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What Happened
by Hillary Rodham Clinton

Language

English

Pages

513

Publication Date

September 12, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“In the past, for reasons I try to explain, I’ve often felt I had to be careful in public, like I was up on a wire without a net. Now I’m letting my guard down.”</b><b> —Hillary Rodham Clinton, from the introduction of <i>What Happened</i></b><BR><BR>For the first time, Hillary Rodham Clinton reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history. Now free from the constraints of running, Hillary takes you inside the intense personal experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, Russian interference, and an opponent who broke all the rules. This is her most personal memoir yet.<BR> <BR>In these pages, she describes what it was like to run against Donald Trump, the mistakes she made, how she has coped with a shocking and devastating loss, and how she found the strength to pick herself back up afterward. With humor and candor, she tells readers what it took to get back on her feet—the rituals, relationships, and reading that got her through, and what the experience has taught her about life. She speaks about the challenges of being a strong woman in the public eye, the criticism over her voice, age, and appearance, and the double standard confronting women in politics.<BR> <BR>She lays out how the 2016 election was marked by an unprecedented assault on our democracy by a foreign adversary. By analyzing the evidence and connecting the dots, Hillary shows just how dangerous the forces are that shaped the outcome, and why Americans need to understand them to protect our values and our democracy in the future.<BR> <BR>The election of 2016 was unprecedented and historic. <i>What Happened </i>is the story of that campaign and its aftermath—both a deeply intimate account and a cautionary tale for the nation.
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women
by Kate Moore

Language

English

Pages

399

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A<em> New York Times</em>, <em>USA Today, </em>and<em> Wall Street Journal</em> Bestseller!</strong></p><p>"<strong>the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still</strong>."—NPR Books </p><p><em>The incredible true story of the women who fought America's Undark danger</em></p><p>The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.</p><p>Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these "shining girls" are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.</p><p>But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women's cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America's early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers' rights that will echo for centuries to come. </p><p>Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, <em>The Radium Girls</em> fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the "wonder" substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...</p>
Lenin: The Man, the Dictator, and the Master of Terror
by Victor Sebestyen

Language

English

Pages

609

Publication Date

November 07, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Victor Sebestyen's riveting biography of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin—the first major biography in English in nearly two decades—is not only a political examination of one of the most important historical figures of the twentieth century but also a fascinating portrait of Lenin the man.<br /><br />Brought up in comfort and with a passion for hunting and fishing, chess, and the English classics, Lenin was radicalized after the execution of his brother in 1887. Sebestyen traces the story from Lenin's early years to his long exile in Europe and return to Petrograd in 1917 to lead the first Communist revolution in history. Uniquely, Sebestyen has discovered that throughout Lenin's life his closest relationships were with his mother, his sisters, his wife, and his mistress. The long-suppressed story told here of the love triangle that Lenin had with his wife, Nadezhda Krupskaya, and his beautiful, married mistress and comrade, Inessa Armand, reveals a more complicated character than that of the coldly one-dimensional leader of the Bolshevik Revolution.<br /><br />With Lenin's personal papers and those of other leading political figures now available, Sebestyen gives is new details that bring to life the dramatic and gripping story of how Lenin seized power in a coup and ran his revolutionary state. The product of a violent, tyrannical, and corrupt Russia, he chillingly authorized the deaths of thousands of people and created a system based on the idea that political terror against opponents was justified for a greater ideal. An old comrade what had once admired him said that Lenin "desired the good . . . but created evil." This included his invention of Stalin, who would take Lenin's system of the gulag and the secret police to horrifying new heights.<br /><br />In <i>Lenin, </i>Victor Sebestyen has written a brilliant portrait of this dictator as a complex and ruthless figure, and he also brings to light important new revelations about the Russian Revolution, a pivotal point in modern history.<br /><br /><br /><i>(With 16 pages of black-and-white photographs)</i>
Lioness: Golda Meir and the Nation of Israel
by Francine Klagsbrun

Language

English

Pages

848

Publication Date

October 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The definitive biography of the iron-willed leader, chain-smoking political operative, and tea-and-cake-serving grandmother who became the fourth prime minister of Israel</b><br />    <br />Golda Meir was a world figure unlike any other. Born in tsarist Russia in 1898, she immigrated to America in 1906 and grew up in Milwaukee, where from her earliest years she displayed the political consciousness and organizational skills that would eventually catapult her into the inner circles of Israel's founding generation. Moving to mandatory Palestine in 1921 with her husband, the passionate socialist joined a kibbutz but soon left and was hired at a public works office by the man who would become the great love of her life. A series of public service jobs brought her to the attention of David Ben-Gurion, and her political career took off. Fund-raising in America in 1948, secretly meeting in Amman with King Abdullah right before Israel's declaration of independence, mobbed by thousands of Jews in a Moscow synagogue in 1948 as Israel's first representative to the USSR, serving as minister of labor and foreign minister in the 1950s and 1960s, Golda brought fiery oratory, plainspoken appeals, and shrewd deal-making to the cause to which she had dedicated her life—the welfare and security of the State of Israel and its inhabitants.<br />     As prime minister, Golda negotiated arms agreements with Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger and had dozens of clandestine meetings with Jordan's King Hussein in the unsuccessful pursuit of a land-for-peace agreement with Israel's neighbors. But her time in office ended in tragedy, when Israel was caught off guard by Egypt and Syria's surprise attack on Yom Kippur in 1973. Analyzing newly available documents from Israeli government archives, Francine Klagsbrun looks into whether Golda could have prevented that war and whether in its darkest days she contemplated using nuclear force. Resigning in the war's aftermath, she spent her final years keeping a hand in national affairs and bemusedly enjoying international acclaim. Klagsbrun's superbly researched and masterly recounted story of Israel's founding mother gives us a Golda for the ages.
The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royal...
by Denise Kiernan

Language

English

Pages

401

Publication Date

September 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From the author of the <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>The Girls of Atomic City</i> comes the fascinating true story behind the magnificent Gilded Age mansion Biltmore—the largest, grandest residence ever built in the United States.<BR><BR>Orphaned at a young age, Edith Stuyvesant Dresser claimed lineage from one of New York’s best known families. She grew up in Newport and Paris, and her engagement and marriage to George Vanderbilt was one of the most watched events of Gilded Age society. But none of this prepared her to be mistress of Biltmore House.<BR> <BR>Before their marriage, the wealthy and bookish Vanderbilt had dedicated his life to creating a spectacular European-style estate on 125,000 acres of North Carolina wilderness. He summoned the famous landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to tame the grounds, collaborated with celebrated architect Richard Morris Hunt to build a 175,000-square-foot chateau, filled it with priceless art and antiques, and erected a charming village beyond the gates. Newlywed Edith was now mistress of an estate nearly three times the size of Washington, DC and benefactress of the village and surrounding rural area. When fortunes shifted and changing times threatened her family, her home, and her community, it was up to Edith to save Biltmore—and secure the future of the region and her husband’s legacy.<BR> <BR>The story of Biltmore spans World Wars, the Jazz Age, the Depression, and generations of the famous Vanderbilt family, and features a captivating cast of real-life characters including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, Teddy Roosevelt, John Singer Sargent, James Whistler, Henry James, and Edith Wharton. <i>The Last Castle </i>is the unique American story of how the largest house in America flourished, faltered, and ultimately endured to this day.
The White Album: Essays
by Joan Didion

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

May 09, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>An extraordinary report on the aftermath of the 1960s in America by the <I>New York Times</I>–bestselling author of <I>South and West</I> and <I>Slouching Towards Bethlehem</I>.</B><BR /><BR /> In this landmark essay collection, Joan Didion brilliantly interweaves her own “bad dreams” with those of a nation confronting the dark underside of 1960s counterculture.<BR />  <BR /> From a jailhouse visit to Black Panther Party cofounder Huey Newton to witnessing First Lady of California Nancy Reagan pretend to pick flowers for the benefit of news cameras, Didion captures the paranoia and absurdity of the era with her signature blend of irony and insight. She takes readers to the “giddily splendid” Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the cool mountains of Bogotá, and the Jordanian Desert, where Bishop James Pike went to walk in Jesus’s footsteps—and died not far from his rented Ford Cortina. She anatomizes the culture of shopping malls—“toy garden cities in which no one lives but everyone consumes”—and exposes the contradictions and compromises of the women’s movement. In the iconic title essay, she documents her uneasy state of mind during the years leading up to and following the Manson murders—a terrifying crime that, in her memory, surprised no one.<BR />  <BR /> Written in “a voice like no other in contemporary journalism,” <I>The White Album </I>is a masterpiece of literary reportage and a fearless work of autobiography by the National Book Award–winning author of <I>The Year of Magical Thinking </I>(<I>The New York Times Book Review</I>). Its power to electrify and inform remains undiminished nearly forty years after it was first published.<BR /><BR />  </DIV>
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Bl...
by Margot Lee Shetterly

Language

English

Pages

373

Publication Date

September 06, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>The #1 New York Times bestseller</em></strong></p><p><em>The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring </em><em>Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. </em></p><p>Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. </p><p>Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. </p><p>Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. </p><p>Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, <em>Hidden Figures</em> follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.</p><p> </p>
The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas ...
by Helen Rappaport

Language

English

Pages

529

Publication Date

June 03, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>A 12-WEEK <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</p><p>"Helen Rappaport paints a compelling portrait of the doomed grand duchesses." <b>—<i>People</i> magazine</b></p><p>"The public spoke of the sisters in a gentile, superficial manner, but Rappaport captures sections of letters and diary entries to showcase the sisters' thoughtfulness and intelligence." <b>—<i>Publishers Weekly</i> (starred review)</b></p><p><b>From the <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author of <i>The Last Days of the Romanovs</i> and <i>Caught in the Revolution</i>, <i>The Romanov Sisters</i> reveals the untold stories of the four daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra. </b></p><p>They were the Princess Dianas of their day—perhaps the most photographed and talked about young royals of the early twentieth century. The four captivating Russian Grand Duchesses—Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia Romanov—were much admired for their happy dispositions, their looks, the clothes they wore and their privileged lifestyle.</p><p>Over the years, the story of the four Romanov sisters and their tragic end in a basement at Ekaterinburg in 1918 has clouded our view of them, leading to a mass of sentimental and idealized hagiography. With this treasure trove of diaries and letters from the grand duchesses to their friends and family, we learn that they were intelligent, sensitive and perceptive witnesses to the dark turmoil within their immediate family and the ominous approach of the Russian Revolution, the nightmare that would sweep their world away, and them along with it.</p><p><i>The Romanov Sisters</i> sets out to capture the joy as well as the insecurities and poignancy of those young lives against the backdrop of the dying days of late Imperial Russia, World War I and the Russian Revolution. Helen Rappaport aims to present a new and challenging take on the story, drawing extensively on previously unseen or unpublished letters, diaries and archival sources, as well as private collections. It is a book that will surprise people, even aficionados.</p>
First Mothers: The Women Who Shaped the Presidents
by Bonnie Angelo

Language

English

Pages

498

Publication Date

February 06, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Bonnie Angelo, a veteran reporter and writer for <em>Time,</em> has captured the daily lives, thoughts, and feelings of the remarkable women who played such a large role in developing the characters of the modern American presidents. From formidably aristocratic Sara Delano Roosevelt to diehard Democrat Martha Truman, champion athlete Dorothy Bush, and hard-living Virginia Clinton Kelley, Angelo blends these women's stories with the texture of their lives and with colorful details of their times. <em>First Mothers</em> is an in-depth look at the special mother-son relationships that nurtured and helped propel the last twelve American presidents to the pinnacle of power.</p>
The Diary of a Young Girl
by Ann Frank

Language

English

Pages

361

Publication Date

September 15, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The diary as Anne Frank wrote it. At last, in a  new translation, this definitive edition contains  entries about Anne's burgeoning sexuality and  confrontations with her mother that were cut from  previous editions. Anne Frank's <i>The Diary of a  Young Girl</i> is among the most enduring  documents of the twentieth century. Since its  publication in 1947, it has been a beloved and deeply  admired monument to the indestructible nature of the  human spirit, read by millions of people and  translated into more than fifty-five languages.  Doubleday, which published the first English translation  of the diary in 1952, now offers a new translation  that captures Anne's youthful spirit and restores  the original material omitted by Anne's father,  Otto -- approximately thirty percent of the diary.  The elder Frank excised details about Anne's  emerging sexuality, and about the often-stormy relations  between Anne and her mother. Anne Frank and her  family, fleeing the horrors of Nazi occupation  forces, hid in the back of an Amsterdam office building  for two years. This is Anne's record of that time.  She was thirteen when the family went into the  "Secret Annex," and in these pages, she grows  to be a young woman and proves to be an insightful  observer of human nature as well. A timeless story  discovered by each new generation, <i>The  Diary of a Young Girl</i> stands without peer.  For young readers and adults, it continues to  bring to life this young woman, who for a time  survived the worst horrors the modern world had seen -- and  who remained triumphantly and heartbreakingly  human throughout her ordeal.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>

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