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Becoming
by Michelle Obama

Language

English

Pages

428

Publication Date

November 13, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States</b><br />  <br /><b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER</b><br /><br /> In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. <br />  <br /> In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, <i>Becoming</i> is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.
Michelle Obama: A Life
by Peter Slevin

Language

English

Pages

450

Publication Date

April 07, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>This is the inspiring story of a modern American icon, the first comprehensive account of the life and times of Michelle Obama. </b><br /><br />With disciplined reporting and a storyteller’s eye for revealing detail, Peter Slevin follows Michelle to the White House from her working-class childhood on Chicago’s largely segregated South Side. He illuminates her tribulations at Princeton University and Harvard Law School during the racially charged 1980s and the dilemmas she faced in Chicago while building a high-powered career, raising a family, and helping a young community organizer named Barack Obama become president of the United States. <br /><br />From the lessons she learned in Chicago to the messages she shares as one of the most recognizable women in the world, the story of this First Lady is the story of America. <i>Michelle Obama: A Life</i> is a fresh and compelling view of a woman of unique achievement and purpose.  <br /><br /><p><b> </b></p>
Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
by Bryan Stevenson

Language

English

Pages

354

Publication Date

October 21, 2014

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES </i>BESTSELLER • <b>A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice—from one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time<b>, as seen in the HBO documentary <i>True Justice</i></b><br /><br /> “[Bryan Stevenson’s] dedication to fighting for justice and equality has inspired me and many others and made a lasting impact on our country.”<b>—John Legend</b><br /><br />SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE STARRING MICHAEL B. JORDAN AND JAMIE FOXX • Named One of the Best Books of the Year by <i>The New York Times • The Washington Post • The Boston Globe • The Seattle Times • Esquire • Time</i></b><br /></b></b><br /> Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.<br /><br /> <i>Just Mercy </i>is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.<br /><br /><b>Winner of the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction • Winner of the NAACP Image Award for Nonfiction • Winner of a Books for a Better Life Award • Finalist for the <i>Los Angeles Times</i> Book Prize • Finalist for the <i>Kirkus Reviews </i>Prize • An American Library Association Notable Book</b><br /><br />“Every bit as moving as <i>To Kill a Mockingbird, </i>and in some ways more so . . . a searing indictment of American criminal justice and a stirring testament to the salvation that fighting for the vulnerable sometimes yields.”<b>—David Cole, <i>The New York Review of Books</i></b><br /><br /> “Searing, moving . . . Bryan Stevenson may, indeed, be America’s Mandela.”<b>—Nicholas Kristof, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “You don’t have to read too long to start cheering for this man. . . . The message of this book . . . is that evil can be overcome, a difference can be made. <i>Just Mercy</i> will make you upset and it will make you hopeful.”<b>—Ted Conover, <i>The New York Times Book Review </i></b><br /><br /> “Inspiring . . . a work of style, substance and clarity . . . Stevenson is not only a great lawyer, he’s also a gifted writer and storyteller.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “As deeply moving, poignant and powerful a book as has been, and maybe ever can be, written about the death penalty.”<b><i>—The Financial Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Brilliant.”<b><i>—The Philadelphia Inquirer</i></b>
Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love
by Dani Shapiro

Language

English

Pages

250

Publication Date

January 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER <br /><br />“A gripping genetic detective story, and a meditation on the meaning of parenthood and family.” —Jennifer Egan, author of <i>Manhattan Beach</i> </b><br /> <b><i> </i></b><br /> <b>From the acclaimed, best-selling memoirist, novelist—“a writer of rare talent” (Cheryl Strayed)— and <b> host of the hit podcast <i>Family Secrets, </i>comes </b>a memoir about the staggering family secret uncovered by a genealogy test: an exploration of the urgent ethical questions surrounding fertility treatments and DNA testing, and a profound inquiry of paternity, identity, and love.</b><br /><br />What makes us who we are? What combination of memory, history, biology, experience, and that ineffable thing called the soul defines us?<br />      In the spring of 2016, through a genealogy website to which she had whimsically submitted her DNA for analysis, Dani Shapiro received the stunning news that her father was not her biological father. She woke up one morning and her entire history--the life she had lived--crumbled beneath her.<br /> <i>Inheritance </i>is a book about secrets--secrets within families, kept out of shame or self-protectiveness; secrets we keep from one another in the name of love. It is the story of a woman's urgent quest to unlock the story of her own identity, a story that has been scrupulously hidden from her for more than fifty years, years she had spent writing brilliantly, and compulsively, on themes of identity and family history. It is a book about the extraordinary moment we live in--a moment in which science and technology have outpaced not only medical ethics but also the capacities of the human heart to contend with the consequences of what we discover.
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of...
by S. C. Gwynne

Language

English

Pages

396

Publication Date

May 05, 2010

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize</b><br /> This stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West was a major <i>New York Times</i> bestseller.<br /><br />In the tradition of <i>Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, </i>a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all.<br /> <br /> S. C. Gwynne’s <i>Empire of the Summer Moon</i><b> </b>spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches.<br /> <br /> Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled <i>backward </i>by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun.<br /> <br /> The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being.<br /> <br /> Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the “White Squaw” who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend.<br /> <br /> S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. <i>Empire of the Summer Moon </i>announces him as a major new writer of American history.
The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row (Op...
by , Lara Love Hardin

Language

English

Pages

359

Publication Date

March 27, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<strong>OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB SUMMER 2018 SELECTION<br /></strong><br /><strong>A powerful, revealing story of hope, love, justice, and the power of reading by a man who spent thirty years on death row for a crime he didn't commit.<br /> </strong><br /><strong><br />“An amazing and heartwarming story, it restores our faith in the inherent goodness of humanity.”<br /> - Archbishop Desmond Tutu<br /></strong><br /> In 1985, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder in Alabama. Stunned, confused, and only twenty-nine years old, Hinton knew that it was a case of mistaken identity and believed that the truth would prove his innocence and ultimately set him free.<br /><br />But with no money and a different system of justice for a poor black man in the South, Hinton was sentenced to death by electrocution. He spent his first three years on Death Row at Holman State Prison in agonizing silence—full of despair and anger toward all those who had sent an innocent man to his death. But as Hinton realized and accepted his fate, he resolved not only to survive, but find a way to live on Death Row. For the next twenty-seven years he was a beacon—transforming not only his own spirit, but those of his fellow inmates, fifty-four of whom were executed mere feet from his cell. With the help of civil rights attorney and bestselling author of <em>Just Mercy,</em> Bryan Stevenson, Hinton won his release in 2015.<br /><br />With a foreword by Stevenson, <em>The Sun Does Shine</em> is an extraordinary testament to the power of hope sustained through the darkest times. Destined to be a classic memoir of wrongful imprisonment and freedom won, Hinton’s memoir tells his dramatic thirty-year journey and shows how you can take away a man’s freedom, but you can’t take away his imagination, humor, or joy.
Taken for Granted: How Conservatism Can Win Back the Americans Th...
by Gianno Caldwell

Language

English

Pages

213

Publication Date

November 12, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b>A Fox News political analyst tackles some of our communities’ toughest challenges with timely insight from his own life: the story of how conservative values helped a kid from the South Side of Chicago find a life of opportunity.</b><br /></b><br /><b>“A must-read.”—Brian Kilmeade, bestselling author of <i>Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers</i></b><br /><br />Born to a mother consumed by drugs and raised by his grandmother in poverty on the South Side of Chicago, Gianno Caldwell saw firsthand how lawmakers from both parties have failed African American voters on issues like poverty, welfare, and education. But as someone who beat the odds growing up under a fear-based mentality that limits what people can achieve, Caldwell believes there’s another way.<br /><br />In this groundbreaking book, the Fox News analyst describes his personal journey while detailing a hopeful vision for a nation no longer beholden to identity politics and self-limitations. Trapped within the expectations and traditions of our communities, families, political parties, faith, race, and gender, we fail to challenge our politicians and ourselves to create real change. Now more than ever, we need to confront preconceived notions about the Democrats and Republicans, public policy, and American history. <br /><br />Looking at the obstacles facing urban communities, such as crime, education, and social mobility, Caldwell digs beneath the statistics. By spotlighting the moments that enabled his rise to success, he proffers steps that can help more people overcome the odds—whether through policy reform or the heroic efforts of men and women who are already working to make a difference in their own communities.
Between the World and Me
by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Language

English

Pages

155

Publication Date

July 14, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b><b><b>Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (<i>The New York Observer</i>)</b><br /><br />#1 <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | <b>NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY <i>The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • <b><i>Entertainment Weekly • </i></b>Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly</i></b><br /></b></b><br />In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?<br /><br /> <i>Between the World and Me </i>is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, <i>Between the World and Me </i>clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward.<br /><br /><b>Praise for <i>Between the World and Me</i></b><br /><br />“Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”<b>—Michiko Kakutani, <i>The New York Times</i></b><br /><br /> “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s <i>Invisible Man</i> . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”<b>—<i>The Boston Globe</i></b><br /><br /> “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”<b>—<i>The Washington Post</i></b><br /><br /> “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”<b>—<i>Vogue</i></b><br /><br /> “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”<b>—<i>The New Yorker</i></b><br /><br /> “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”<b>—<i>Entertainment Weekly</i></b>
The Survivors: A Story of War, Inheritance, and Healing
by Adam Frankel

Language

English

Pages

277

Publication Date

October 29, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>A memoir of family, the Holocaust, trauma, and identity, in which Adam Frankel, a former Obama speechwriter, must come to terms with the legacy of his family’s painful past and discover who he is in the wake of a life-changing revelation about his own origins.</strong></p><p><strong>“<em>The Survivors</em> is an astonishingly beautiful and profoundly moving book.  Frankel’s haunting search to unravel the mysteries of his family is so compelling that it reads like a fine novel.” –Doris Kearns Goodwin</strong></p><p>Adam Frankel’s maternal grandparents survived the Holocaust and built new lives, with new names, in Connecticut. Though they tried to leave the horrors of their past behind, the pain they suffered crossed generational lines—a fact most apparent in the mental health of Adam’s mother. When Adam sat down with her to examine their family history in detail, he learned another shocking secret, this time one that unraveled Adam’s entire understanding of who he is. </p><p>In the midst of piecing together a story of inherited familial trauma, Adam discovered he was only half of who he thought he was, knowledge that raised essential questions of identity. Who was he, if not his father’s son? If not part of a rich heritage of writers and public servants? Does it matter? What defines a family’s bonds? What will he pass on to his own children? To rewrite his story in truth and to build a life for his own young family, Adam had to navigate his pain to find answers and a way forward.</p><p>Throughout this journey into the past, his family’s psyche, and his own understanding of identity, Adam comes to realize that while the nature of our families’ traumas may vary, each of us is faced with the same choice. We can turn away from what we’ve inherited—or, we can confront it, in the hopes of moving on and stopping that trauma from inflicting pain on future generations. The stories Adam shares with us in <em>The Survivors</em> are about the ways the past can haunt our future, the resilience that can be found on the other side of trauma, and the good that can come from things that are unspeakably bad. <strong></strong></p>
I Only Wanted to Live: A WWII Young Jewish Boy Holocaust Survival...
by Arie Tamir

Language

English

Pages

335

Publication Date

November 16, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Three mass deportations. A death sentence. One remarkable story of survival.</b><p>When Leosz was only six, his life changed completely.</p><p>World War II broke out in 1939, sweeping the young boy into the whirlwind of the Holocaust.</p><p>For six long torturous years, Leosz sees and goes through everything: myriads of overcrowded transports headed for concentration camps, life on the streets of occupied Poland as an abandoned child, hiding from cruel Nazis, forced labor under conditions of starvation and the constant threat of death.</p><p>Only one thing kept him safe—his unwavering will to go on living.</p><p>This is the incredible inspiring story of a little Jewish boy who managed to survive all possible levels of hell as he clung on to life.</p>

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