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Becoming
by Michelle Obama

Language

English

Pages

429

Publication Date

November 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States</b><br />  <br /> In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. <br />  <br /> In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, <i>Becoming</i> is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.
Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom
by David W. Blight

Language

English

Pages

913

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A <i>TIME</i> TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR</b><BR> <BR><b>The definitive, dramatic biography of the most important African American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era.</b><BR><BR>As a young man Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was fortunate to have been taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. He wrote three versions of his autobiography over the course of his lifetime and published his own newspaper. His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: with dignity and great intelligence he bore witness to the brutality of slavery.<BR> <BR>Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, often to large crowds, using his own story to condemn slavery. He broke with Garrison to become a political abolitionist, a Republican, and eventually a Lincoln supporter. By the Civil War and during Reconstruction, Douglass became the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. He denounced the premature end of Reconstruction and the emerging Jim Crow era. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. He sometimes argued politically with younger African-Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights.<BR> <BR>In this remarkable biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. Blight tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. Douglass was not only an astonishing man of words, but a thinker steeped in Biblical story and theology. There has not been a major biography of Douglass in a quarter century. David Blight’s <i>Frederick Douglass</i> affords this important American the distinguished biography he deserves.
The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story
by Hyeonseo Lee

Language

English

Pages

322

Publication Date

July 02, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<h2>NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER</h2><p>An extraordinary insight into life under one of the world’s most ruthless and secretive dictatorships – and the story of one woman’s terrifying struggle to avoid capture/repatriation and guide her family to freedom.</p><p>As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee was one of millions trapped by a secretive and brutal communist regime. Her home on the border with China gave her some exposure to the world beyond the confines of the Hermit Kingdom and, as the famine of the 1990s struck, she began to wonder, question and to realise that she had been brainwashed her entire life. Given the repression, poverty and starvation she witnessed surely her country could not be, as she had been told “the best on the planet”?</p><p>Aged seventeen, she decided to escape North Korea. She could not have imagined that it would be twelve years before she was reunited with her family.</p>
Enrique's Journey: The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reun...
by Sonia Nazario

Language

English

Pages

426

Publication Date

January 02, 2007

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An astonishing story that puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States, now updated with a new Epilogue and Afterword, photos of Enrique and his family, an author interview, and more—the definitive edition of a classic of contemporary America</b><br /> <b> </b><br /> Based on the <i>Los Angeles Times</i> newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject.<br />  <br /> <i>Enrique’s Journey</i> recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops. But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: “This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one.”<br /> <b> </b><br /><b>Praise for <i>Enrique<i>’s Journey</i></i></b><br /><br /> “Magnificent . . . <i>Enrique’s Journey</i> is about love. It’s about family. It’s about home.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post Book World</i></b><br /> <i> </i><br /> “[A] searing report from the immigration frontlines . . . as harrowing as it is heartbreaking.”<b>—<i>People</i> (four stars)</b><br />  <br /> “Stunning . . . As an adventure narrative alone, <i>Enrique’s Journey</i> is a worthy read. . . . Nazario’s impressive piece of reporting [turns] the current immigration controversy from a political story into a personal one.”<b>—<i>Entertainment Weekly</i></b><br />  <br /> “Gripping and harrowing . . . a story begging to be told.”<b>—<i>The Christian Science Monitor</i></b><br /> <i> </i><br /> “[A] prodigious feat of reporting . . . [Sonia Nazario is] amazingly thorough and intrepid.”<b>—<i>Newsday</i></b>
Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
by Bryan Stevenson

Language

English

Pages

354

Publication Date

October 21, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • <b>A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice—from one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time<br /><br />SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE STARRING MICHAEL B. JORDAN AND JAMIE FOXX</b><br /><br /><b>Named one of the Best Books of the Year by <i>The New York Times • The Washington Post • The Boston Globe • The Seattle Times • Esquire • Time</i></b><br /></b></b><br /> Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.<br /><br /> <i>Just Mercy </i>is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.<br /><br /><b>Winner of the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction • Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Nonfiction • Winner of a Books for a Better Life Award • Finalist for the <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Book Prize • Finalist for the <i>Kirkus Reviews </i>Prize • An American Library Association Notable Book</b><br /><br />“Every bit as moving as <i>To Kill a Mockingbird, </i>and in some ways more so . . . a searing indictment of American criminal justice and a stirring testament to the salvation that fighting for the vulnerable sometimes yields.”<b>—David Cole, <i>The New York Review of Books</i></b><br /><br /> “Searing, moving . . . Bryan Stevenson may, indeed, be America’s Mandela.”<b>—Nicholas Kristof, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “You don’t have to read too long to start cheering for this man. . . . The message of this book . . . is that evil can be overcome, a difference can be made. <i>Just Mercy</i> will make you upset and it will make you hopeful.”<b>—Ted Conover, <i>The New York Times Book Review </i></b><br /><br /> “Inspiring . . . a work of style, substance and clarity . . . Stevenson is not only a great lawyer, he’s also a gifted writer and storyteller.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “As deeply moving, poignant and powerful a book as has been, and maybe ever can be, written about the death penalty.”<b><i>—The Financial Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Brilliant.”<b><i>—The Philadelphia Inquirer</i></b><br /><br /> “Not since Atticus Finch has a fearless and committed lawyer made such a difference in the American South. Though larger than life, Atticus exists only in fiction. Bryan Stevenson, however, is very much alive and doing God’s work fighting for the poor, the oppressed, the voiceless, the vulnerable, the outcast, and those with no hope. <i>Just Mercy</i> is his inspiring and powerful story.”<b>—John Grisham</b><br /><br /> “Bryan Stevenson is one of my personal heroes, perhaps the most inspiring and influential crusader for justice alive today, and <i>Just Mercy</i> is extraordinary. The stories told within these pages hold the potential to transform what we think we mean when we talk about justice.”<b>—Michelle Alexander, author of <i>The New Jim Crow</i></b>
All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir
by Nicole Chung

Language

English

Pages

240

Publication Date

October 02, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Named a Best Book of Fall by <i>The Washington Post</i>, <i>Entertainment Weekly</i>, <i>TIME</i>, <i>Elle</i>, and more<br /><br /></b> "This book moved me to my very core. . . . [<i>All You Can Ever Know</i>] should be required reading for anyone who has ever had, wanted, or found a family―which is to say, everyone.” <b>―Celeste Ng, author of <i>Little Fires Everywhere</i><br /><br /></b><br /><br /> What does it mean to lose your roots—within your culture, within your family—and what happens when you find them? <br /><br /> Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up—facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn’t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from—she wondered if the story she’d been told was the whole truth. <br /><br /> With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Nicole Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. <i>All You Can Ever Know</i> is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets—vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong.
A River in Darkness: One Man's Escape from North Korea
by Masaji Ishikawa

Language

English

Pages

174

Publication Date

January 01, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An Amazon Charts Most Read and Most Sold book.</b></p><p><b>The harrowing true story of one man’s life in—and subsequent escape from—North Korea, one of the world’s most brutal totalitarian regimes.</b></p><p>Half-Korean, half-Japanese, Masaji Ishikawa has spent his whole life feeling like a man without a country. This feeling only deepened when his family moved from Japan to North Korea when Ishikawa was just thirteen years old, and unwittingly became members of the lowest social caste. His father, himself a Korean national, was lured to the new Communist country by promises of abundant work, education for his children, and a higher station in society. But the reality of their new life was far from utopian.</p><p>In this memoir translated from the original Japanese, Ishikawa candidly recounts his tumultuous upbringing and the brutal thirty-six years he spent living under a crushing totalitarian regime, as well as the challenges he faced repatriating to Japan after barely escaping North Korea with his life. <i>A River in Darkness</i> is not only a shocking portrait of life inside the country but a testament to the dignity—and indomitable nature—of the human spirit.</p>
Heavy: An American Memoir
by Kiese Laymon

Language

English

Pages

257

Publication Date

October 16, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>*Shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal and Kirkus Prize Finalist*</b><BR> <BR> <b>In this powerful and provocative memoir, genre-bending essayist and novelist Kiese Laymon explores what the weight of a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception does to a black body, a black family, and a nation teetering on the brink of moral collapse.</b><BR><BR>Kiese Laymon is a fearless writer. In his essays, personal stories combine with piercing intellect to reflect both on the state of American society and on his experiences with abuse, which conjure conflicted feelings of shame, joy, confusion and humiliation. Laymon invites us to consider the consequences of growing up in a nation wholly obsessed with progress yet wholly disinterested in the messy work of reckoning with where we’ve been.<BR> <BR>In <i>Heavy</i>, Laymon writes eloquently and honestly about growing up a hard-headed black son to a complicated and brilliant black mother in Jackson, Mississippi. From his early experiences of sexual violence, to his suspension from college, to his trek to New York as a young college professor, Laymon charts his complex relationship with his mother, grandmother, anorexia, obesity, sex, writing, and ultimately gambling. By attempting to name secrets and lies he and his mother spent a lifetime avoiding, Laymon asks himself, his mother, his nation, and us to confront the terrifying possibility that few in this nation actually know how to responsibly love, and even fewer want to live under the weight of actually becoming free.<BR> <BR> A personal narrative that illuminates national failures, <i>Heavy </i>is defiant yet vulnerable, an insightful, often comical exploration of weight, identity, art, friendship, and family that begins with a confusing childhood—and continues through twenty-five years of haunting implosions and long reverberations.
Street of Eternal Happiness: Big City Dreams Along a Shanghai Roa...
by Rob Schmitz

Language

English

Pages

337

Publication Date

May 17, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><b>An unforgettable portrait of individuals who hope, struggle, and grow along a single street cutting through the heart of Shanghai, from one of the most acclaimed broadcast journalists reporting on China.</b><br /> <br />Modern Shanghai: a global city in the midst of a renaissance, where dreamers arrive each day to partake in a mad torrent of capital, ideas, and opportunity. <i>Marketplace</i>’s Rob Schmitz is one of them. He immerses himself in his neighborhood, forging deep relationships with ordinary people who see in the city’s sleek skyline a brighter future, and a chance to rewrite their destinies. There’s Zhao, whose path from factory floor to shopkeeper is sidetracked by her desperate measures to ensure a better future for her sons. Down the street lives Auntie Fu, a fervent capitalist forever trying to improve herself with religion and get-rich-quick schemes while keeping her skeptical husband at bay. Up a flight of stairs, musician and café owner CK sets up shop to attract young dreamers like himself, but learns he’s searching for something more. As Schmitz becomes more involved in their lives, he makes surprising discoveries which untangle the complexities of modern China: A mysterious box of letters that serve as a portal to a family’s—and country’s—dark past, and an abandoned neighborhood where fates have been violently altered by unchecked power and greed. <br /> <br />A tale of 21st-century China, <i>Street of Eternal Happiness </i>profiles China’s distinct generations through multifaceted characters who illuminate an enlightening, humorous, and at times heartrending journey along the winding road to the Chinese Dream. Each story adds another layer of humanity and texture to modern China, a tapestry also woven with Schmitz’s insight as a foreign correspondent. The result is an intimate and surprising portrait that dispenses with the tired stereotypes of a country we think we know, immersing us instead in the vivid stories of the people who make up one of the world’s most captivating cities.</p>
Between the World and Me
by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Language

English

Pages

155

Publication Date

July 14, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (<i>The New York Observer</i>)</b><br /><br />#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | <b>NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • <b><i>Entertainment Weekly • </i></b>Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly</i></b><br /></b></b><br />In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?<br /><br /> <i>Between the World and Me </i>is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, <i>Between the World and Me </i>clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Between the World and Me</i></b><br /><br />“Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”<b>—Michiko Kakutani, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s <i>Invisible Man</i> . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”<b>—<i>The Boston Globe</i></b><br /><br /> “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”<b>—<i>Vogue</i></b><br /><br /> “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”<b>—<i>The New Yorker</i></b><br /><br /> “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”<b>—<i>Entertainment Weekly</i></b>

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