Categories

 > Biographies & Memoirs > True Crime

24,427 results were found

Sort by:

Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice
by Sidney Powell

Language

English

Pages

460

Publication Date

May 01, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Dare to learn the truth about a core group of corrupt prosecutors who rose to powerful positions, including now on Robert Mueller's hit squad investigating President Trump. A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tactics used by headline-grabbing federal prosecutors in their narcissistic pursuit of power. Its scope reaches from the US Department of Justice to the US Senate, the FBI, and the White House. This true story is a scathing attack on corrupt prosecutors, the judges who turned a blind eye to these injustices, and the president who has promoted them to powerful political positions.
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of th...
by David Grann

Language

English

Pages

347

Publication Date

April 18, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   -  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST <br /><br />"Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." <b>—</b>Dave Eggers, <i>New York Times Book Review</i><br /><br />SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017<br /><br />Named a best book of the year by <i>Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, </i>NPR's Maureen Corrigan<i>, </i>NPR's "On Point,"<i> Vogue</i>, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, <i>Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's </i>"Ultimate Best Books<i>," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus,</i> Slate.com<i> </i>and</b><i><b> Book Browse</b><br /></i><b><i><br /></i>From <i>New Yorker</i> staff writer David Grann, #1 <i>New York Times</i> best-selling author of <i>The Lost City of Z,</i> a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history</b><br />        <br />In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.<br />       Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. <br />       In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. <br />       In <i>Killers of the Flower Moon, </i>David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. <i>Killers of the Flower Moon</i> is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Go...
by Michelle McNamara

Language

English

Pages

340

Publication Date

February 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER</strong><strong> • </strong><strong>The haunting true story of the elusive serial rapist turned murderer who terrorized California during the 70s and 80s, and of the gifted journalist who died tragically while investigating the case—which was solved in April 2018.</strong></p><p><p><strong>Introduction by Gillian Flynn •</strong><strong> Afterword by Patton Oswalt</strong></p><p><strong>“A brilliant genre-buster.... Propulsive, can’t-stop-now reading.</strong><strong>”   —Stephen King</strong></p><p></p><p>For more than ten years, a mysterious and violent predator committed fifty sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated ten sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area.</p><p>Three decades later, Michelle McNamara, a true crime journalist who created the popular website TrueCrimeDiary.com, was determined to find the violent psychopath she called "the Golden State Killer." Michelle pored over police reports, interviewed victims, and embedded herself in the online communities that were as obsessed with the case as she was.</p><p><em><em>I’ll Be Gone in the Dark</em></em>—the masterpiece McNamara was writing at the time of her sudden death—offers an atmospheric snapshot of a moment in American history and a chilling account of a criminal mastermind and the wreckage he left behind. It is also a portrait of a woman’s obsession and her unflagging pursuit of the truth. Utterly original and compelling, it has been hailed as a modern true crime classic—one which fulfilled Michelle's dream: helping unmask the Golden State Killer.</p>
Lincoln's Last Trial: The Murder Case That Propelled Him to the P...
by , David Fisher

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

June 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>Instant <em>New York Times</em> bestseller!</strong><Br><Br><strong>A <em>USA Today</em> Top 10 Hot Book for Summer</strong><Br><Br><strong>“Makes you feel as if you are watching a live camera riveted on a courtroom more than 150 years ago.” —Diane Sawyer </strong><Br><Br><strong>The true story of Abraham Lincoln’s last murder trial, a case in which he had a deep personal involvement—and which played out in the nation’s newspapers as he began his presidential campaign</strong><Br><Br>At the end of the summer of 1859, twenty-two-year-old Peachy Quinn Harrison went on trial for murder in Springfield, Illinois. Abraham Lincoln, who had been involved in more than three thousand cases—including more than twenty-five murder trials—during his two-decades-long career, was hired to defend him. This was to be his last great case as a lawyer.<Br><Br>What normally would have been a local case took on momentous meaning. Lincoln’s debates with Senator Stephen Douglas the previous fall had gained him a national following, transforming the little-known, self-taught lawyer into a respected politician. He was being urged to make a dark-horse run for the presidency in 1860. Taking this case involved great risk. His reputation was untarnished, but should he lose this trial, should Harrison be convicted of murder, the spotlight now focused so brightly on him might be dimmed. He had won his most recent murder trial with a daring and dramatic maneuver that had become a local legend, but another had ended with his client dangling from the end of a rope.<Br><Br>The case posed painful personal challenges for Lincoln. The murder victim had trained for the law in his office, and Lincoln had been his friend and his mentor. His accused killer, the young man Lincoln would defend, was the son of a close friend and loyal supporter. And to win this trial he would have to form an unholy allegiance with a longtime enemy, a revivalist preacher he had twice run against for political office—and who had bitterly slandered Lincoln as an “infidel…too lacking in faith” to be elected.<Br><Br><em>Lincoln’s Last Trial</em> captures the presidential hopeful’s dramatic courtroom confrontations in vivid detail as he fights for his client—but also for his own blossoming political future. It is a moment in history that shines a light on our legal system, as in this case Lincoln fought a legal battle that remains incredibly relevant today.
To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder
by Nancy Rommelmann

Language

English

Pages

292

Publication Date

July 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>The case was closed, but for journalist Nancy Rommelmann, the mystery remained: What made a mother want to murder her own children?</b></p><p>On May 23, 2009, Amanda Stott-Smith drove to the middle of the Sellwood Bridge in Portland, Oregon, and dropped her two children into the Willamette River. Forty minutes later, rescuers found the body of four-year-old Eldon. Miraculously, his seven-year-old sister, Trinity, was saved. As the public cried out for blood, Amanda was arrested, convicted, and sentenced to thirty-five years in prison.</p><p>Embarking on a seven-year quest for the truth, Rommelmann traced the roots of Amanda’s fury and desperation through thousands of pages of records, withheld documents, meetings with lawyers and convicts, and interviews with friends and family who felt shocked, confused, and emotionally swindled by a woman whose entire life was now defined by an unspeakable crime. At the heart of that crime: a tempestuous marriage, a family on the fast track to self-destruction, and a myriad of secrets and lies as dark and turbulent as the Willamette River.</p>
The Devil in the White City: A Saga of Magic and Murder at the Fa...
by Erik Larson

Language

English

Pages

447

Publication Date

February 10, 2004

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>In <i>The Devil in the White City, </i>the smoke, romance, and mystery of the Gilded Age come alive as never before.</b><br /><br />Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America’s rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fair’s brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the country’s most important structures, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. The murderer was Henry H. Holmes, a young doctor who, in a malign parody of the White City, built his “World’s Fair Hotel” just west of the fairgrounds—a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium. <br /><br />Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is that Holmes really lived, walking the grounds of that dream city by the lake.<br /><br /> <i>The Devil in the White City</i> draws the reader into a time of magic and majesty, made all the more appealing by a supporting cast of real-life characters, including Buffalo Bill, Theodore Dreiser, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and others. Erik Larson’s gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both.<br /><br /> To find out more about this book, go to http://www.DevilInTheWhiteCity.com.
The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Hei...
by Kirk Wallace Johnson

Language

English

Pages

320

Publication Date

April 24, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>“Absorbing . . . Though it's non-fiction, <i>The Feather Thief</i> contains many of the elements of a classic thriller.” —Maureen Corrigan, NPR’s <i>Fresh Air</i><br /><br />“One of the most peculiar and memorable true-crime books ever.” —<i>Christian Science Monitor</i><br /><br /><b>A rollicking true-crime adventure and a captivating journey into an underground world of fanatical fly-tiers and plume peddlers, for readers of <i>The Stranger in the Woods</i>, <i>The Lost City of Z</i>, and <i>The Orchid Thief</i>.</b><br /><br /></b>On a cool June evening in 2009, after performing a concert at London's Royal Academy of Music, twenty-year-old American flautist Edwin Rist boarded a train for a suburban outpost of the British Museum of Natural History. Home to one of the largest ornithological collections in the world, the Tring museum was full of rare bird specimens whose gorgeous feathers were worth staggering amounts of money to the men who shared Edwin's obsession: the Victorian art of salmon fly-tying. Once inside the museum, the champion fly-tier grabbed hundreds of bird skins—some collected 150 years earlier by a contemporary of Darwin's, Alfred Russel Wallace, who'd risked everything to gather them—and escaped into the darkness.<b><br /><br /></b>Two years later, Kirk Wallace Johnson was waist high in a river in northern New Mexico when his fly-fishing guide told him about the heist. He was soon consumed by the strange case of the feather thief. What would possess a person to steal dead birds? Had Edwin paid the price for his crime? What became of the missing skins? In his search for answers, Johnson was catapulted into a years-long, worldwide investigation. The gripping story of a bizarre and shocking crime, and one man's relentless pursuit of justice, <i>The Feather Thief</i> is also a fascinating exploration of obsession, and man's destructive instinct to harvest the beauty of nature.
Mrs. Sherlock Holmes: The True Story of New York City's Greatest ...
by Brad Ricca

Language

English

Pages

452

Publication Date

January 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<span><span></span></span><i><span></span></i><span><b>Recipient of the </b></span><span><b><span><b><b><span><b><span><span><span>★ </span></span></span></b></span></b></b></span>Kirkus Star, Awarded to Books of Exceptional Merit</b></span><br /><span><b><span>A </span></b></span><span><b><span>2017 True Crime Book for Summer, </span></b></span><span><b><span><i>The New York Times Sunday Book Review</i></span></b><br /><br />"An express train of a story." -</span><span><span></span><i>Kirkus Reviews</i></span><span><b><b><span><b><span><span><span></span></span></span></b></span></b></b></span><i><span></span></i><br /><span><span>"Ricca makes a heroic case</span><i><span> </span></i><span>for Humiston...her inspiring story demands a hearing."</span><i><span> -The New York Times Sunday Book Review</span></i></span><i><span></span></i><br /><i><span></span></i><i><span><br />Mrs. Sherlock Holmes </span></i><span>tells the true story of Mrs. Grace Humiston, the detective and lawyer who turned her back on New York society life to become one of the nation's greatest crime fighters during an era when women weren't even allowed to vote. After graduating from N.Y.U. law school, Grace opened a legal clinic in the city for low-income immigrant clients, and quickly established a reputation as a fierce, but fair lawyer who was always on the side of the disenfranchised.</span><br /><div><span> </span><br /><span>Grace's motto "Justice for those of limited means" led her to strange cases all over the city, and eventually the world. From defending an innocent giant on death row to investigating an island in Arkansas with a terrible secret about slavery; from the warring halls of Congress to a crumbling medieval tower in Italy, Grace solved crimes in-between shopping at Bergdorf Goodman and being marked for death by the sinister Black Hand. She defended women clients who had killed their attackers and fought the framing of a Baltimore black man at the mercy of a corrupt police department. Known for dressing only in black, Grace was appointed the first woman U.S. district attorney in history. And when a pretty 18-year-old girl named Ruth Cruger went missing on Valentine's Day in New York, Grace took the case after  the police gave up. </span><span><span>Grace and her partner, the hard-boiled Hungarian detective Julius J. Kron, navigated a dangerous mystery of secret boyfriends, two-faced cops, underground tunnels, rumors of white slavery, and a mysterious pale man -- in a desperate race against time to save Ruth. When she solved the crime, she was made the first female consulting detective to the NYPD.</span></span><br /><span></span><br /><span>But despite her many successes in social and criminal justice, Grace began to see chilling connections in the cases she had solved, leading to a final showdown with her most fearsome adversary of all and one of the most powerful men of the twentieth century. </span><span></span><br /><span> </span><br /><span>This is the first-ever literary biography of the singular woman the press nicknamed after fiction's greatest detective. In the narrative tradition of <i>In Cold Blood</i> and <i>The Devil in the White City</i>, her poignant story unmasks unmistakable connections between missing girls, the role of the media, and the real truth of crime stories. The great mystery of <i>Mrs. Sherlock Holmes</i> -- and its haunting twist ending -- is how one woman dedicated to finding the missing herself become so lost to history?</span></div>
The Blood of Emmett Till
by Timothy B. Tyson

Language

English

Pages

305

Publication Date

January 31, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>* Longlisted for the National Book Award * </b><b>Winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award</b> *<b> A <i>New York Times</i> Notable Book</b> <b>* A <i>Washington Post</i> Notable Book * An NPR Best Book of 2017 * A <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Best Book of 2017 * An <i>Atlanta Journal-Constitution</i> Best Southern Book of 2017 *</b><BR> <BR> This extraordinary <i>New York Times</i> bestseller reexamines a pivotal event of the civil rights movement—the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till—“and demands that we do the one vital thing we aren’t often enough asked to do with history: learn from it” (<i>The Atlantic</i>).<BR><BR>In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional. Only weeks later, Rosa Parks thought about young Emmett as she refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Five years later, Black students who called themselves “the Emmett Till generation” launched sit-in campaigns that turned the struggle for civil rights into a mass movement. Till’s lynching became the most notorious hate crime in American history.<BR> <BR>But what actually happened to Emmett Till—not the icon of injustice, but the flesh-and-blood boy? Part detective story, part political history, <i>The Blood of Emmett Till</i> “unfolds like a movie” (<i>The Atlanta Journal-Constitution</i>), drawing on a wealth of new evidence, including a shocking admission of Till’s innocence from the woman in whose name he was killed. “Jolting and powerful” (<i>The Washington Post</i>), the book “provides fresh insight into the way race has informed and deformed our democratic institutions” (Diane McWhorter, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of <i>Carry Me Home</i>) and “calls us to the cause of justice today” (Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, president of the North Carolina NAACP).
The Disappearance of Kristin Smart
by Jodi Goggins

Language

English

Pages

173

Publication Date

June 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<H1>MISSING WOMEN</H1>An anthology of unsolved disappearances headlined by the case of Kristin Smart.... When Kristin Smart was 19, she had lofty goals. After growing up in Stockton, California, Kristin was almost finished her freshman year at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo in May of 1996.<BR><BR><br /><br />“She was a dreamer. She had expectations,” her mother, Denise Smart, said in an interview with FOX40 in May of 2018. “She was going to be a millionaire. She was going to be an architect. She was going to be Joan Lunden. She was going to travel the world – she had a very adventurous spirit.”<BR><BR><br /><br />But when Kristin called her mother on Memorial Day weekend in 1996, it was the last time her family would hear her voice. Three days later, Denise recalled, she got an SOS call from the Cal Poly Police Department, asking if they knew where their daughter was.<br /><BR><BR><br />Kristin had gone missing from campus.

Blog - Latest Entries

Roxane Gay Difficult Women Review
For avid readers, the advent of the Kindle was a godsend. It allowed them to expand their personal libraries as much as they wanted without worrying about taking up too much space. Along with increasing the potential for library depth, the kindle has also allowed for a more diverse reading taste. You can now take risks on books that you previously wouldnt have due to the Kindle eliminating sp...

David Foster Wallace Brief Interviews with Hideous Men & Girl with Curious Hair Reviews
The technology of the Kindle allows you to carry a library with you wherever you go. And, like a library, your Kindle collection should be vast and diverse. Aside from the New York Times Bestseller list, it can be hard to know which books are worth your time to download. Luckily, the literary cannon spans for generations. Of the most recent generation of literary greats, David Foster Wallac...

Junot Diaz The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Review
Kindle technology allows you to build an impressive collection of stories without filling shelves upon shelves with books. This convenience makes it possible to experiment with your reading choices without making the commitment to order a book, wait for its arrival, and sticking it on your shelf. Ive found that the Kindle has made me a much more adventurous reader. With this new-found adve...

Ernest Hemingway The Old Man and the Sea Review
As you start to increase your kindle collection, it is wise to download a variety of things to read. And sure, the latest serial novel is a great addition to the collection, but sometimes you need a literary classic. Luckily, there is a plethora of classics to choose from. When it comes to literary classics, there are few authors with a better reputation than Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway, so...

Stephen Kings On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
For fans of the suspense and horror genres, Stephen King is a household name. Chances are, if you read the genres at all, your kindles are filled with a novel or two of his. But Kings prolific career has not stayed within the genre. In fact, one of Kings greatest efforts came in the form of a nonfiction memoir. Kings On Writing blends personal memoir and advice on writing craft that resu...

More >>

Enter the Kind Reader Monthly Drawing

Kind Reader Monthly Drawing (March 2017)

Congratulations to February 2017's winner Henry H. of New York, USA.

There's a daily limit of 3 free e-books that can be downloaded at KindReader.com