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Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
by John Carreyrou

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

May 21, 2018

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<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BEST SELLER •  NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY: NPR,<i> The New York Times Book Review</i>, <i>Time</i>, <i>Wall Street Journal, Washington Post</i> • The McKinsey Business Book of the Year </b><br />  <br /> <b>The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos, the one-time multibillion-dollar biotech startup founded by Elizabeth Holmes—now the subject of the HBO documentary <i>The Inventor—</i>by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end.<br /><br /> “The story is even crazier than I expected, and I found myself unable to put it down once I started. This book has everything: elaborate scams, corporate intrigue, magazine cover stories, ruined family relationships, and the demise of a company once valued at nearly $10 billion.” —Bill Gates</b><br /><br /> In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup “unicorn” promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes’s worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn’t work.<br /><br /> A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
Trillion Dollar Coach: The Leadership Playbook of Silicon Valley'...
by , Alan Eagle

Language

English

Pages

238

Publication Date

April 16, 2019

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<p><strong>#1<em> Wall Street Journal</em> Bestseller<br /></strong><strong><em>New York Times </em>Bestseller<br /></strong><strong><em>USA Today </em>Bestseller</strong></p><p>The team behind How Google Works returns with management lessons from legendary coach and business executive, Bill Campbell, whose mentoring of some of our most successful modern entrepreneurs has helped create well over a trillion dollars in market value.<br /><br />Bill Campbell played an instrumental role in the growth of several prominent companies, such as Google, Apple, and Intuit, fostering deep relationships with Silicon Valley visionaries, including Steve Jobs, Larry Page, and Eric Schmidt. In addition, this business genius mentored dozens of other important leaders on both coasts, from entrepreneurs to venture capitalists to educators to football players, leaving behind a legacy of growing companies, successful people, respect, friendship, and love after his death in 2016.</p><p>Leaders at Google for over a decade, Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg, and Alan Eagle experienced firsthand how the man fondly known as Coach Bill built trusting relationships, fostered personal growth—even in those at the pinnacle of their careers—inspired courage, and identified and resolved simmering tensions that inevitably arise in fast-moving environments. To honor their mentor and inspire and teach future generations, they have codified his wisdom in this essential guide.</p><p>Based on interviews with over eighty people who knew and loved Bill Campbell, Trillion Dollar Coach explains the Coach’s principles and illustrates them with stories from the many great people and companies with which he worked. The result is a blueprint for forward-thinking business leaders and managers that will help them create higher performing and faster moving cultures, teams, and companies. </p>
Billion Dollar Whale: The Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, ...
by , Bradley Hope

Language

English

Pages

401

Publication Date

September 18, 2018

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Customer Reviews
<div><b>Named a Best Book of 2018 by the <i>Financial Times</i> and <i>Fortune</i>, this "thrilling" (Bill Gates) <i>New York Times</i> bestseller exposes how a "modern Gatsby" swindled over $5 billion with the aid of Goldman Sachs in "the heist of the century" (Axios).</b></div><br />Now a #1 international bestseller, <b>BILLION DOLLAR WHALE</b><i> </i>is "an epic tale of white-collar crime on a global scale" (<i>Publishers Weekly</i>, starred review), revealing how a young social climber from Malaysia pulled off one of the biggest heists in history.<br /><br />In 2009, a chubby, mild-mannered graduate of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business named Jho Low set in motion a fraud of unprecedented gall and magnitude--one that would come to symbolize the next great threat to the global financial system. Over a decade, Low, with the aid of Goldman Sachs and others, siphoned billions of dollars from an investment fund--right under the nose of global financial industry watchdogs. Low used the money to finance elections, purchase luxury real estate, throw champagne-drenched parties, and even to finance Hollywood films like <i>The Wolf of Wall Street</i>.<br /><br />By early 2019, with his yacht and private jet reportedly seized by authorities and facing criminal charges in Malaysia and in the United States, Low had become an international fugitive, even as the U.S. Department of Justice continued its investigation. <div><b><br /></b></div><div><b>BILLION DOLLAR WHALE</b> has joined the ranks of <i>Liar's Poker</i>, <i>Den of Thieves</i>, and <i>Bad Blood</i> as a classic harrowing parable of hubris and greed in the financial world. </div>
Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike
by Phil Knight

Language

English

Pages

401

Publication Date

April 26, 2016

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Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER</b><BR> <BR>In this instant<i> </i>and tenacious bestseller, Nike founder and board chairman Phil Knight “offers a rare and revealing look at the notoriously media-shy man behind the swoosh” (<i>Booklist</i>, starred review), illuminating his company’s early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands.<BR><BR>Bill Gates named <i>Shoe Dog</i> one of his five favorite books of 2016 and called it “an amazing tale, a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like. It’s a messy, perilous, and chaotic journey, riddled with mistakes, endless struggles, and sacrifice. Phil Knight opens up in ways few CEOs are willing to do.”<BR> <BR>Fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed fifty dollars from his father and launched a company with one simple mission: import high-quality, low-cost running shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his car in 1963, Knight grossed eight thousand dollars that first year. Today, Nike’s annual sales top $30 billion. In this age of start-ups, Knight’s Nike is the gold standard, and its swoosh is one of the few icons instantly recognized in every corner of the world.<BR> <BR>But Knight, the man behind the swoosh, has always been a mystery. In <i>Shoe Dog</i>, he tells his story at last. At twenty-four, Knight decides that rather than work for a big corporation, he will create something all his own, new, dynamic, different. He details the many risks he encountered, the crushing setbacks, the ruthless competitors and hostile bankers—as well as his many thrilling triumphs. Above all, he recalls the relationships that formed the heart and soul of Nike, with his former track coach, the irascible and charismatic Bill Bowerman, and with his first employees, a ragtag group of misfits and savants who quickly became a band of swoosh-crazed brothers.<BR> <BR>Together, harnessing the electrifying power of a bold vision and a shared belief in the transformative power of sports, they created a brand—and a culture—that changed everything.
Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s (Harper Perennia...
by Frederick Lewis Allen

Language

English

Pages

354

Publication Date

May 26, 2015

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Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>A history of roaring prosperity—and economic cataclysm: “The one account of America in the 1920s against which all others must be measured” (<I>The</I><I> Washington Post</I>).</B><BR /><BR /> Beginning November 11, 1918, when President Woodrow Wilson declared the end of World War I in a letter to the American public, and continuing through his defeat, Prohibition, the Big Red Scare, the rise of women’s hemlines, and the stock market crash of 1929, <I>Only Yesterday</I>, published just two years after the crash, chronicles a decade like no other. Allen, who witnessed firsthand the events he describes, immerses you in the era of flappers, speakeasies, and early radio, making you feel like part of history as it unfolds.<BR /><BR /> This bestselling, enduring account brings to life towering historical figures including J. Pierpont Morgan, Henry Ford, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, Al Capone, Babe Ruth, and Jack Dempsey. Allen provides insightful, in-depth analyses of President Warren G. Harding’s oil scandal, the growth of the auto industry, the decline of the family farm, and the long bull market of the late twenties. Peppering his narrative with actual stock quotes and breaking financial news, Allen tracks the major economic trends of the decade and explores the underlying causes of the crash. From the trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti to the inventions, crazes, and revolutions of the day, this timeless work will continue to be savored for generations to come.<BR />  </DIV>
People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of ...
by Joseph E. Stiglitz

Language

English

Pages

389

Publication Date

April 23, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A Nobel prize winner challenges us to throw off the free market fundamentalists and reclaim our economy.</strong></p><br /><p>We all have the sense that the American economy—and its government—tilts toward big business, but as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains in his new book, <em>People, Power, and Profits</em>, the situation is dire. A few corporations have come to dominate entire sectors of the economy, contributing to skyrocketing inequality and slow growth. This is how the financial industry has managed to write its own regulations, tech companies have accumulated reams of personal data with little oversight, and our government has negotiated trade deals that fail to represent the best interests of workers. Too many have made their wealth through exploitation of others rather than through wealth creation. If something isn’t done, new technologies may make matters worse, increasing inequality and unemployment.</p><br /><p>Stiglitz identifies the true sources of wealth and of increases in standards of living, based on learning, advances in science and technology, and the rule of law. He shows that the assault on the judiciary, universities, and the media undermines the very institutions that have long been the foundation of America’s economic might and its democracy.</p><br /><p>Helpless though we may feel today, we are far from powerless. In fact, the economic solutions are often quite clear. We need to exploit the benefits of markets while taming their excesses, making sure that markets work for us—the U.S. citizens—and not the other way around. If enough citizens rally behind the agenda for change outlined in this book, it may not be too late to create a progressive capitalism that will recreate a shared prosperity. Stiglitz shows how a middle-class life can once again be attainable by all.</p><br /><p>An authoritative account of the predictable dangers of free market fundamentalism and the foundations of progressive capitalism, <em>People, Power, and Profits</em> shows us an America in crisis, but also lights a path through this challenging time.</p>
To Pixar and Beyond: My Unlikely Journey with Steve Jobs to Make ...
by Lawrence Levy

Language

English

Pages

248

Publication Date

November 01, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV>“Lovely and surprising . . . This delightful book is about finance, creative genius, workplace harmony, and luck.”—<B><I>Fortune</I></B><BR /><BR /> ”Enchanting,”—<B><I>New York Times</I></B><BR /><BR /> “I love this book! I think it is brilliant.”—<B>Ed Catmull,</B> cofounder and president of Pixar Animation, president of Disney Animation, and coauthor of the bestseller <I>Creativity Inc.</I><BR /><BR /><B>The revelatory saga of Pixar’s rocky start and improbable success</B><BR /><BR /> After Steve Jobs was dismissed from Apple in the early 1990s, he turned his attention to a little‑known graphics company he owned called Pixar. One day, out of the blue, Jobs called Lawrence Levy, a Harvard‑trained lawyer and executive to whom he had never spoken before. He hoped to persuade Levy to help him pull Pixar back from the brink of failure. <BR /><BR /> This is the extraordinary story of what happened next: how Jobs and Levy concocted and pulled off a highly improbable plan that transformed Pixar into one of Hollywood’s greatest success stories. Levy offers a masterful, firsthand account of how Pixar rose from humble beginnings, what it was like to work so closely with Jobs, and how Pixar’s story offers profound lessons that can apply to many aspects of our lives. <BR /><BR />  “Part business book and part thriller—a tale that’s every bit as compelling as the ones Pixar tells in its blockbuster movies. It’s also incredibly inspirational, a story about a team that took big risks and reaped the rewards . . . I loved this book and could not put it down.”—<B>Dan Lyons</B>, best-selling author of <I>Disrupted</I><BR /><BR /> “A natural storyteller, Levy offers an inside look at the business and a fresh, sympathetic view of Jobs.”<B><I>—Success Magazine</I></B><BR /><BR /><B>An Amazon Best Book of 2016 in Business & Leadership</B> • <B>A top pick on <I>Fortune</I>’s Favorite Booksof 2016 • A 2017 Axiom Business Book Award winner in Memoir/Biography</B></DIV>
Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don'...
by Jim Collins

Language

English

Pages

315

Publication Date

July 19, 2011

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>The Challenge </strong><br /><em>Built to Last,</em> the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning. </p><p>But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness? </p><p><strong>The Study </strong><br />For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great? </p><p><strong>The Standards </strong><br />Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great? After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world's greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck.</p><p><strong>The Comparisons <br /></strong>The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different? Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good? </p><p>Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness -- why some companies make the leap and others don't. </p><p><strong>The Findings</strong><br /> The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include:</p><ul type="DISC"><li><strong>Level 5 Leaders:</strong> The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness. </li><li><strong>The Hedgehog Concept</strong> (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence. </li><li><strong>A Culture of Discipline:</strong> When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology. </li><li><strong>The Flywheel and the Doom Loop:</strong> Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.</li></ul><p>“Some of the key concepts discerned in the study,” comments Jim Collins, "fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people.” </p><p>Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings? </p>
Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall ...
by John Brooks

Language

English

Pages

468

Publication Date

July 08, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>“<I>Business Adventures</I> remains the best business book I’ve ever read.” —Bill Gates, <I>The Wall Street Journal</I></B><BR /><BR /> What do the $350 million Ford Motor Company disaster known as the Edsel, the fast and incredible rise of Xerox, and the unbelievable scandals at General Electric and Texas Gulf Sulphur have in common? Each is an example of how an iconic company was defined by a particular moment of fame or notoriety; these notable and fascinating accounts are as relevant today to understanding the intricacies of corporate life as they were when the events happened.<BR /><BR /> Stories about Wall Street are infused with drama and adventure and reveal the machinations and volatile nature of the world of finance. Longtime <I>New Yorker </I>contributor John Brooks’s insightful reportage is so full of personality and critical detail that whether he is looking at the astounding market crash of 1962, the collapse of a well-known brokerage firm, or the bold attempt by American bankers to save the British pound, one gets the sense that history repeats itself.<BR /><BR /> Five additional stories on equally fascinating subjects round out this wonderful collection that will both entertain and inform readers . . . <I>Business Adventures</I> is truly financial journalism at its liveliest and best.</DIV>
The Third Pillar: How Markets and the State Leave the Community B...
by Raghuram Rajan

Language

English

Pages

464

Publication Date

February 26, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A Fareed Zakaria GPS Book of the Week<br /><br />From one of the most important economic thinkers of our time, a brilliant and far-seeing analysis of the current populist backlash against globalization.</b><br /><br />Raghuram Rajan, distinguished University of Chicago professor, former IMF chief economist, head of India's central bank, and author of the 2010 FT-Goldman-Sachs Book of the Year <i>Fault Lines</i>, has an unparalleled vantage point onto the social and economic consequences of globalization and their ultimate effect on our politics. In <i>The Third Pillar</i> he offers up a magnificent big-picture framework for understanding how these three forces--the state, markets, and our communities--interact, why things begin to break down, and how we can find our way back to a more secure and stable plane. <br /><br />The "third pillar" of the title is the community we live in. Economists all too often understand their field as the relationship between markets and the state, and they leave squishy social issues for other people. That's not just myopic, Rajan argues; it's dangerous. All economics is actually socioeconomics - all markets are embedded in a web of human relations, values and norms. As he shows, throughout history, technological phase shifts have ripped the market out of those old webs and led to violent backlashes, and to what we now call populism. Eventually, a new equilibrium is reached, but it can be ugly and messy, especially if done wrong. <br /><br />Right now, we're doing it wrong. As markets scale up, the state scales up with it, concentrating economic and political power in flourishing central hubs and leaving the periphery to decompose, figuratively and even literally. Instead, Rajan offers a way to rethink the relationship between the market and civil society and argues for a return to strengthening and empowering local communities as an antidote to growing despair and unrest. Rajan is not a doctrinaire conservative, so his ultimate argument that decision-making has to be devolved to the grass roots or our democracy will continue to wither, is sure to be provocative. But even setting aside its solutions, <i>The Third Pillar </i>is a masterpiece of explication, a book that will be a classic of its kind for its offering of a wise, authoritative and humane explanation of the forces that have wrought such a sea change in our lives.

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