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A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Wh...
by Sonia Purnell

Language

English

Pages

368

Publication Date

April 09, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b> <b>A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><br /><br />“E<b>xcellent…This book is as riveting as any thriller, and as hard to put down</b>.” -- <i>The New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />"A compelling biography of a masterful spy, and a reminder of what can be done with a few brave people -- and a little resistance." - <b>NPR</b><br /><br /><b>The never-before-told story of Virginia Hall, the American spy who changed the course of World War II, from the author of <i>Clementine</i></b></b><br /><br />In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: "She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her." <br /><br />The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare." She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and--despite her prosthetic leg--helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. <br /><br />Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day.<br /><br />Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall--an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spycraft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. <i>A Woman of No Importance</i> is the breathtaking story of how one woman's fierce persistence helped win the war.
Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee
by Casey Cep

Language

English

Pages

308

Publication Date

May 07, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> Best Seller</b><br /> <b> </b><br /> <b>“Compelling . . . at once a true-crime thriller, courtroom drama, and miniature biography of Harper Lee. If <i>To Kill a Mockingbird</i> was one of your favorite books growing up, you should add <i>Furious Hours</i> to your reading list today.” —<i>Southern Living</i></b><br />  <br /> Reverend Willie Maxwell was a rural preacher accused of murdering five of his family members for insurance money in the 1970s. With the help of a savvy lawyer, he escaped justice for years until a relative shot him dead at the funeral of his last victim. Despite hundreds of witnesses, Maxwell’s murderer was acquitted—thanks to the same attorney who had previously defended the Reverend.<br />  <br /> Sitting in the audience during the vigilante’s trial was Harper Lee, who had traveled from New York City to her native Alabama with the idea of writing her own <i>In Cold Blood,</i> the true-crime classic she had helped her friend Truman Capote research seventeen years earlier. Lee spent a year in town reporting, and many more years working on her own version of the case.<br /><br /> Now Casey Cep brings this story to life, from the shocking murders to the courtroom drama to the racial politics of the Deep South. At the same time, she offers a deeply moving portrait of one of the country’s most beloved writers and her struggle with fame, success, and the mystery of artistic creativity.
The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty
by Susan Page

Language

English

Pages

433

Publication Date

April 02, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>INSTANT <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER</b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><div><b>"[The] rare biography of a public figure that's not only beautifully written, but also shockingly revelatory." -- <i>The Atlantic</i></b></div><div><b><br /></b></div><b>A vivid biography of former First Lady Barbara Bush, one of the most influential and under-appreciated women in American political history.</b><br /><br /><div>Barbara Pierce Bush was one of the country's most popular and powerful figures, yet her full story has never been told.</div><div><br /></div><div>THE MATRIARCH tells the riveting tale of a woman who helped define two American presidencies and an entire political era. Written by USA TODAY's Washington Bureau chief Susan Page, this biography is informed by more than one hundred interviews with Bush friends and family members, hours of conversation with Mrs. Bush herself in the final six months of her life, and access to her diaries that spanned decades. THE MATRIARCH examines not only her public persona but also less well-known aspects of her remarkable life. </div><div><br /></div><div>As a girl in Rye, New York, Barbara Bush weathered criticism of her weight from her mother, barbs that left lifelong scars. As a young wife, she coped with the death of her three-year-old daughter from leukemia, a loss that changed her forever. In middle age, she grappled with depression so serious that she contemplated suicide. And as first the wife and then the mother of American presidents, she made history as the only woman to see -- and advise -- both her husband and son in the Oval Office.</div><div><br /></div><div>As with many women of her era, Barbara Bush was routinely underestimated, her contributions often neither recognized nor acknowledged. But she became an astute and trusted political campaign strategist and a beloved First Lady. She invested herself deeply in expanding literacy programs in America, played a critical role in the end of the Cold War, and led the way in demonstrating love and compassion to those with HIV/AIDS. With her cooperation, this book offers Barbara Bush's last words for history -- on the evolution of her party, on the role of women, on Donald Trump, and on her family's legacy.</div><div><br /></div><div>Barbara Bush's accomplishments, struggles, and contributions are many. Now, Susan Page explores them all in THE MATRIARCH, a groundbreaking book certain to cement Barbara Bush as one of the most unique and influential women in American history.</div>
American Heroines: Female Role Models in America
by Kay Bailey Hutchison

Language

English

Pages

402

Publication Date

March 03, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>As long as there has been an America, the indomitable spirit of American women has shaped both the country's history and society. Regardless of the time and place these women were born each excelled in her respective field, making it easier for the next generation. This is what makes them heroines. </p><p> In American Heroines, Kay Bailey Hutchison presents female pioneers in fields as varied as government, business, education and healthcare, who overcame the resistance and prejudice of their times and accomplished things that no woman–and sometimes no man –– had done before. Hutchison, a pioneer in her own right, became the first woman elected to the United States Senate from the State of Texas. </p><p> Interspersed with the stories of America's historic female leaders are stories of today's women whose successes are clearly linked to those predecessors. Would Sally Ride have been given the chance to orbit the earth had Amelia Earhart not flown solo across the Atlantic Ocean fifty years before? Had Clara Barton not nursed wounded soldiers on Civil War battlefields, aid may not have reached the millions it did while the Red Cross was in the hands of women like Elizabeth Dole and Bernadine Healy. Had Oveta Culp Hobby not been appointed the first Secretary of the Department of Health and Education by President Eisenhower, the country may have been deprived of such leaders as Secretary of State Madeline Albright and National Security Advisor Condoleeza Rice. </p><p> As a young girl, Senator Hutchison dreamed of an America where the qualifier "the first woman" had become obsolete. The profiles contained in American Heroines, illustrate how her dream is coming true, one courageous step at a time.</p>
Queens of the Conquest: England's Medieval Queens Book One
by Alison Weir

Language

English

Pages

551

Publication Date

September 26, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>In the first volume of an exciting new series, bestselling author Alison Weir brings the dramatic reigns of England’s medieval queens to life.</b><br /><br /> The lives of England’s medieval queens were packed with incident—love, intrigue, betrayal, adultery, and warfare—but their stories have been largely obscured by centuries of myth and omission. Now esteemed biographer Alison Weir provides a fresh perspective and restores these women to their rightful place in history.<br /><br /> Spanning the years from the Norman conquest in 1066 to the dawn of a new era in 1154, when Henry II succeeded to the throne and Eleanor of Aquitaine, the first Plantagenet queen, was crowned, this epic book brings to vivid life five women, including: Matilda of Flanders, wife of William the Conqueror, the first Norman king; Matilda of Scotland, revered as “the common mother of all England”; and Empress Maud, England’s first female ruler, whose son King Henry II would go on to found the Plantagenet dynasty. More than those who came before or after them, these Norman consorts were recognized as equal sharers in sovereignty. Without the support of their wives, the Norman kings could not have ruled their disparate dominions as effectively.<br /><br /> Drawing from the most reliable contemporary sources, Weir skillfully strips away centuries of romantic lore to share a balanced and authentic take on the importance of these female monarchs. What emerges is a seamless royal saga, an all-encompassing portrait of English medieval queenship, and a sweeping panorama of British history.<br /><br /> <b>Praise for <i>Queens of the Conquest</i><br /><br /></b>“Best-selling author [Alison] Weir pens another readable, well-researched English history, the first in a proposed four-volume series on England’s medieval queens. . . . Weir’s research skills and storytelling ability combine beautifully to tell a fascinating story supported by excellent historical research. Fans of her fiction and nonfiction will enjoy this latest work.”<b>—<i>Library Journal </i>(starred review)</b><br />  <br /> “Another sound feminist resurrection by a seasoned historian . . . Though Norman queens were largely unknowable, leave it to this prolific historical biographer to bring them to life. . . . As usual, Weir is meticulous in her research.”<b>—<i>Kirkus Reviews</i></b>
The Library Book
by Susan Orlean

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A REESE WITHERSPOON x HELLO SUNSHINE BOOK CLUB PICK</b><BR> <BR><b>A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR </b> * <b>A</b> <b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER and <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018</b><BR> <BR><b>“A constant pleasure to read…Everybody who loves books should check out <i>The Library Book</i>.” —<i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i></b><BR> <BR><b>“CAPTIVATING…DELIGHTFUL.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i> * “EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING.” —<i>The New York Times</i> * “MESMERIZING…RIVETING.” —<i>Booklist </i>(starred review)</b><BR> <BR><b>A dazzling love letter to a beloved institution—and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries—from the bestselling author hailed as a “national treasure” by <i>The</i> <i>Washington Post</i>.</b><BR><BR>On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?<BR> <BR> Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning <i>New Yorker </i>reporter and <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Library Book</i>, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.<BR> <BR> Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.<BR> <BR> Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, <i>The Library Book </i>is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.
Code Name: Lise: The True Story of the Woman Who Became WWII's Mo...
by Larry Loftis

Language

English

Pages

385

Publication Date

January 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>NATIONAL BESTSELLER<BR> Featured in <i>The</i> <i>New York Times</i>, <i>The</i> <i>Atlantic</i>, <i>Time</i>, New York <i>Newsday</i>, and on <i>Today</i>!</b><BR> <b>Best Nonfiction Books to Read in 2019—<i>Woman’s Day</i></b><BR> <b>The Best Nonfiction Books Coming Out This Year—<i>BookBub</i></b><BR> <b>“A nonfiction thriller.”—<i>The</i> <i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><BR> <BR><b>From nationally bestselling author of the “gripping” (Michael Connelly, #1 <i>New York Times </i>bestselling author) <i>Into the Lion’s Mouth </i>comes the extraordinary true story of Odette Sansom, the British spy who operated in occupied France and fell in love with her commanding officer during World War II—perfect for fans of <i>Unbroken</i>, <i>The Nightingale</i>, and <i>Code Girls</i>. </b><BR><BR>The year is 1942, and World War II is in full swing. Odette Sansom decides to follow in her war hero father’s footsteps by becoming an SOE agent to aid Britain and her beloved homeland, France. Five failed attempts and one plane crash later, she finally lands in occupied France to begin her mission. It is here that she meets her commanding officer Captain Peter Churchill.<BR> <BR> As they successfully complete mission after mission, Peter and Odette fall in love. All the while, they are being hunted by the cunning German secret police sergeant, Hugo Bleicher, who finally succeeds in capturing them. They are sent to Paris’s Fresnes prison, and from there to concentration camps in Germany where they are starved, beaten, and tortured. But in the face of despair, they never give up hope, their love for each other, or the whereabouts of their colleagues.<BR> <BR> In<i> </i><i>Code Name: Lise</i><i>, </i>Larry Loftis paints a portrait of true courage, patriotism, and love—of two incredibly heroic people who endured unimaginable horrors and degradations. He seamlessly weaves together the touching romance between Odette and Peter and the thrilling cat and mouse game between them and Sergeant Bleicher. With this amazing testament to the human spirit, Loftis proves once again that he is adept at writing “nonfiction that reads like a page-turning novel” (<i>Parade</i>).
D-Day Girls: The Spies Who Armed the Resistance, Sabotaged the Na...
by Sarah Rose

Language

English

Pages

372

Publication Date

April 23, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>NATIONAL BESTSELLER • The dramatic, untold true story of the extraordinary women recruited by Britain’s elite spy agency to help pave the way for Allied victory in World War II</b><br /><br /><b>“Gripping. Spies, romance, Gestapo thugs, blown-up trains, courage, and treachery (lots of treachery)—and all of it true.”—Erik Larson, author of <i>The Devil in the White City</i> and <i>Dead Wake</i></b> <br /><br />In 1942,<b> </b>the Allies were losing, Germany seemed unstoppable, and every able man in England was on the front lines. To “set Europe ablaze,” in the words of Winston Churchill, the Special Operations Executive (SOE) was forced to do something unprecedented: recruit women as spies. Thirty-nine answered the call, leaving their lives and families to become saboteurs in France. <br /><br />In <i>D-Day Girls</i>, Sarah Rose draws on recently de­classified files, diaries, and oral histories to tell the thrilling story of three of these remarkable women. There’s Andrée Borrel, a scrappy and streetwise Parisian who blew up power lines with the Gestapo hot on her heels; Odette Sansom, an unhappily married suburban mother who saw the SOE as her ticket out of domestic life and into a meaningful adventure; and Lise de Baissac, a fiercely independent member of French colonial high society and the SOE’s unflap­pable “queen.” Together, they destroyed train lines, ambushed Nazis, plotted prison breaks, and gathered crucial intelligence—laying the groundwork for the D-Day invasion that proved to be the turning point in the war.<br /><br />Rigorously researched and written with razor-sharp wit, <i>D-Day Girls </i>is an inspiring story for our own moment of resistance: a reminder of what courage—and the energy of politically animated women—can accomplish when the stakes seem incalculably high.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>D-Day Girls</i></b><br /><br />“Rigorously researched . . . [a] thriller in the form of a non-fiction book.”<b>—<i>Refinery29</i></b><br /><br />“Gripping history . . . thoroughly researched and written as smoothly as a good thriller, this is a mesmerizing story of creativity, perseverance, and astonishing heroism.”<b>—<i>Publishers Weekly</i> (starred review)</b> <br /><br />“The mission is this: Read <i>D-Day Girls</i> today. Not just for the spy flair—code names, aliases, and operating covers—but also because this history feels more relevant than ever, as an army of women and girls again find themselves in a fight for the common good.”<b>—Lily Koppel, author of <i>The Astronaut Wives Club</i></b>
The Queen Mother
by William Shawcross

Language

English

Pages

1096

Publication Date

October 21, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>The official and definitive biography of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, the most beloved British monarch of the twentieth century. Consort of King George VI, mother of Queen Elizabeth II, and grandmother of Prince Charles, Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon—the ninth of the Earl of Strathmore’s ten children—was born on August 4, 1900, and, certainly, no one could have imagined that her long life (she died in 2002) would come to reflect a changing nation over the course of an entire century. Vividly detailed, written with unrestricted access to her personal papers, letters, and diaries, this candid royal biography by William Shawcross is also a singular history of Britain in the twentieth century.</p>
Behind the Throne: A Domestic History of the British Royal Househ...
by Adrian Tinniswood

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>An upstairs/downstairs history of the British royal court, from the Middle Ages to the reign of Queen Elizabeth II</b><br /><br /> Monarchs: they're just like us. They entertain their friends and eat and worry about money. Henry VIII tripped over his dogs. George II threw his son out of the house. James I had to cut back on the alcohol bills.<br /><br /> In <i>Behind the Throne, </i>historian Adrian Tinniswood uncovers the reality of five centuries of life at the English court, taking the reader on a remarkable journey from one Queen Elizabeth to another and exploring life as it was lived by clerks and courtiers and clowns and crowned heads: the power struggles and petty rivalries, the tension between duty and desire, the practicalities of cooking dinner for thousands and of ensuring the king always won when he played a game of tennis.<br /><br /> A masterful and witty social history of five centuries of royal life, <i>Behind the Throne </i>offers a grand tour of England's grandest households.<br /><br /></div>

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