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Women in Higher Education, 1850-1970: International Perspectives ...
by Routledge

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

September 19, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<P>This edited collection illustrates the way in which women’s experiences of academe could be both contextually diverse but historically and culturally similar. It looks at both the micro (individual women and universities) and macro-level (comparative analyses among regions and countries) within regional, national, trans-national, and international contexts. <BR> <BR>The contributors integrally advance knowledge about the university in history by exploring the intersections of the lived experiences of women students and professors, practices of co-education, and intellectual and academic cultures. They also raise important questions about the complementary and multidirectional flow and exchange of academic knowledge and information among gender groups across programmes, disciplines, and universities. <BR> <BR>Historical inquiry and interpretation serve as efficacious ways with which to understand contemporary events and discourses in higher education, and more broadly in community and society. This book will provide important historical contexts for current debates about the numerical dominance and significance of women in higher education, and the tensions embedded in the gendering of specific academic programs and disciplines, and university policies, missions, and mandates.</P>
Wearing the Trousers: Fashion, Freedom and the Rise of the Modern...
by Don Chapman

Language

English

Pages

462

Publication Date

September 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In the 1850s a craze swept through the wardrobes of the women of British and American society. These 'bloomers', wearing their new loose-fitting 'Turkish dress', represented a turn against the painful and unhealthy fashions of the Victorian hey-day with its corsets and bindings. But it was more than that: with the newspapers everywhere decrying this new style of dress, bloomers became an overnight feminist firestorm. These early pioneers had set in motion a form of social protest in which everyday dress – in public and in the home – became a political act.<br /><br />Don Chapman traces the development of this new movement through the changing fashions. With every new style of dress, there came predictable outcries of disapproval and satire from the world's press. Slowly, inch by inch and stitch by stitch, the women made progress. At the turn of the century, campaigners such as Lady Harberton championed the new 'Rational Dress Movement', adroitly rebranding the movement as a rational cause – the buzzword of the day for all right-thinking individuals – and thereby giving the case for the divided skirt a new scientific justification. Her movement would scandalize and inspire many, from H. G. Wells to George Bernard Shaw. Merging with the early Suffragist cause in 1907, the story of women's fashion takes in issues as various as the working conditions of garment makers, female prostitution and the nineteenth-century slave trade. Wearing the Trousers charts the progression from the corseted lady at a remove from the Establishment to the liberated woman at work in a modern, more inclusive society.
The White Album: Essays
by Joan Didion

Language

English

Pages

224

Publication Date

May 09, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>An extraordinary report on the aftermath of the 1960s in America by the <I>New York Times</I>–bestselling author of <I>South and West</I> and <I>Slouching Towards Bethlehem</I>.</B><BR /><BR /> In this landmark essay collection, Joan Didion brilliantly interweaves her own “bad dreams” with those of a nation confronting the dark underside of 1960s counterculture.<BR />  <BR /> From a jailhouse visit to Black Panther Party cofounder Huey Newton to witnessing First Lady of California Nancy Reagan pretend to pick flowers for the benefit of news cameras, Didion captures the paranoia and absurdity of the era with her signature blend of irony and insight. She takes readers to the “giddily splendid” Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the cool mountains of Bogotá, and the Jordanian Desert, where Bishop James Pike went to walk in Jesus’s footsteps—and died not far from his rented Ford Cortina. She anatomizes the culture of shopping malls—“toy garden cities in which no one lives but everyone consumes”—and exposes the contradictions and compromises of the women’s movement. In the iconic title essay, she documents her uneasy state of mind during the years leading up to and following the Manson murders—a terrifying crime that, in her memory, surprised no one.<BR />  <BR /> Written in “a voice like no other in contemporary journalism,” <I>The White Album </I>is a masterpiece of literary reportage and a fearless work of autobiography by the National Book Award–winning author of <I>The Year of Magical Thinking </I>(<I>The New York Times Book Review</I>). Its power to electrify and inform remains undiminished nearly forty years after it was first published.<BR /><BR />  </DIV>
The Unfinished Palazzo: Life, Love and Art in Venice: The Stories...
by Judith Mackrell

Language

English

Pages

408

Publication Date

September 05, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The story of Venice’s “Unfinished Palazzo”— told through the lives of three of its most unconventional, passionate, and fascinating residents: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim</p><br /><p>Commissioned in 1750, the Palazzo Venier was planned as a testimony to the power and wealth of a great Venetian family, but the fortunes of the Veniers waned midconstruction and the project was abandoned. Empty, unfinished, and decaying, the building was considered an eyesore until the early twentieth century when it attracted and inspired three women at key moments in their lives: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim.</p><br /><p>Luisa Casati turned her home into an aesthete’s fantasy where she hosted parties as extravagant and decadent as Renaissance court operas, spending small fortunes on her own costumes in her quest to become a “living work of art” and muse. Doris Castlerosse strove to make her mark in London and Venice during the glamorous, hedonistic interwar years, hosting film stars and royalty at glittering parties. In the postwar years, Peggy Gugenheim turned the Palazzo into a model of modernist simplicity that served as a home for her exquisite collection of modern art that today draws tourists and art lovers from around the world. Each vivid life story is accompanied by previously unseen materials from family archives, weaving an intricate history of these legendary art world eccentrics.</p>
The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that I...
by Marta McDowell

Language

English

Pages

390

Publication Date

September 20, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>A must-read companion to the Little House books </B><BR /><BR /> The universal appeal of Laura Ingalls Wilde’s books springs from a life lived in partnership with the land, on farms she and her family settled across the Northeast and Midwest. In this revealing exploration of Wilder’s deep connection with the natural world, Marta McDowell follows the wagon trail of the beloved Little House series. You’ll learn details about Wilder’s life and inspirations, pinpoint the Ingalls and Wilder homestead claims on authentic archival maps, and learn to grow the plants and vegetables featured in the series. Excerpts from Wilder’s books, letters, and diaries bring to light her profound appreciation for the landscapes at the heart of her world. Featuring the beloved illustrations by Helen Sewell and Garth Williams, plus hundreds of historic and contemporary photographs, <I>The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder</I> is a treasure for anyone enchanted by Laura’s wild and beautiful life. </DIV>
Plain and Simple: A Journey to the Amish
by Sue Bender

Language

English

Pages

178

Publication Date

March 17, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<em> "I had an obsession with the Amish. Plan and simple. Objectively it made no sense. I, who worked hard at being special, fell in love with a people who valued being ordinary." </em><p> So begins Sue Bender's story, the captivating and inspiring true story of a harried urban Californian moved by the beauty of a display of quilts to seek out and live with the Amish. Discovering lives shaped by unfamiliar yet comforting ideas about time, work, and community, Bender is gently coaxed to consider, "Is there another way to lead a good life?" <p> Her journey begins in a New York men's clothing store. There she is spellbound by the vibrant colors and stunning geometric simplicity of the Amish quilts "spoke directly to me," writes Bender. Somehow, "they went straight to my heart." <p> Heeding a persistent inner voice, Bender searches for Amish families willing to allow her to visit and share in there daily lives. <em>Plain and Simple</em> vividly recounts sojourns with two Amish families, visits during which Bender enters a world without television, telephone, electric light, or refrigerators; a world where clutter and hurry are replaced with inner quiet and calm ritual; a world where a sunny kitchen "glows" and "no distinction was made between the sacred and the everyday." <p> In nine interrelated chapters--as simple and elegant as a classic nine-patch Amish quilt--Bender shares the quiet power she found reflected in lives of joyful simplicity, humanity, and clarity. The fast-paced, opinionated, often frazzled Bender returns home and reworks her "crazy-quilt" life, integrating the soul-soothing qualities she has observed in the Amish, and celebrating the patterns in the Amish, and celebrating the patterns formed by the distinctive "patches" of her own life. <p> Charmingly illustrated and refreshingly spare, <em>Plain and Simple</em> speaks to the seeker in each of us.
The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics
by Mark Lilla

Language

English

Pages

165

Publication Date

August 15, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>From one of the country’s most admired political thinkers, an urgent wake-up call to American liberals to turn from the divisive politics of identity and develop a vision of our future that can persuade all citizens that they share a common destiny.</em></strong></p><p>In <em>The Once and Future Liberal</em>, Mark Lilla offers an impassioned, tough-minded, and stinging look at the failure of American liberalism over the past two generations. Although there have been Democrats in the White House, and some notable policy achievements, for nearly 40 years the vision that Ronald Reagan offered—small government, lower taxes, and self-reliant individualism—has remained the country’s dominant political ideology. And the Democratic Party has offered no convincing competing vision in response.</p><p>Instead, as Lilla argues, American liberalism fell under the spell of identity politics, with disastrous consequences. Driven originally by a sincere desire to protect the most vulnerable Americans, the left has now unwittingly balkanized the electorate, encouraged self-absorption rather than solidarity, and invested its energies in social movements rather than in party politics.  </p><p>With dire consequences. Lilla goes on to show how the left’s identity-focused individualism insidiously conspired with the amoral economic individualism of the Reaganite right to shape an electorate with little sense of a shared future and near-contempt for the idea of the common good. In the contest for the American imagination, liberals have abdicated.</p><p>Now they have an opportunity to reset. The left is motivated, and the Republican Party, led by an unpredictable demagogue, is in ideological disarray. To seize this opportunity, Lilla insists, liberals must concentrate their efforts on recapturing our institutions by winning elections. The time for hectoring is over. It is time to reach out and start persuading people from every walk of life and in every region of the country that liberals will stand up for them. We must appeal to – but also help to rebuild –  a sense of common feeling among Americans, and a sense of duty to each other. </p><p>A fiercely-argued, no-nonsense book, enlivened by Lilla’s acerbic wit and erudition, <em>The Once and Future Liberal</em> is essential reading for our momentous times.</p>
Miss U: Angel of the Underground
by Margaret Utinsky

Language

English

Pages

192

Publication Date

September 02, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<em>Miss U</em>, first published in 1948, is the autobiographical account of Margaret Utinsky's experiences in the Philippines during the Second World War. <br /><br />In addition to her work as a nurse caring for wounded soldiers, Utinsky was instrumental in setting up an underground network to smuggle food, medicine, and money to Allied prisoners-of-war held at Camps O'Donnell and Cabanatuan (many of whom were survivors of the infamous Bataan Death March). <br /><br />Her code-name in the network was "Miss U." <br /><br />However, she was eventually captured by the Japanese and subjected to 32 days of imprisonment and torture at Fort Santiago in Manila. <br /><br />Following her release, and after six weeks in a hospital for treatment of her injuries, she left Manila and returned to the Bataan Peninsula, again serving as a nurse to guerrilla fighters. <br /><br />After American forces regained the Philippines, Utinsky was attached to the U.S. Army's Counter Intelligence Corps to help identify collaborators and those involved in the torture of prisoners. <br /><br />With the end of the war, she returned to the United States, and was awarded the Medal of Freedom in 1946. <br /><br /><b>Margaret Elizabeth Doolin Utinsky</b> (August 26, 1900 – August 30, 1970) was an American nurse who worked with the Filipino resistance movement to provide medicine, food, and other items to aid Allied prisoners of war in the Philippines during World War II. She was recognized in 1946 with the Medal of Freedom for her actions.
The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royal...
by Denise Kiernan

Language

English

Pages

400

Publication Date

September 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
From the author of the <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>The Girls of Atomic City</i> comes the fascinating true story behind the magnificent Gilded Age mansion Biltmore—the largest, grandest residence ever built in the United States.<BR><BR>Orphaned at a young age, Edith Stuyvesant Dresser claimed lineage from one of New York’s best known families. She grew up in Newport and Paris, and her engagement and marriage to George Vanderbilt was one of the most watched events of Gilded Age society. But none of this prepared her to be mistress of Biltmore House.<BR> <BR>Before their marriage, the wealthy and bookish Vanderbilt had dedicated his life to creating a spectacular European-style estate on 125,000 acres of North Carolina wilderness. He summoned the famous landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to tame the grounds, collaborated with celebrated architect Richard Morris Hunt to build a 175,000-square-foot chateau, filled it with priceless art and antiques, and erected a charming village beyond the gates. Newlywed Edith was now mistress of an estate nearly three times the size of Washington, DC and benefactress of the village and surrounding rural area. When fortunes shifted and changing times threatened her family, her home, and her community, it was up to Edith to save Biltmore—and secure the future of the region and her husband’s legacy.<BR> <BR>The story of Biltmore spans World Wars, the Jazz Age, the Depression, and generations of the famous Vanderbilt family, and features a captivating cast of real-life characters including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, Teddy Roosevelt, John Singer Sargent, James Whistler, Henry James, and Edith Wharton. <i>The Last Castle </i>is the unique American story of how the largest house in America flourished, faltered, and ultimately endured to this day.
Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims
by Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins

Language

English

Pages

251

Publication Date

May 29, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“Oh, for shame… Yes, you, who call yourselves the great civilization… your so-called civilization sweeps inland from the ocean wave; but, oh, my God! leaving its pathway marked by crimson lines of blood; and strewed by the bones of two races, the inheritor and the invader; and I am crying out to you for justice…”</b><br /><br /><em>Life Among the Piutes</em> is the first known autobiography of a Native American woman. <br /><br />Compelling and, at times, heartbreaking, Sarah Winnemuca Hopkins’ memoir is both a history of the Piute Indian tribe and an account of the devastation caused to the Piute people after their first contact with white men in the nineteenth century. <br /><br />Born in 1841, Winnemucca was the granddaughter of Piute chief, Truckee, an early advocate of co-operation between the Indians and European-Americans. <br /><br />As a result of her grandfather’s relationship with the white authorities in Nevada, Sarah became one of the few Piutes could speak and write English fluently, ensuring she became interpreter between the two groups. <br /><br />Her unique position allowed her to promote the welfare of the Native American people and protest against their oftentimes shocking treatments at the hands of white people. <br /><br /><em>Life Among the Piutes</em> is a chronicle of these struggles and the indignities faced by the Piute people. The book also captures the beautiful simplicity of Piute life and is an integral part of Native American history. <br /><br />“For students of Western American history, this book is invaluable. Rarely do we have firsthand accounts of events of such importance; even more rarely are these accounts written by Native Americans who participated in them; and, still rarer are the accounts written by Native American women.” — <em>Journal of the West</em><br /><br /><b>Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins</b> (1844-1891) was a prominent female Piute activist and educator; she helped gain release of her people from the Yakima Reservation following the Bannock War of 1878, lectured widely in the East in 1883 on injustices against Native Americans in the West, established a private school for Indian students in Nevada, and was an influential figure in development of United States' 19th-century Indian policies. She died in 1891. <br /><br />

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