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The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels
by Jon Meacham

Language

English

Pages

372

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jon Meacham helps us understand the present moment in American politics and life by looking back at critical times in our history when hope overcame division and fear.</b><br /><br /> Our current climate of partisan fury is not new, and in <i>The Soul of America</i> Meacham shows us how what Abraham Lincoln called the “better angels of our nature” have repeatedly won the day. Painting surprising portraits of Lincoln and other presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, and Lyndon B. Johnson, and illuminating the courage of such influential citizen activists as Martin Luther King, Jr., early suffragettes Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt, civil rights pioneers Rosa Parks and John Lewis, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Army-McCarthy hearings lawyer Joseph N. Welch, Meacham brings vividly to life turning points in American history. He writes about the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the birth of the Lost Cause; the backlash against immigrants in the First World War and the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s; the fight for women’s rights; the demagoguery of Huey Long and Father Coughlin and the isolationist work of America First in the years before World War II; the anti-Communist witch-hunts led by Senator Joseph McCarthy; and Lyndon Johnson’s crusade against Jim Crow. Each of these dramatic hours in our national life have been shaped by the contest to lead the country to look forward rather than back, to assert hope over fear—a struggle that continues even now.<br /><br />While the American story has not always—or even often—been heroic, we have been sustained by a belief in progress even in the gloomiest of times. In this inspiring book, Meacham reassures us, “The good news is that we have come through such darkness before”—as, time and again, Lincoln’s better angels have found a way to prevail.<br /><b><br />Praise for <i>The Soul of America</i></b><br /><br />“Appalled by the ascendancy of Donald J. Trump, and shaken by the deadly white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville in 2017, Meacham returns to other moments in our history when fear and division seemed rampant. He wants to remind us that the current political turmoil is not unprecedented, that as a nation we have survived times worse than this. . . . Meacham tries to summon the better angels by looking back at when America truly has been great. He is effective as ever at writing history for a broad readership.”<b>—<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /><br />“This is a brilliant, fascinating, timely, and above all profoundly important book.”<b>—Walter Isaacson</b>
The Weight of Ink
by Rachel Kadish

Language

English

Pages

592

Publication Date

June 06, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>WINNER OF A NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD<BR /> A <I>USA TODAY</I> BESTSELLER<BR /><BR /> "A gifted writer, astonishingly adept at nuance, narration, and the politics of passion."—Toni Morrison</B><BR /><BR /> Set in London of the 1660s and of the early twenty-first century, <I>The Weight of Ink</I> is the interwoven tale of two women of remarkable intellect: Ester Velasquez, an emigrant from Amsterdam who is permitted to scribe for a blind rabbi, just before the plague hits the city; and Helen Watt, an ailing historian with a love of Jewish history. <BR />  <BR /> When Helen is summoned by a former student to view a cache of newly discovered seventeenth-century Jewish documents, she enlists the help of Aaron Levy, an American graduate student as impatient as he is charming, and embarks on one last project: to determine the identity of the documents' scribe, the elusive "Aleph."<BR />   <BR /> Electrifying and ambitious, <I>The Weight of Ink</I> is about women separated by centuries—and the choices and sacrifices they must make in order to reconcile the life of the heart and mind.  </DIV>
Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textboo...
by James W. Loewen

Language

English

Pages

604

Publication Date

July 17, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“Every teacher, every student of history, every citizen should read this book. It is both a refreshing antidote to what has passed for history in our educational system and a one-volume education in itself.”<br /> —Howard Zinn<br /><br />A new edition of the national bestseller and American Book Award winner, with a new preface by the author</b> <p>Since its first publication in 1995, <em>Lies My Teacher Told Me</em> has become one of the most important—and successful—history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book also won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship and was heralded on the front page of the <em>New York Times</em> in the summer of 2006.</p> <p>For this new edition, Loewen has added a new preface that shows how inadequate history courses in high school help produce adult Americans who think Donald Trump can solve their problems, and calls out academic historians for abandoning the concept of truth in a misguided effort to be “objective.” </p> <p>What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the <em>San Francisco Chronicle</em> calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In <em>Lies My Teacher Told Me</em>, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students.</p>
The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld
by Chris Wiltz

Language

English

Pages

288

Publication Date

July 01, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>The “raunchy, hilarious, and thrilling” true story of the incomparable Norma Wallace, proprietor of a notorious 1920s New Orleans brothel (NPR). </B><BR /><BR /> Norma Wallace grew up fast. In 1916, at fifteen years old, she went to work as a streetwalker in New Orleans’ French Quarter. By the 1920s, she was a “landlady”—or, more precisely, the madam of what became one of the city’s most lavish brothels. It was frequented by politicians, movie stars, gangsters, and even the notoriously corrupt police force. But Wallace acquired more than just repeat customers. There were friends, lovers . . . and also enemies.<BR />  <BR /> Wallace’s romantic interests ran the gamut from a bootlegger who shot her during a fight to a famed bandleader to the boy next door, thirty-nine years her junior, who became her fifth husband. She knew all of the Crescent City’s dirty little secrets, and used them to protect her own interests—she never got so much as a traffic ticket, until the early 1960s, when District Attorney Jim Garrison decided to clean up vice and corruption. After a jail stay, Wallace went legitimate as successfully as she had gone criminal, with a lucrative restaurant business—but it was love that would undo her in the end.<BR />  <BR /><I>The Last Madam</I> combines original research with Wallace’s personal memoirs, bringing to life an era in New Orleans history rife with charm and decadence, resurrecting “a secret world, like those uncovered by Luc Sante and James Ellroy” (<I>Publishers Weekly</I>). It reveals the colorful, unforgettable woman who reigned as an underworld queen and “capture[s] perfectly the essential, earthy complexity of the most fascinating city on this continent” (Robert Olen Butler).<BR />  </DIV>
Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow
by Yuval Noah Harari

Language

English

Pages

456

Publication Date

February 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>NEW YORK TIMES</em> BESTSELLER </strong></p><p>Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed <em>New York Times</em> bestseller and international phenomenon <em>Sapiens</em>, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.</p><strong></strong><p>Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.</p><p>What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake?<em> Homo Deus</em> explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus.</p><p>With the same insight and clarity that made <em>Sapiens</em> an international hit and a <em>New York Times</em> bestseller, Harari maps out our future. </p>
Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviatio...
by Keith O'Brien

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

August 07, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>“<B>Riveting.</B>”<B> —<I>People</I></B><BR /><BR /> “<B>Mr. O'Brien . . . has recovered a fascinating chapter not just in feminism and aviation but in 20th-century American history.”</B> —<I><B>Wall Street Journal</B></I><BR /><BR /><B>The untold story of five women who fought to compete against men in the high-stakes national air races of the 1920s and 1930s — and won</B><BR />  <BR /> Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi‑day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed. Female pilots were more often ridiculed than praised for what the press portrayed as silly efforts to horn in on a manly, and deadly, pursuit. <I>Fly Girls</I> recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky.<BR /><BR /> O’Brien weaves together the stories of five remarkable women: Florence Klingensmith, a high‑school dropout who worked for a dry cleaner in Fargo, North Dakota; Ruth Elder, an Alabama divorcee; Amelia Earhart, the most famous, but not necessarily the most skilled; Ruth Nichols, who chafed at the constraints of her blue‑blood family’s expectations; and Louise Thaden, the mother of two young kids who got her start selling coal in Wichita. Together, they fought for the chance to race against the men — and in 1936 one of them would triumph in the toughest race of all.<BR />  <BR /> Like <I>Hidden Figures</I> and <I>Girls of Atomic City</I>, <I>Fly Girls</I> celebrates a little-known slice of history in which tenacious, trail-blazing women braved all obstacles to achieve greatness.</DIV>
Things That Matter: Three Decades of Passions, Pastimes and Polit...
by Charles Krauthammer

Language

English

Pages

416

Publication Date

October 22, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From America’s preeminent columnist, named by the </b><i><b>Financial Times</b> </i><b>the most influential commentator in the nation, the long-awaited collection of Charles Krauthammer’s essential, timeless writings.</b><br /><b>  </b><br /> A brilliant stylist known for an uncompromising honesty that challenges conventional wisdom at every turn, Krauthammer has for decades daz­zled readers with his keen insight into politics and government. His weekly column is a must-read in Washington and across the country. Now, finally, the best of Krauthammer’s intelligence, erudition and wit are collected in one volume.<br />  <br /> Readers will find here not only the country’s leading conservative thinker offering a pas­sionate defense of limited government, but also a highly independent mind whose views—on feminism, evolution and the death penalty, for example—defy ideological convention. <i>Things That Matter </i>also features several of Krautham­mer’s major path-breaking essays—on bioeth­ics, on Jewish destiny and on America’s role as the world’s superpower—that have pro­foundly influenced the nation’s thoughts and policies. And finally, the collection presents a trove of always penetrating, often bemused re­flections on everything from border collies to Halley’s Comet, from Woody Allen to Win­ston Churchill, from the punishing pleasures of speed chess to the elegance of the perfectly thrown outfield assist.<br />  <br /> With a special, highly autobiographical in­troduction in which Krauthammer reflects on the events that shaped his career and political philosophy, this indispensible chronicle takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the fashions and follies, the tragedies and triumphs, of the last three decades of American life.
The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women
by Kate Moore

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A<em> New York Times</em>, <em>USA Today, Wall Street Journal</em>, and Amazon Charts Bestseller!<br /> Emma Watson's Our Shared Shelf Bookclub Selection - May/June 2018</strong></p><p>"<strong>the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still</strong>."—NPR Books </p><p><em>The incredible true story of the women who fought America’s Undark danger</em></p><p>The Curies’ newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.</p><p>Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these “shining girls” are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.</p><p>But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women’s cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America’s early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers’ rights that will echo for centuries to come. </p><p>Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, <em>The Radium Girls</em> fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the “wonder” substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...</p>
Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"
by Zora Neale Hurston

Language

English

Pages

193

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>New York Times</em> Bestseller</strong></p><p><strong>“A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—New York Times</strong></p><p><strong>“One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison</strong></p><p><strong>“Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a <em>Maestrapiece</em>.”—Alice Walker</strong></p><p><strong>A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic <em>Their Eyes Were Watching God, </em>with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States.</strong></p><p>In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.</p><p>In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the <em>Clotilda</em>, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.</p><p>Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, <em>Barracoon</em> masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.</p>
Stalling for Time: My Life as an FBI Hostage Negotiator
by Gary Noesner

Language

English

Pages

242

Publication Date

September 21, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The FBI’s chief hostage negotiator recounts harrowing standoffs, including the Waco siege with David Koresh and the Branch Davidians, in a memoir that serves as a basis for the upcoming series <i>Waco</i>.</b><br /><br />In <i>Stalling for Time, </i>the FBI’s chief hostage negotiator takes readers on a harrowing tour through many of the most famous hostage crises in the history of the modern FBI, including the siege at Waco, the Montana Freemen standoff, and the D.C. sniper attacks. Having helped develop the FBI’s nonviolent communication techniques for achieving peaceful outcomes in tense situations, Gary Noesner offers a candid, fascinating look back at his years as an innovator in the ranks of the Bureau and a pioneer on the front lines. Whether vividly recounting showdowns with the radical Republic of Texas militia or clashes with colleagues and superiors that expose the internal politics of America’s premier law enforcement agency, <i>Stalling for Time</i> crackles with insight and breathtaking suspense. Case by case, minute by minute, it’s a behind-the-scenes view of a visionary crime fighter in action.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Stalling for Time</i></b><br /><br />“Riveting . . . the most in-depth and absorbing section is devoted to the 1993 siege near Waco, Texas.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br />“Captivating . . . an electrifying read . . . No Hollywood movie can top this story for thrills, suspense, or action.”<b><i>—New York Journal of Books</i></b><br />  <br /> “Certain to fascinate true crime readers . . . The compelling centerpiece of the book is Noesner’s analysis of ‘what went wrong at Waco’ with the Branch Davidians.”<b><i>—Publishers Weekly</i></b><br />  <br /> “An intense, immersive narrative . . . vicariously entertaining.”<b>—<i>Kirkus Reviews</i></b><br />  <br /> “Engrossing . . . The book is also an intimate history of contemporary American militia movements.”<b>—<i>New Republic</i></b>

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