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Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977-2002)
by David Sedaris

Language

English

Pages

529

Publication Date

May 30, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong></strong><strong>One of the most anticipated books of 2017: <i>Boston Globe, New York Times Book Review</i>, <i>New York</i>'s "Vulture", <i>The Week</i>, Bustle, BookRiot</strong><div><b><br /></b></div><div><b>An <i>NPR </i>Best Book of 2017</b></div><div><b>An AV Club Favorite Book of 2017</b><div><strong>A Barnes & Noble Best Book of 2017</strong></div><div><strong>A Goodreads Choice Awards nominee<br /><br /></strong><strong>David Sedaris tells all in a book that is, literally, a lifetime in the making<br /></strong><br />For forty years, David Sedaris has kept a diary in which he records everything that captures his attention-overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and through them he has honed his cunning, surprising sentences.<br /><br />Now, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world. <i>Theft by Finding</i>, the first of two volumes, is the story of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet.<br /><br />Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can't fully disguise, <i>Theft By Finding </i>proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It's a potent reminder that when you're as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, there's no such thing as a boring day<strong>.<br /></strong><strong></strong> </div> </div>
Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Other F...
by Michael Ausiello

Language

English

Pages

321

Publication Date

September 12, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
In this evocative and gorgeously wrought memoir reminiscent of Rob Sheffield’s <i>Love Is a Mixtape</i> and George Hodgman’s <i>Bettyville</i>, Michael Ausiello—a respected TV columnist and founder and editor-in-chief of <i>TVLine.com—</i>remembers his late husband, and the lessons, love, and laughter that they shared throughout their fourteen years together.<BR><BR>For the past decade, TV fans of all stripes have counted upon Michael Ausiello’s insider knowledge to get the scoop on their favorite shows and stars. From his time at <i>Soaps in Depth </i>to his influential stints at <i>TV Guide </i>and <i>Entertainment Weekly</i> to his current role as founder and editor-in-chief of the wildly popular website <i>TVLine.com</i>, Michael has established himself as <i>the </i>go-to expert when it comes to our most popular form of entertainment.<BR> <BR>What many of his fans don’t know, however, is that while his professional life was in full swing, Michael had to endure the greatest of personal tragedies: his husband, Kit Cowan, was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of neuroendocrine cancer. Over the course of eleven months, Kit and Michael did their best to combat the deadly disease, but Kit succumbed to his illness in February 2015.<BR> <BR>In this heartbreaking and darkly hilarious memoir, Michael tells the story of his harrowing and challenging last year with Kit while revisiting the thirteen years that preceded it, and how the undeniably powerful bond between him and Kit carried them through all manner of difficulty—always with laughter front and center in their relationship. Instead of a tale of sadness and loss, <i>Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies </i>is an unforgettable, inspiring, and beautiful testament to the resilience and strength of true love.
Logical Family: A Memoir
by Armistead Maupin

Language

English

Pages

309

Publication Date

October 03, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>"A book for any of us, gay or straight, who have had to find our family. Maupin is one of America’s finest storytellers."—Neil Gaiman</strong></p><p><strong>"I fell in love with Maupin’s effervescent Tales of the City decades ago, and his genius turn at memoir is no less compelling. <em>Logical Family</em> is a must read."—Mary Karr</strong></p><p>In this long-awaited memoir, the beloved author of the bestselling Tales of the City series chronicles his odyssey from the old South to freewheeling San Francisco, and his evolution from curious youth to ground-breaking writer and gay rights pioneer.</p><p>Born in the mid-twentieth century and raised in the heart of conservative North Carolina, Armistead Maupin lost his virginity to another man "on the very spot where the first shots of the Civil War were fired." Realizing that the South was too small for him, this son of a traditional lawyer packed his earthly belongings into his Opel GT (including a beloved portrait of a Confederate ancestor), and took to the road in search of adventure. It was a journey that would lead him from a homoerotic Navy initiation ceremony in the jungles of Vietnam to that strangest of strange lands: San Francisco in the early 1970s. </p><p>Reflecting on the profound impact those closest to him have had on his life, Maupin shares his candid search for his "logical family," the people he could call his own. "Sooner or later, we have to venture beyond our biological family to find our logical one, the one that actually makes sense for us," he writes. "We have to, if we are to live without squandering our lives." From his loving relationship with his palm-reading Grannie who insisted Maupin was the reincarnation of her artistic bachelor cousin, Curtis, to an awkward conversation about girls with President Richard Nixon in the Oval Office, Maupin tells of the extraordinary individuals and situations that shaped him into one of the most influential writers of the last century. </p><p>Maupin recalls his losses and life-changing experiences with humor and unflinching honesty, and brings to life flesh-and-blood characters as endearing and unforgettable as the vivid, fraught men and women who populate his enchanting novels. What emerges is an illuminating portrait of the man who depicted the liberation and evolution of America’s queer community over the last four decades with honesty and compassion—and inspired millions to claim their own lives.</p><p><em>Logical Family</em> includes black-and-white photographs.</p>
One of These Things First: A Memoir
by Steven Gaines

Language

English

Pages

272

Publication Date

August 09, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>From <I>New York Times–</I>bestselling author Steven Gaines comes a wry and touching memoir of his trials as a gay teen at the famed Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic.</B><BR /><BR /><I>One of These Things First</I> is a poignant reminiscence of a fifteen-year-old gay Jewish boy’s unexpected trajectory from a life behind a rack of dresses in his grandmother’s Brooklyn bra-and-girdle store to Manhattan’s infamous Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, whose alumni includes writers, poets, and madmen, as well as Marilyn Monroe and bestselling author Steven Gaines.<BR /><BR /> With a gimlet eye and a true gift for storytelling, Gaines captures his childhood shtetl in Brooklyn, and all its drama and secrets, like an Edward Hopper tableau: his philandering grandfather with his fleet of Cadillacs and Corvettes; a giant, empty movie theater, his portal to the outside world; a shirtless teenage boy pushing a lawnmower; and a pair of tormenting bullies whose taunts drive Gaines to a suicide attempt.<BR /><BR /> Gaines also takes the reader behind the walls of Payne Whitney—the “Harvard of psychiatric clinics,” as <I>Time</I> magazine called it—populated by a captivating group of neurasthenics who affect his life in unexpected ways. The cast of characters includes a famous Broadway producer who becomes his unlikely mentor; an elegant woman who claims to be the ex-mistress of newly elected president John F. Kennedy; a snooty, suicidal architect; and a seductive young <I>contessa</I>. At the center of the story is a brilliant young psychiatrist who promises to cure a young boy of his homosexuality and give him the normalcy he so longs for.<BR /><BR /> For readers who love stories of self-transformation, <I>One of These Things First</I> is a fascinating memoir in the vain of Susanna Kaysen’s <I>Girl, Interrupted</I> and Augusten Burroughs’s <I>Running with Scissors</I>. With its novelistic texture and unflagging narrative, this book is destined to become one of the great, indelible works of the memoir genre.</DIV>
A Body of Work: Dancing to the Edge and Back
by David Hallberg

Language

English

Pages

433

Publication Date

November 07, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
David Hallberg, the first American to join the famed Bolshoi Ballet as a principal dancer and the dazzling artist <i>The New Yorker </i>described as “the most exciting male dancer in the western world,” presents an intimate journey through his artistic life up to the moment he returns to the stage after a devastating injury almost cost him his career.<BR><BR>Beginning with his real-life Billy Elliot childhood—an all-American story marred by intense bullying—and culminating in his hard-won come-back, Hallberg’s brave memoir dives deep into life as an artist as he wrestles with ego, pushes the limits of his body, and searches for ecstatic perfection and fulfillment as one of the world’s most acclaimed ballet dancers.<BR> <BR>While rich in detail ballet fans will adore, this is a book that anyone interested in a life of creativity will love. Hallberg reflects on themes like inspiration, self-doubt, and perfectionism as he takes readers into daily class, rigorous rehearsals, and triumphant performances, searching for new interpretations of ballet’s greatest roles. He reveals the loneliness he felt as a teenager leaving America to join the Paris Opera Ballet, the ambition he had to tame as a new member of American Ballet Theatre, and the reasons behind his headline-grabbing decision to be the first American to join the top rank of Bolshoi Ballet, tendered by the artistic director who would later be the victim of a vicious acid attack. Then, as Hallberg performed throughout the world at the peak of his abilities, he suffered a crippling ankle injury and unsuccessful surgery leading to an agonizing retreat from ballet and an honest reexamination of his entire life.<BR> <BR>Combining his powers of observation and memory with emotional honesty and artistic insight, Hallberg has written a great ballet memoir and an intimate portrait of an artist in all his vulnerability, passion, and wisdom.
Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family
by Amy Ellis Nutt

Language

English

Pages

313

Publication Date

October 20, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER • A <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> NOTABLE BOOK • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>PEOPLE </i>AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>MEN’S JOURNAL</i> • A <b>STONEWALL HONOR BOOK IN NONFICTION • FINALIST FOR THE LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD FOR TRANSGENDER NONFICTION</b></b><br /><br />The inspiring true story of a transgender girl, her identical twin brother, and an ordinary American family’s extraordinary journey to understand, nurture, and celebrate the uniqueness in us all, from the Pulitzer Prize–winning science reporter for <i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> When Wayne and Kelly Maines adopted identical twin boys, they thought their lives were complete. But it wasn’t long before they noticed a marked difference between Jonas and his brother, Wyatt. Jonas preferred sports and trucks and many of the things little boys were “supposed” to like; but Wyatt liked princess dolls and dress-up and playing Little Mermaid. By the time the twins were toddlers, confusion over Wyatt’s insistence that he was female began to tear the family apart. In the years that followed, the Maineses came to question their long-held views on gender and identity, to accept and embrace Wyatt’s transition to Nicole, and to undergo an emotionally wrenching transformation of their own that would change all their lives forever.<br /><br /> <i>Becoming Nicole</i> chronicles a journey that could have destroyed a family but instead brought it closer together. It’s the story of a mother whose instincts told her that her child needed love and acceptance, not ostracism and disapproval; of a Republican, Air Force veteran father who overcame his deepest fears to become a vocal advocate for trans rights; of a loving brother who bravely stuck up for his twin sister; and of a town forced to confront its prejudices, a school compelled to rewrite its rules, and a courageous community of transgender activists determined to make their voices heard. Ultimately, <i>Becoming Nicole</i> is the story of an extraordinary girl who fought for the right to be herself.<br /><br /> Granted wide-ranging access to personal diaries, home videos, clinical journals, legal documents, medical records, and the Maineses themselves, Amy Ellis Nutt spent almost four years reporting this immersive account of an American family confronting an issue that is at the center of today’s cultural debate. <i>Becoming Nicole</i> will resonate with anyone who’s ever raised a child, felt at odds with society’s conventions and norms, or had to embrace life when it plays out unexpectedly. It’s a story of standing up for your beliefs and yourself—and it will inspire all of us to do the same.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Becoming Nicole</i></b><br /><br />“A profoundly moving true story about one remarkable family’s evolution.”<b>—<i>People</i></b><br /><br />“Fascinating and enlightening.”<b>—Cheryl Strayed</b><br /><br />“Exceptional . . . ‘Stories move the walls that need to be moved,’ Nicole told her father last year. In telling Nicole’s story and those of her brother and parents luminously, and with great compassion and intelligence, that is exactly what Amy Ellis Nutt has done.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br />“If you aren’t moved by <i>Becoming Nicole,</i> I’d suggest there’s a lump of dark matter where your heart should be.”<b>—Jennifer Senior, <i>The New York Times<br /></i></b><br />“Extraordinary . . . a wonderful and inspiring story.”<b>—Minneapolis <i>Star Tribune</i></b><br /><br />“A downright necessary book—and a remarkable act of generosity by the Maines family.”<b>—<i>BuzzFeed</i></b><br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
Bettyville: A Memoir
by George Hodgman

Language

English

Pages

290

Publication Date

March 10, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER<br /><br />FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD<br /><br /> “A beautifully crafted memoir, rich with humor and wisdom.” —Will Schwalbe, author of <i>The End of Your Life Book Club</i></b><br /><br />“The idea of a cultured gay man leaving New York City to care for his aging mother in Paris, Missouri, is already funny, and George Hodgman reaps that humor with great charm. But then he plunges deep, examining the warm yet fraught relationship between mother and son with profound insight and understanding.” —Alison Bechdel, author of <i>Fun Home</i><br /></b><br />When George Hodgman leaves Manhattan for his hometown of Paris, Missouri, he finds himself—an unlikely caretaker and near-lethal cook—in a head-on collision with his aging mother, Betty, a woman of wit and will. Will George lure her into assisted living? When hell freezes over. He can’t bring himself to force her from the home both treasure—the place where his father’s voice lingers, the scene of shared jokes, skirmishes, and, behind the dusty antiques, a rarely acknowledged conflict: Betty, who speaks her mind but cannot quite reveal her heart, has never really accepted the fact that her son is gay.<br /><br />As these two unforgettable characters try to bring their different worlds together, Hodgman reveals the challenges of Betty’s life and his own struggle for self-respect, moving readers from their small town—crumbling but still colorful—to the star-studded corridors of Vanity Fair. Evocative of <i>The End of Your Life Book Club </i>and <i>The Tender Bar</i>, Hodgman’s <i>New York Times</i> bestselling debut is both an indelible portrait of a family and an exquisitely told tale of a prodigal son’s return.<br /><br /><br /><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>
Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded
by Hannah Hart

Language

English

Pages

253

Publication Date

October 18, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>NEW YORK TIMES</em> BESTSELLER</strong></p><p><strong>With a New Afterword by the Author</strong></p><p><strong>"By turns hilarious and heartbreaking, Hannah Hart’s new book is a roaring, beautiful, and profoundly human account of an extraordinary life."—John Green </strong></p><p><strong>"Hannah shares her truth with an honesty that is inspiring—one that makes me believe her when she says that it’s going to get better or that laughter is just around the corner or that you aren’t alone."—Jenny Lawson, #1 <em>New York Times</em>bestselling author of <em>Let's Pretend This Never Happened</em>and <em>Furiously Happy</em> </strong></p><p>The wildly popular YouTube personality, star of Food Network's<em> I Hart Food,</em> and author of the <em>New York Times</em> bestseller <em>My Drunk Kitchen </em>is back! This time, she’s stirring up memories and tales from her past.</p><p>By combing through the journals that Hannah has kept for much of her life, this collection of narrative essays deliver a fuller picture of her life, her experiences, and the things she’s figured out about family, faith, love, sexuality, self-worth, friendship and fame.</p><p>Revealing what makes Hannah tick, this sometimes cringe-worthy, poignant collection of stories is sure to deliver plenty of Hannah’s wit and wisdom, and hopefully encourage you to try your hand at her patented brand of reckless optimism. </p><p>Personal note: </p><p>Hello, my darlings! I am incredibly pleased to present BUFFERING: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded!</p><p>As a big fan of memoirs, I wanted to try my hand at writing about the events of my life that deserve a little more consideration than can be accomplished in 140-characters or a 6-minute vlog. Now on the cusp of turning 30, I'm ready to expose some parts of my life that I haven't shared before. Before, it was all about privacy, process and time. And now the time has come! I’m ready to put myself out there, for you.  </p><p>I'm a little nervous about all these vulnerable words going into the world, these tales about my love life, the wrestling I’ve done with faith, how I feel about sex and my family and myself. I’ve had a lot of trials, a lot of errors, but also a lot of passion. Here’s the thing--I've always found comfort in the stories shared by others, so I hope my stories, now that I feel ready to tell them, will bring you some comfort too.</p><p>And when you read this book please remember: Buffering is just the time it takes to process.</p><p>Enjoy! </p><p>Love,</p><p>Hannah </p><p> </p><p> </p>
Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Mu...
by Janet Mock

Language

English

Pages

289

Publication Date

February 04, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<i>New York Times</i> Bestseller • Winner of the 2015 WOMEN'S WAY Book Prize • Goodreads Best of 2014 Semi-Finalist • Books for a Better Life Award Finalist • Lambda Literary Award Finalist • <i>Time</i> Magazine “30 Most Influential People on the Internet” • American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book<BR> <BR> In her profound and courageous <i>New York Times</i> bestseller, Janet Mock establishes herself as a resounding and inspirational voice for the transgender community—and anyone fighting to define themselves on their own terms.<BR><BR>With unflinching honesty and moving prose, Janet Mock relays her experiences of growing up young, multiracial, poor, and trans in America, offering readers accessible language while imparting vital insight about the unique challenges and vulnerabilities of a marginalized and misunderstood population. Though undoubtedly an account of one woman’s quest for self at all costs, <i>Redefining Realness</i> is a powerful vision of possibility and self-realization, pushing us all toward greater acceptance of one another—and of ourselves—showing as never before how to be unapologetic and real.
She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders
by Jennifer Finney Boylan

Language

English

Pages

324

Publication Date

April 30, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The provocative bestseller <i>She’s Not There </i>is the exuberant memoir of a man named James who became a woman named Jenny.</b><br /><br />She’s Not There is the story of a person changing genders, the story of a person bearing and finally revealing a complex secret; above all, it is a love story. By turns hilarious and deeply moving, Jennifer Finney Boylan explores the remarkable territory that lies between men and women, examines changing friendships, and rejoices in the redeeming power of family.<i> She’s Not There</i> is a portrait of a loving marriage—the love of James for his wife, Grace, and, against all odds, the enduring love of Grace for the woman who becomes her “sister,” Jenny.<br /><br />To this extraordinary true story, Boylan brings the humorous, fresh voice that won her accolades as one of the best comic novelists of her generation. With her distinctive and winning perspective,<i> She’s Not There</i> explores the dramatic outward changes and unexpected results of life as a woman: Jenny fights the urge to eat salad, while James consumed plates of ribs; gone is the stability of “one damn mood, all the damn time.”<br /><br />While Boylan’s own secret was unusual, to say the least, she captures the universal sense of feeling uncomfortable, out of sorts with the world, and misunderstood by her peers. Jenny is supported on her journey by her best friend, novelist Richard Russo, who goes from begging his friend to “Be a man” (in every sense of the word) to accepting her as an attractive, buoyant woman. “The most unexpected thing,” Russo writes in his Afterword to the book, “is in how Jenny’s story we recognize our shared humanity.”<br /><br />As James evolves into Jennifer in scenes that are by turns tender, startling, and witty, a marvelously human perspective emerges on issues of love, sex, and the fascinating relationship between our physical and our intuitive selves. Through the clear eyes of a truly remarkable woman,<i> She’s Not There</i> provides a new window on the often confounding process of accepting ourselves.

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