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Becoming
by Michelle Obama

Language

English

Pages

429

Publication Date

November 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States</b><br />  <br /> In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. <br />  <br /> In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, <i>Becoming</i> is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.
Educated: A Memoir
by Tara Westover

Language

English

Pages

336

Publication Date

February 20, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES, WALL STREET JOURNAL, </i>AND<i> BOSTON GLOBE </i>BESTSELLER • <i>WASHINGTON POST </i>AND <i>USA TODAY</i> BESTSELLER • LONGLISTED FOR THE CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S 2018 SUMMER READING • #1 <i>LIBRARYREADS</i> FAVORITE OF FAVORITES PICK • A <i>WASHINGTON POST</i> NOTABLE BOOK • ONE OF <i>TIME</i>’S TEN BEST NONFICTION BOOKS OF 2018 • ONE OF <i>PUBLISHERS WEEKLY</i>’S TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR • <i>PBS</i> <i>NEWSHOUR</i>/<i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BOOK OF THE MONTH</b><br /><br /><b>An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University</b><br /><br />“Beautiful and propulsive . . . Despite the singularity of [Tara Westover’s] childhood, the questions her book poses are universal: How much of ourselves should we give to those we love? And how much must we betray them to grow up?”—<i>Vogue</i><br /></b><br />Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Educated</i></b><br /><br />“Westover has somehow managed not only to capture her unsurpassably exceptional upbringing, but to make her current situation seem not so exceptional at all, and resonant for many others.”<b>—<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b><br /><br />“A heartbreaking, heartwarming, best-in-years memoir about striding beyond the limitations of birth and environment into a better life.”<b>—<i>USA Today<br /></i></b><br />“A coming-of-age memoir reminiscent of <i>The Glass Castle.”</i>—<b><i>O: The Oprah Magazine</i><br /></b><br />“Heart-wrenching . . . a beautiful testament to the power of education to open eyes and change lives.”<b>—Amy Chua, <i>The</i> <i>New York Times Book Review<br /><br /></i></b>“Westover is a keen and honest guide to the difficulties of filial love, and to the enchantment of embracing a life of the mind.”<b>—<i>The New Yorker</i></b>
In Pieces
by Sally Field

Language

English

Pages

417

Publication Date

September 18, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>In this intimate, haunting literary memoir, an American icon tells her own story for the first time--about a challenging and lonely childhood, the craft that helped her find her voice, and a powerful emotional legacy that shaped her journey as a daughter and a mother.</b></div> <br /><div><div>One of the most celebrated, beloved, and enduring actors of our time, Sally Field has an infectious charm that has captivated the nation for more than five decades, beginning with her first TV role at the age of seventeen. From <i>Gidget</i>'s sweet-faced "girl next door" to the dazzling complexity of <i>Sybil</i> to the Academy Award-worthy ferocity and depth of <i>Norma Rae </i>and Mary Todd Lincoln, Field has stunned audiences time and time again with her artistic range and emotional acuity. Yet there is one character who always remained hidden: the shy and anxious little girl within.</div><div><br /></div><div><div>With raw honesty and the fresh, pitch-perfect prose of a natural-born writer, and with all the humility and authenticity her fans have come to expect, Field brings readers behind-the-scenes for not only the highs and lows of her star-studded early career in Hollywood, but deep into the truth of her lifelong relationships--including her complicated love for her own mother. Powerful and unforgettable, <i>In Pieces</i> is an inspiring and important account of life as a woman in the second half of the twentieth century. </div></div></div><div><br /></div>
The Indifferent Stars Above: The Harrowing Saga of the Donner Par...
by Daniel James Brown

Language

English

Pages

384

Publication Date

April 17, 2009

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>From the #1 bestselling author of <em>The Boys in the Boat</em> comes an unforgettable epic of family, tragedy, and survival on the American frontier</strong></p><p><strong>“An ideal pairing of talent and material.… Engrossing.… A deft and ambitious storyteller.” – Mary Roach, <em>New York Times Book Review</em></strong></p><p>In April of 1846, twenty-one-year-old Sarah Graves, intent on a better future, set out west from Illinois with her new husband, her parents, and eight siblings. Seven months later, after joining a party of pioneers led by George Donner, they reached the Sierra Nevada Mountains as the first heavy snows of the season closed the pass ahead of them. In early December, starving and desperate, Sarah and fourteen others set out for California on snowshoes, and, over the next thirty-two days, endured almost unfathomable hardships and horrors.</p><p>In this gripping narrative, <em>New York Times </em>bestselling author Daniel James Brown sheds new light on one of the most legendary events in American history. Following every painful footstep of Sarah’s journey with the Donner Party, Brown produces a tale both spellbinding and richly informative.</p>
Jefferson's Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young...
by Catherine Kerrison

Language

English

Pages

409

Publication Date

January 30, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>The remarkable untold story of Thomas Jefferson’s three daughters—two white and free, one black and enslaved—and the divergent paths they forged in a newly independent America</b><br />  <br /> Thomas Jefferson had three daughters: Martha and Maria by his wife, Martha Wayles Jefferson, and Harriet by his slave Sally Hemings. In <i>Jefferson’s Daughters,</i> Catherine Kerrison, a scholar of early American and women’s history, recounts the remarkable journey of these three women—and how their struggle to define themselves reflects both the possibilities and the limitations that resulted from the American Revolution.<br />             <br /> Although the three women shared a father, the similarities end there. Martha and Maria received a fine convent school education while they lived with their father during his diplomatic posting in Paris—a hothouse of intellectual ferment whose celebrated <i>salonnières</i> are vividly brought to life in Kerrison’s narrative. Once they returned home, however, the sisters found their options limited by the laws and customs of early America. <br />             <br /> Harriet Hemings followed a different path. She escaped slavery—apparently with the assistance of Jefferson himself. Leaving Monticello behind, she boarded a coach and set off for a decidedly uncertain future.<br />             <br /> For this groundbreaking triple biography, Kerrison has uncovered never-before-published documents written by the Jefferson sisters when they were in their teens, as well as letters written by members of the Jefferson and Hemings families. She has interviewed Hemings family descendants (and, with their cooperation, initiated DNA testing) and searched for descendants of Harriet Hemings. <br />             <br /> The eventful lives of Thomas Jefferson’s daughters provide a unique vantage point from which to examine the complicated patrimony of the American Revolution itself.  The richly interwoven story of these three strong women and their fight to shape their own destinies sheds new light on the ongoing movement toward human rights in America—and on the personal and political legacy of one of our most controversial Founding Fathers.<br /><br /><b>“Beautifully written . . . To a nuanced study of Jefferson’s two white daughters, Martha and Maria, [Kerrison] innovatively adds a discussion of his only enslaved daughter, Harriet Hemings.”—<i>The New York Times Book Review</i></b>
Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviatio...
by Keith O'Brien

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

March 05, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>A<I> NEW YORK TIMES</I> BESTSELLER<BR /><BR /> “Exhilarating.” —<I>New York Times Book Review</I></B><BR /><BR /> “<B>Riveting.</B>”<B> —<I>People</I></B><BR /><BR /><B>“Keith O’Brien has brought these women—mostly long-hidden and forgotten—back into the light where they belong. And he’s done it with grace, sensitivity and a cinematic eye for detail that makes <I>Fly Girls</I> both exhilarating and heartbreaking.” —<I>USA Today</I></B><BR /><BR /><B>The untold story of five women who fought to compete against men in the high-stakes national air races of the 1920s and 1930s — and won</B><BR />  <BR /> Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi‑day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed. Female pilots were more often ridiculed than praised for what the press portrayed as silly efforts to horn in on a manly, and deadly, pursuit. <I>Fly Girls</I> recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky.<BR /><BR /> O’Brien weaves together the stories of five remarkable women: Florence Klingensmith, a high‑school dropout who worked for a dry cleaner in Fargo, North Dakota; Ruth Elder, an Alabama divorcee; Amelia Earhart, the most famous, but not necessarily the most skilled; Ruth Nichols, who chafed at the constraints of her blue‑blood family’s expectations; and Louise Thaden, the mother of two young kids who got her start selling coal in Wichita. Together, they fought for the chance to race against the men — and in 1936 one of them would triumph in the toughest race of all.<BR />  <BR /> Like <I>Hidden Figures</I> and <I>Girls of Atomic City</I>, <I>Fly Girls</I> celebrates a little-known slice of history in which tenacious, trail-blazing women braved all obstacles to achieve greatness.</DIV>
We're Going to Need More Wine: Stories That Are Funny, Complicate...
by Gabrielle Union

Language

English

Pages

266

Publication Date

October 17, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong><em>NEW YORK TIMES</em> BESTSELLER</strong></p><p><strong>Nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work</strong></p><p><strong>Named a Best Book of the Year by The Root</strong></p><p><strong>Chosen by Emma Straub as a Best New Celebrity Memoir</strong></p><p><strong>“A book of essays as raw and honest as anyone has ever produced.” — Lena Dunham, Lenny Letter</strong></p><p>In the spirit of Amy Poehler’s <em>Yes Please, </em>Lena Dunham’s <em>Not That Kind of Girl</em>, and Roxane Gay's <em>Bad Feminist</em>, a powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman.</p><p>One month before the release of the highly anticipated film <em>The Birth of a Nation,</em> actress Gabrielle Union shook the world with a vulnerable and impassioned editorial in which she urged our society to have compassion for victims of sexual violence. In the wake of rape allegations made against director and actor Nate Parker, Union—a forty-four-year-old actress who launched her career with roles in iconic ’90s movies—instantly became the insightful, outspoken actress that Hollywood has been desperately awaiting. With honesty and heartbreaking wisdom, she revealed her own trauma as a victim of sexual assault: "It is for you that I am speaking. This is real. We are real." </p><p>In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.</p>
The Audacity of Inez Burns: Dreams, Desire, Treachery & Ruin in t...
by Stephen G. Bloom

Language

English

Pages

448

Publication Date

February 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<B>THE </B><B>VIVID, SCANDAL-FILLED STORY OF A SHREWD, RAGS-TO-RICHES MILLIONAIRESS AND THE RUTHLESS POLITICIAN WHO PURSUED HER, TOLD AGAINST THE EFFERVESCENT BACKDROP OF AMERICA’S GOLDEN CITY—SAN FRANCISCO.</B><BR><BR>San Francisco, until the mid-1940s, was a city that lived by its own rules, fast and loose. Formed by the gold rush and destroyed by the 1906 earthquake, it served as a pleasure palace for the legions of men who sought their fortunes in the California foothills. For the women who followed, their only choice was to support, serve, or submit.<BR> <BR> Inez Burns was different. She put everyone to shame with her dazzling, calculated, stone-cold ambition.<BR> <BR> Born in the slums of San Francisco to a cigar-rolling alcoholic, Inez transformed herself into one of California’s richest women, becoming a notorious powerbroker, grand dame, and iconoclast. A stunning beauty with perfumed charm, she rose from manicurist to murderess to millionaire, seducing one man after another, bearing children out of wedlock, and bribing politicians and cops along the way to secure her place in the San Francisco firmament.<BR> <BR> Inez ruled with incandescent flair. She owned five hundred hats and a closet full of furs, had two small toes surgically removed to fit into stylish high heels, and had two ribs excised to accentuate her hourglass figure. Her presence was defined by couture dresses from Paris, red-carpet strutting at the San Francisco Opera, and a black Pierce-Arrow that delivered her everywhere. She threw outrageous parties on her sprawling, eight-hundred-acre horse ranch, a compound with servants, cooks, horse groomers, and trainers, where politicians, judges, attorneys, Hollywood moguls, and entertainers gamboled over silver fizzes.<BR> <BR> Inez was adored by the desperate women who sought her out—and loathed by the power-hungry men who plotted to destroy her.<BR> <BR> During a time when women risked their lives with predatory practitioners lurking in back alleys, Inez and her team of women, clad in crisp, white nurse’s uniforms, worked night and day in her elegantly appointed clinic, performing fifty thousand of the safest, most hygienic abortions available during a time when even the richest wives, Hollywood stars, and mistresses had few options when they found themselves with an unwanted pregnancy.<BR> <BR> Inez’s illegal business bestowed upon her power and influence—until a determined politician by the name of Edmund G. (Pat) Brown—the father of current California Governor Jerry Brown—used Inez to catapult his nascent career to national prominence.<BR> <BR> In <i>The Audacity of Inez Burns</i>, Stephen G. Bloom, the author of the bestselling <i>Postville, </i>reveals a jagged slice of lost American history. From Inez’s riveting tale of glamour and tragedy, he has created a brilliant, compulsively readable portrait of an unforgettable woman during a moment when America’s pendulum swung from compassion to criminality by punishing those who permitted women to control their own destinies.
Stalin's Daughter: The Extraordinary and Tumultuous Life of Svetl...
by Rosemary Sullivan

Language

English

Pages

759

Publication Date

June 02, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>Winner of the Plutarch Award for Best Biography</strong></p><p><strong>National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist</strong></p><p><strong>PEN Literary Award Finalist</strong></p><p><strong><em>New York Times </em>Notable Book</strong></p><p><strong><em>Washington Post </em>Notable Book</strong></p><p><strong><em>Boston Globe </em>Best Book of the Year</strong></p><p>The award-winning author of <em>Villa Air-Bel</em> returns with a painstakingly researched, revelatory biography of Svetlana Stalin, a woman fated to live her life in the shadow of one of history’s most monstrous dictators—her father, Josef Stalin.</p><p>Born in the early years of the Soviet Union, Svetlana Stalin spent her youth inside the walls of the Kremlin. Communist Party privilege protected her from the mass starvation and purges that haunted Russia, but she did not escape tragedy—the loss of everyone she loved, including her mother, two brothers, aunts and uncles, and a lover twice her age, deliberately exiled to Siberia by her father.</p><p>As she gradually learned about the extent of her father’s brutality after his death, Svetlana could no longer keep quiet and in 1967 shocked the world by defecting to the United States—leaving her two children behind. But although she was never a part of her father’s regime, she could not escape his legacy. Her life in America was fractured; she moved frequently, married disastrously, shunned other Russian exiles, and ultimately died in poverty in Wisconsin.</p><p>With access to KGB, CIA, and Soviet government archives, as well as the close cooperation of Svetlana’s daughter, Rosemary Sullivan pieces together Svetlana’s incredible life in a masterful account of unprecedented intimacy. Epic in scope, it’s a revolutionary biography of a woman doomed to be a political prisoner of her father’s name. Sullivan explores a complicated character in her broader context without ever losing sight of her powerfully human story, in the process opening a closed, brutal world that continues to fascinate us.</p><p>Illustrated with photographs.</p>
The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story
by Hyeonseo Lee

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

July 02, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER</h2><p>An extraordinary insight into life under one of the world’s most ruthless and secretive dictatorships – and the story of one woman’s terrifying struggle to avoid capture/repatriation and guide her family to freedom.</p><p>As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee was one of millions trapped by a secretive and brutal communist regime. Her home on the border with China gave her some exposure to the world beyond the confines of the Hermit Kingdom and, as the famine of the 1990s struck, she began to wonder, question and to realise that she had been brainwashed her entire life. Given the repression, poverty and starvation she witnessed surely her country could not be, as she had been told “the best on the planet”?</p><p>Aged seventeen, she decided to escape North Korea. She could not have imagined that it would be twelve years before she was reunited with her family.</p>

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