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Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World
by Eric Metaxas

Language

English

Pages

494

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER<br /><br />“Metaxas is a scrupulous chronicler and has an eye for a good story. . . . full, instructive, and pacey.” <i>—The Washington Post</i><br /><br />From #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes a brilliant and inspiring biography of the most influential man in modern history, Martin Luther, in time for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation</b><br />  <br /> On All Hallow’s Eve in 1517, a young monk named Martin Luther posted a document he hoped would spark an academic debate, but that instead ignited a conflagration that would forever destroy the world he knew. Five hundred years after Luther’s now famous Ninety-five Theses appeared, Eric Metaxas, acclaimed biographer of the bestselling <i>Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy</i> and <i>Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery</i>, paints a startling portrait of the wild figure whose adamantine faith cracked the edifice of Western Christendom and dragged medieval Europe into the future. Written in riveting prose and impeccably researched, <i>Martin Luther</i> tells the searing tale of a humble man who, by bringing ugly truths to the highest seats of power, caused the explosion whose sound is still ringing in our ears. Luther’s monumental faith and courage gave birth to the ideals of liberty, equality, and individualism that today lie at the heart of all modern life.
The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought a...
by Victor Davis Hanson

Language

English

Pages

720

Publication Date

October 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><br />A definitive account of World War II by America's preeminent military historian</b><br /><br />World War II was the most lethal conflict in human history. Never before had a war been fought on so many diverse landscapes and in so many different ways, from rocket attacks in London to jungle fighting in Burma to armor strikes in Libya.<br /><br /><i>The Second World Wars </i>examines how combat unfolded in the air, at sea, and on land to show how distinct conflicts among disparate combatants coalesced into one interconnected global war. Drawing on 3,000 years of military history, Victor Davis Hanson argues that despite its novel industrial barbarity, neither the war's origins nor its geography were unusual. Nor was its ultimate outcome surprising. The Axis powers were well prepared to win limited border conflicts, but once they blundered into global war, they had no hope of victory.<br /><br />An authoritative new history of astonishing breadth, <i>The Second World Wars</i> offers a stunning reinterpretation of history's deadliest conflict.<br /><br /><br />
The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly...
by Lindsey Fitzharris

Language

English

Pages

284

Publication Date

October 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>"Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, bestselling author of </b><i style="font-weight: bold;">Dead Wake</i> <br /><b style="font-weight: bold;">A Top 10 Science Book of Fall 2017, <i>Publishers Weekly</i></b><br /><b style="font-weight: bold;">"Fascinating and shocking." —<i>Kirkus Reviews</i> (starred review)<br /></b><br />The gripping story of how Joseph Lister’s antiseptic method changed medicine forever</p><p>In <i style="">The Butchering Art</i>, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery on the eve of profound transformation. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These medical pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than their patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the deadly riddle and change the course of history. </p><p>Fitzharris dramatically recounts Lister’s discoveries in gripping detail, culminating in his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection—and could be countered by antiseptics. Focusing on the tumultuous period from 1850 to 1875, she introduces us to Lister and his contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and takes us through the grimy medical schools and dreary hospitals where they learned their art, the deadhouses where they studied anatomy, and the graveyards they occasionally ransacked for cadavers. </p><p>Eerie and illuminating, <i style="">The Butchering Art</i> celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.</p>
The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia
by Masha Gessen

Language

English

Pages

527

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD IN NONFICTION</b><br /><br /><b>The visionary journalist and bestselling biographer of Vladimir Putin reveals how, in the space of a generation, Russia surrendered to a more virulent and invincible new strain of autocracy. </b> <br /><br />Hailed for her “fearless indictment of the most powerful man in Russia” (<i>The</i> <i>Wall Street Journal</i>), award-winning journalist Masha Gessen is unparalleled in her understanding of the events and forces that have wracked her native country in recent times. In <i>The Future Is History</i>, she follows the lives of four people born at what promised to be the dawn of democracy. Each of them came of age with unprecedented expectations, some as the children and grandchildren of the very architects of the new Russia, each with newfound aspirations of their own—as entrepreneurs, activists, thinkers, and writers, sexual and social beings. <br /><br />Gessen charts their paths against the machinations of the regime that would crush them all, and against the war it waged on understanding itself, which ensured the unobstructed reemergence of the old Soviet order in the form of today’s terrifying and seemingly unstoppable mafia state. Powerful and urgent, <i>The Future Is History</i> is a cautionary tale for our time and for all time.
On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century
by Timothy Snyder

Language

English

Pages

130

Publication Date

February 28, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 <i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><br /><br />The Founding Fathers tried to protect us from the threat they knew, the tyranny that overcame ancient democracy. Today, our political order faces new threats, not unlike the totalitarianism of the twentieth century. We are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism.  Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience.
Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
by Mark Bowden

Language

English

Pages

608

Publication Date

June 06, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>New York Times</i> Bestseller</b><p><br /><br /><br /><br /><b>"An extraordinary feat of journalism . . . full of emotion and color."—Karl Marlantes, <i>Wall Street Journal</i></b><p><br /><br />The first battle book from Mark Bowden since his #1 <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>Black Hawk Down</i>, <i>Hue 1968</i> is the story of the centerpiece of the Tet Offensive and a turning point in the American War in Vietnam.<br /><br /><br /><br />In the early hours of January 31, 1968, the North Vietnamese launched over one hundred attacks across South Vietnam in what would become known as the Tet Offensive. The lynchpin of Tet was the capture of Hue, Vietnam?s intellectual and cultural capital, by 10,000 National Liberation Front troops who descended from hidden camps and surged across the city of 140,000. Within hours the entire city was in their hands save for two small military outposts. American commanders refused to believe the size and scope of the Front?s presence, ordering small companies of marines against thousands of entrenched enemy troops. After several futile and deadly days, Lieutenant Colonel Ernie Cheatham would finally come up with a strategy to retake the city, block by block and building by building, in some of the most intense urban combat since World War II.<p><br /><br /><br /><br />With unprecedented access to war archives in the U.S. and Vietnam and interviews with participants from both sides, Bowden narrates each stage of this crucial battle through multiple viewpoints. Played out over 24 days and ultimately costing 10,000 lives, the Battle of Hue was by far the bloodiest of the entire war. When it ended, the American debate was never again about winning, only about how to leave. <i>Hue 1968</i> is a gripping and moving account of this pivotal moment.
Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine
by Anne Applebaum

Language

English

Pages

496

Publication Date

October 10, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning <i>Gulag</i> and the National Book Award finalist <i>Iron Curtain</i>, a revelatory history of one of Stalin's greatest crimes—the consequences of which still resonate today</b><br /><br />In 1929 Stalin launched his policy of agricultural collectivization—in effect a second Russian revolution—which forced millions of peasants off their land and onto collective farms. The result was a catastrophic famine, the most lethal in European history. At least five million people died between 1931 and 1933 in the USSR. But instead of sending relief the Soviet state made use of the catastrophe to rid itself of a political problem. In <i>Red Famine</i>, Anne Applebaum argues that more than three million of those dead were Ukrainians who perished not because they were accidental victims of a bad policy but because the state deliberately set out to kill them.<br /><br />Applebaum proves what has long been suspected: after a series of rebellions unsettled the province, Stalin set out to destroy the Ukrainian peasantry. The state sealed the republic’s borders and seized all available food. Starvation set in rapidly, and people ate anything: grass, tree bark, dogs, corpses. In some cases, they killed one another for food. Devastating and definitive, <i>Red Famine</i> captures the horror of ordinary people struggling to survive extraordinary evil.<br /><br />Today, Russia, the successor to the Soviet Union, has placed Ukrainian independence in its sights once more. Applebaum’s compulsively readable narrative recalls one of the worst crimes of the twentieth century, and shows how it may foreshadow a new threat to the political order in the twenty-first.
The Dust Bowl and the 1936 North American Heat Wave: The History ...
by Charles River Editors

Language

English

Pages

86

Publication Date

November 02, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
*Includes pictures<br />*Includes contemporary accounts<br />*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading<br /><br />“People caught in their own yards grope for the doorstep. Cars come to a standstill, for no light in the world can penetrate that swirling murk…. The nightmare is deepest during the storms. But on the occasional bright day and the usual gray day we cannot shake from it. We live with the dust, eat it, sleep with it, watch it strip us of possessions and the hope of possessions." – Avis D. Carlson <br /><br />It is almost impossible to imagine today, but in the late 19th century and early 20th century, there were places where land was cheaper than food and more plentiful than water. During the homesteading period of the 1860s-1880s, the government typically offered land grants of 160 acres to any farmer who could get it cultivated within a certain amount of time. With that much land to make productive and a limited number of years to get it cleared and planted, men would do whatever it took to get their crops in. Of course, these farmers, trying to quickly carve working farms, were more concerned with speed than with the impact on the ground itself. Surviving each year itself was enough work; the future would have to worry about itself. <br /><br />While farmers were planting crops, the seeds were also being sown for a natural disaster once a severe drought hit the prairie land in the 1930s. Due to a lack of proper dryland farming methods, wind erosion and the drought combined to create horrific dust storms that devastated wide swathes of Great Plains and even reached cities on the East Coast like New York City and Washington, D.C. It’s estimated that the dust storms affected about 100 million acres during the decade, uprooting not just soil but tens of thousands of people as their farms and families suffered. <br /><br />With farms failing across vast portions of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico Colorado and Kansas, those who could no longer support themselves became migrants, moving to other states like California, but the country was still in the throes of the Great Depression. As a result, there was a unique class of suffering that was documented not only in pictures but in graphically realistic novels like John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Pictures of abandoned farms that looked like post-apocalyptic ghost towns helped drive the crisis home across the country, to the extent that the Dust Bowl is still well-known 80 years later. <br /><br />As if the destruction of the Dust Bowl wasn’t bad enough, conditions were exacerbated by a heat wave in 1936. Ironically, the weather early that year did not exactly suggest that heat would be a problem, as December 1935 was seasonably cold, and February 1936 was downright frigid. In fact, February was the coldest month in the nation’s history, with a number of cities recording record low temperatures. As a result, when the weather began to warm up in March and April, people breathed a sigh of relief, but it kept getting warmer, and rain ceased to fall in some areas. By May, there was a crisis building, even as people maintained hope that each rainstorm would end the heat wave. <br /><br />By the end of the summer, the heat wave had killed thousands across the nation, and it was still far from over. Humidity remained low, making the heat somewhat more bearable, but it exacerbated the nationwide drought that kept killing crops. The heat and drought became front page news that even President Roosevelt had to address on a regular basis. <br /><br />The Dust Bowl and the 1936 North American Heat Wave: The History of America’s Worst Natural Disasters at the Height of the Great Depression chronicles some of the toughest years in American history. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Dust Bowl and the 1936 heat wave like never before.
The Fear and the Freedom: How the Second World War Changed Us
by Keith Lowe

Language

English

Pages

579

Publication Date

October 24, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Bestselling historian Keith Lowe's <i>The Fear and the Freedom</i> looks at the astonishing innovations that sprang from WWII and how they changed the world.</b></p><p><i>The Fear and the Freedom</i> is Keith Lowe’s follow-up to <i>Savage Continent</i>. While that book painted a picture of Europe in all its horror as WWII was ending, <i>The Fear and the Freedom</i> looks at all that has happened since, focusing on the changes that were brought about because of WWII—simultaneously one of the most catastrophic and most innovative events in history. It killed millions and eradicated empires, creating the idea of human rights, and giving birth to the UN. It was because of the war that penicillin was first mass-produced, computers were developed, and rockets first sent to the edge of space. The war created new philosophies, new ways of living, new architecture: this was the era of Le Corbusier, Simone de Beauvoir and Chairman Mao. </p><p>But amidst the waves of revolution and idealism there were also fears of globalization, a dread of the atom bomb, and an unexpressed longing for a past forever gone. All of these things and more came about as direct consequences of the war and continue to affect the world that we live in today. <i>The Fear and the Freedom</i> is the first book to look at all of the changes brought about because of WWII. Based on research from five continents, Keith Lowe’s <i>The Fear and the Freedom</i> tells the very human story of how the war not only transformed our world but also changed the very way we think about ourselves.</p>
Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

450

Publication Date

March 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>#1 New York Times Bestseller<br /><br />From the bestselling author and master of narrative nonfiction comes the enthralling story of the sinking of the <i>Lusitania</i></b><br /><br />On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the <i>Lusitania</i> was one of the era’s great transatlantic “Greyhounds”—the fastest liner then in service—and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. <br /><br />Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of <i>Unterseeboot</i>-20, was happy to oblige. Meanwhile, an ultra-secret British intelligence unit tracked Schwieger’s U-boat, but told no one. As U-20 and the <i>Lusitania</i> made their way toward Liverpool, an array of forces both grand and achingly small—hubris, a chance fog, a closely guarded secret, and more—all converged to produce one of the great disasters of history.<br /><br /> It is a story that many of us think we know but don’t, and Erik Larson tells it thrillingly, switching between hunter and hunted while painting a larger portrait of America at the height of the Progressive Era. Full of glamour and suspense, <i>Dead Wake</i> brings to life a cast of evocative characters, from famed Boston bookseller Charles Lauriat to pioneering female architect Theodate Pope to President Woodrow Wilson, a man lost to grief, dreading the widening war but also captivated by the prospect of new love. <br /><br /> Gripping and important, <i>Dead Wake</i> captures the sheer drama and emotional power of a disaster whose intimate details and true meaning have long been obscured by history.

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