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Don't Read Poetry: A Book About How to Read Poems
by Stephanie Burt

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

May 21, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An award-winning poet offers a brilliant introduction to the joys--and challenges--of the genre</b><br />In <i>Don't Read Poetry</i>, award-winning poet and literary critic Stephanie Burt offers an accessible introduction to the seemingly daunting task of reading, understanding, and appreciating poetry. Burt dispels preconceptions about poetry and explains how poems speak to one another--and how they can speak to our lives. She shows readers how to find more poems once they have some poems they like, and how to connect the poetry of the past to the poetry of the present. Burt moves seamlessly from Shakespeare and other classics to the contemporary poetry circulated on Tumblr and Twitter. She challenges the assumptions that many of us make about "poetry," whether we think we like it or think we don't, in order to help us cherish--and distinguish among--individual poems.<br />A masterful guide to a sometimes confounding genre, <i>Don't Read Poetry</i> will instruct and delight ingénues and cognoscenti alike.
Queer Retrosexualities: The Politics of Reparative Return
by Nishant Shahani

Language

English

Pages

172

Publication Date

February 01, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Queer Retrosexualities: The Politics of ReparativeReturn examines the retrospective logic that informs contemporary queer thinking; specifically the narrative return to the 1950s in post-1990s queer and LGBT culture in the United States. The term “Queer Retrosexuality” marks the intersection between retrospective thinking and queerness—to illustrate not only how to “queer” retrospection, but also how retrospection, in some senses can be thought of as always already queer. This book examines the historical possibilities that inform the narrative return to the 1950s in queer cultural and literary productions such as Samuel Delany’s The Motion of Light in Water, Todd Haynes’s Far from Heaven, Sarah Schulman’s Shimmer, and Mark Merlis’s American Studies—all texts that return to a traumatic past marked by shame, exile, and persecution. Queer Retrosexualities inquires into what motivates the return in these texts to a historical moment informed by the bruises and wounds of history; but more importantly, it poses the question of how such a turn backwards could be theorized as reparative or even hopeful. This book shows how the framework of queer retrospection offers new ways of understanding history and culture, of reformulating disciplines and institutions, and of rethinking traditional modes of political activism and knowledge production. Even while it seems counterproductive to return to a historical moment that is marked by the persecution of sexual and racial minorities, the book examines how a shared feeling of relationality and community produced by the exile of shame shapes the political value of queer retrosexualities. The retrospective return to the 1950s allows queer thinking to move away from the commodification of queer culture in the present that masquerades as progress. Thus, the book theorizes how traumatic history becomes a valuable resource for the political project of assembling collective memory as the base materials for imagining a different—and more queer—future.
Queer: A Graphic History (Introducing...)
by Meg-John Barker

Language

English

Pages

176

Publication Date

September 08, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>'Queer: A Graphic History Could Totally Change the Way You Think About Sex and Gender' <i>Vice</i></b><br /><br /><br /><br />Activist-academic Meg-John Barker and cartoonist Julia Scheele illuminate the histories of queer thought and LGBTQ+ action in this groundbreaking non-fiction graphic novel.<br /><br /><br /><br />From identity politics and gender roles to privilege and exclusion, Queer explores how we came to view sex, gender and sexuality in the ways that we do; how these ideas get tangled up with our culture and our understanding of biology, psychology and sexology; and how these views have been disputed and challenged.<br /><br /><br /><br />Along the way we look at key landmarks which shift our perspective of what’s ‘normal’ – Alfred Kinsey’s view of sexuality as a spectrum, Judith Butler’s view of gendered behaviour as a performance, the play Wicked, or moments in Casino Royale when we’re invited to view James Bond with the kind of desiring gaze usually directed at female bodies in mainstream media. <br /><br /><br /><br />Presented in a brilliantly engaging and witty style, this is a unique portrait of the universe of queer thinking.
Transgender 101: A Simple Guide to a Complex Issue
by Nicholas Teich

Language

English

Pages

194

Publication Date

March 13, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Written by a social worker, popular educator, and member of the transgender community, this well-rounded resource combines an accessible portrait of transgenderism with a rich history of transgender life and its unique experiences of discrimination. Chapters introduce transgenderism and its psychological, physical, and social processes. They describe the coming out process and its effect on family and friends, the relationship between sexual orientation, and gender and the differences between transsexualism and lesser-known types of transgenderism. The volume covers the characteristics of Gender Identity Disorder/Gender Dysphoria and the development of the transgender movement. Each chapter explains how transgender individuals handle their gender identity, how others view it within the context of non-transgender society, and how the transitioning of genders is made possible. Featuring men who become women, women who become men, and those who live in between and beyond traditional classifications, this book is written for students, professionals, friends, and family members.
Regarding Sedgwick: Essays on Queer Culture and Critical Theory
by Routledge

Language

English

Pages

290

Publication Date

August 21, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick is one of the most important figures in the history of modern gender studies. This book, which features an interview with Sedgwick, is a collection of new essays by established scholars
Daemon Voices: On Stories and Storytelling
by Philip Pullman

Language

English

Pages

489

Publication Date

September 18, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From the internationally best-selling author of the <i>His Dark Materials</i> trilogy, a spellbinding journey into the secrets of his art--the narratives that have shaped his vision, his experience of writing, and the keys to mastering the art of storytelling.</b><br /><br />One of the most highly acclaimed and best-selling authors of our time now gives us a book that charts the history of his own enchantment with story--from his own books to those of Blake, Milton, Dickens, and the Brothers Grimm, among others--and delves into the role of story in education, religion, and science. At once personal and wide-ranging, <i>Daemon Voices</i> is both a revelation of the writing mind and the methods of a great contemporary master, and a fascinating exploration of storytelling itself.
Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twent...
by Lillian Faderman

Language

English

Pages

404

Publication Date

February 21, 2012

Product Description
Customer Reviews
As Lillian Faderman writes, there are "no constants with regard to lesbianism," except that lesbians prefer women. In this groundbreaking book, she reclaims the history of lesbian life in twentieth-century America, tracing the evolution of lesbian identity and subcultures from early networks to more recent diverse lifestyles. She draws from journals, unpublished manuscripts, songs, media accounts, novels, medical literature, pop culture artifacts, and oral histories by lesbians of all ages and backgrounds, uncovering a narrative of uncommon depth and originality.
What Is the Grass: Walt Whitman in My Life
by Mark Doty

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

April 14, 2020

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Effortlessly blending biography, criticism, and memoir, National Book Award–winning poet and best- selling memoirist Mark Doty explores his personal quest for Walt Whitman.</strong></p><br /><p>Mark Doty has always felt haunted by Walt Whitman’s bold, new American voice, and by his equally radical claims about body and soul and what it means to be a self. In <em>What Is the Grass</em>, Doty—a poet, a lover of men, a New Yorker, and an American—keeps company with Whitman and his mutable, landmark work, <em>Leaves of Grass</em>, tracing the resonances between his own experience and the legendary poet’s life and work.</p><br /><p><em>What is it, then, between us?</em> Whitman asks. Doty’s answer is to explore spaces tied to Whitman’s life and spaces where he finds the poet’s ghost, meditating on desire, love, and the mysterious wellsprings of the poet’s enduring work. How does a voice survive death? <em>What Is the Grass</em> is a conversation across time and space, a study of the astonishment one poet finds in the accomplishment of another, and an attempt to grasp Whitman’s deeply hopeful vision of humanity.</p>
February House: The Story of W. H. Auden, Carson McCullers, Jane...
by Sherill Tippins

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

July 26, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An “irresistible” account of a little-known literary salon and creative commune in 1940s Brooklyn (<i>The Washington Post Book World</i>).</b><br />  <br /> A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year<br />  <br /><i>February House</i> is the true story of an extraordinary experiment in communal living, one involving young but already iconic writers—and America’s best-known burlesque performer—in a house at 7 Middagh Street in Brooklyn. It was a fevered yearlong party, fueled by the appetites of youth and a shared sense of urgency to take action as artists in the months before the country entered World War II.<br />  <br /> In spite of the sheer intensity of life at 7 Middagh, the house was for its residents a creative crucible. Carson McCullers’s two masterpieces, <i>The Member of the Wedding</i> and <i>The Ballad of the Sad Cafe</i>, were born, bibulously, in Brooklyn. Gypsy Rose Lee, workmanlike by day, party girl by night, wrote her book <i>The G-String Murders</i> in her Middagh Street bedroom. W. H. Auden—who, along with Benjamin Britten, was being excoriated back in England for absenting himself from the war—presided over the house like a peevish auntie, collecting rent money and dispensing romantic advice. And yet all the while, he was composing some of the most important work of his career.<br />  <br /> Enlivened by primary sources and an unforgettable story, this tale of daily life at the most fertile and improbable live-in salon of the twentieth century comes from the acclaimed author of <i>Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York’s Legendary Chelsea Hotel</i>.<br />  <br /> “Brimming with information . . . The personalities she depicts [are] indelibly drawn.” —<i>Los Angeles Times Book Review</i><br />  <br /> “Magnificent . . . Not to mention funny and raunchy.” —<i>The Seattle Times</i>
Me and My House: James Baldwin's Last Decade in France
by Magdalena J. Zaborowska

Language

English

Pages

408

Publication Date

March 29, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The last sixteen years of James Baldwin's life (1971–87) unfolded in a village in the South of France, in a sprawling house nicknamed “Chez Baldwin.” In <i>Me and My House</i> Magdalena J. Zaborowska employs Baldwin’s home space as a lens through which to expand his biography and explore the politics and poetics of blackness, queerness, and domesticity in his complex and underappreciated later works. Zaborowska shows how the themes of dwelling and black queer male sexuality in <i>The Welcome Table</i>, <i>Just above My Head</i>, and <i>If Beale Street Could Talk</i> directly stem from Chez Baldwin's influence on the writer. The house was partially torn down in 2014. Accessible, heavily illustrated, and drawing on interviews with Baldwin's friends and lovers, unpublished letters, and manuscripts, <i>Me and My House</i> offers new insights into Baldwin's life, writing, and relationships, making it essential reading for all students, scholars, and fans of Baldwin.

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