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Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger
by Rebecca Traister

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>***<i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER***</b><BR> <BR><b>“In a year when issues of gender and sexuality dominated the national conversation, no one shaped that exchange more than Rebecca Traister. Her wise and provocative columns helped make sense of a cultural transformation.”—National Magazine Award Citation, 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“The most brilliant voice on feminism in this country.”—Anne Lamott, author of <i>Bird by Bird</i></b><BR> <BR><b>From Rebecca Traister, the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author of <i>All the Single Ladies </i>comes a vital, incisive exploration into the transformative power of female anger and its ability to transcend into a political movement. </b><BR><BR>In the year 2018, it seems as if women’s anger has suddenly erupted into the public conversation. But long before Pantsuit Nation, before the Women’s March, and before the #MeToo movement, women’s anger was not only politically catalytic—but politically problematic. The story of female fury and its cultural significance demonstrates the long history of bitter resentment that has enshrouded women’s slow rise to political power in America, as well as the ways that anger is received when it comes from women as opposed to when it comes from men.<BR> <BR> With eloquence and fervor, Rebecca tracks the history of female anger as political fuel—from suffragettes marching on the White House to office workers vacating their buildings after Clarence Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court. Here Traister explores women’s anger at both men and other women; anger between ideological allies and foes; the varied ways anger is perceived based on its owner; as well as the history of caricaturing and delegitimizing female anger; and the way women’s collective fury has become transformative political fuel—as is most certainly occurring today. She deconstructs society’s (and the media’s) condemnation of female emotion (notably, rage) and the impact of their resulting repercussions.<BR> <BR> Highlighting a double standard perpetuated against women by all sexes, and its disastrous, stultifying effect, Traister’s latest is timely and crucial. It offers a glimpse into the galvanizing force of women’s collective anger, which, when harnessed, can change history.
Daughters of the Winter Queen: Four Remarkable Sisters, the Crown...
by Nancy Goldstone

Language

English

Pages

453

Publication Date

April 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The thrilling family saga of five unforgettable women who remade Europe</b><br /><br />From the great courts, glittering palaces, and war-ravaged battlefields of the seventeenth century comes the story of four spirited sisters and their glamorous mother, Elizabeth Stuart, granddaughter of the martyred Mary, Queen of Scots.<div><br /></div><div>Upon her father's ascension to the illustrious throne of England, Elizabeth Stuart was suddenly thrust from the poverty of unruly Scotland into the fairy-tale existence of a princess of great wealth and splendor. When she was married at sixteen to a German count far below her rank, it was with the understanding that her father would help her husband achieve the kingship of Bohemia. The terrible betrayal of this commitment would ruin "the Winter Queen," as Elizabeth would forever be known, imperil the lives of those she loved, and launch a war that would last for thirty years. </div><div><br /></div><div>Forced into exile, the Winter Queen and her family found refuge in Holland, where the glorious art and culture of the Dutch Golden Age indelibly shaped her daughters' lives. Her eldest, Princess Elizabeth, became a scholar who earned the respect and friendship of the philosopher René Descartes. Louisa was a gifted painter whose engaging manner and appealing looks provoked heartache and scandal. Beautiful Henrietta Maria would be the only sister to marry into royalty, although at great cost. But it was the youngest, Sophia, a heroine in the tradition of a Jane Austen novel, whose ready wit and good-natured common sense masked immense strength of character, who fulfilled the promise of her great-grandmother Mary and reshaped the British monarchy, a legacy that endures to this day.</div><div><br /></div><div>Brilliantly researched and captivatingly written, filled with danger, treachery, and adventure but also love, courage, and humor, <i>Daughters of the Winter Queen </i>follows the lives of five remarkable women who, by refusing to surrender to adversity, changed the course of history.</div>
The Secrets of the Notebook: A Woman's Quest to Uncover Her Royal...
by Eve Haas

Language

English

Pages

273

Publication Date

October 01, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div>“The beautiful owner of this book is dearer to me than my life – August your protector.” This one sentence was the key to a mystery involving some of the greatest and most infamous figures in European history, from Frederick the Great to Napoleon and Hitler—and solved by the author of this book.<BR><p>Eve Haas is the daughter of a German Jewish family that took refuge in London after Hitler came to power. Following a terrifying air raid in the blitz, her father revealed the family secret, that her great-great grandmother Emilie was married to a Prussian prince. He then showed her the treasured leather-bound notebook inscribed to Emilie by the prince. Her parents were reluctant to learn more, but later in life, when Eve was married and inherited the diary, she became obsessed with proving this birthright. <I>The Secrets of the Notebook</I> tells how she follows the clues, from experts on European royalty in London to archives in West Germany and then, under threat of being arrested as a spy by the Communist regime, to an archive in East Germany that had never before opened its doors to the West. What she unearths is a love story set against the upheaval of the Napoleonic wars and the antiSemitism of the Prussian court, and a ruse that both protected Emilie’s daughter and probably condemned her granddaughter—Eve’s beloved grandmother, Anna—to death in the Nazi camps.</p><p>When first published in the UK, <I>The Secrets of the Notebook</I> was an <I>Irish Times </I>bestseller. A movie based on the book is in production. </p></div>
A Treasury of Royal Scandals: The Shocking True Stories History's...
by Michael Farquhar

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

May 01, 2001

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From Nero's nagging mother (whom he found especially annoying after taking her as his lover) to Catherine's stable of studs (not of the equine variety), here is a wickedly delightful look at the most scandalous royal doings you never learned about in history class.<br /><br /> Gleeful, naughty, sometimes perverted-like so many of the crowned heads themselves-<b>A Treasury of Royal Scandals</b> presents the best (the worst?) of royal misbehavior through the ages. From ancient Rome to Edwardian England, from the lavish rooms of Versailles to the dankest corners of the Bastille, the great royals of Europe have excelled at savage parenting, deadly rivalry, pathological lust, and meeting death with the utmost indignity-or just very bad luck.
Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill
by Sonia Purnell

Language

English

Pages

436

Publication Date

October 27, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>A long over-due tribute to the extraordinary woman who was Winston Churchill’s closest confidante, fiercest critic and shrewdest advisor that captures the intimate dynamic of one of history’s most fateful marriages, as seen on <i>The Crown</i> and <i>Darkest Hour</i>—“Engrossing…the first formal biography of a woman who has heretofore been relegated to the sidelines.”</b> <b><i>–The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> Late in life, Winston Churchill claimed that victory in the Second World War would have been “impossible” without the woman who stood by his side for fifty-seven turbulent years. Why, then, do we know so little about her? In this landmark biography, a finalist for the Plutarch prize, Sonia Purnell finally gives Clementine Churchill her due. <br /><br />Born into impecunious aristocracy, the young Clementine Hozier was the target of cruel snobbery. Many wondered why Winston married her, when the prime minister’s daughter was desperate for his attention. Yet their marriage proved to be an exceptional partnership. "You know,"Winston confided to FDR, "I tell Clemmie everything." <br />  <br /> Through the ups and downs of his tumultuous career, in the tense days when he stood against Chamberlain and the many months when he helped inspire his fellow countrymen and women to keep strong and carry on, Clementine made her husband’s career her mission, at the expense of her family, her health and, fatefully, of her children. Any real consideration of Winston Churchill is incomplete without an understanding of their relationship. <i>Clementine</i> is both the first real biography of this remarkable woman and a fascinating look inside their private world.<br />  <br /> <b>"Sonia Purnell has at long last given Clementine Churchill the biography she deserves. Sensitive yet clear-eyed, <i>Clementine</i> tells the fascinating story of a complex woman struggling to maintain her own identity while serving as the conscience and principal adviser to one of the most important figures in history. I was enthralled all the way through." –Lynn Olson, bestselling author of <i>Citizens of London</i> </b><br /><br /></p>
The Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt's Master...
by Anne-Marie O'Connor

Language

English

Pages

370

Publication Date

February 07, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><span><b>The true story that inspired the movie <i>Woman in Gold</i> starring Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds.</b></span></div> <b>The Award-Winning Nazi Art Theft Saga<br />Winner of the Marfield National Award for Arts Writing<br /> Winner of a California Book Award</b><br /> Library Journal Top 10 Book of 2012  <br /> Christian Science Monitor Top 15 Nonfiction of 2012<br /> Best Huffington Post Art Book 2012<br /> Top 12 Nonfiction 2012 of Examiner.com<br /><br />The spellbinding story, part fairy tale, part suspense, of Gustav Klimt's <i>Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer</i>, one of the most emblematic portraits of its time; of the beautiful, seductive Viennese Jewish salon hostess who sat for it; the notorious artist who painted it; the now vanished turn-of-the-century Vienna that shaped it; and the strange twisted fate that befell it.<br /> <i> </i><br /> <i>The Lady in Gold,</i> considered an unforgettable masterpiece, one of the twentieth century's most recognizable paintings, made headlines all over the world when Ronald Lauder bought it for $135 million a century after Klimt, the most famous Austrian painter of his time, completed the society portrait.<br />  <br /> Anne-Marie O'Connor, writer for<i> The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>, formerly of the <i>Los Angeles Times,</i> tells the galvanizing story of the Lady in Gold, Adele Bloch-Bauer, a dazzling Viennese Jewish society figure; daughter of the head of one of the largest banks in the Hapsburg Empire, head of the Oriental Railway, whose Orient Express went from Berlin to Constantinople; wife of Ferdinand Bauer, sugar-beet baron.<br />  <br /> The Bloch-Bauers were art patrons, and Adele herself was considered a rebel of fin de siècle Vienna (she wanted to be educated, a notion considered "degenerate" in a society that believed women being out in the world went against their feminine "nature"). The author describes how Adele inspired the portrait and how Klimt made more than a hundred sketches of her--simple pencil drawings on thin manila paper.<br />  <br /> And O'Connor writes of Klimt himself, son of a failed gold engraver, shunned by arts bureaucrats, called an artistic heretic in his time, a genius in ours. <br />  <br /> She writes of the Nazis confiscating the portrait of Adele from the Bloch-Bauers' grand <i>palais;</i> of the Austrian government putting the painting on display, stripping Adele's Jewish surname from it so that no clues to her identity (nor any hint of her Jewish origins) would be revealed. Nazi officials called the painting, <i>The Lady in Gold</i> and proudly exhibited it in Vienna's Baroque Belvedere Palace, consecrated in the 1930s as a Nazi institution. <br />  <br /> The author writes of the painting, inspired by the Byzantine mosaics Klimt had studied in Italy, with their exotic symbols and swirls, the subject an idol in a golden shrine.<br />  <br /> We see how, sixty years after it was stolen by the Nazis, the <i>Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer</i> became the subject of a decade-long litigation between the Austrian government and the Bloch-Bauer heirs, how and why the U.S. Supreme Court became involved in the case, and how the Court's decision had profound ramifications in the art world. <br />  <br /> A riveting social history; an illuminating and haunting look at turn-of-the-century Vienna; a brilliant portrait of the evolution of a painter; a masterfully told tale of suspense. And at the heart of it, the Lady in Gold--the shimmering painting, and its equally irresistible subject, the fate of each forever intertwined.
The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code
by Margalit Fox

Language

English

Pages

385

Publication Date

May 14, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>In the tradition of Simon Winchester and Dava Sobel, <em>The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code</em> tells one of the most intriguing stories in the history of language, masterfully blending history, linguistics, and cryptology with an elegantly wrought narrative.<br /> <br />When famed archaeologist Arthur Evans unearthed the ruins of a sophisticated Bronze Age civilization that flowered on Crete 1,000 years before Greece’s Classical Age, he discovered a cache of ancient tablets, Europe’s earliest written records. For half a century, the meaning of the inscriptions, and even the language in which they were written, would remain a mystery.<br />                                              <br />Award-winning <em>New York Times</em> journalist Margalit Fox's riveting real-life intellectual detective story travels from the Bronze Age Aegean—the era of Odysseus, Agamemnon, and Helen—to the turn of the 20th century and the work of charismatic English archeologist Arthur Evans, to the colorful personal stories of the decipherers. These include Michael Ventris, the brilliant amateur who deciphered the script but met with a sudden, mysterious death that may have been a direct consequence of the deipherment; and Alice Kober, the unsung heroine of the story whose painstaking work allowed Ventris to crack the code.</p>
Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her
by Melanie Rehak

Language

English

Pages

387

Publication Date

September 05, 2006

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The true story behind the iconic fictional detective is “a fascinating chapter in the history of publishing” (<I>The Seattle Times</I>).</B><BR />  <BR /> An Edgar Award Winner for Best Biography and a Chicago Tribune Best Book of the Year<BR />  <BR /> The plucky “titian-haired” sleuth solved her first mystery in 1930—and eighty million books later, Nancy Drew has survived the Depression, World War II, and the sixties (when she was taken up with a vengeance by women’s libbers) to enter the pantheon of American culture. As beloved by girls today as she was by their grandmothers, Nancy Drew has both inspired and reflected the changes in her readers’ lives. Here, in a narrative with all the page-turning pace of Nancy’s adventures, Melanie Rehak solves an enduring literary mystery: Who created Nancy Drew? And how did she go from pulp heroine to icon?<BR />  <BR /> The brainchild of children’s book mogul Edward Stratemeyer, Nancy was brought to life by two women: Mildred Wirt Benson, a pioneering journalist from Iowa, and Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, a well-bred wife and mother who took over her father’s business empire as CEO. In this century-spanning, “absorbing and delightful” story, the author traces their roles—and Nancy’s—in forging the modern American woman (<I>The Wall Street Journal</I>).<BR />  <BR /> “It’s truly fun to see behind the scenes of the girl sleuth’s creation.” —<I>Publishers Weekly</I><BR />  <BR /> “As much a social history of the times as a book about the popular series . . . Those who followed the many adventures of Nancy Drew and her friends will be fascinated with the behind-the-scenes stories of just who Carolyn Keene really was.” —<I>School Library Journal</I><BR />  <BR /> “Sheds light on perhaps the most successful writing franchise of all time and also the cultural and historic changes through which it passed. Grab your flashlights, girls. The mystery of Carolyn Keene is about to begin.” —Karen Joy Fowler</DIV>
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women
by Kate Moore

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A<em> New York Times</em>, <em>USA Today, Wall Street Journal</em>, and Amazon Charts Bestseller!<br /> Emma Watson's Our Shared Shelf Bookclub Selection - May/June 2018</strong></p><p>"<strong>the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still</strong>."—NPR Books </p><p><em>The incredible true story of the women who fought America’s Undark danger</em></p><p>The Curies’ newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.</p><p>Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these “shining girls” are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.</p><p>But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women’s cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America’s early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers’ rights that will echo for centuries to come. </p><p>Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, <em>The Radium Girls</em> fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the “wonder” substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...</p>
Fascism: A Warning
by Madeleine Albright

Language

English

Pages

283

Publication Date

April 10, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>#1 <em>New York Times</em> Bestseller </strong></p><p><strong>A personal and urgent examination of Fascism in the twentieth century and how its legacy shapes today’s world, written by one of America’s most admired public servants, the first woman to serve as U.S. secretary of state</strong></p><p>A Fascist, observes Madeleine Albright, “is someone who claims to speak for a whole nation or group, is utterly unconcerned with the rights of others, and is willing to use violence and whatever other means are necessary to achieve the goals he or she might have.” </p><p>The twentieth century was defined by the clash between democracy and Fascism, a struggle that created uncertainty about the survival of human freedom and left millions dead. Given the horrors of that experience, one might expect the world to reject the spiritual successors to Hitler and Mussolini should they arise in our era. In <em>Fascism: A Warning</em>, Madeleine Albright draws on her experiences as a child in war-torn Europe and her distinguished career as a diplomat to question that assumption.</p><p>Fascism, as she shows, not only endured through the twentieth century but now presents a more virulent threat to peace and justice than at any time since the end of World War II.  The momentum toward democracy that swept the world when the Berlin Wall fell has gone into reverse.  The United States, which historically championed the free world, is led by a president who exacerbates division and heaps scorn on democratic institutions.  In many countries, economic, technological, and cultural factors are weakening the political center and empowering the extremes of right and left.  Contemporary leaders such as Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong-un are employing many of the tactics used by Fascists in the 1920s and 30s.</p><p><em>Fascism: A Warning</em> is a book for our times that is relevant to all times.  Written  by someone who has not only studied history but helped to shape it, this call to arms teaches us the lessons we must understand and the questions we must answer if we are to save ourselves from repeating the tragic errors of the past.</p>

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