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Heart Berries: A Memoir
by Terese Marie Mailhot

Language

English

Pages

160

Publication Date

February 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><br />A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER<br /><br />Selected by Emma Watson as the Our Shared Shelf Book Club Pick for March/April 2018<br /><br /><br />A <i>New York Times</i> Editor's Choice<br /><br />A Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection<br /><br /><br /><br />"A sledgehammer. . . . Her experiments with structure and language . . . are in the service of trying to find new ways to think about the past, trauma, repetition and reconciliation, which might be a way of saying a new model for the memoir." —Parul Sehgal, <i>The New York Times</i><br /><br /><br /><br /><b>"<i>Heart Berries</i> by Terese Mailhot is an astounding memoir in essays. Here is a wound. Here is need, naked and unapologetic. Here is a mountain woman, towering in words great and small... What Mailhot has accomplished in this exquisite book is brilliance both raw and refined." —Roxane Gay, author of <i>Hunger</i></b><br /><br /><br /><br /></b><br /><i>Heart Berries</i> is a powerful, poetic memoir of a woman's coming of age on the Seabird Island Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. Having survived a profoundly dysfunctional upbringing only to find herself hospitalized and facing a dual diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder and bipolar II disorder; Terese Marie Mailhot is given a notebook and begins to write her way out of trauma. The triumphant result is <i>Heart Berries</i>, a memorial for Mailhot's mother, a social worker and activist who had a thing for prisoners; a story of reconciliation with her father—an abusive drunk and a brilliant artist—who was murdered under mysterious circumstances; and an elegy on how difficult it is to love someone while dragging the long shadows of shame.<br /><br />Mailhot trusts the reader to understand that memory isn't exact, but melded to imagination, pain, and what we can bring ourselves to accept. Her unique and at times unsettling voice graphically illustrates her mental state. As she writes, she discovers her own true voice, seizes control of her story, and, in so doing, reestablishes her connection to her family, to her people, and to her place in the world.<br /><br /><br /><br /><b>"I am quietly reveling in the profundity of Mailhot’s deliberate transgression in <i>Heart Berries</i> and its perfect results. I love her suspicion of words. I have always been terrified and in awe of the power of words – but Mailhot does not let them silence her in <i>Heart Berries</i>. She finds the purest way to say what she needs to say... [T]he writing is so good it’s hard not to temporarily be distracted from the content or narrative by its brilliance...Perhaps, because this author so generously allows us to be her witness, we are somehow able to see ourselves more clearly and become better witnesses to ourselves." —Emma Watson, Official March/April selection for Our Shared Shelf<br /><br /><br /><br /><b>Named One of the Most Anticipated Books of 2018 by:<br /><br />Goodreads<br /><br /><i>Esquire</i><br /><br /><i>Entertainment Weekly</i><br /><br /><i>ELLE</i><br /><br /><i>Cosmopolitan</i><br /><br /><i>Huffington Post</i><br /><br /><i>B*tch</i><br /><br /><i>NYLON</i><br /><br />Buzzfeed<br /><br />Bustle<br /><br /><i>The Rumpus</i><br /><br />The New York Public Library</b>
Ravensbruck: Life and Death in Hitler's Concentration Camp for Wo...
by Sarah Helm

Language

English

Pages

785

Publication Date

March 31, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A masterly and moving account of the most horrific hidden atrocity of World War II: Ravensbrück, the only Nazi concentration camp built for women</b><br />  <br />On a sunny morning in May 1939 a phalanx of 867 women—housewives, doctors, opera singers, politicians, prostitutes—was marched through the woods fifty miles north of Berlin, driven on past a shining lake, then herded in through giant gates. Whipping and kicking them were scores of German women guards.<br />      Their destination was Ravensbrück, a concentration camp designed specifically for women by Heinrich Himmler, prime architect of the Holocaust. By the end of the war 130,000 women from more than twenty different European countries had been imprisoned there; among the prominent names were Geneviève de Gaulle, General de Gaulle’s niece, and Gemma La Guardia Gluck, sister of the wartime mayor of New York. <br />     Only a small number of these women were Jewish; Ravensbrück was largely a place for the Nazis to eliminate other inferior beings—social outcasts, Gypsies, political enemies, foreign resisters, the sick, the disabled, and the “mad.” Over six years the prisoners endured beatings, torture, slave labor, starvation, and random execution. In the final months of the war, Ravensbrück became an extermination camp. Estimates of the final death toll by April 1945 have ranged from 30,000 to 90,000.<br />     For decades the story of Ravensbrück was hidden behind the Iron Curtain, and today it is still little known. Using testimony unearthed since the end of the Cold War and interviews with survivors who have never talked before, Sarah Helm has ventured into the heart of the camp, demonstrating for the reader in riveting detail how easily and quickly the unthinkable horror evolved. <br />     Far more than a catalog of atrocities, however, <i>Ravensbrück </i>is also a compelling account of what one survivor called “the heroism, superhuman tenacity, and exceptional willpower to survive.” For every prisoner whose strength failed, another found the will to resist through acts of self-sacrifice and friendship, as well as sabotage, protest, and escape. <br />     While the core of this book is told from inside the camp, the story also sheds new light on the evolution of the wider genocide, the impotence of the world to respond, and Himmler’s final attempt to seek a separate peace with the Allies using the women of Ravensbrück as a bargaining chip. Chilling, inspiring, and deeply unsettling, <i>Ravensbrück</i> is a groundbreaking work of historical investigation. With rare clarity, it reminds us of the capacity of humankind both for bestial cruelty and for courage against all odds.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics
by Mark Lilla

Language

English

Pages

165

Publication Date

August 15, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>From one of the country’s most admired political thinkers, an urgent wake-up call to American liberals to turn from the divisive politics of identity and develop a vision of our future that can persuade all citizens that they share a common destiny.</em></strong></p><p>In <em>The Once and Future Liberal</em>, Mark Lilla offers an impassioned, tough-minded, and stinging look at the failure of American liberalism over the past two generations. Although there have been Democrats in the White House, and some notable policy achievements, for nearly 40 years the vision that Ronald Reagan offered—small government, lower taxes, and self-reliant individualism—has remained the country’s dominant political ideology. And the Democratic Party has offered no convincing competing vision in response.</p><p>Instead, as Lilla argues, American liberalism fell under the spell of identity politics, with disastrous consequences. Driven originally by a sincere desire to protect the most vulnerable Americans, the left has now unwittingly balkanized the electorate, encouraged self-absorption rather than solidarity, and invested its energies in social movements rather than in party politics.  </p><p>With dire consequences. Lilla goes on to show how the left’s identity-focused individualism insidiously conspired with the amoral economic individualism of the Reaganite right to shape an electorate with little sense of a shared future and near-contempt for the idea of the common good. In the contest for the American imagination, liberals have abdicated.</p><p>Now they have an opportunity to reset. The left is motivated, and the Republican Party, led by an unpredictable demagogue, is in ideological disarray. To seize this opportunity, Lilla insists, liberals must concentrate their efforts on recapturing our institutions by winning elections. The time for hectoring is over. It is time to reach out and start persuading people from every walk of life and in every region of the country that liberals will stand up for them. We must appeal to – but also help to rebuild –  a sense of common feeling among Americans, and a sense of duty to each other. </p><p>A fiercely-argued, no-nonsense book, enlivened by Lilla’s acerbic wit and erudition, <em>The Once and Future Liberal</em> is essential reading for our momentous times.</p>
What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our...
by Michael Eric Dyson

Language

English

Pages

304

Publication Date

June 05, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>A stunning follow up to <i>New York Times</i> bestseller <i>Tears We Cannot Stop</i></b></p><p><b>Harry Belafonte says: </b><b>“Dyson has finally written the book I always wanted to read. </b>I had the privilege of attending the meeting he has insightfully written about, and it’s as if he were a fly on the wall...<b>a tour de force</b>...a poetically written work that calls on all of us to get back in that room and to resolve the racial crises we confronted more than fifty years ago.”</p><p><b>Joy-Ann Reid says: </b><b>A work of searing prose and seminal brilliance...</b> Dyson takes that once in a lifetime conversation between black excellence and pain and the white heroic narrative, and drives it right into the heart of our current politics and culture, <b>leaving the reader reeling and reckoning</b>."</p><p><b>Robin D. G. Kelley</b> says:“Dyson <b>masterfully refracts</b> our present racial conflagration through a subtle reading of one of the most consequential meetings about race to ever take place. In so doing, he reminds us that Black artists and intellectuals bear an awesome responsibility to speak truth to power."</p><p><b>President Barack Obama says:<i> "</i></b>Everybody who speaks after Michael Eric Dyson pales in comparison.”</p><p>In 2015 BLM activist Julius Jones confronted Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton with an urgent query: “What in your heart has changed that’s going to change the direction of this country?” “I don’t believe you just change hearts,” she protested. “I believe you change <i>laws</i>.”</p><p>The fraught conflict between conscience and politics – between morality and power – in addressing race hardly began with Clinton. An electrifying and traumatic encounter in the sixties crystallized these furious disputes.</p><p>In 1963 Attorney General Robert Kennedy sought out James Baldwin to explain the rage that threatened to engulf black America. Baldwin brought along some friends, including playwright Lorraine Hansberry, psychologist Kenneth Clark, and a valiant activist, Jerome Smith. It was Smith’s relentless, unfiltered fury that set Kennedy on his heels, reducing him to sullen silence.</p><p>Kennedy walked away from the nearly three-hour meeting angry – that the black folk assembled didn’t understand politics, and that they weren’t as easy to talk to as Martin Luther King. But especially that they were more interested in witness than policy. But Kennedy’s anger quickly gave way to empathy, especially for Smith. “I guess if I were in his shoes…I might feel differently about this country.” Kennedy set about changing policy – the meeting having transformed his thinking in fundamental ways.</p><p>There was more: every big argument about race that persists to this day got a hearing in that room. Smith declaring that he’d never fight for his country given its racist tendencies, and Kennedy being appalled at such lack of patriotism, tracks the disdain for black dissent in our own time. His belief that black folk were ungrateful for the Kennedys’ efforts to make things better shows up in our day as the charge that black folk wallow in the politics of ingratitude and victimhood. The contributions of black queer folk to racial progress still cause a stir. BLM has been accused of harboring a covert queer agenda. The immigrant experience, like that of Kennedy – versus the racial experience of Baldwin – is a cudgel to excoriate black folk for lacking hustle and ingenuity. The questioning of whether folk who are interracially partnered can authentically communicate black interests persists. And we grapple still with the responsibility of black intellectuals and artists to bring about social change.</p><p><i>What Truth Sounds Like</i> exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy – of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. The future of race and democracy hang in the balance.</p>
Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civi...
by Janet Dewart Bell

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

May 08, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A “New & Noteworthy” selection of <I>The New York Times</I><BR><BR>One of <i>Book Riot</i>'s “29 Amazing New Books Coming in 2018”<BR><BR>A groundbreaking collection based on oral histories that brilliantly plumb the leadership of African American women in the twentieth-century fight for civil rights—many nearly lost to history—from the latest winner of the Studs and Ida Terkel Prize</b> <p>During the Civil Rights Movement, African American women were generally not in the headlines; they simply did the work that needed to be done. Yet despite their significant contributions at all levels of the movement, they remain mostly invisible to the larger public. Beyond Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and Dorothy Height, most Americans, black and white alike, would be hard-pressed to name other leaders at the community, local, and national levels.</p> <p>In <em>Lighting the Fires of Freedom</em> Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. <em>Lighting the Fires of Freedom</em> offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that remain important and relevant today.</p> <p>Published to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, <em>Lighting the Fires of Freedom</em> is a vital document for understanding the Civil Rights Movement and an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.</p>
When We Rise: My Life in the Movement
by Cleve Jones

Language

English

Pages

305

Publication Date

November 29, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>2017 LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD WINNER <br /><br />The partial inspiration for the ABC television mini-series! </b><br /><br /><strong>"You could read Cleve Jones's book because you should know about the struggle for gay, lesbian, and transgender rights from one of its key participants--maybe heroes--but really, you should read it for pleasure and joy."--Rebecca Solnit, author of <em>Men Explain Things to Me</em></strong><br /><br />Born in 1954, Cleve Jones was among the last generation of gay Americans who grew up wondering if there were others out there like himself. There were. Like thousands of other young people, Jones, nearly penniless, was drawn in the early 1970s to San Francisco, a city electrified by progressive politics and sexual freedom. <br /><br />Jones found community--in the hotel rooms and ramshackle apartments shared by other young adventurers, in the city's bathhouses and gay bars like The Stud, and in the burgeoning gay district, the Castro, where a New York transplant named Harvey Milk set up a camera shop, began shouting through his bullhorn, and soon became the nation's most outspoken gay elected official. With Milk's encouragement, Jones dove into politics and found his calling in "the movement." When Milk was killed by an assassin's bullet in 1978, Jones took up his mentor's progressive mantle--only to see the arrival of AIDS transform his life once again. <br /><br />By turns tender and uproarious, <em>When We Rise</em> is Jones' account of his remarkable life. He chronicles the heartbreak of losing countless friends to AIDS, which very nearly killed him, too; his co-founding of the San Francisco AIDS Foundation during the terrifying early years of the epidemic; his conception of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, the largest community art project in history; the bewitching story of 1970s San Francisco and the magnetic spell it cast for thousands of young gay people and other misfits; and the harrowing, sexy, and sometimes hilarious stories of Cleve's passionate relationships with friends and lovers during an era defined by both unprecedented freedom and and violence alike. <br /><br /><i>When We Rise</i> is not only the story of a hero to the LQBTQ community, but the vibrantly voice memoir of a full and transformative American life.
The Unholy Trinity: Blocking the Left's Assault on Life, Marriage...
by Matt Walsh

Language

English

Pages

233

Publication Date

March 28, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>It's now or never for conservative values.<br /><br /></b>This highly anticipated debut from Matt Walsh of <i>The Blaze</i> demands that conservative voters make a last stand and fight for the moral center of America. The Trump presidency and Republican Congress provides an urgent opportunity to stop the Left's value-bending march to destroy the culture of our country.  <br /><br />Republican control of the presidency, senate, and House of Representatives for the next two years is a precious—and fleeting—gift to conservatives. Americans concerned with blocking liberals’ swift rethinking of life, marriage, and gender need to capture this moment to turn the tide of history. <br /><br />For years conservatives have worried endlessly about peripheral issues, liberals have been hard at work chipping away at the bedrock of our civilization, and putting a new foundation in its place. New attitudes on abortion, gay marriage, and gender identity threaten to become culture defining victories for progressives—radically altering not just our politics, but dangerously placing Man above God and the self above the good of the whole. <br /><br />What’s at stake? The most fundamental elements of society, including how we understand reality itself.  <br /><br />In <i>The Unholy Trinity,</i> <i>TheBlaze </i>contributor Matt Walsh draws on Catholic teachings to expose how liberals have attempted, with startling success, to redefine life, marriage, and gender. Abortion redefines human life, gay marriage redefines the family, and the latest theories on gender redefine what it means to be a man or a woman. The potential consequences are dire. If progressivism can bend life, family, and sex to its whims, Walsh argues, it has established relativism over God as the supreme law, and owns the power to destroy western civilization.<br /><br />With insight, candor, and faith, Walsh shows conservatives how to confront liberal arguments, defeat the progressive agenda for good, and reclaim American culture for truth.
Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's Amer...
by , Kate Harding

Language

English

Pages

250

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and Solidarity</b></p><p>When 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump’s America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do to move forward.</p><p>Featuring essays by <b>REBECCA SOLNIT</b> on Trump and his “misogyny army,” <b>CHERYL STRAYED</b> on grappling with the aftermath of Hillary Clinton’s loss, <b>SARAH HEPOLA</b> on resisting the urge to drink after the election, <b>NICOLE CHUNG </b>on family and friends who support Trump, <b>KATHA POLLITT</b> on the state of reproductive rights and what we do next, <b>JILL FILIPOVIC</b> on Trump’s policies and the life of a young woman in West Africa, <b>SAMANTHA IRBY </b>on racism and living as a queer black woman in rural America, <b>RANDA JARRAR</b> on traveling across the country as a queer Muslim American, <b>SARAH HOLLENBECK</b> on Trump’s cruelty toward the disabled, <b>MEREDITH TALUSAN</b> on feminism and the transgender community, and <b>SARAH JAFFE</b> on the labor movement and active and effective resistance, <b>among others</b>.</p>
The End of Patriarchy: Radical Feminism for Men
by Robert Jensen

Language

English

Pages

202

Publication Date

January 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The End of Patriarchy asks one key question: what do we need to create stable and decent human communities that can thrive in a sustainable relationship with the larger living world? Robert Jensen's answer is feminism and a critique of patriarchy. He calls for a radical feminist challenge to institutionalized male dominance; an uncompromising rejection of men's assertion of a right to control women's sexuality; and a demand for an end to the violence and coercion that are at the heart of all systems of domination and subordination. The End of Patriarchy makes a powerful argument that a socially just society requires no less than a radical feminist overhaul of the dominant patriarchal structures.
Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around t...
by , Condé Nast

Language

English

Pages

315

Publication Date

January 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>In celebration of the one-year anniversary of Women’s March, this gorgeously designed full-color book offers an unprecedented, front-row seat to one of the most galvanizing movements in American history, with exclusive interviews with Women’s March organizers, never-before-seen photographs, and essays by feminist activists.</p><p>On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald J. Trump’s inauguration, more than three million marchers of all ages and walks of life took to the streets as part of the largest protest in American history. In red states and blue states, in small towns and major urban centers, from Boise to Boston, Bangkok to Buenos Aires, people from eighty-two countries—on all seven continents—rose up in solidarity to voice a common message: Hear our voice.</p><p>It became the largest global protest in modern history.</p><p>Compiled by Women’s March organizers, in partnership with Condé Nast and <em>Glamour</em> magazine Editor in Chief Cindi Leive, Together We Rise—published for the one-year anniversary of the event—is the complete chronicle of this remarkable uprising. For the first time, Women’s March organizers—including Bob Bland, Cassady Fendlay, Sarah Sophie Flicker, Janaye Ingram, Tamika Mallory, Paola Mendoza, Carmen Perez, and Linda Sarsour —tell their personal stories and reflect on their collective journey in an oral history written by Jamia Wilson, writer, activist and director of The Feminist Press. They provide an inside look at how the idea for the event originated, how it was organized, how it became a global movement that surpassed their wildest expectations, and how they are sustaining and building on the widespread outrage, passion, and determination that sparked it. </p><p><em>Together We Rise</em> interweaves their stories with "Voices from the March"—recollections from real women who were there, across the world—plus exclusive images by top photographers, and 20 short, thought-provoking essays by esteemed writers, celebrities and artists including Rowan Blanchard, Senator Tammy Duckworth, America Ferrera, Roxane Gay, Ilana Glazer, Ashley Judd, Valarie Kaur, David Remnick, Yara Shahidi, Jill Soloway, Jia Tolentino, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, and Elaine Welteroth. An inspirational call to action that reminds us that together, ordinary people can make a difference, <em>Together We Rise</em> is an unprecedented look at a day that made history—and the beginning of a resistance movement to reclaim our future. </p>

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