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The Geometry of Love: Space, Time, Mystery, and Meaning in an Ord...
by Margaret Visser

Language

English

Pages

325

Publication Date

June 23, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<DIV><B>A “delightful” tour of Rome’s St. Agnes Outside the Walls, examining the stories, rituals, and architecture of this seventeen-hundred-year-old building (<I>The Christian Science Monitor</I>).</B><BR /><BR /> In <I>The Geometry of Love</I>, acclaimed author Margaret Visser, the preeminent “anthropologist of everyday life,” takes on the living history of the ancient church of St. Agnes. Examining every facet of the building, from windows to catacombs, Visser takes readers on a mesmerizing tour of the old church, covering its social, political, religious, and architectural history. In so doing, she illuminates not only the church’s evolution but also its religious legacy in our modern lives. Written as an antidote to the usual dry and traditional studies of European churches, <I>The Geometry of Love</I> is infused with Visser’s unmatched warmth and wit, celebrating the remarkable ways that one building can reveal so much about our history and ourselves.</DIV>
The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition
by Donald A. Norman

Language

English

Pages

370

Publication Date

November 05, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<div><b>The ultimate guide to human-centered design </b></div><div><br /></div><div>Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious-even liberating-book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization.</div><div><i><br /></i></div><div><i>The Design of Everyday Things</i> shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time.<br /><br /><i>The Design of Everyday Things</i> is a powerful primer on how--and why--some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.<br /></div>
The Science Fiction Collection
by , Ben Bova

Language

English

Pages

Publication Date

April 15, 2019

Product Description
Customer Reviews
The Science Fiction Collection features some of the most amazing sci fi tales ever told!<br /><br />Featuring:<br /><br />The Sentimentalists, by Murray Leinster<br />The Girls from Earth, by Frank Robinson<br />The Death Traps of FX-31, by Sewell Wright<br />Song in a minor key, by C.L. Moore<br />Sentry of the Sky, by Evelyn E. Smith<br />Meeting of the Minds, by Robert Sheckley<br />Junior, by Robert Abernathy<br />Death Wish, by Ned Lang<br />Dead World, by Jack Douglas<br />Cost of Living, by Robert Sheckley<br />Aloys, by R.A. Lafferty<br />With These Hands, by C.M. Kornbluth<br />What is POSAT?, by Phyllis Sterling-Smith<br />A Little Journey, by Ray Bradbury<br />Hunt the Hunter, by Kris Neville<br />Citizen Jell, by Michael Shaara<br />Operation Distress, by Lester Del Rey<br />Syndrome Johnny, by Charles Dye<br />Psychotennis, anyone?, by Lloyd Williams<br />Prime Difference, by Alan Nourse<br />Doorstep, by Keith Laumer<br />The Drug, by C.C. MacApp<br />An Elephant For the Prinkip, by L.J. Stecher<br />License to Steal, by Louis Newman<br />The Last Letter, by Fritz Lieber<br />The Stuff, by Henry Slesar<br />The Celestial Hammerlock, by Donald Colvin<br />Always A Qurono, by Jim Harmon<br />Jamieson, by Bill Doede<br />A Fall of Glass, by Stanley Lee<br />Shatter the Wall, by Sydney Van Scyoc<br />Transfer Point, by Anthony Boucher<br />Thy Name Is Woman, by Kenneth O’Hara<br />Twelve Times Zero, by Howard Browne<br />All Day Wednesday, by Richard Olin<br />Blind Spot, by Bascom Jones<br />Double Take, by Richard Wilson<br />Field Trip, by Gene Hunter<br />Larson’s Luck, by Gerald Vance<br />Navy Day, by Harry Harrison<br />One Martian Afternoon, by Tom Leahy<br />Planet of Dreams, by James McKimmey<br />Prelude To Space, by Robert Haseltine<br />Pythias, by Frederik Pohl<br />Show Business, by Boyd Ellanby<br />Slaves of Mercury, by Nat Schachner<br />Sound of Terror, by Don Berry<br />The Big Tomorrow, by Paul Lohrman<br />The Four-Faced Visitors of…Ezekiel, by Arthur Orton<br />The Happy Man, by Gerald Page<br />The Last Supper, by T.D. Hamm<br />The One and the Many, by Milton Lesser<br />The Other Likeness, by James Schmitz<br />The Outbreak of Peace, by H.B. Fyfe<br />The Skull, by Philip K. Dick<br />The Smiler, by Albert Hernhunter<br />The Unthinking Destroyer, by Roger Phillips<br />Two Timer, by Frederic Brown<br />Vital Ingredient, by Charles De Vet<br />Weak on Square Roots, by Russell Burton<br />With a Vengeance, by J.B. Woodley<br />Zero Hour, by Alexander Blade<br />The Great Nebraska Sea, by Allan Danzig<br />The Valor of Cappen Varra, by Poul Anderson<br />A Bad Day for Vermin, by Keith Laumer<br />Hall of Mirrors, by Frederic Brown<br />Common Denominator, by John MacDonald<br />Doctor, by Murray Leinster<br />The Nothing Equation, by Tom Godwin<br />The Last Evolution, by John Campbell<br />A Hitch in Space, by Fritz Leiber<br />On the Fourth Planet, by J.F. Bone<br />Flight From Tomorrow, by H. Beam Piper<br />Card Trick, by Walter Bupp<br />The K-Factor, by Harry Harrison<br />The Lani People, by J. F. Bone<br />Advanced Chemistry, by Jack Huekels<br />Sodom and Gomorrah, Texas, by R. A. Lafferty<br />Keep Out, by Frederic Brown<br />All Cats are Gray, by Andre Norton<br />A Problem in Communication, by Miles J. Breuer<br />The Terrible Tentacles of L-472, by Sewell Peaslee Wright<br />Marooned Under the Sea, by Paul Ernst<br />The Murder Machine, by Hugh B. Cave<br />The Attack from Space, by Captain S. P. Meek<br />The Knights of Arthur, by Frederik Pohl<br />And All the Earth a Grave, by C.C. MacApp<br />Citadel, by Algis Budrys<br />Micro-Man, by Weaver Wright<br />Missing Link, by Frank Herbert<br />People Soup, by Alan Arkin<br />The Brain, by Alexander Blade<br />The Judas Valley, by Gerald Vance<br />The Moon is Green, by Fritz Leiber<br />The Next Logical Step, by Ben Bova<br />The Year When Stardust Fell, by Raymond Jones<br />Toy Shop, by Harry Harriso [...]
Whiskey in a Teacup: What Growing Up in the South Taught Me About...
by Reese Witherspoon

Language

English

Pages

299

Publication Date

September 18, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>Academy Award–winning actress, producer, and entrepreneur Reese Witherspoon invites you into her world, where she infuses the southern style, parties, and traditions she loves with contemporary flair and charm.</b><BR><BR>Reese Witherspoon’s grandmother Dorothea always said that a combination of beauty and strength made southern women “whiskey in a teacup.” We may be delicate and ornamental on the outside, she said, but inside we’re strong and fiery.<BR> <BR>Reese’s southern heritage informs her whole life, and she loves sharing the joys of southern living with practically everyone she meets. She takes the South wherever she goes with bluegrass, big holiday parties, and plenty of Dorothea’s fried chicken. It’s reflected in how she entertains, decorates her home, and makes holidays special for her kids—not to mention how she talks, dances, and does her hair (in these pages, you will learn Reese’s fail-proof, only slightly insane hot-roller technique). Reese loves sharing Dorothea’s most delicious recipes as well as her favorite southern traditions, from midnight barn parties to backyard bridal showers, magical Christmas mornings to rollicking honky-tonks.<BR> <BR>It’s easy to bring a little bit of Reese’s world into your home, no matter where you live. After all, there’s a southern side to every place in the world, right?
Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
by Fumio Sasaki

Language

English

Pages

260

Publication Date

April 11, 2017

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p><strong>The best-selling phenomenon from Japan that shows us a minimalist life is a happy life.</strong></p><br /><p>Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo—he’s just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn’t absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him. In <em>Goodbye, Things</em> Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement can not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasaki’s humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalism’s potential.</p>
The Death and Life of Great American Cities
by Jane Jacobs

Language

English

Pages

448

Publication Date

July 20, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Thirty years after its publication, <b><i>The Death and Life of Great American Cities</i></b> was described by <i>The New York Times</i> as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context.  It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments."  Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners.  Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities.  It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable.  The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.
Homebody: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave
by Joanna Gaines

Language

English

Pages

352

Publication Date

November 06, 2018

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<p></p><p></p><p>In <em>Homebody: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave</em>, Joanna Gaines walks you through how to create a home that reflects the personalities and stories of the people who live there. Using examples from her own farmhouse as well as a range of other homes, this comprehensive guide will help you assess your priorities and instincts, as well as your likes and dislikes, with practical steps for navigating and embracing your authentic design style. Room by room, <em>Homebody </em>gives you an in-depth look at how these styles are implemented as well as how to blend the looks you're drawn to in order to create spaces that feel distinctly yours. A design template at the end of the book offers a step-by-step guide to planning and sketching out your own design plans. The insight shared in <em>Homebody </em>will instill in you the confidence to thoughtfully create spaces you never want to leave.</p>
The Complete Book of Home Organization: 200+ Tips and Projects
by Toni Hammersley

Language

English

Pages

208

Publication Date

January 22, 2016

Product Description
Customer Reviews
Have you ever wished you had the time and tools to organize your house in a clutter-free, design-conscious, Pinterest-worthy way? From storage solutions and cleaning tips to secret space-saving methods and expert strategies, The Complete Book of Home Organization is packed with the tips and shortcuts you need to effectively organize your home.<br /><br />From small spaces and apartment solutions to how to tackle a big, messy home with a 15-week total home organization challenge, this book covers it all. The Complete Book of Home Organization spells out everything you need to de-clutter your house, store your belongings, and keep your home—and life—in tip-top shape. With high-quality design, intricate detail, and a durable flexicover—this manual is the perfect gift!<br /><br />Organize the 30 main spaces of your home, including the living and dining spaces, bedrooms and bathrooms, guest areas, baby and kids’ rooms, utility spaces and garages, entryways and offices, patios and decks, closets and pet areas! Keep track of your pantry, holiday and craft supplies, weekly menu planning, keepsakes, and schedules. From the basement to the attic, this book covers every nook and cranny.<br /><br />With step-by-step instructions, detailed illustrations, and handy checklists, say goodbye to a messy home and wasted storage space!
Brunelleschi's Dome: How a Renaissance Genius Reinvented Architec...
by Ross King

Language

English

Pages

208

Publication Date

August 13, 2013

Product Description
Customer Reviews
On August 19, 1418, a competition concerning Florence's magnificent new cathedral, Santa Maria del Fiore--already under construction for more than a century--was announced: "Whoever desires to make any model or design for the vaulting of the main Dome....shall do so before the end of the month of September." The proposed dome was regarded far and wide as all but impossible to build: not only would it be enormous, but its original and sacrosanct design shunned the flying buttresses that supported cathedrals all over Europe. The dome would literally need to be erected over thin air.<br /> <br /> Of the many plans submitted, one stood out--a daring and unorthodox solution to vaulting what is still the largest dome (143 feet in diameter) in the world. It was offered not by a master mason or carpenter, but by a goldsmith and clockmaker named Filippo Brunelleschi, who would dedicate the next twenty-eight years to solving the puzzles of the dome's construction. In the process, he did nothing less than reinvent the field of architecture.<br /> <br /> <i>Brunelleschi's Dome</i> is the story of how a Renaissance genius bent men, materials, and the very forces of nature to build an architectural wonder we continue to marvel at today. Denounced at first as a madman, Brunelleschi was celebrated at the end as a genius. He engineered the perfect placement of brick and stone, built ingenious hoists and cranes to carry an estimated 70 million pounds hundreds of feet into the air, and designed the workers' platforms and routines so carefully that only one man died during the decades of construction--all the while defying those who said the dome would surely collapse and his own personal obstacles that at times threatened to overwhelm him. <br /> <br /> Even today, in an age of soaring skyscrapers, the cathedral dome of Santa Maria del Fiore retains a rare power to astonish. Ross King brings its creation to life in a fifteenth-century chronicle with twenty-first-century resonance.
A Song for Bellafortuna: An Italian Historical Fiction Novel
by Vincent B. "Chip" LoCoco

Language

English

Pages

286

Publication Date

May 14, 2015

Product Description
Customer Reviews
<b>A GRIPPING SICILIAN SAGA. A SWEEPING EPIC TALE OF LOVE, DRAMA, SACRIFICE, AND REDEMPTION, SET AMONG THE BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPE OF SICILY.<b> <br /><br />*WINNER OF THE B.R.A.G. MEDALLION AWARD IN HISTORICAL FICTION<br /><br />The beautiful, yet secluded, hilltop village of Bellafortuna, Sicily, is a great producer of wine and olive oil. The entire village prospers. However, after the arrival of the Vasaio family, production dwindles and the villagers soon find themselves in crushing debt to the Vasaios. Only the Sanguinetti family remains outside the control of the Vasaios, but the reason haunts Antonio Sanguinetti every day of his life, and he offers financial and emotional support to his fellow villagers. When Antonio's only son, Giuseppe, discovers his family's past, he becomes determined to take on the Vasaios and remove them from power. Led by the young Giuseppe, a plan is hatched that could result in either complete freedom for the villagers, or if it fails, forever solidify the Vasaios' control. <br />Find out what happens in A Song for Bellafortuna.<br /> <br />* SHORT LIST FINALIST IN THE WILLIAM FAULKNER-WILLIAM WISDOM WRITING COMPETITION <br />* NAMED AS A HOT NEW RELEASE BY AMAZON<br />* AMAZON BESTSELLING HISTORICAL FICTION NOVEL<br />* LISTED AS A TOP RATED NOVEL BY AMAZON <br /> <br /> The novel has been called lyrical, intelligent, majestic, magical, powerful and compelling. Here are some advance reviews.<br /><br />Vincent B. LoCoco writes a heartwarming piece of historical fiction . . . He captured the essence of the Sicilian culture, especially regarding the value of ancestry and music . . . A Song For Bellafortuna is a beautiful tale of antiquity."- Readers Favorite 5 Star Review<br /><br />"The book was a joy to read. It is a wonderful story, told in a magical way."-Cavaliere Ufficiale Aldo Mancusi, President of the Enrico Caruso Museum of America in New York<br /><br />"An inspiring story of an Italian village threatened by commerce and saved by opera."-John Biguenet, author of The Torturer's Apprentice and Oyster<br /><br />Categories: Italy Fiction, Italian Historical Fiction, Christian Historical Fiction, European Historical Fiction, Biographical Historical Fiction, Christian Historical Romance, Women's Historical Fiction, Opera Music</b></b>

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