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The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty
by Susan Page

Language

English

Pages

432

Publication Date

April 02, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div ><b>INSTANT <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</b></div><div ><b><br /></b></div><div ><b>"[The] rare biography of a public figure that's not only beautifully written, but also shockingly revelatory." -- <i>The Atlantic</i></b></div><div ><b><br /></b></div><b >A vivid biography of former First Lady Barbara Bush, one of the most influential and under-appreciated women in American political history.</b><br ><br ><div >Barbara Pierce Bush was one of the country's most popular and powerful figures, yet her full story has never been told.</div><div ><br /></div><div >THE MATRIARCH tells the riveting tale of a woman who helped define two American presidencies and an entire political era. Written by USA TODAY's Washington Bureau chief Susan Page, this biography is informed by more than one hundred interviews with Bush friends and family members, hours of conversation with Mrs. Bush herself in the final six months of her life, and access to her diaries that spanned decades. THE MATRIARCH examines not only her public persona but also less well-known aspects of her remarkable life. As a girl in Rye, New York, Barbara Bush weathered criticism of her weight from her mother, barbs that left lifelong scars. As a young wife, she coped with the death of her three-year-old daughter from leukemia, a loss that changed her forever. In middle age, she grappled with depression so serious that she contemplated suicide. And as first the wife and then the mother of American presidents, she made history as the only woman to see -- and advise -- both her husband and son in the Oval Office.</div><div ><br /></div><div >As with many women of her era, Barbara Bush was routinely underestimated, her contributions often neither recognized nor acknowledged. But she became an astute and trusted political campaign strategist and a beloved First Lady. She invested herself deeply in expanding literacy programs in America, played a critical role in the end of the Cold War, and led the way in demonstrating love and compassion to those with HIV/AIDS. With her cooperation, this book offers Barbara Bush's last words for history -- on the evolution of her party, on the role of women, on Donald Trump, and on her family's legacy.</div><div ><br /></div><div >Barbara Bush's accomplishments, struggles, and contributions are many. Now, Susan Page explores them all in THE MATRIARCH, a groundbreaking book certain to cement Barbara Bush as one of the most unique and influential women in American history.</div>
Madame Fourcade's Secret War: The Daring Young Woman Who Led Fran...
by Lynne Olson

Language

English

Pages

421

Publication Date

March 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • The little-known true story of Marie-Madeleine Fourcade, the woman who headed the largest spy network in occupied France during World War II, from the bestselling author of <i>Citizens of London</i> and <i>Last Hope Island</i></b><br /><br /><b>“Brava to Lynne Olson for a biography that should challenge any outdated assumptions about who deserves to be called a hero.”—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> In 1941 a thirty-one-year-old Frenchwoman, a young mother born to privilege and known for her beauty and glamour, became the leader of a vast intelligence organization—the only woman to serve as a <i>chef de résistance</i> during the war. Strong-willed, independent, and a lifelong rebel against her country’s conservative, patriarchal society, Marie-Madeleine Fourcade was temperamentally made for the job. Her group’s name was Alliance, but the Gestapo dubbed it Noah’s Ark because its agents used the names of animals as their aliases. The name Marie-Madeleine chose for herself was Hedgehog: a tough little animal, unthreatening in appearance, that, as a colleague of hers put it, “even a lion would hesitate to bite.”<br /><br /> No other French spy network lasted as long or supplied as much crucial intelligence—including providing American and British military commanders with a 55-foot-long map of the beaches and roads on which the Allies would land on D-Day—as Alliance. The Gestapo pursued them relentlessly, capturing, torturing, and executing hundreds of its three thousand agents, including Fourcade’s own lover and many of her key spies. Although Fourcade, the mother of two young children, moved her headquarters every few weeks, constantly changing her hair color, clothing, and identity, she was captured twice by the Nazis. Both times she managed to escape—once by slipping naked through the bars of her jail cell—and continued to hold her network together even as it repeatedly threatened to crumble around her.<br /><br />Now, in this dramatic account of the war that split France in two and forced its people to live side by side with their hated German occupiers, Lynne Olson tells the fascinating story of a woman who stood up for her nation, her fellow citizens, and herself.<br /><b><br />“Fast-paced and impressively researched . . . Olson writes with verve and a historian’s authority. . . . With this gripping tale, Lynne Olson pays [Marie-Madeleine Fourcade] what history has so far denied her. France, slow to confront the stain of Vichy, would do well to finally honor a fighter most of us would want in our foxhole.”—<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b>
The Library Book
by Susan Orlean

Language

English

Pages

310

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK</b><BR> <BR><b>A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR </b> * <b>A</b> <b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER and <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“A constant pleasure to read…Everybody who loves books should check out <i>The Library Book</i>.” —<i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR><b>“CAPTIVATING…DELIGHTFUL.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i> * “EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING.” —<i>The New York Times</i> * “MESMERIZING…RIVETING.” —<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><BR> <BR><b>A dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries—from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by <i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>.</b><BR><BR>On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?<BR> <BR> Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>reporter and <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Library Book</i>, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.<BR> <BR> Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.<BR> <BR> Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, <i>The Library Book </i>is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Bl...
by Margot Lee Shetterly

Language

English

Pages

370

Publication Date

September 06, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>The #1 New York Times bestseller</em></strong></p><p><em>The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring </em><em>Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. </em></p><p>Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. </p><p>Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. </p><p>Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. </p><p>Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, <em>Hidden Figures</em> follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.</p><p> </p>
A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Wh...
by Sonia Purnell

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

April 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>"An incredible story of under-appreciated heroism." - <b><i>USA Today</i></b><br /><br />"A compelling biography of a masterful spy, and a reminder of what can be done with a few brave people -- and a little resistance." - <b>NPR</b><br /><br /><b>The never-before-told story of Virginia Hall, the American spy who changed the course of World War II, from the author of </b><b><i>Clementine</i></b></b><br /><br />In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." <br /><br />The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare." She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and--despite her prosthetic leg--helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. <br /><br />Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day.<br /><br />Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall--an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spycraft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. <i>A Woman of No Importance</i> is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.
The Case for Trump
by Victor Davis Hanson

Language

English

Pages

389

Publication Date

March 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>An instant <i>New York Times</i> bestseller: </b><b >From an award-winning historian and regular Fox contributor, the true story of how Donald Trump has become one of the most successful presidents in history -- and why America needs him now more than ever</b></div><div><b><br /></b><div> </div><div>In <i>The Case for Trump</i>, award-winning historian and political commentator Victor Davis Hanson explains how a celebrity businessman with no political or military experience triumphed over sixteen well-qualified Republican rivals, a Democrat with a quarter-billion-dollar war chest, and a hostile media and Washington establishment to become president of the United States -- and an extremely successful president.</div><div><br /></div><div>Trump alone saw a political opportunity in defending the working people of America's interior whom the coastal elite of both parties had come to scorn, Hanson argues. And Trump alone had the instincts and energy to pursue this opening to victory, dismantle a corrupt old order, and bring long-overdue policy changes at home and abroad. We could not survive a series of presidencies as volatile as Trump's. But after decades of drift, America needs the outsider Trump to do what normal politicians would not and could not do.</div></div><div></div>
Code Name: Lise: The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII's Mo...
by Larry Loftis

Language

English

Pages

385

Publication Date

January 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Best Nonfiction Books to Read in 2019—<i>Woman’s Day</i></b><BR> <b>The Best Nonfiction Books Coming Out This Year—<i>BookBub</i></b><BR> <b>“A nonfiction thriller.”—<i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><BR> <BR> <b>From internationally bestselling author of the “gripping” (Michael Connelly, #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author) <i>Into the Lion’s Mouth </i>comes the extraordinary true story of Odette Sansom, the British spy who operated in occupied France and fell in love with her commanding officer during World War II—perfect for fans of <i>Unbroken</i>, <i>The Nightingale</i>, and <i>Code Girls</i>. </b><BR><BR>The year is 1942, and World War II is in full swing. Odette Sansom decides to follow in her war hero father’s footsteps by becoming an SOE agent to aid Britain and her beloved homeland, France. Five failed attempts and one plane crash later, she finally lands in occupied France to begin her mission. It is here that she meets her commanding officer Captain Peter Churchill.<BR> <BR> As they successfully complete mission after mission, Peter and Odette fall in love. All the while, they are being hunted by the cunning German secret police sergeant, Hugo Bleicher, who finally succeeds in capturing them. They are sent to Paris’s Fresnes prison, and from there to concentration camps in Germany where they are starved, beaten, and tortured. But in the face of despair, they never give up hope, their love for each other, or the whereabouts of their colleagues.<BR> <BR> In<i> </i><i>Code Name: Lise</i><i>, </i>Larry Loftis paints a portrait of true courage, patriotism, and love—of two incredibly heroic people who endured unimaginable horrors and degradations. He seamlessly weaves together the touching romance between Odette and Peter and the thrilling cat and mouse game between them and Sergeant Bleicher. With this amazing testament to the human spirit, Loftis proves once again that he is adept at writing “nonfiction that reads like a page-turning novel” (<i>Parade</i>).
First: Sandra Day O'Connor
by Evan Thomas

Language

English

Pages

455

Publication Date

March 19, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • The intimate, inspiring, and authoritative biography of Sandra Day O’Connor, America’s first female Supreme Court justice, drawing on exclusive interviews and first-time access to Justice O’Connor’s archives—by the <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Evan Thomas.</b><br /><br /><b>“She’s a hero for our time, and this is the biography for our time.”—Walter Isaacson</b><br /><br /> She was born in 1930 in El Paso and grew up on a cattle ranch in Arizona. At a time when women were expected to be homemakers, she set her sights on Stanford University. When she graduated near the top of her law school class in 1952, no firm would even interview her. But Sandra Day O’Connor’s story is that of a woman who repeatedly shattered glass ceilings—doing so with a blend of grace, wisdom, humor, understatement, and cowgirl toughness.<br /><br /> She became the first ever female majority leader of a state senate. As a judge on the Arizona Court of Appeals, she stood up to corrupt lawyers and humanized the law. When she arrived at the United States Supreme Court, appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1981, she began a quarter-century tenure on the Court, hearing cases that ultimately shaped American law. Diagnosed with cancer at fifty-eight, and caring for a husband with Alzheimer’s, O’Connor endured every difficulty with grit and poise.<br /><br /> Women and men who want to be leaders and be first in their own lives—who want to learn when to walk away and when to stand their ground—will be inspired by O’Connor’s example. This is a remarkably vivid and personal portrait of a woman who loved her family, who believed in serving her country, and who, when she became the most powerful woman in America, built a bridge forward for all women.<br /><br /><b>Advance praise for </b><i><b>First</b></i><br /><br />“A great storyteller has found his greatest subject in trailblazer Sandra Day O’Connor. Evan Thomas has written one of the most insightful and thoroughly captivating biographies I have ever read: A clear and compelling illumination of Sandra Day O’Connor’s unique voice and place in American history is told through her remarkable life’s journey from a rancher’s daughter to the first woman appointed to the highest court in the land.”<b>—Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of <i>Leadership:</i></b><i> <b>In Turbulent Times</b></i><br />   <br /> “A vivid, humane, and inspiring portrait of an extraordinary woman and how she both reflected and shaped an era.”<b>—Drew Faust, president emerita, Harvard University</b>
The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld
by Chris Wiltz

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

July 01, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The “raunchy, hilarious, and thrilling” true story of the incomparable Norma Wallace, proprietor of a notorious 1920s New Orleans brothel (NPR). </B><BR /><BR /> Norma Wallace grew up fast. In 1916, at fifteen years old, she went to work as a streetwalker in New Orleans’ French Quarter. By the 1920s, she was a “landlady”—or, more precisely, the madam of what became one of the city’s most lavish brothels. It was frequented by politicians, movie stars, gangsters, and even the notoriously corrupt police force. But Wallace acquired more than just repeat customers. There were friends, lovers . . . and also enemies.<BR />  <BR /> Wallace’s romantic interests ran the gamut from a bootlegger who shot her during a fight to a famed bandleader to the boy next door, thirty-nine years her junior, who became her fifth husband. She knew all of the Crescent City’s dirty little secrets, and used them to protect her own interests—she never got so much as a traffic ticket, until the early 1960s, when District Attorney Jim Garrison decided to clean up vice and corruption. After a jail stay, Wallace went legitimate as successfully as she had gone criminal, with a lucrative restaurant business—but it was love that would undo her in the end.<BR />  <BR /><I>The Last Madam</I> combines original research with Wallace’s personal memoirs, bringing to life an era in New Orleans history rife with charm and decadence, resurrecting “a secret world, like those uncovered by Luc Sante and James Ellroy” (<I>Publishers Weekly</I>). It reveals the colorful, unforgettable woman who reigned as an underworld queen and “capture[s] perfectly the essential, earthy complexity of the most fascinating city on this continent” (Robert Olen Butler).<BR />  </DIV>
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women
by Kate Moore

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A<em> New York Times</em>, <em>USA Today, </em>and<em> Wall Street Journal</em> Bestseller!</strong><br /><strong>Emma Watson's Our Shared Shelf Bookclub Selection - May/June 2018 </strong></p><p>"<strong>the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still</strong>."—NPR Books </p><p><em>The incredible true story of the women who fought America's Undark danger</em></p><p>The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.</p><p>Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these "shining girls" are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.</p><p>But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women's cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America's early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers' rights that will echo for centuries to come. </p><p>Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, <em>The Radium Girls</em> fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the "wonder" substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...</p>

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