Categories

 > Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender eBooks > Politics

1,160 results were found

Sort by:

The Truths We Hold: An American Journey
by Kamala Harris

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

January 08, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>From one of America's most inspiring political leaders, a book about the core truths that unite us, and the long struggle to discern what those truths are and how best to act upon them, in her own life and across the life of our country.</b><br /><br />Senator Kamala Harris's commitment to speaking truth is informed by her upbringing. The daughter of immigrants, she was raised in an Oakland, California community that cared deeply about social justice; her parents--an esteemed economist from Jamaica and an admired cancer researcher from India--met as activists in the civil rights movement when they were graduate students at Berkeley. Growing up, Harris herself never hid her passion for justice, and when she became a prosecutor out of law school, a deputy district attorney, she quickly established herself as one of the most innovative change agents in American law enforcement. She progressed rapidly to become the elected District Attorney for San Francisco, and then the chief law enforcement officer of the state of California as a whole. Known for bringing a voice to the voiceless, she took on the big banks during the foreclosure crisis, winning a historic settlement for California's working families. Her hallmarks were applying a holistic, data-driven approach to many of California's thorniest issues, always eschewing stale "tough on crime" rhetoric as presenting a series of false choices. Neither "tough" nor "soft" but <i>smart</i> on crime became her mantra. Being smart means learning the truths that can make us better as a community, and supporting those truths with all our might. That has been the pole star that guided Harris to a transformational career as the top law enforcement official in California, and it is guiding her now as a transformational United States Senator, grappling with an array of complex issues that affect her state, our country, and the world, from health care and the new economy to immigration, national security, the opioid crisis, and accelerating inequality. <br /><br />By reckoning with the big challenges we face together, drawing on the hard-won wisdom and insight from her own career and the work of those who have most inspired her, Kamala Harris offers in THE TRUTHS WE HOLD a master class in problem solving, in crisis management, and leadership in challenging times. Through the arc of her own life, on into the great work of our day, she communicates a vision of shared struggle, shared purpose, and shared values. In a book rich in many home truths, not least is that a relatively small number of people work very hard to convince a great many of us that we have less in common than we actually do, but it falls to us to look past them and get on with the good work of living our common truth. When we do, our shared effort will continue to sustain us and this great nation, now and in the years to come.
Diabolical: How Pope Francis Has Betrayed Clerical Abuse Victims ...
by Milo Yiannopoulos

Language

English

Pages

118

Publication Date

October 30, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>MILO YIANNOPOULOS HAS EXPERIENCED THE MORAL DECAY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH FIRST-HAND. NOW HE WANTS TO FIX IT--STARTING WITH POPE FRANCIS.</b><br /><br />In DIABOLICAL, Milo Yiannopoulos levels his critical eye and legendarily caustic wit at the Catholic Church, an institution he reveres but which, under the leadership of a "Lavender Mafia" of left-wing gay bishops, has become shambolic and depraved. Yes, there really is a gay mafia. And yes, their outfits are fabulous.<div><br /><div></div><div>Who is the real Pope Francis? And can the Church survive him? Milo Yiannopoulos traces the origins of the Church's descent into sin and shame, pointing the finger at left-wing reformers, trendy progressive bishops, gay clergy, and ultimately, Francis himself. <br /><br />The Catholic Church hasn't had a crisis like this since the Reformation. It won't survive unless it learns how to talk to men again, sets aside transitory political nostrums like environmentalism and identity politics, and gets back to worshiping Almighty God.</div></div>
Heart Berries: A Memoir
by Terese Marie Mailhot

Language

English

Pages

140

Publication Date

February 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER<br /><br />Selected by Emma Watson as the Our Shared Shelf Book Club Pick for March/April 2018<br /><br /><br />A <i>New York Times</i> Editor's Choice<br /><br />Finalist for the Governor General's Literary Award for English-Language Nonfiction<br /><br />A Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection<br /><br /><br /><br />"A sledgehammer. . . . Her experiments with structure and language . . . are in the service of trying to find new ways to think about the past, trauma, repetition and reconciliation, which might be a way of saying a new model for the memoir." —Parul Sehgal, <i>The New York Times</i><br /><br /><br /><br /><b>"<i>Heart Berries</i> by Terese Mailhot is an astounding memoir in essays. Here is a wound. Here is need, naked and unapologetic. Here is a mountain woman, towering in words great and small... What Mailhot has accomplished in this exquisite book is brilliance both raw and refined." —Roxane Gay, author of <i>Hunger</i></b><br /><br /><br /><br /></b><br /><i>Heart Berries</i> is a powerful, poetic memoir of a woman's coming of age on the Seabird Island Band in the Pacific Northwest. Having survived a profoundly dysfunctional upbringing only to find herself hospitalized and facing a dual diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder and bipolar II disorder; Terese Marie Mailhot is given a notebook and begins to write her way out of trauma. The triumphant result is <i>Heart Berries</i>, a memorial for Mailhot's mother, a social worker and activist who had a thing for prisoners; a story of reconciliation with her father—an abusive drunk and a brilliant artist—who was murdered under mysterious circumstances; and an elegy on how difficult it is to love someone while dragging the long shadows of shame.<br /><br />Mailhot trusts the reader to understand that memory isn't exact, but melded to imagination, pain, and what we can bring ourselves to accept. Her unique and at times unsettling voice graphically illustrates her mental state. As she writes, she discovers her own true voice, seizes control of her story, and, in so doing, reestablishes her connection to her family, to her people, and to her place in the world.<br /><br /><br /><br /><b>"I am quietly reveling in the profundity of Mailhot’s deliberate transgression in <i>Heart Berries</i> and its perfect results. I love her suspicion of words. I have always been terrified and in awe of the power of words – but Mailhot does not let them silence her in <i>Heart Berries</i>. She finds the purest way to say what she needs to say... [T]he writing is so good it’s hard not to temporarily be distracted from the content or narrative by its brilliance...Perhaps, because this author so generously allows us to be her witness, we are somehow able to see ourselves more clearly and become better witnesses to ourselves." —Emma Watson, Official March/April selection for Our Shared Shelf<br /><br /><br /><br /><b>Named One of the Most Anticipated Books of 2018 by:<br /><br />Goodreads<br /><br /><i>Esquire</i><br /><br /><i>Entertainment Weekly</i><br /><br /><i>ELLE</i><br /><br /><i>Cosmopolitan</i><br /><br /><i>Huffington Post</i><br /><br /><i>B*tch</i><br /><br /><i>NYLON</i><br /><br />Buzzfeed<br /><br />Bustle<br /><br /><i>The Rumpus</i><br /><br />The New York Public Library</b>
What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our...
by Michael Eric Dyson

Language

English

Pages

306

Publication Date

June 05, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Named a 2018 Notable Work of Nonfiction by The Washington Post NOW A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Winner, The 2018 Southern Book Prize NAMED A BEST/MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK OF 2018 BY: Chicago Tribune • Time • Publisher's Weekly A stunning follow up to New York Times bestseller Tears We Cannot Stop The Washington Post: "Passionately written." Chris Matthews, MSNBC: "A beautifully written book." Shaun King: “I kid you not–I think it’s the most important book I’ve read all year...” Harry Belafonte: “Dyson has finally written the book I always wanted to read...a tour de force.” Joy-Ann Reid: A work of searing prose and seminal brilliance... Dyson takes that once in a lifetime conversation between black excellence and pain and the white heroic narrative, and drives it right into the heart of our current politics and culture, leaving the reader reeling and reckoning." Robin D. G. Kelley: “Dyson masterfully refracts our present racial conflagration... he reminds us that Black artists and intellectuals bear an awesome responsibility to speak truth to power." President Barack Obama: "Everybody who speaks after Michael Eric Dyson pales in comparison.” In 2015 BLM activist Julius Jones confronted Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton with an urgent query: “What in your heart has changed that’s going to change the direction of this country?” “I don’t believe you just change hearts,” she protested. “I believe you change laws.” The fraught conflict between conscience and politics – between morality and power – in addressing race hardly began with Clinton. An electrifying and traumatic encounter in the sixties crystallized these furious disputes. In 1963 Attorney General Robert Kennedy sought out James Baldwin to explain the rage that threatened to engulf black America. Baldwin brought along some friends, including playwright Lorraine Hansberry, psychologist Kenneth Clark, and a valiant activist, Jerome Smith. It was Smith’s relentless, unfiltered fury that set Kennedy on his heels, reducing him to sullen silence. Kennedy walked away from the nearly three-hour meeting angry – that the black folk assembled didn’t understand politics, and that they weren’t as easy to talk to as Martin Luther King. But especially that they were more interested in witness than policy. But Kennedy’s anger quickly gave way to empathy, especially for Smith. “I guess if I were in his shoes…I might feel differently about this country.” Kennedy set about changing policy – the meeting having transformed his thinking in fundamental ways. There was more: every big argument about race that persists to this day got a hearing in that room. Smith declaring that he’d never fight for his country given its racist tendencies, and Kennedy being appalled at such lack of patriotism, tracks the disdain for black dissent in our own time. His belief that black folk were ungrateful for the Kennedys’ efforts to make things better shows up in our day as the charge that black folk wallow in the politics of ingratitude and victimhood. The contributions of black queer folk to racial progress still cause a stir. BLM has been accused of harboring a covert queer agenda. The immigrant experience, like that of Kennedy – versus the racial experience of Baldwin – is a cudgel to excoriate black folk for lacking hustle and ingenuity. The questioning of whether folk who are interracially partnered can authentically communicate black interests persists. And we grapple still with the responsibility of black intellectuals and artists to bring about social change. What Truth Sounds Like exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy – of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. The future of race and democracy hang in the balance.
The Most Dangerous Branch: Inside the Supreme Court's Assault on ...
by David A. Kaplan

Language

English

Pages

426

Publication Date

September 04, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>In the bestselling tradition of <i>The Nine</i> and <i>The Brethren</i>, <i>The Most Dangerous Branch</i> takes us inside the secret world of the Supreme Court. David A. Kaplan, the former legal affairs editor of Newsweek, shows how the justices subvert the role of the other branches of government—and how we’ve come to accept it at our peril.</b><br /><br /> With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Court has never before been more central in American life. It is the nine justices who too often now decide the controversial issues of our time—from abortion and same-sex marriage, to gun control, campaign finance and voting rights. The Court is so crucial that many voters in 2016 made their choice based on whom they thought their presidential candidate would name to the Court. Donald Trump picked Neil Gorsuch—the key decision of his new administration. The next justice—replacing Anthony Kennedy—will be even more important, holding the swing vote over so much social policy. Is that really how democracy is supposed to work?<br />  <br /> Based on exclusive interviews with the justices and dozens of their law clerks, Kaplan provides fresh details about life behind the scenes at the Court – Clarence Thomas’s simmering rage, Antonin Scalia’s death, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s celebrity, Breyer Bingo, the petty feuding between Gorsuch and the chief justice, and what John Roberts thinks of his critics.<br /> <b> </b><br /> Kaplan presents a sweeping narrative of the justices’ aggrandizement of power over the decades – from <i>Roe v. Wade</i> to <i>Bush v. Gore</i> to <i>Citizens United</i>, to rulings during the 2017-18 term. But the arrogance of the Court isn’t partisan: Conservative and liberal justices alike are guilty of overreach. Challenging conventional wisdom about the Court’s transcendent power, <i>The Most Dangerous Branch</i> is sure to rile both sides of the political aisle.
Shortest Way Home: One Mayor's Challenge and a Model for America'...
by Pete Buttigieg

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

February 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A mayor’s inspirational story of a Midwest city that has become nothing less than a blueprint for the future of American renewal.</strong></p><br /><p>Once described by the <em>Washington Post</em> as “the most interesting mayor you’ve never heard of,” Pete Buttigieg, the thirty-six-year-old Democratic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has improbably emerged as one of the nation’s most visionary politicians. First elected in 2011, Buttigieg left a successful business career to move back to his hometown, previously tagged by Newsweek as a “dying city,” because the industrial Midwest beckoned as a challenge to the McKinsey-trained Harvard graduate. Whether meeting with city residents on middle-school basketball courts, reclaiming abandoned houses, confronting gun violence, or attracting high-tech industry, Buttigieg has transformed South Bend into a shining model of urban reinvention.</p><br /><p>While Washington reels with scandal, <em>Shortest Way Home</em> interweaves two once-unthinkable success stories: that of an Afghanistan veteran who came out and found love and acceptance, all while in office, and that of a Rust Belt city so thoroughly transformed that it shatters the way we view America’s so-called flyover country.</p>
The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics
by Mark Lilla

Language

English

Pages

165

Publication Date

August 15, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>From one of the most internationally admired political thinkers, a controversial polemic on the failures of identity politics and what comes next for the left — in America and beyond.</strong></p><p>Following the shocking results of the US election of 2016, public intellectuals across the globe offered theories and explanations, but few were met with such vitriol, panic, and debate as Mark Lilla’s. <em>The Once and Future Liberal </em>is a passionate plea to liberals to turn from the divisive politics of identity and develop a vision of the future that can persuade all citizens that they share a common destiny.</p><p>Driven by a sincere desire to protect society’s most vulnerable, the left has unwittingly balkanized the electorate, encouraged self-absorption rather than solidarity, and invested its energies in social movements rather than party politics. Identity-focused individualism has insidiously conspired with amoral economic individualism to shape an electorate with little sense of a shared future and near-contempt for the idea of the common good.</p><p>Now is the time to re-build a sense of common feeling and purpose, and a sense of duty to one another. A fiercely argued, important book, enlivened by acerbic wit and erudition, <em>The Once and Future Liberal </em>is essential reading for our times.</p>
Ravensbruck: Life and Death in Hitler's Concentration Camp for Wo...
by Sarah Helm

Language

English

Pages

746

Publication Date

March 31, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A masterly and moving account of the most horrific hidden atrocity of World War II: Ravensbrück, the only Nazi concentration camp built for women</b><br />  <br />On a sunny morning in May 1939 a phalanx of 867 women—housewives, doctors, opera singers, politicians, prostitutes—was marched through the woods fifty miles north of Berlin, driven on past a shining lake, then herded in through giant gates. Whipping and kicking them were scores of German women guards.<br />      Their destination was Ravensbrück, a concentration camp designed specifically for women by Heinrich Himmler, prime architect of the Holocaust. By the end of the war 130,000 women from more than twenty different European countries had been imprisoned there; among the prominent names were Geneviève de Gaulle, General de Gaulle’s niece, and Gemma La Guardia Gluck, sister of the wartime mayor of New York. <br />     Only a small number of these women were Jewish; Ravensbrück was largely a place for the Nazis to eliminate other inferior beings—social outcasts, Gypsies, political enemies, foreign resisters, the sick, the disabled, and the “mad.” Over six years the prisoners endured beatings, torture, slave labor, starvation, and random execution. In the final months of the war, Ravensbrück became an extermination camp. Estimates of the final death toll by April 1945 have ranged from 30,000 to 90,000.<br />     For decades the story of Ravensbrück was hidden behind the Iron Curtain, and today it is still little known. Using testimony unearthed since the end of the Cold War and interviews with survivors who have never talked before, Sarah Helm has ventured into the heart of the camp, demonstrating for the reader in riveting detail how easily and quickly the unthinkable horror evolved. <br />     Far more than a catalog of atrocities, however, <i>Ravensbrück </i>is also a compelling account of what one survivor called “the heroism, superhuman tenacity, and exceptional willpower to survive.” For every prisoner whose strength failed, another found the will to resist through acts of self-sacrifice and friendship, as well as sabotage, protest, and escape. <br />     While the core of this book is told from inside the camp, the story also sheds new light on the evolution of the wider genocide, the impotence of the world to respond, and Himmler’s final attempt to seek a separate peace with the Allies using the women of Ravensbrück as a bargaining chip. Chilling, inspiring, and deeply unsettling, <i>Ravensbrück</i> is a groundbreaking work of historical investigation. With rare clarity, it reminds us of the capacity of humankind both for bestial cruelty and for courage against all odds.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
The Remarkable Rise of Transgender Rights
by , Daniel C. Lewis

Language

English

Pages

440

Publication Date

October 17, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><br /><p>While medical identification and treatment of gender dysphoria have existed for decades, the development of transgender as a “collective political identity” is a recent construct. Over the past twenty-five years, the transgender movement has gained statutory nondiscrimination protections at the state and local levels, hate crimes protections in a number of states, inclusion in a federal law against hate crimes, legal victories in the courts, and increasingly favorable policies in bureaucracies at all levels. It has achieved these victories despite the relatively small number of trans people and despite the widespread discrimination, poverty, and violence experienced by many in the transgender community. This is a remarkable achievement in a political system where public policy often favors those with important resources that the transgender community lacks: access, money, and voters. <i>The Remarkable Rise of Transgender Rights</i> explains the growth of the transgender rights movement despite its marginalized status within the current political opportunity structure.</p><br /></div>
A Hard Rain: America in the 1960s, Our Decade of Hope, Possibilit...
by Frye Gaillard

Language

English

Pages

704

Publication Date

July 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Frye Gaillard has given us a deeply personal history, bringing his keen storyteller’s eye to this pivotal time in American life. He explores the competing story arcs of tragedy and hope through the political and social movements of the times — civil rights, black power, women’s liberation, the War in Vietnam, and the protests against it. But he also examines the cultural manifestations of change — music, literature, art, religion, and science — and so we meet not only the Brothers Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X, but also Gloria Steinem, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash, Harper Lee, Mister Rogers, Rachel Carson, James Baldwin, Andy Warhol, Billy Graham, Thomas Merton, George Wallace, Richard Nixon, Angela Davis, Barry Goldwater, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and the Berrigan Brothers.<br />“There are many different ways to remember the sixties,” Gaillard writes, “and this is mine. There was in these years the sense of a steady unfolding of time, as if history were on a forced march, and the changes spread to every corner of our lives. As future generations debate the meaning of the decade, I hope to offer a sense of how it felt to have lived it. A Hard Rain is one writer’s reconstruction and remembrance of a transcendent era — one that, for better or worse, lives with us still.”

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldnt have due to the Kindle eliminating sp...

David Foster Wallace Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. Ive found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found adve...

Ernest Hemingway The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen Kings On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But Kings prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of Kings greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. Kings On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft that resu...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

$25 Amazon.com Gift Card giveaway

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com