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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of th...
by David Grann

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   -  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST <br /><br />"Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." <b>—</b>Dave Eggers, <i>New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017<br /><br />Named a best book of the year by <i>Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, </i>NPR's Maureen Corrigan<i>, </i>NPR's "On Point,"<i> Vogue</i>, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, <i>Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's </i>"Ultimate Best Books<i>," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus,</i> Slate.com<i> </i>and</b><i><b> Book Browse</b><br /></i><b><i><br /></i>From <i>New Yorker</i> staff writer David Grann, #1 <i>New York Times</i> best-selling author of <i>The Lost City of Z,</i> a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history</b><br />        <br />In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.<br />       Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. <br />       In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. <br />       In <i>Killers of the Flower Moon, </i>David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i> is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Go...
by Michelle McNamara

Language

English

Pages

340

Publication Date

February 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER</strong><strong> • </strong><strong>The haunting true story of the elusive serial rapist turned murderer who terrorized California during the 70s and 80s, and of the gifted journalist who died tragically while investigating the case—which was solved in April 2018.</strong></p><p><p><strong>Introduction by Gillian Flynn •</strong><strong> Afterword by Patton Oswalt</strong></p><p><strong>“A brilliant genre-buster.... Propulsive, can’t-stop-now reading.</strong><strong>”   —Stephen King</strong></p><p></p><p>For more than ten years, a mysterious and violent predator committed fifty sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated ten sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area.</p><p>Three decades later, Michelle McNamara, a true crime journalist who created the popular website TrueCrimeDiary.com, was determined to find the violent psychopath she called "the Golden State Killer." Michelle pored over police reports, interviewed victims, and embedded herself in the online communities that were as obsessed with the case as she was.</p><p><em><em>I’ll Be Gone in the Dark</em></em>—the masterpiece McNamara was writing at the time of her sudden death—offers an atmospheric snapshot of a moment in American history and a chilling account of a criminal mastermind and the wreckage he left behind. It is also a portrait of a woman’s obsession and her unflagging pursuit of the truth. Utterly original and compelling, it has been hailed as a modern true crime classic—one which fulfilled Michelle's dream: helping unmask the Golden State Killer.</p>
Black Klansman: Race, Hate, and the Undercover Investigation of a...
by Ron Stallworth

Language

English

Pages

187

Publication Date

June 05, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>The <i>New York Times</i> Bestseller!</b><br /><b></b><br /><b>The extraordinary true story and basis for the major motion picture <i>BlacKkKlansman</i>, written and directed by Spike Lee, produced by Jordan Peele, and starring John David Washington and Adam Driver.</b><br /><b></b><br /><b></b>When detective Ron Stallworth, the first black detective in the history of the Colorado Springs Police Department, comes across a classified ad in the local paper asking for all those interested in joining the Ku Klux Klan to contact a P.O. box, Detective Stallworth does his job and responds with interest, using his real name while posing as a white man. He figures he’ll receive a few brochures in the mail, maybe even a magazine, and learn more about a growing terrorist threat in his community. </p><p>A few weeks later the office phone rings, and the caller asks Ron a question he thought he’d never have to answer, “Would you like to join our <i>cause</i>?” This is 1978, and the KKK is on the rise in the United States. Its Grand Wizard, David Duke, has made a name for himself, appearing on talk shows, and major magazine interviews preaching a “kinder” Klan that wants nothing more than to preserve a heritage, and to restore a nation to its former glory.</p><p>Ron answers the caller’s question that night with a yes, launching what is surely one of the most audacious, and incredible undercover investigations in history. Ron recruits his partner Chuck to play the "white" Ron Stallworth, while Stallworth himself conducts all subsequent phone conversations. During the months-long investigation, Stallworth sabotages cross burnings, exposes white supremacists in the military, and even befriends David Duke himself. </p><p><i>Black Klansman</i> is an amazing true story that reads like a crime thriller, and a searing portrait of a divided America and the extraordinary heroes who dare to fight back.</p>
Incident at Big Sky: The Inside Story of the Search for Two Savag...
by , Malcolm McConnell

Language

English

Pages

285

Publication Date

March 21, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>Edgar Award Finalist: The “exciting” true story of the abduction of biathlete Kari Swenson and the five-month manhunt to bring her tormentors to justice (<I>The New York Times Book Review</I>).</B><BR /><BR /> Former rodeo cowboy Johnny France had been sheriff of Madison County, Montana, for three years when Kari Swenson, a Bozeman resident training for the World Biathlon Championship, went missing near Big Sky Resort in July 1984. Her friends feared that Kari had been attacked by a grizzly bear, but the truth was far scarier: She’d been kidnapped at gunpoint by father-and-son survivalists Don and Dan Nichols. The pair had been living in the wilderness off and on for years and hoped to make Kari a “mountain woman” and Dan’s bride. But the plan went horribly wrong from the start, and after a deadly firefight with rescuers, the kidnappers vanished into the rugged terrain of the Spanish Peaks.<BR />  <BR /> As Montana’s summer froze into brutal winter blizzards, SWAT teams, forest rangers, and antiterrorist units searched the backcountry but sighted the mountain men only once. Then came the call about a strange campfire on a slope above the Madison River. Sheriff France decided to go into the forest to face the fugitives—alone. The resulting showdown made him “perhaps the most famous Western sheriff since Wyatt Earp . . . a modern legend” (<I>Chicago Tribune</I>)<I>.</I><BR />  <BR /><I>Incident at Big Sky</I> is an “amazing . . . exciting retelling of a modern crime” that made headlines around the world (<I>The New York Times Book Review</I>). In a voice as distinctive and compelling as the Montana landscape, France takes readers on a high-stakes adventure so bizarre and unforgettable it could only be true.</DIV>
Lincoln's Last Trial: The Murder Case That Propelled Him to the P...
by , David Fisher

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

June 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>Instant <em>New York Times</em> bestseller!</strong><Br><Br><strong>A <em>USA Today</em> Top 10 Hot Book for Summer</strong><Br><Br><strong>“Makes you feel as if you are watching a live camera riveted on a courtroom more than 150 years ago.” —Diane Sawyer </strong><Br><Br><strong>The true story of Abraham Lincoln’s last murder trial, a case in which he had a deep personal involvement—and which played out in the nation’s newspapers as he began his presidential campaign</strong><Br><Br>At the end of the summer of 1859, twenty-two-year-old Peachy Quinn Harrison went on trial for murder in Springfield, Illinois. Abraham Lincoln, who had been involved in more than three thousand cases—including more than twenty-five murder trials—during his two-decades-long career, was hired to defend him. This was to be his last great case as a lawyer.<Br><Br>What normally would have been a local case took on momentous meaning. Lincoln’s debates with Senator Stephen Douglas the previous fall had gained him a national following, transforming the little-known, self-taught lawyer into a respected politician. He was being urged to make a dark-horse run for the presidency in 1860. Taking this case involved great risk. His reputation was untarnished, but should he lose this trial, should Harrison be convicted of murder, the spotlight now focused so brightly on him might be dimmed. He had won his most recent murder trial with a daring and dramatic maneuver that had become a local legend, but another had ended with his client dangling from the end of a rope.<Br><Br>The case posed painful personal challenges for Lincoln. The murder victim had trained for the law in his office, and Lincoln had been his friend and his mentor. His accused killer, the young man Lincoln would defend, was the son of a close friend and loyal supporter. And to win this trial he would have to form an unholy allegiance with a longtime enemy, a revivalist preacher he had twice run against for political office—and who had bitterly slandered Lincoln as an “infidel…too lacking in faith” to be elected.<Br><Br><em>Lincoln’s Last Trial</em> captures the presidential hopeful’s dramatic courtroom confrontations in vivid detail as he fights for his client—but also for his own blossoming political future. It is a moment in history that shines a light on our legal system, as in this case Lincoln fought a legal battle that remains incredibly relevant today.
The Devil in the White City: A Saga of Magic and Murder at the Fa...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

447

Publication Date

February 10, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>In <i>The Devil in the White City, </i>the smoke, romance, and mystery of the Gilded Age come alive as never before.</b><br /><br />Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America’s rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fair’s brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the country’s most important structures, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. The murderer was Henry H. Holmes, a young doctor who, in a malign parody of the White City, built his “World’s Fair Hotel” just west of the fairgrounds—a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium. <br /><br />Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is that Holmes really lived, walking the grounds of that dream city by the lake.<br /><br /> <i>The Devil in the White City</i> draws the reader into a time of magic and majesty, made all the more appealing by a supporting cast of real-life characters, including Buffalo Bill, Theodore Dreiser, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and others. Erik Larson’s gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both.<br /><br /> To find out more about this book, go to http://www.DevilInTheWhiteCity.com.
The Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fa...
by , Peter Elkind

Language

English

Pages

480

Publication Date

November 26, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
There were dozens of books about Watergate, but only <b>All the President's Men</b> gave readers the full story, with all the drama and nuance and exclusive reporting. And thirty years later, if you're going to read only one book on Watergate, that's still the one. Today, Enron is the biggest business story of our time, and <b>Fortune</b> senior writers Bethany McLean and Peter Elkind are the new Woodward and Bernstein.<p>Remarkably, it was just two years ago that Enron was thought to epitomize a great New Economy company, with its skyrocketing profits and share price. But that was before <b>Fortune</b> published an article by McLean that asked a seemingly innocent question: How exactly does Enron make money? From that point on, Enron's house of cards began to crumble. Now, McLean and Elkind have investigated much deeper, to offer the definitive book about the Enron scandal and the fascinating people behind it.</p><p>Meticulously researched and character driven, <b>Smartest Guys in the Room</b> takes the reader deep into Enron's past—and behind the closed doors of private meetings. Drawing on a wide range of unique sources, the book follows Enron's rise from obscurity to the top of the business world to its disastrous demise. It reveals as never before major characters such as Ken Lay, Jeff Skilling, and Andy Fastow, as well as lesser known players like Cliff Baxter and Rebecca Mark. <b>Smartest Guys in the Room</b> is a story of greed, arrogance, and deceit—a microcosm of all that is wrong with American business today. Above all, it's a fascinating human drama that will prove to be the authoritative account of the Enron scandal.</p>
The Ghosts of the Orphanage
by Christine Kenneally

Language

English

Pages

86

Publication Date

August 26, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Millions of American children were placed in orphanages. Some didn’t make it out alive. <br /> <br />After hearing whispers that seemed almost too awful to believe, BuzzFeed News investigative reporter Christine Kenneally embarked on a years-long journey to find out what really went on in these institutions. What she discovered was even more horrifying than the legend: the systematic abuse and even the alleged murder of children by nuns. Her searing report, which is part investigation, part true crime drama, part ghost story, cracks open a secret history of American life — and adds a vast new dimension to the Catholic church’s mistreatment of children. <br /> <br />From a world shrouded in secrecy, Kenneally tells the story of St. Joseph’s Orphanage in Burlington, Vermont, and of Sally Dale, the plucky redhead who was the apple of the nuns’ eyes. Until they decided to make an example of her, administering daily torments, isolating her from the rest of the world, and convincing her that she would never escape. Of all the children who passed through St. Joseph’s, she may have been there the longest. <br /> <br />The horrors she suffered and the deaths she said she witnessed did not come into full view until the day, decades later, when she attended a St Joseph’s reunion. Then the past came flooding back like a torrent. <br /> <br />Along with scores of other survivors, and guided by an idealistic young lawyer, Sally somehow found the courage to come forward and tell the world what she had experienced. She wanted more than anything else to be heard and believed. But she was going up against one of the most powerful institutions in the world, and she was in for the fight of a lifetime. <br /> <br />The legal battle that ensued upended every assumption that the people of Burlington had. Could memory be trusted? Could forgetting be forgotten? Could a pleasant community turn a blind eye to evil? And could nuns, the very women charged with protecting these most vulnerable members of society, have instead tortured or even killed them? <br /> <br />The Catholic sex abuse scandal – which most recently yielded a grand jury report on how the church hid the crimes of hundreds of priests — shattered the silence that for so long had protected the church. But the truth about what went on inside its orphanages has somehow remained all but unspoken, even as other countries have undertaken huge national inquiries. In the US, there has been no reckoning. The orphanages’ dark secrets, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams, still lay buried. Until now. <br /> <br />Through painstaking reporting, based in thousands of pages of documents — many of them secret — and interviews with survivors, Kenneally connects what happened at St. Joseph’s to similar accounts that emerged from seven countries across three continents, revealing a terrible matrix of corroboration. <br /><br />
Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil...
by Karen Abbott

Language

English

Pages

533

Publication Date

September 02, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p>Karen Abbott, the <em>New York Times</em> bestselling author of <em>Sin in the Second City</em> and “pioneer of sizzle history” <em>(USA Today</em>), tells the spellbinding true story of four women who risked everything to become spies during the Civil War.</p><p>Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War: the stories of four courageous women—a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow—who were spies.</p><p>After shooting a Union soldier in her front hall with a pocket pistol, Belle Boyd became a courier and spy for the Confederate army, using her charms to seduce men on both sides. Emma Edmonds cut off her hair and assumed the identity of a man to enlist as a Union private, witnessing the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. The beautiful widow, Rose O’Neale Greenhow, engaged in affairs with powerful Northern politicians to gather intelligence for the Confederacy, and used her young daughter to send information to Southern generals. Elizabeth Van Lew, a wealthy Richmond abolitionist, hid behind her proper Southern manners as she orchestrated a far-reaching espionage ring, right under the noses of suspicious rebel detectives.</p><p>Using a wealth of primary source material and interviews with the spies’ descendants, Abbott seamlessly weaves the adventures of these four heroines throughout the tumultuous years of the war. With a cast of real-life characters including Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, General Stonewall Jackson, detective Allan Pinkerton, Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln, and Emperor Napoleon III, <em>Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy</em> draws you into the war as these daring women lived it.</p><p><em>Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy</em> contains 39 black & photos and 3 maps. </p>
The Disappearance of the Yuba County Five: A collection of True C...
by Jessi Dixon

Language

English

Pages

173

Publication Date

September 12, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
An anthology of True Crime headlined by the strange disappearance of the Yuba County Five...When Joe Shones left his house on February 24, 1978, he seemed to be in good health. He felt fine, especially for 55, and he’d decided that day to venture up a lonely road through the Plumas National Forest, close to Rogers Cow Camp, to check the weather conditions in the area. He was hoping to come back the next day, this time with his family, to enjoy an outing in the mountains.<br /><br />However, as Shones forced his little Volkswagen further and further down the snowy trail, the car started fighting back. And when it finally gave in to the mounting snowdrifts, Shones got out of the car and set to work pushing it.<br /><br />That’s when the pain started – deep in his chest, then radiating outward. Miles and miles from any help, Shones was suffering a heart attack.<br /><br />Unable to rescue his car from its snowy encasement, Shones climbed back into the driver’s seat and started thinking through his possible next steps. It was then that he noticed headlights coming toward him – two sets, even. The first set of lights, he could tell, were from a pickup truck. <br /><br />Shones quickly jumped out of the car and headed toward the oncoming vehicle, screaming for help and waving his arms. But no one paid him any attention – later, he said he watched as a group of men, a single woman, and a little baby walked right by. It must have been hours later, he remembered, when he thought he saw flashlights in the trees. He tried calling out again, but – again – got no response.<br /><br />By the time his car ran out of gas, the excruciating pain in Shones’ chest had receded enough that he felt he could handle the eight mile walk down the snowy road to a lodge he knew would be occupied. On the way, he recalled, he spotted a 1969 Mercury Montego on the side of the road – complete empty. He assumed the vehicle belonged to the people he’d seen passing by hours before.<br /><br />In that moment, Shones wasn’t too worried about the strange group of people he’d encountered – he was focused on handling an emergency of his own. Later, though, authorities pieced together that it wasn’t Shones’ near-death experience that was the strangest thing to happen that night. Instead, it was the fact that Joe Shones had – in all likelihood – been the last person to see Bill Sterling, Ted Weiher, Jack Madruga, Jack Huett, and Gary Mathias alive.

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