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The People’s Voice: A Testimony of Human Rights in Santa Marta,...
by A.E Cole

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

May 25, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The Salvadoran Civil War saw widespread violations of human rights, and the people of the Community of Santa Marta experienced these first-hand. On March 15th 1981, 7,000 troops entered the community of Santa Marta and massacred all those that they found, forcing the survivors into refugee camps in Honduras for seven years. The people of Santa Marta tell their stories of the war and ‘The Great Massacre’ but also, ongoing problems such as poverty, a lack of education and job opportunities, gang violence, mass migration to the United States, environmental problems, the mining industry and the violation of women’s rights. The People’s Voice shares first-person narratives of those in the community from ex-guerrilla fighters to community leaders to young, teenage mothers to build a picture of the social landscape, human rights and women's rights in the Community of Santa Marta throughout the past and present. All proceeds of the book will be donated to Youth Empowerment El Salvador.
Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women (Wo...
by Brittney C. Cooper

Language

English

Pages

208

Publication Date

May 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><i>Beyond Respectability</i> charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Barrier Williams, Pauli Murray, and Toni Cade Bambara. Cooper delves into the processes that transformed these women and others into racial leadership figures, including long-overdue discussions of their theoretical output and personal experiences. As Cooper shows, their body of work critically reshaped our understandings of race and gender discourse. It also confronted entrenched ideas of how--and who--produced racial knowledge.</div>
Gyppo Logger (Columbia Northwest Classics)
by Margaret Elley Felt

Language

English

Pages

328

Publication Date

May 01, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<P>Margaret Elley Felt�s autobiographical Gyppo Logger, originally published in 1963, tells a story almost universally overlooked in the history of the logging industry: the emergence of family-based, independent contract or "gyppo" loggers in the post-World War II timber economy, and the crucial role of women within that economy. For seven years Margaret Felt was her husband�s partner in their logging business � driving truck, keeping the wage rolls, and jawboning her way into more credit at the supply stores.</P><P>Margaret Elley Felt is the author of thirteen books in addition to Gyppo Logger. She has contributed to popular magazines including National Wildlife and Parents Magazine, and was an editor and public information officer for several Washington State agencies.</P>
To Live and Die a WASP: 38 Women Pilots Who Died in WWII
by William M. Miller

Language

English

Pages

346

Publication Date

May 25, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
When the war began, the men called these women “girls.” They didn’t believe this grand experiment could ever work—that the women of America—sisters and wives—could fly Army airplanes all over the country. Yet, these women were patriots and all they asked was a chance to do something that would help win the war. Of the 1,074 who flew as a WASP, 38 young women never came back—never had a future, and never heard their country say, “Thank you.”<br />Here, we remember them.<br />There have been many books about the Women Airforce Service Pilots of WWII (WASP); however, hardly any about these 38 women who lost their lives while flying for the Army Air Corps. This book tells their story.
The White Album: Essays
by Joan Didion

Language

English

Pages

163

Publication Date

May 09, 2017

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Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>An extraordinary report on the aftermath of the 1960s in America by the <I>New York Times</I>–bestselling author of <I>South and West</I> and <I>Slouching Towards Bethlehem</I>.</B><BR /><BR /> In this landmark essay collection, Joan Didion brilliantly interweaves her own “bad dreams” with those of a nation confronting the dark underside of 1960s counterculture.<BR />  <BR /> From a jailhouse visit to Black Panther Party cofounder Huey Newton to witnessing First Lady of California Nancy Reagan pretend to pick flowers for the benefit of news cameras, Didion captures the paranoia and absurdity of the era with her signature blend of irony and insight. She takes readers to the “giddily splendid” Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the cool mountains of Bogotá, and the Jordanian Desert, where Bishop James Pike went to walk in Jesus’s footsteps—and died not far from his rented Ford Cortina. She anatomizes the culture of shopping malls—“toy garden cities in which no one lives but everyone consumes”—and exposes the contradictions and compromises of the women’s movement. In the iconic title essay, she documents her uneasy state of mind during the years leading up to and following the Manson murders—a terrifying crime that, in her memory, surprised no one.<BR />  <BR /> Written in “a voice like no other in contemporary journalism,” <I>The White Album </I>is a masterpiece of literary reportage and a fearless work of autobiography by the National Book Award–winning author of <I>The Year of Magical Thinking </I>(<I>The New York Times Book Review</I>). Its power to electrify and inform remains undiminished nearly forty years after it was first published.<BR /><BR />  </DIV>
Murder In Matera: A True Story of Passion, Family, and Forgivenes...
by Helene Stapinski

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

May 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>“A thrilling detective story… Stapinski pursues the study of her family’s criminal genealogy with unexpected emotional results.” — Library Journal</strong> </p><p>A writer goes deep into the heart of Italy to unravel a century-old family mystery in this spellbinding memoir that blends the suspenseful twists of <em>Making a Murderer</em> and the emotional insight of Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan Novels.</p><p>Since childhood, Helene Stapinski heard lurid tales about her great-great-grandmother, Vita. In Southern Italy, she was a loose woman who had murdered someone. Immigrating to America with three children, she lost one along the way. Helene’s youthful obsession with Vita deepened as she grew up, eventually propelling the journalist to Italy, where, with her own children in tow, she pursued the story, determined to set the record straight.</p><p>Finding answers would take Helene ten years and numerous trips to Basilicata, the rural "instep" of Italy’s boot—a mountainous land rife with criminals, superstitions, old-world customs, and desperate poverty. Though false leads sent her down blind alleys, Helene’s dogged search, aided by a few lucky—even miraculous—breaks and a group of colorful local characters, led her to the truth. </p><p>Yes, the family tales she’d heard were true: There had been a murder in Helene’s family, a killing that roiled 1870s Italy. But the identities of the killer and victim weren’t who she thought they were. In revisiting events that happened more than a century before, Helene came to another stunning realization—she wasn’t who she thought she was, either.</p><p>Weaving Helene’s own story of discovery with the tragic tale of Vita’s life, <em>Murder in Matera</em> is a literary whodunit and a moving tale of self-discovery that brings into focus a long ago tragedy in a little-known region remarkable for its stunning sunny beauty and dark buried secrets.</p>
Sarah Osborn’s Collected Writings
by Sarah Osborn

Language

English

Pages

448

Publication Date

June 27, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>Riveting and eloquent, the collected writings of a key figure—and one of the first female leaders—of the eighteenth-century evangelical movement</B><BR /><BR /> Sarah Osborn (1714–1796) was one of the most charismatic female religious leaders of her time and one of relatively few colonial women whose writings have been preserved. This volume reprints selections from Osborn’s fascinating manuscripts, including her memoir, letters, and diaries.<BR />  <BR /> An evangelical Christian who led popular revival meetings at her own home, Osborn was also a gifted writer who recorded the story of her life. In thousands of pages of manuscripts, Osborn chronicled her personal struggles alongside the great events of her age, including the Great Awakening, the French and Indian War, the moral crisis posed by slavery, and the American Revolution. A rare opportunity to hear an early American woman speak about her faith and her religious leadership, this masterfully edited work is also an invaluable resource for understanding the rise of evangelical Christianity.</DIV>
A Living Memory: Immortality for Sarra Copia Sulam
by Kathleen Ann González

Language

English

Pages

44

Publication Date

May 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Denounced for heresy, pressured relentlessly to convert, accused of plagiarism, questioned for her learning, and literally robbed of hundreds of ducats in gold and goods, Sarra Copia Sulam faced travails that would have felled those fainter of heart. As a Jewish scholar in seventeenth century Venice, she had to remain steadfast in her faith while she brought together both Christian and Jewish scholars in her literary salon. Sarra kept her wits about her, utilized her learning, remained devout, and garnered the support of numerous friends and scholars who came to her defense when she was besieged. Her name means princess, and like one used to being followed, Sarra has inspired others for centuries. Sarra Copia Sulam created a “living memory,” her own immortality.
Ladies of the Lights: Michigan Women in the U.S. Lighthouse Servi...
by Patricia Majher

Language

English

Pages

136

Publication Date

March 15, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"A great read about some great ladies, Pat Majher's <i>Ladies of the Lights</i> pays long overdue homage to an overlooked part of Great Lakes maritime history in which a select group of stalwart women beat the odds to succeed in a field historically reserved for men."<br /><br />---Terry Pepper, Executive Director of Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Michigan once led the country in the number of lighthouses, and they're still a central part of the mystique and colorful countryside of the state. What even the region's lighthouse enthusiasts might not know is the rich history of female lighthouse keepers in the area.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Fifty women served the sailing communities on Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior, as well as on the Detroit River, for more than 100 years. From Catherine Shook, who raised eight children while maintaining the Pointe Aux Barques light at the entrance to Saginaw Bay; to Eliza Truckey, who assumed responsibility for the lighthouse in Marquette while her husband fought for four years in the Civil War; to Elizabeth Whitney, whose combined service on Beaver Island and in Harbor Springs totaled forty-one years---the stories of Michigan's "ladies of the light" are inspiring.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />This is no technical tome documenting the minutiae of Michigan's lighthouse specifications. Rather, it's a detailed, human portrait of the women who kept those lighthouses running, defying the gender expectations of their time.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Patricia Majher is Editor of <i>Michigan History</i> magazine, published by the Historical Society of Michigan. Prior, she was Assistant Director of the Michigan Women's Historical Center and Hall of Fame in Lansing, Michigan. In addition, she has been writing both advertising and editorial copy for almost thirty years and has been a frequent contributor to Michigan newspapers and magazines.<br /><br /><br />
The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancien...
by Kara Cooney

Language

English

Pages

330

Publication Date

October 14, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An engrossing biography of the longest-reigning female pharaoh in Ancient Egypt and the story of her audacious rise to power.</b><br /> <br />Hatshepsut—the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne—was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir, however, paved the way for her improbable rule as a cross-dressing king. At just over twenty, Hatshepsut out-maneuvered the mother of Thutmose III, the infant king, for a seat on the throne, and ascended to the rank of pharaoh.</p><p>Shrewdly operating the levers of power to emerge as Egypt's second female pharaoh, Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power plays in the veil of piety and sexual reinvention. She successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods.</p><p>Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power—and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. <i>The Woman Who Would Be King</i> traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.</p>

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