Categories

 > History > Social History

20,871 results were found

Sort by:

Incredible india: India:An idea
by Chanchal

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Incredible India:India,an idea
La liberazione della donna (Italian Edition)
by Anna Maria Mozzoni

Language

Italian

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<br /><br />"Onore a voi tutte, donne del progresso; che, trattando con gloria le arti e la penna, affermate col fatto l’attitudine e la capacità femminile!<br /><br />Possa il vostro nobile esempio scuotere dall’inerzia la massa neghittosa, e chiamarle sul volto il rossore dell’aver tollerato in silenzio una sí lunga servitù."<br />
History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II
by , And Matilda Joslyn Gage

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 23, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"In presenting to our readers, the second volume of the “History of Woman Suffrage,” we gladly return our thanks to the press for the many favorable notices we have received from leading journals, both in the old world and the new. The words of cordial approval from a large circle of friends, and especially from women well known in periodical literature, have been to us a constant stimulus during the toilsome months we have spent in gathering material for these pages. It was our purpose to have condensed the records of the last twenty years in a second volume, but so many new questions in regard to Citizenship, State rights, and National power, indirectly bearing on the political rights of women, grew out of the civil war, that the arguments and decisions in Congress and the Supreme Courts have combined to swell these pages beyond our most liberal calculations, with much valuable material that cannot be condensed nor ignored, making a third volume inevitable.By their active labors all through the great conflict, women learned that they had many interests outside the home. In the camp and hospital, and the vacant places at their firesides, they saw how intimately the interests of the State and the home were intertwined; that as war and all its concomitants were subjects of legislation, it was only through a voice in the laws that their efforts for peace could command consideration".
History of Odisha: (Ancient, Medieval & Modern)
by Sangram Keshari Rout

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
History of Odisha records its eventful days of yore with ineffaceable footprints on the sand of the fleeting time. Ancient Odisha, which attained enduring fame and indelible glory under its past names (Kalinga, Udra, Toshali, Dakshina Kosala, Mahakantara (great forest) and Utkal), dates back to hoary days of human civilization. The littoral State was noted, far and wide, for the heroic deeds, flourishing maritime trade and over-sea expansion of its inhabitants. They were pioneer founders of Indian colonies across the oceans. Gorgeous glimpses of its uncommon past are found in many epics including Mahabharat. Buddhist and Jain literature also have rich descriptions of bravery, patriotism and generosity of the people of ancient Kalinga. It is the soil of Odisha and supremely gallant sacrifices of its people that turned an inexorable barbaric Chandasoka to Dharmasoka amid the Kalinga war in 261 B.C. It is here in this soil; Asoka relinquished his expansionism and war adventures, took asylum in Buddhism and ultimately became its great patron. According to the Puranas 32 Kshetriya kings ruled over Kalinga after the Mahabharata War up to the time of Mahapadmananda who ascended the throne of Magadha in 362 B. C.
The Trial of the Bideford Witches
by Frank J. Gent

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The trial of the Bideford witches in 1682 although well-known has been little studied. Previous accounts have concentrated on reproducing the original sources mostly for their antiquarian and sensational value, and no attempt made to analyse and understand the events in their wider social and historical context.<br />The Bideford trial merits closer examination in several respects. Firstly, it came at the very end of the witch-hunting craze of 1550 to 1660. There were very few executions for witchcraft in England after the Restoration, and the Bideford witches were almost the last to be executed in England. By that time most witchcraft trials ended in acquittals; the circumstances in which such a retrogressive act could have taken place deserve careful study.<br />Secondly, the trial was exceptional in that it concerned events in an urban, even cosmopolitan, environment. Most studies of seventeenth-century witchcraft concentrate on village life; how did it occur in a thriving, bustling provincial town with a cultured, educated and wealthy elite? A third problem which needs to be studied is the apparent acquiescence of the victims in their fate. They appear to have made little or no attempt to deny the charges made against them either before or during their trial.<br />Finally, the trial gives us an extraordinary, exceptional and valuable insight into the lives and mentality of ordinary people at the close of the seventeenth century. We hear the very words they spoke, we can recapture the excitement of those distant events in a way no other source could provide.<br />
How I Filmed the War (Annotated)
by Geoffrey H. Malins

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
CONTENTS<br />PART I<br />* CHAPTER I<br />A FEW WORDS OF INTRODUCTION<br />* CHAPTER II<br />WITH THE BELGIANS AT RAMSCAPELLE<br />PAGE<br />I Reach the First Line Belgian Trenches--And become a Belgian Soldier for the Time Being--A Night Attack--An Adventure whilst Filming a Mitrailleuse Outpost--Among the Ruins of Ramscapelle--I Leave the Company and Lose my Way in the Darkness--A Welcome Light and a Long Sleep--How Little does the Public know of the Dangers and Difficulties a Film Operator has to Face 6<br />* CHAPTER III<br />WITH THE GOUMIERS AT LOMBARTZYDE<br />A Morning of Surprises--The German Positions Bombarded from the Sea--Filming the Goumiers in Action--How these Tenacious Fighters Prepare for Battle--Goumier Habits and Customs--I Take the Chief's Photograph for the First Time--And Afterwards take Food with Him--An Interesting and Fruitful Adventure Ends Satisfactorily 15<br />* CHAPTER IV<br />THE BATTLE OF THE SAND-DUNES<br />A Dangerous Adventure and What Came of It--A Race Across the Sand-dunes--And a Spill in a Shell-hole--The Fate of a Spy--A Battle in the Dunes--Of which I Secured Some Fine Films--A Collision with an Obstructive Mule 22<br />* CHAPTER V<br />UNDER HEAVY SHELL-FIRE<br />In a Trench Coat and Cap I again Run the Gauntlet--A Near Squeak--Looking for Trouble--I Nearly Find It--A Rough Ride and a Mud Bath--An Affair of Outposts--I Get Used to Crawling--Hot Work at the Guns--I am Reported Dead--But Prove Very Much Alive--And then Receive a Shock--A Stern Chase 30<br />* CHAPTER VI<br />AMONG THE SNOWS OF THE VOSGES<br />I Start for the Vosges--Am Arrested on the Swiss Frontier--And Released--But Arrested Again--And then Allowed to Go My Way--Filming in the Firing Zone--A Wonderful French Charge Over the Snow-clad Hills--I Take Big Risks--And Get a Magnificent Picture 40<br />PART II<br />* CHAPTER I<br />HOW I CAME TO MAKE OFFICIAL WAR PICTURES<br />I am Appointed an Official War Office Kinematographer--And Start for the Front Line Trenches--Filming the German Guns in Action--With the Canadians--Picturesque Hut Settlement Among the Poplars--"Hyde Park Corner"--Shaving by Candlelight in Six Inches of Water--Filming in Full View of the German Lines, 75 yards away--A Big Risk, but a Realistic Picture 51<br />* CHAPTER II<br />CHRISTMAS DAY AT THE FRONT<br />Leave-taking at Charing Cross--A Fruitless Search for Food on Christmas Eve--How Tommy Welcomed the Coming of the Festive Season--"Peace On Earth, Good Will To Men" to the Boom of the Big Guns--Filming the Guards' Division--And the Prince of Wales--Coming from a Christmas Service--This Year and Next 61<br />* CHAPTER III<br />I GET INTO A WARM CORNER<br />Boxing Day--But No Pantomime--Life in the Trenches--A Sniper at Work--Sinking a Mine Shaft--The Cheery Influence of an Irish Padre--A Cemetery Behind the Lines--Pathetic Inscriptions and Mementoes on Dead Heroes' Graves--I Get Into a Pretty Warm Corner--And Have Some Difficulty in Getting Out Again--But All's Well that Ends Well 65<br />* CHAPTER IV<br />THE BATTLEFIELD OF NEUVE CHAPELLE<br />A Visit to the Old German Trenches--Reveals a Scene of Horror that Defies Description--Dodging the Shells--I Lose the Handle of My Camera--And then Lose My Man--The Effect of Shell-fire on a Novice--In the Village of Neuve Chapelle--A Scene of Devastation--The Figure of the Lonely Christ 72<br />* CHAPTER V<br />FILMING THE PRINCE OF WALES<br />How I Made a "Hide-up"--And Secured a Fine Picture of the Prince Inspecting some Gun-pits--His Anxiety to Avoid the Camera--And His Subsequent Remarks--How a German Block-house was Blown to Smithereens--And the Way I Managed to Film it Under Fire 76<br />* CHAPTER VI<br />MY FIRST VISIT TO YPRES AND ARRAS<br />Greeted on Arrival in the Ruined City of Ypres by a Furious Fusillade--I Film the Cloth Hall and Cathedral, and Have a Narrow Escape--A Once Beautiful Town Now Little More Than a Heap of Ruins--Arras a City of the Dead--Its Cathedral Destroyed--But Cross and Crucifixes Unharmed 80<br />* CHAPTER VII<br />THE BATTLE OF ST. ELOI<br />.....
History of the Plague in England (Annotated)
by Daniel Defoe

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
INTRODUCTION.<br />The father of Daniel Defoe was a butcher in the parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, London. In this parish, probably, Daniel Defoe was born in 1661, the year after the restoration of Charles II. The boy's parents wished him to become a dissenting minister, and so intrusted his education to a Mr. Morton who kept an academy for the training of nonconformist divines. How long Defoe staid at this school is not known. He seems to think himself that he staid there long enough to become a good scholar; for he declares that the pupils were "made masters of the English tongue, and more of them excelled in that particular than of any school at that time." If this statement be true, we can only say that the other schools must have been very bad indeed. Defoe never acquired a really good style, and can in no true sense be called a "master of the English tongue."<br />Nature had gifted Defoe with untiring energy, a keen taste for public affairs, and a special aptitude for chicanery and intrigue. These were not qualities likely to advance him in the ministry, and he wisely refused to adopt that profession. With a young man's love for adventure and a dissenter's hatred for Roman Catholicism, he took part in the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion (1685) against James II. More fortunate than three of his fellow students, who were executed for their share in this affair, Defoe escaped the hue and cry that followed the battle of Sedgemoor, and after some months' concealment set up as a wholesale merchant in Cornhill. When James II. was deposed in 1688, and the Protestant William of Orange elected to the English throne, Defoe hastened to give in his allegiance to the new dynasty. In 1691 he published his first pamphlet, "A New Discovery of an Old Intrigue, a Satire leveled at Treachery and Ambition." This is written in miserable doggerel verse. That Defoe should have mistaken it for poetry, and should have prided himself upon it accordingly, is only a proof of how incompetent an author is to pass judgment upon what is good and what is bad in his own work.<br />In 1692 Defoe failed in business, probably from too much attention to politics, which were now beginning to engross more and more of his time and thoughts. His political attitude is clearly defined in the title of his next pamphlet, "The Englishman's Choice and True Interest: in the Vigorous Prosecution of the War against France, and serving K. William and Q. Mary, and acknowledging their Right." "K. William" was too astute a manager to neglect a writer who showed the capacity to become a dangerous opponent. Defoe was accordingly given the place of accountant to the commissioners of the glass duty (1694). From this time until William's death (1702), he had no more loyal and active servant than Defoe. Innumerable pamphlets bear tribute to his devotion to the King and his policy,--pamphlets written in an easy, swinging, good-natured style, with little imagination and less passion; pamphlets whose principal arguments are based upon a reasonable self-interest, and for the comprehension of which no more intellectual power is called for than Providence has doled out to the average citizen. Had Defoe lived in the nineteenth century, instead of in the seventeenth, he would have commanded a princely salary as writer for the Sunday newspaper, and as composer of campaign documents and of speeches for members of the House of Representatives.<br />In 1701 Defoe published his "True-born Englishman," a satire upon the English people for their stupid opposition to the continental policy of the King. This is the only metrical composition of prolific Daniel that has any pretensions to be called a poem. It contains some lines not unworthy to rank with those of Dryden at his second-best. For instance, the opening:--<br />"Wherever God erects a house of prayer, The Devil always builds a chapel there; And 'twill be found upon examination The latter <br />.......
A History of the Gipsies (Annotated): with Specimens of the Gipsy...
by Walter Simson

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
CONTENTS.[1]<br />PAGE EDITOR'S PREFACE 5<br />EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION 27<br />INTRODUCTION 55<br />CHAPTER. I. CONTINENTAL GIPSIES 69<br />II. ENGLISH GIPSIES 90<br />III. SCOTTISH GIPSIES, DOWN TO THE YEAR 1715 98<br />IV. LINLITHGOWSHIRE GIPSIES 123<br />V. FIFE AND STIRLINGSHIRE GIPSIES 140<br />VI. TWEED-DALE AND CLYDESDALE GIPSIES 185<br />VII. BORDER GIPSIES 236<br />VIII. MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE CEREMONIES 257<br />IX. LANGUAGE 281<br />X. PRESENT CONDITION AND NUMBER OF THE GIPSIES IN SCOTLAND 341<br />DISQUISITION ON THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF GIPSYDOM 371<br />INDEX 543<br />[1] The Contents of these Chapters will be found detailed in the Index, forming an epitome of the work, for reference, or studying the subject of the Gipsies.<br />Ever since entering Great Britain, about the year 1506, the Gipsies have been drawing into their body the blood of the ordinary inhabitants and conforming to their ways; and so prolific has the race been, that there cannot be less than 250,000 Gipsies of all castes, colours, characters, occupations, degrees of education, culture, and position in life, in the British Isles alone, and possibly double that number. There are many of the same race in the United States of America. Indeed, there have been Gipsies in America from nearly the first day of its settlement; for many of the race were banished to the plantations, often for very trifling offences, and sometimes merely for being by "habit and repute Egyptians." But as the Gipsy race leaves the tent, and rises to civilization, it hides its nationality from the rest of the world, so great is the prejudice against the name of Gipsy. In Europe and America together, there cannot be less than 4,000,000 Gipsies in existence. John Bunyan, the author of the celebrated Pilgrim's Progress, was one of this singular people, as will be conclusively shown in the present work. The philosophy of the existence of the Jews, since the dispersion, will also be discussed and established in it.<br />When the "wonderful story" of the Gipsies is told, as it ought to be told, it constitutes a work of interest to many classes of readers, being a subject unique, distinct from, and unknown to, the rest of the human family. In the present work, the race has been treated of so fully and elaborately, in all its aspects, as in a great measure to fill and satisfy the mind, instead of being, as heretofore, little better than a myth to the understanding of the most intelligent person.<br />The history of the Gipsies, when thus comprehensively treated, forms a study for the most advanced and cultivated mind, as well as for the youth whose intellectual and literary character is still to be formed; and furnishes, among other things, a system of science not too abstract in its nature, and having for its subject-matter the strongest of human feelings and sympathies. The work also seeks to raise the name of Gipsy out of the dust, where it now lies; while it has a very important bearing on the conversion of the Jews, the advancement of Christianity generally, and the development of historical and moral science.<br />NEW YORK, May 1st, 1866.<br /><br />EDITOR'S PREFACE.<br />This work should have been introduced to the world long ere now. The proper time to have brought it forward would have been about twenty years ago,[2] when the subject was nearly altogether new, and when popular feeling, in Scotland especially, ran strongly toward the body it treats of, owing to the celebrity of the writings of the great Scottish novelist, in which were depicted, with great truthfulness, some real characters of this wayward race. The inducements then to hazard a publication of it were great; for by bringing it out at that time, the author would have enjoyed, in some measure, the sunshine which the fame of that great luminary cast around all who, in any way, illustrated a subject on which he had written. But for Sir Walter Scott's advice--an <br />.....
Home Life in Colonial Days (Annotated)
by Alice Morse Earle

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Contents<br />Page<br />I. Homes of the Colonists 1<br />II. The Light of Other Days 32<br />III. The Kitchen Fireside 52<br />IV. The Serving of Meals 76<br />V. Food from Forest and Sea 108<br />VI. Indian Corn 126<br />VII. Meat and Drink 142<br />VIII. Flax Culture and Spinning 166<br />IX. Wool Culture and Spinning, with a Postscript on Cotton 187<br />X. Hand-Weaving 212<br />XI. Girls' Occupations 252<br />XII. Dress of the Colonists 281<br />XIII. Jack-knife Industries 300<br />XIV. Travel, Transportation, and Taverns 325<br />XV. Sunday in the Colonies 364<br />XVI. Colonial Neighborliness 388<br />XVII. Old-time Flower Gardens 421<br /><br />Home Life in Colonial Days<br />CHAPTER I<br />HOMES OF THE COLONISTS<br />When the first settlers landed on American shores, the difficulties in finding or making shelter must have seemed ironical as well as almost unbearable. The colonists found a land magnificent with forest trees of every size and variety, but they had no sawmills, and few saws to cut boards; there was plenty of clay and ample limestone on every side, yet they could have no brick and no mortar; grand boulders of granite and rock were everywhere, yet there was not a single facility for cutting, drawing, or using stone. These homeless men, so sorely in need of immediate shelter, were baffled by pioneer conditions, and had to turn to many poor expedients, and be satisfied with rude covering. In Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, and, possibly, other states, some reverted to an ancient form of shelter: they became cave-dwellers; caves were dug in the side of a hill, and lived in till the settlers could have time to chop down and cut up trees for log houses. Cornelis Van Tienhoven, Secretary of the Province of New Netherland, gives a description of these cave-dwellings, and says that "the wealthy and principal men in New England lived in this fashion for two reasons: first, not to waste time building; second, not to discourage poorer laboring people." It is to be doubted whether wealthy men ever lived in them in New England, but Johnson, in his Wonder-working Providence, written in 1645, tells of the occasional use of these "smoaky homes." They were speedily abandoned, and no records remain of permanent cave-homes in New England. In Pennsylvania caves were used by newcomers as homes for a long time, certainly half a century. They generally were formed by digging into the ground about four feet in depth on the banks or low cliffs near the river front. The walls were then built up of sods or earth laid on poles or brush; thus half only of the chamber was really under ground. If dug into a side hill, the earth formed at least two walls. The roofs were layers of tree limbs covered over with sod, or bark, or rushes and bark. The chimneys were laid of cobblestone or sticks of wood mortared with clay and grass. The settlers were thankful even for these poor shelters, and declared that they found them comfortable. By 1685 many families were still living in caves in Pennsylvania, for the Governor's Council then ordered the caves to be destroyed and filled in. Sometimes the settler used the cave for a cellar for the wooden house which he built over it.<br />These cave-dwellings were perhaps the poorest houses ever known by any Americans, yet pioneers, or poor, or degraded folk have used them for homes in America until far more recent days. In one of these miserable habitations of earth and sod in the town of Rutland, Massachusetts, were passed some of the early years of the girlhood of Madame Jumel, whose beautiful house on Washington Heights, New York, still stands to show the contrasts that can come in a single life.<br />The homes of the Indians were copied by the English, being ready adaptations of natural and plentiful resources. Wigwams in the South were of plaited rush or grass mats; of deerskins pinned on a frame; of tree boughs rudely piled into a cover, and in the far <br />....
The Hour and the Man, An Historical Romance (Annotated)
by Harriet Martineau

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

March 22, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
"And houses, too--the sugar-house, no doubt," said Margot, who had come out to look. "It burns too red to be canes only. Can it be at Latour's? That would keep Jean from coming.--It was the best supper I ever got ready for him."<br /><br />"Latour's is over that way," said Toussaint, pointing some distance further to the south-east. "But see! there is fire there, too! God have mercy!"<br /><br />He was silent, in mournful fear that he knew now too well the reason why Jean had not come, and the nature of the conversation Jean had desired to have with him. As he stood with folded arms looking from the one conflagration to the other, Genifrede clung to him trembling with terror. In a quarter of an hour another blaze appeared on the horizon; and soon after, a fourth.<br /><br />"The sky is on fire," cried Denis, in more delight than fear. "Look at the clouds!" And the clouds did indeed show, throughout their huge pile, some a mild flame colour, and others a hard crimson edge, as during a stormy sunset.<br /><br />"Alas! a<br />.....

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

Kind Reader Monthly Drawing (March 2017)

Congratulations to February 2017's winner Henry H. of New York, USA.