

English

Pages

161

Publication Date

October 17, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the host of <i>Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown</i> and bestselling author of <i>Kitchen Confidential</i> comes the true, thrilling story of Mary Mallon, otherwise known as the infamous Typhoid Mary.</b><br /><br />This is a tale of pursuit through the kitchens of New York City at the turn of the century. By the late nineteenth century, it seemed that New York City had put an end to the outbreaks of typhoid fever that had so frequently decimated the city's population. That is until 1904, when the disease broke out in a household in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Authorities suspected the family cook, Mary Mallon, of being a carrier. But before she could be tested, the woman, soon to be known as Typhoid Mary, had disappeared. Over the course of the next three years, Mary worked at several residences, spreading her pestilence as she went. In 1907, she was traced to a home on Park Avenue, and taken into custody. <br /><br />Institutionalized at Riverside Hospital for three years, she was released only when she promised never to work as a cook again. She promptly disappeared. For the next five years Mary worked in homes and institutions in and around New York, often under assumed names. In February 1915, a devastating outbreak of typhoid at the Sloane Hospital for Women was traced to her. She was finally apprehended and reinstitutionalized at Riverside Hospital, where she would remain for the rest of her life. <i>Typhoid Mary</i> is the story of her infamous life. <br /><br />Anthony Bourdain reveals the seedier side of the early 1900s, and writes with his renowned panache about life in the kitchen, uncovering the horrifying conditions that allowed the deadly spread of typhoid over a decade. <i>Typhoid Mary</i> is a true feast for history lovers and Bourdain lovers alike.
Milk!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
by Mark Kurlansky

Language

English

Pages

390

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestselling <i>Cod</i> and<i> Salt</i>; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. </b><br /><b> </b><br />According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. <br /> <br />Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanization made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurization slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurization.<br /> <br />Profoundly intertwined with human civilization, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid's diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.
Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human
by Richard Wrangham

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

May 26, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>The groundbreaking theory of how fire and food drove the evolution of modern humans</b></div><div><br /></div><div>Ever since Darwin and <i>The Descent of Man</i>, the evolution and world-wide dispersal of humans has been attributed to our intelligence and adaptability. But in <i>Catching Fire</i>, renowned primatologist Richard Wrangham presents a startling alternative: our evolutionary success is the result of cooking. In a groundbreaking theory of our origins, Wrangham shows that the shift from raw to cooked foods was the key factor in human evolution. Once our hominid ancestors began cooking their food, the human digestive tract shrank and the brain grew. Time once spent chewing tough raw food could be sued instead to hunt and to tend camp. Cooking became the basis for pair bonding and marriage, created the household, and even led to a sexual division of labor. In short, once our ancestors adapted to using fire, humanity began. Tracing the contemporary implications of our ancestors' diets, <i >Catching Fire</i> sheds new light on how we came to be the social, intelligent, and sexual species we are today. A pathbreaking new theory of human evolution, <i >Catching Fire</i> will provoke controversy and fascinate anyone interested in our ancient origins-or in our modern eating habits.</div><div><br /></div>
Alcohol and its Role in the Evolution of Human Society
by Ian S Hornsey

Language

English

Pages

684

Publication Date

January 13, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Archaelogists and anthropologists (especially ethnologists) have for many years realised that man's ingestion of alcoholic beverages may well have played a significant part in his transition from hunter-gatherer to agriculturalist. This unique book provides a scientific text on the subject of 'ethanol' that also aims to include material designed to show 'non-scientists' what fermentation is all about. Conversely, scientists may well be surprised to find the extent to which ethanol has played a part in evolution and civilisation of our species.

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldnt have due to the Kindle eliminating sp...

David Foster Wallace Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. Ive found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found adve...

Ernest Hemingway The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen Kings On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But Kings prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of Kings greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. Kings On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft that resu...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

$25 Amazon.com Gift Card giveaway

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com